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Bloom County Complete Library Volume 2 Signed Limited Edition

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IDW Publishing introduces this special limited edition of Bloom County: The Complete Library Volume 2, which comes with bound-in bookplates, each signed by Bloom County creator Berkeley Breathed. The Library of American Comics is the world's #1 publisher of classic newspaper comic strips, with 14 Eisner Award nominations and three wins for best book. LOAC has become "the g IDW Publishing introduces this special limited edition of Bloom County: The Complete Library Volume 2, which comes with bound-in bookplates, each signed by Bloom County creator Berkeley Breathed. The Library of American Comics is the world's #1 publisher of classic newspaper comic strips, with 14 Eisner Award nominations and three wins for best book. LOAC has become "the gold standard for archival comic strip reprints... The research and articles provide insight and context, and most importantly the glorious reproduction of the material has preserved these strips for those who knew them and offers a new gateway to adventure for those discovering them for the first time." - Scoop


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IDW Publishing introduces this special limited edition of Bloom County: The Complete Library Volume 2, which comes with bound-in bookplates, each signed by Bloom County creator Berkeley Breathed. The Library of American Comics is the world's #1 publisher of classic newspaper comic strips, with 14 Eisner Award nominations and three wins for best book. LOAC has become "the g IDW Publishing introduces this special limited edition of Bloom County: The Complete Library Volume 2, which comes with bound-in bookplates, each signed by Bloom County creator Berkeley Breathed. The Library of American Comics is the world's #1 publisher of classic newspaper comic strips, with 14 Eisner Award nominations and three wins for best book. LOAC has become "the gold standard for archival comic strip reprints... The research and articles provide insight and context, and most importantly the glorious reproduction of the material has preserved these strips for those who knew them and offers a new gateway to adventure for those discovering them for the first time." - Scoop

30 review for Bloom County Complete Library Volume 2 Signed Limited Edition

  1. 4 out of 5

    Megan Baxter

    After the terrible experience of reading A Gate at the Stairs, what I needed was a palate cleanser. Something light, something fun, probably something I'd read before. Luckily for me, my husband and I had spotted this volume on sale for a mere $15, instead of the $40 or so it usually goes for, and snapped it up. Note: The rest of this review has been withdrawn due to the changes in Goodreads policy and enforcement. You can read why I came to this decision here. In the meantime, you can read the en After the terrible experience of reading A Gate at the Stairs, what I needed was a palate cleanser. Something light, something fun, probably something I'd read before. Luckily for me, my husband and I had spotted this volume on sale for a mere $15, instead of the $40 or so it usually goes for, and snapped it up. Note: The rest of this review has been withdrawn due to the changes in Goodreads policy and enforcement. You can read why I came to this decision here. In the meantime, you can read the entire review at Smorgasbook

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    What makes this collected volume of Breathed's works fun, aside from revisiting the all too familiar strips, are the little asides and footnotes injected here and there. It seems impossible that these strips are 30 years old; it feels like yesterday when i was cutting them out of the paper to hang on my cube... What makes this collected volume of Breathed's works fun, aside from revisiting the all too familiar strips, are the little asides and footnotes injected here and there. It seems impossible that these strips are 30 years old; it feels like yesterday when i was cutting them out of the paper to hang on my cube...

  3. 4 out of 5

    Brian Rogers

    Tons of material in here I'd never seen, and so much of the door breaking down genre expanding that Breathed did is now such second nature, how much of the culture of 82-84 is still with is in pop culture and politics, and how much has changed. Its interesting to read Breathed's editorial comments from 2010, and think of how much has changed since then. If you grew up with this stuff, or came to love it in collections in the 90's, this volume is a must read. For kids now? Hard to say. Binkley's Tons of material in here I'd never seen, and so much of the door breaking down genre expanding that Breathed did is now such second nature, how much of the culture of 82-84 is still with is in pop culture and politics, and how much has changed. Its interesting to read Breathed's editorial comments from 2010, and think of how much has changed since then. If you grew up with this stuff, or came to love it in collections in the 90's, this volume is a must read. For kids now? Hard to say. Binkley's dad's anxiety of his son's lack of manliness reads very differently in 2019 than in 1983, but it's a theme that still has resonance. It's scary how much still makes sense, but parts of this veer into the Pogo territory of politics from generations back can be lost to comprehension if not humor.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Melody Karle

