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Close Encounters of the Third Kind

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Close Encounter of the First Kind: Sighting of a UFO Close Encounter of the Second Kind: Physical evidence Close Encounter of the Third Kind: Contact Earth's greatest adventure had begun. The world was being readied for...Close Encounters of the Third Kind. It meant the beginning of the most dramatic event in the history of the world. It will lead to the inescapable conclusio Close Encounter of the First Kind: Sighting of a UFO Close Encounter of the Second Kind: Physical evidence Close Encounter of the Third Kind: Contact Earth's greatest adventure had begun. The world was being readied for...Close Encounters of the Third Kind. It meant the beginning of the most dramatic event in the history of the world. It will lead to the inescapable conclusion: WE ARE NOT ALONE


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Close Encounter of the First Kind: Sighting of a UFO Close Encounter of the Second Kind: Physical evidence Close Encounter of the Third Kind: Contact Earth's greatest adventure had begun. The world was being readied for...Close Encounters of the Third Kind. It meant the beginning of the most dramatic event in the history of the world. It will lead to the inescapable conclusio Close Encounter of the First Kind: Sighting of a UFO Close Encounter of the Second Kind: Physical evidence Close Encounter of the Third Kind: Contact Earth's greatest adventure had begun. The world was being readied for...Close Encounters of the Third Kind. It meant the beginning of the most dramatic event in the history of the world. It will lead to the inescapable conclusion: WE ARE NOT ALONE

30 review for Close Encounters of the Third Kind

  1. 5 out of 5

    James Caterino

    “Close Encounters of the Third Kind” was like a quasi-religious out of body experience for me on that Thanksgiving weekend back in 1977. I picked up this book the same weekend thinking it would be impossible to recreate the experience in fictional form. But this novelization—written by the man himself—comes pretty damn close. Of course, it is impossible to capture the visual grandeur and wonder of this trans-formative film, not to mention the soaring dramatic beauty of John William's masterful s “Close Encounters of the Third Kind” was like a quasi-religious out of body experience for me on that Thanksgiving weekend back in 1977. I picked up this book the same weekend thinking it would be impossible to recreate the experience in fictional form. But this novelization—written by the man himself—comes pretty damn close. Of course, it is impossible to capture the visual grandeur and wonder of this trans-formative film, not to mention the soaring dramatic beauty of John William's masterful score. But this suspenseful novelization does a fine job of delivering the essence of the movie into prose form. There is also great supplemental information, backstories, and some great insight into the Roy Neary and Lacombe characters. A well-done adaption of a powerful, classic film. I had always assumed this book (like the "Star Wars" novelization at the time) had been ghost written by Alan Dean Foster or someone of similar stature. But I came across several vintage interviews with Spielberg including one done by Roger Ebert in 1977 that provide evidence it was indeed the bearded one himself who wrote this novel and not a ghost writer. Of course he had no beard back then.

  2. 4 out of 5

    B. Jay

    A straightforward adaptation of Spielberg's own screenplay for the masterful movie, Steven does little to improve on the original. The format does allow for some leisurely reflection on the UFO / Bermuda Triangle phase America was enamored with in the seventies, which had as much or more to do with the creation and popularity of Close Encounters as that other crazy popular sci-fi movie that came out a year earlier. Reading it in novel form also gives you additional time to wonder at the characte A straightforward adaptation of Spielberg's own screenplay for the masterful movie, Steven does little to improve on the original. The format does allow for some leisurely reflection on the UFO / Bermuda Triangle phase America was enamored with in the seventies, which had as much or more to do with the creation and popularity of Close Encounters as that other crazy popular sci-fi movie that came out a year earlier. Reading it in novel form also gives you additional time to wonder at the character of Roy Neary, himself so enamored of kidnapping aliens that he never really gives his wife or children a second thought as he steps into their spacecraft and leaves earth for possibly the last time. Would the story have caught on if Dryfuss had not made Neary so likable, despite his lunacy? I did enjoy the novel's elaboration on Lacombe and his crew of mysterious federal UFO chasers. Simply knowing a tad bit more about them made them more enjoyable versus confusing. A fine read for Spielberg fans, but not worth slogging through verse pulling up the movie on Netflix.

  3. 4 out of 5

    cri

    Loved the story —just like the film, except for a few details—, hated the Spanish translation. But, well, it's a book from 1978 that I found in my grandparents' house and that you cannot even buy anymore, so who am I to complain. Loved the story —just like the film, except for a few details—, hated the Spanish translation. But, well, it's a book from 1978 that I found in my grandparents' house and that you cannot even buy anymore, so who am I to complain.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ariel

    This was a fast and interesting read. I read this in under 24 hours haha It kept we wanting to read. The story its self was good I liked it a lot. The writing was okay. I really enjoyed it. The end had be scratching my head but I guess its whatever he wanted to do with his life.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Helen

    Basically like reading the movie. I enjoyed it despite the bad writing, but I don't know that I'd really recommend it to someone. Basically like reading the movie. I enjoyed it despite the bad writing, but I don't know that I'd really recommend it to someone.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Zoë