    I love Bloom County but have never read it all the way through. It amazes me how well it holds up—it is oddly comforting to know that the frustrations (with politics, news, neighbors, and family) are basically the same even after nearly 40 years. I was not old enough to read this strip in the early 1980’s but I enjoy it anyway. Lots of love for the anxiety closet, the birth of home computers, and the everyday life of people as they navigate the weirdness of the world.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Seth

    Amazing how well these strips hold up.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jerry

    Love this series of books. These bring back so many great memories. I had all of the paperback publications, but lost them to a flood. So I am very happy to see this series. On to the next one.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Erik

    Solid but not as great as I've always been led to believe. Most of the jokes land and the it's a fun group of characters to spend some time with. Solid but not as great as I've always been led to believe. Most of the jokes land and the it's a fun group of characters to spend some time with.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    One of the classics as newspaper strips go. Some parts haven't aged as well as others, but a good way of looking at the era. One of the classics as newspaper strips go. Some parts haven't aged as well as others, but a good way of looking at the era.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sharon Falduto

    1982 to 1984 or so, every strip. I miss you, Opus.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Tyler Hill

    Few artists shaped my own personal drawing style the way Berkley Breathed did. And, few writers, outside of maybe Douglas Adams or (in an odd way) Hunter S. Thompson have shaped my sense of humor the way he did. So, when the began releasing these "complete" chronological editions in hardcover, I sold my old soft cover editions to Half Price Books, and began leverage those funds into buying these volumes. As far as the the presentation goes, there's little to quibble about here. The blurry reprodu Few artists shaped my own personal drawing style the way Berkley Breathed did. And, few writers, outside of maybe Douglas Adams or (in an odd way) Hunter S. Thompson have shaped my sense of humor the way he did. So, when the began releasing these "complete" chronological editions in hardcover, I sold my old soft cover editions to Half Price Books, and began leverage those funds into buying these volumes. As far as the the presentation goes, there's little to quibble about here. The blurry reproductions of the color Sunday strips which plagues volume 1 are much improved in this volume. Still not crisp in the way I'd wish they were, but fine for what they are. And, while the cover design leaves a little to be desired, the spines look handsome on my bookshelf. With regards to the content, these are probably some of Bloom County's golden years. It feels like, at this point in the strip, Breathed had found his voice, pace and style. Most of the major characters have been introduced (with the exception of some of the later Outland characters, like Milquetoast and the Basselope) and we see a lot of Bloom County's best tropes and themes emerging here. Also, we have a couple of quintessential arcs included, such as Bill the Cat's death and subsequent run for Presidency. The annotation, similar to volume 1, is neither here nor there. There are times when it's genuinely insightful, other times it fails to add to the strip, and other places where it seems oddly absent. Reading through these as an adult, it's fun to see a new perspective on a favorite strip. The antics of Bill always entertained, and before I could relate to many of the reoccurring childhood motifs; but this read through the political and social humor made more sense. Sadly, much of it still resonates today. Overall, great volume. Nice, but not excellent packaging.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Eric Bauman

    Back in the early eighties, when I was in high school (and the last time I was truly happy, now that I think of it), there were three comic strips that I absolutely HAD to read every day in the papers: “The Far Side,” “Calvin and Hobbes,” and “Bloom County.” I have the complete collections of the first two (and reread them all recently), and now I am building up the collection of the third. This volume collects all strips between September, 1982 and June, 1984. Among the highlights of this volume Back in the early eighties, when I was in high school (and the last time I was truly happy, now that I think of it), there were three comic strips that I absolutely HAD to read every day in the papers: “The Far Side,” “Calvin and Hobbes,” and “Bloom County.” I have the complete collections of the first two (and reread them all recently), and now I am building up the collection of the third. This volume collects all strips between September, 1982 and June, 1984. Among the highlights of this volume are: Senator Bedfellow goes to jail. Binkley begins to be tormented by his “Closet of Anxieties.” Steve Dallas tries to win Bobbi Harlow back from Cutter John. The Meadow Party is formed and runs Limekiller and Opus for president and vice president. Opus goes in search of his Mom. Bill the Cat is tragically killed either in a car accident or from acne, depending on who you listen to. Mr. Breathed scatters comments throughout on some of the strips, mostly on the ones that have references to things that people who weren’t there wouldn’t know anything about. I know a lot of my friends from “back in the day” used to read “Bloom County.” I heartily urge them to pick up these books and relive the good times. Ack!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    The second collection of one of the greatest comic strips of all time. In these complete collected works between 1982 and 1984, we see artist Berkely Breathed hit his stride in terms of characters, tone, and art. And boy, were the early to mid-eighties chock full of popular culture silliness for him to parody? Just between Ronald Reagan and Michael Jackson, he could have done two years' worth of material. As it was, though, he didn't lean too heavily on such topics and continued to use his own c The second collection of one of the greatest comic strips of all time. In these complete collected works between 1982 and 1984, we see artist Berkely Breathed hit his stride in terms of characters, tone, and art. And boy, were the early to mid-eighties chock full of popular culture silliness for him to parody? Just between Ronald Reagan and Michael Jackson, he could have done two years' worth of material. As it was, though, he didn't lean too heavily on such topics and continued to use his own creations to poke all sorts of fun as hypocrisy and insanity within U.S. and world culture. Sure, some of the references are outdated to the point of being downright confusing, but this is rare. Even if the details are no longer crystal clear to all of us, the heart of most of the jokes is still there. The frightening thing is just how many of the social ills which Breathed points have become highly relevant once again, even over three decades later. These volumes also have little side comments sprinkled into the margins, which Breathed added in 2009, when the books were published. Many of them are just as hilarious as the strips themselves. Any fan of Breathed's works would enjoy this collection.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Brad

    A five-star volume that fulfills the promise shown periodically in the second half of Volume 1. Opus starts becoming the fully embodied character he is, not just how he is drawn, but also how he is noticeably more articulate, comically so. (60) It also introduces some great new bits the comic would revisit: (view spoiler)[ Milo reminiscing about imagined memories (18), Opus’ innocent misunderstandings (35), Opus as Steve Dallas’ right hand man (52, 275) and the Bloom Beacon editor at the end of A five-star volume that fulfills the promise shown periodically in the second half of Volume 1. Opus starts becoming the fully embodied character he is, not just how he is drawn, but also how he is noticeably more articulate, comically so. (60) It also introduces some great new bits the comic would revisit: (view spoiler)[ Milo reminiscing about imagined memories (18), Opus’ innocent misunderstandings (35), Opus as Steve Dallas’ right hand man (52, 275) and the Bloom Beacon editor at the end of his rope (62). It also includes one of my favorite plot lines: Steve Dallas acting as legal defense for an axe murderer (starting p. 279). It also introduces some notable new characters with varying staying power, whether the strip regular Oliver Wendell Jones, child hacker (166), the semi-active Yaz Pistachio or the shortly-lived but memorable Blondie, the African-American girl from L.A. whom Binkley finds intimidatingly cool (32). (I believe it is in this volume that two of the recurring animals are finally, with little fanfare, given names: Portnoy the woodchuck and Hodge Podge the rabbit.) Other favorites: p. 34 p. 51 top p. 58 (hide spoiler)]

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jason Seaver

    "Bloom County" becomes much more familiar in the second volume, both in terms of general art style, characters moving to the forefront, and being strips I've seen before. Despite remembering it as topical, it holds up very well; even the strips where Breathed is mocking something very specific and dated, there's goofiness where other satirists might be tempted to be vicious. "Bloom County" doesn't need to declare victory. Still, it's kind of amazing that this ran on the comics page; it was almos "Bloom County" becomes much more familiar in the second volume, both in terms of general art style, characters moving to the forefront, and being strips I've seen before. Despite remembering it as topical, it holds up very well; even the strips where Breathed is mocking something very specific and dated, there's goofiness where other satirists might be tempted to be vicious. "Bloom County" doesn't need to declare victory. Still, it's kind of amazing that this ran on the comics page; it was almost certainly the most bizarre thing there in the 1980s. IDW, as usual, does a great job of packaging the strip. The pages look like newsprint rather than the too-bright paper other collections of strips use, although they're much thicker and sturdier. I just wish it had a more colorful spine, even if that means a dust jacket.