    Whether you’ve seen the film or not, I highly recommend finding a copy in a second hand book shop, or your gran’s attic. As a sci-fi lover myself, I couldn’t put it down. Just a fantastic classic plot, which I can’t find fault in.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    The reason that I give this book 5 stars is not because I am enamored of the writing style, but because I am enamored of the author. For whatever reason I have suddenly and inexplicable fallen head over heels in love with Steven Spielberg. I don't know what happened or what moment triggered it, but it had something to do with listening to his voice and seeing his beautiful expressive face as he describes making Jaws and ET in the "bonus features" on those "Collector's Edition" DVDs. The impetus f The reason that I give this book 5 stars is not because I am enamored of the writing style, but because I am enamored of the author. For whatever reason I have suddenly and inexplicable fallen head over heels in love with Steven Spielberg. I don't know what happened or what moment triggered it, but it had something to do with listening to his voice and seeing his beautiful expressive face as he describes making Jaws and ET in the "bonus features" on those "Collector's Edition" DVDs. The impetus for reading this book was my complete immersion into the Steven Spielberg biography by Joseph McBride, which I keep pausing in order to do more expansive research (Purchase and re-watch "Duel", Purchase and watch "The Sugarland Express" for the first time, Purchase and Read "The Jaws Log", Purchase and read this book, as well as the DVD sets of "Amazing Stories", almost every other Spielberg movie on DVD - collector's editions when available, etc...) On a side note, I've added "Make Steven Spielberg more wealthy" to my bucket list because it's always nice to be able to check something off and feel accomplished!!! As I began to read this book, I found some of the writing unintentionally amusing. Some passages read like a writing assignment turned in by a teen boy. Steven was close to 30 years old when this movie came out, and probably 28 when directing it. However, he would've been younger when he "wrote" it, and when you consider that this story is in large part based on "Firelight", a film that he made as a teenager, then some of the writing begins to make a lot of sense. Although there was a "ghost writer", it's difficult to imagine some of these passages being penned by a professional writer, so I think they were largely his own words. The voice that I heard in my head as I started to read the book, was mostly my own voice, or sometimes the voice of Richard Dreyfuss. But, then one day I watched a long interview of Steven on You Tube (I think it was the Japanese one. Nice and long and really interesting, ...and filled with weird Japanese commercials, so VERY entertaining!) When I picked this book back up to read, I could hear Steven's voice telling me the story. This was SO AMAZING!! So, after that, almost every time I picked the book back up after a lapse of time had occurred, I would go to You Tube and watch an interview with Steven so that I could have his voice fresh in my head. Every time Neary spoke, it would revert to Dreyfuss, sometimes forcing me to stop and listen to Steven again before continuing on. When Steven's voice is telling this story, you have to slow down and read a little bit more deliberately. He emphasizes words and phrases differently, and you have to allow some space in your mind for that to happen. He also, sometimes, talks too fast and smooshes some phrases together. After listening to interviews with him, your brain begins to grasp and duplicate the cadence of his speech, which is A BEAUTIFUL THING!!! I wish there was a way that I could listen to Steven tell me stories the way he told bed time stories to his children, or ghost stories around the campfire with his friends. I would spend good money for access to that, because I love his voice, and the expressions on his face, and the sparkle in his eyes when he does... like when he talks about his childhood, or the trauma of making Jaws, or the post-traumatic stress FROM making jaws, or the characteristics he looks for when auditioning actors for his films, or the way he relates to children, or his feelings about family, or the interview he gave after watching the restored "Lawrence of Arabia" with his role model, Director David Lean, by his side providing him with a personal "Director's Commentary", or anything else that excites and animates him. I do realize that it is a bit selfish of me to want Steven to tell me stories in his own voice. I mean, I have access to all of these movies, some of which were written by him, filled with actors specifically chosen by him, and then directed by him. These movies are quite biographical, containing very specific images from his childhood imagination and emotional or psycho-social experiences from his life. And these films are amazing and exhilarating and triumphant and thought provoking and tumultuous and heart breaking and glorious... and how can I ask for anything more. But I do want more... I enjoyed this book because it provided me with something that I desperately need, a story written in young Mr Spielberg's own words (mostly), that I can hear (if I concentrate hard enough) in his own voice.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Saskia (Smitie)

    I didn't see the movie, so I didn't have any reference. The book was a bit boring, but the ending was unexpected. I didn't see the movie, so I didn't have any reference. The book was a bit boring, but the ending was unexpected.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Rita

    DNF at 48% I just couldn't get into the writing style. It's obvious based on what I've read that Steven Spielberg is a fantastic director, but the prose of the novelization just didn't flow right and it made this book a chore for me to read. Descriptive imagery seemed like non sequiturs and I generally wasn't a fan of the lack of non-"bitchy" or weak female characters. I thought that it would be an interesting experience to read this book before I watched the film but clearly, I should always sta DNF at 48% I just couldn't get into the writing style. It's obvious based on what I've read that Steven Spielberg is a fantastic director, but the prose of the novelization just didn't flow right and it made this book a chore for me to read. Descriptive imagery seemed like non sequiturs and I generally wasn't a fan of the lack of non-"bitchy" or weak female characters. I thought that it would be an interesting experience to read this book before I watched the film but clearly, I should always start with the source material first. Oh well, c'est la vie.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Colin