  15. 5 out of 5

    David Edmonds

    The second volume of the collected editions of Berkeley Breathed's Bloom County is just as good as the first, if not a little better. Breathed's wit is becoming a little sharper; his characters a little more defined, both artistically and literarily; he's beginning to find his way with the characters and the direction that he wants to take his strip in. His social commentary is starting to really solidify into what made this strip what it was: a commentary on us in the 80s. And what rings true t The second volume of the collected editions of Berkeley Breathed's Bloom County is just as good as the first, if not a little better. Breathed's wit is becoming a little sharper; his characters a little more defined, both artistically and literarily; he's beginning to find his way with the characters and the direction that he wants to take his strip in. His social commentary is starting to really solidify into what made this strip what it was: a commentary on us in the 80s. And what rings true then seems to still ring true in some cases today. The reproduction quality of the strips could be a little better, but to be able to have all of the strips collected like this in such great editions, I'm willing to overlook that.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kogiopsis

    It is constantly amazing to me how comics so well-grounded in their era can still be as relevant as these are today. Yes, sometimes I don't get the jokes. Sometimes they're just silly one-offs about cats (which I do get, and which make me laugh). There are, however, a startling number of extraordinary ones which are at least as powerful in the modern era as they were when they were first drawn. I wasn't born yet when these comics were running in newspapers, so I'm very glad of these omnibus coll It is constantly amazing to me how comics so well-grounded in their era can still be as relevant as these are today. Yes, sometimes I don't get the jokes. Sometimes they're just silly one-offs about cats (which I do get, and which make me laugh). There are, however, a startling number of extraordinary ones which are at least as powerful in the modern era as they were when they were first drawn. I wasn't born yet when these comics were running in newspapers, so I'm very glad of these omnibus collections. It's a rare newspaper comic that can make me stop and think the way Bloom County so often does.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Dominick

    Classic stuff. Pretty much everything is in place by now, especially the dynamic between the characters, which is so much of what made/makes the strip funny--and it's not got TOO Opus-centric or Bill-centric yet; much of the fun comes from characters whose role diminishes as time passes. The introduction of Oliver Wendell Jones is perhaps the final piece in place. Not a strip that often makes me laugh out loud, but one that always impresses me with its wit and diversity. The archival project is Classic stuff. Pretty much everything is in place by now, especially the dynamic between the characters, which is so much of what made/makes the strip funny--and it's not got TOO Opus-centric or Bill-centric yet; much of the fun comes from characters whose role diminishes as time passes. The introduction of Oliver Wendell Jones is perhaps the final piece in place. Not a strip that often makes me laugh out loud, but one that always impresses me with its wit and diversity. The archival project is a nice way to get it, though the notes are sometimes haphazard, and I'd like to see more "bonus materials." Overall, well worth while.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Mitchell

    Exhausting but awesome. But very big and very heavy. Actually it was quite nostalgic. I figure I started reading Bloom County at Ga. Tech in Sept 1983. So these comics were ones I would have read at the time - they definitely felt vaguely familiar. I didn't realize that Oliver Wendell Jones had just been introduced - definitely he had some of the best bits and was always one of my favorites. Actually this book is a hard one to judge. It doesn't actually have a through story, but it does have a c Exhausting but awesome. But very big and very heavy. Actually it was quite nostalgic. I figure I started reading Bloom County at Ga. Tech in Sept 1983. So these comics were ones I would have read at the time - they definitely felt vaguely familiar. I didn't realize that Oliver Wendell Jones had just been introduced - definitely he had some of the best bits and was always one of my favorites. Actually this book is a hard one to judge. It doesn't actually have a through story, but it does have a certain intellectual silliness, some of which is timeless. 3.5 of 5.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Tom Franklin

    The best thing about re-reading Bloom County comic strips, in order, from decades ago, is realizing how flat-out brilliant Berkeley Breathed was. Despite some of the political and cultural references that might be lost on the current generation, this body of work holds up extremely and should be easily enjoyed by those too young to have read them in the newspapers when they were originally published. God, I love Bloom County!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Seth

    By midway through this collection the strip hits its stride and finds the originality and voice that makes it classic. Two things that struck me: First, there hasn't been a better illustrated newspaper strip since. Second, some of the satire gets pretty shrill. As a kid I don't understand enough of the references to realize that. Oh, and the annotations are better in this edition. There are more notes from Breathed, though he doesn't seem any less embittered. By midway through this collection the strip hits its stride and finds the originality and voice that makes it classic. Two things that struck me: First, there hasn't been a better illustrated newspaper strip since. Second, some of the satire gets pretty shrill. As a kid I don't understand enough of the references to realize that. Oh, and the annotations are better in this edition. There are more notes from Breathed, though he doesn't seem any less embittered.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ubalstecha

    This second volume of the Bloom Country collection brings us the Bloom County we remember. Fully developed, with ridiculous pop-culture references and plots. Cartoonist Breathed gets even more into the Bill the Cat mythos, presenting the Bill the Cat film festival with the Texas Chainsaw Massacre rip-off. Hilarity. For those of you that spent your teens reading this comic in the newspaper or in collections like me, then this book will take you right back.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Amy Winkelman

    I have always had a spot in my heart for Opus and the gang from Bloom County. :) I have all the books but as I am overseas they are in America I love that I can get The Bloom County Library on my kindle. The best part of having it digital is all the comments Breathed writes on some of the pages. I still laugh out loud and some of the strips take me right back to High School which is when I discovered Bloom County.

  23. 4 out of 5

    James

    Breathed is in classic form throughout this volume, mixing political humor and fun arcs highlighting his character's foibles. The full cast starts to round out, with Oliver becoming a regular (although it's a little strange to see Limekiller show up again as a presidential candidate). Some great gags here: Binkley's dad stops smoking, the anxiety closet runs amok, a week of Star Wars send-ups, and more. Should be fun even for those who didn't read it when it came out. Breathed is in classic form throughout this volume, mixing political humor and fun arcs highlighting his character's foibles. The full cast starts to round out, with Oliver becoming a regular (although it's a little strange to see Limekiller show up again as a presidential candidate). Some great gags here: Binkley's dad stops smoking, the anxiety closet runs amok, a week of Star Wars send-ups, and more. Should be fun even for those who didn't read it when it came out.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Caroline

    So much of my cultural memory of the '80s is tied up in these comics. . .This library collection series is outstanding and improves on the first volume because (1) the comics themselves have found their stride and (2) the completely unnecessary footnotes are mostly gone (the only ones left are mostly the author's personal observations, which are fun.) So much of my cultural memory of the '80s is tied up in these comics. . .This library collection series is outstanding and improves on the first volume because (1) the comics themselves have found their stride and (2) the completely unnecessary footnotes are mostly gone (the only ones left are mostly the author's personal observations, which are fun.)

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Still startled how many strips could be re-ran today and be just as relevant. I really appreciated B. Breatheds' commentary in this volume, which replaced much of the (unnecessary) explanation of the strips that was present in the first volume. Seeing all the strips together - it is amazing how short Bill the Cats' original lifespan was! Still startled how many strips could be re-ran today and be just as relevant. I really appreciated B. Breatheds' commentary in this volume, which replaced much of the (unnecessary) explanation of the strips that was present in the first volume. Seeing all the strips together - it is amazing how short Bill the Cats' original lifespan was!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    Opus, who only emerged as a character late in the first volume of the collected run of this strip, becomes one of the majors during the two year (approximately) period we're now in, which pretty much completes the lineup that will carry us through Bloom County's life. And they're in great form here, with lotsa good laughs. The comics page was never better than this. Opus, who only emerged as a character late in the first volume of the collected run of this strip, becomes one of the majors during the two year (approximately) period we're now in, which pretty much completes the lineup that will carry us through Bloom County's life. And they're in great form here, with lotsa good laughs. The comics page was never better than this.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Mark Bult

    These first six or seven years of Bloom County were just awesome, containing classics from my childhood that I’ll never forget. Looking back through each and ever daily strip, though, also reminded me of some I’d completely forgotten about, plus the first book let me see the early strips I missed, before my local papers had syndicated the comic.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Elton

    This second collection sees Breathed getting comfortable with his characters & Bloom County maturing (Ha!) into the cutting edge social & political farce that I remember. Yes, some of the strips in here are dated. But it's amazing how relevant some of them still are. This second collection sees Breathed getting comfortable with his characters & Bloom County maturing (Ha!) into the cutting edge social & political farce that I remember. Yes, some of the strips in here are dated. But it's amazing how relevant some of them still are.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Sean

    I love this comic. In this volume we get the first appearance of the surprisingly short-lived Bill The Cat, the scientist/computer hacker Oliver Wendell Jones, Binkley's closet of anxieties, and miss Yaz Pistachio, with whom I forgot I was in love. I love this comic. In this volume we get the first appearance of the surprisingly short-lived Bill The Cat, the scientist/computer hacker Oliver Wendell Jones, Binkley's closet of anxieties, and miss Yaz Pistachio, with whom I forgot I was in love.

  30. 5 out of 5

    David

    Took longer to read this one than it should have because I went back and re-read Volume 1 first. As I have said else where, I love these guys. And I still get a kick out of the political and cultural references, probably because I lived through them.

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