    While not a fan of the movie, I thought that maybe the book would be more interesting... I was wrong.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Realini

    Close Encounter of the Third Kind, written and directed by Steven Spielberg 8 out of 10 If you are of the opinion that intelligent beings, civilizations might exist on other planets, in far corners of the universe, then the idea of Close Encounters of the Third Kind is not so ridiculous, impossible or both. Nevertheless, there are passages that even for a firm believer in extraterrestrial beings and their haunting of various places on this planet might seem preposterous and badly presented. For thi Close Encounter of the Third Kind, written and directed by Steven Spielberg 8 out of 10 If you are of the opinion that intelligent beings, civilizations might exist on other planets, in far corners of the universe, then the idea of Close Encounters of the Third Kind is not so ridiculous, impossible or both. Nevertheless, there are passages that even for a firm believer in extraterrestrial beings and their haunting of various places on this planet might seem preposterous and badly presented. For this cinephile, the very long, annoying minutes when Roy Neary, the character that comes closest to being the main protagonist, played by Richard Dreyfuss, has an obsession, nightmare or maybe a vision for some. As he had just had one of those Close Encounters, even if his could have been of the Second Kind, for it is hard to draw the line, he is surely affected and the Aliens have had an impact on his mind. Even so, the insistence on the building of a small mountain in his family's living room is for this viewer the anticlimax of the film. Yes, I get that having contact with the other world must be or could be transformational. But to go on and on over this has the opposite effect to the one intended. Repetition is of course an artistic method. Used in literature, art in general. In this motion picture it is annoying and overbearing. The hero sits at table and while his wife and children eat, he begins to pile up his food on the plate. Then he starts making a mole on the table. Again, he has seen something important, a key to the plot. There is no spoiler here, when I say that the extraterrestrials might gather on the mountain that the protagonist replicates in his house. And some time spent on this art work that is a symbol and message would be just fine. There is also the comedy that audiences better equipped with a sense of humor would get here. On the following morning, unhappy with his work in the middle of the living room, Roy Neary is out early, before the rest of the family is "woke" ...to use a fashionable term in the political language of this day. Indeed, spouse and children are startled and wake up when the frantic pater familias destroys the small garden they have. The bushes near the house are uprooted and torn apart by the frenzied, possessed, haunted man. And Richard Dreyfuss knows how to portray this emotion. Which means that a much shorter version of this frantic, overlong scene would have worked much better. Not satisfied with bushes, bricks and earth thrown through the window, in the sink and all over the kitchen, he has to get more. A puzzled, rather amusing neighbor is watching all the uproar while drying her hair with a blow dryer. She tries to protest when the lunatic comes to take away the fences protecting her ducks, floating on a small pond. When she sees the state in which the evidently mad man is, she has another comic moment: "never mind what I said...take them...take them!" Or something similar to that Instead of a few minutes, this orgy of building a damn mole in a room takes half the film... Well, not quite... But it certainly felt like that. We all know from Einstein that time is relative and this was one of those proofs. Eleven minutes (maybe) that seemed to be one hundred. Having insisted too much on this aspect, making the same stupid mistake that I blamed on a young, inexperienced Spielberg- the Sacred Monster of the present-, I must highlight the fact that the movie has had a tremendous impact. It was such a landmark that I remember exactly the circumstances of the first Close Encounter. I saw it at the Gloria cinema, in the district of my childhood and teenage years, with Serban Popescu, a friend at that time and 'comandant de pioneri' in our school. We took a long time to discuss the ending, what does it mean, if we will see 'them' in the future, flaws, but most of the time, the I ingenuity, wondrous moments of a film that I think we both loved... In other words, forget about the criticism, exaggerated and overblown, of the mole building in the house, and consider watching this film, for it has its undisputed attractions. One of them would be that Francois Truffaut, the legendary director is...acting in it, and he has one of the major roles.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    5 stars are given to "Close Encounters of the Third Kind" written by Steven Spielberg...basically if you have seen the movie, you have read the book. The publisher was Columbia Pictures so I have to imagine that Spielberg was writing directly from the script, notes, storyboards, etc....and having directed the film doesn't hurt either. It is such a wonderful film that the novel is just as wonderful an experience. There are a few surprises...one or two adult moments...and a short epilogue from Dr. 5 stars are given to "Close Encounters of the Third Kind" written by Steven Spielberg...basically if you have seen the movie, you have read the book. The publisher was Columbia Pictures so I have to imagine that Spielberg was writing directly from the script, notes, storyboards, etc....and having directed the film doesn't hurt either. It is such a wonderful film that the novel is just as wonderful an experience. There are a few surprises...one or two adult moments...and a short epilogue from Dr. T. Allen Hynek, Director, Center for UFO Studies which is interesting just by itself. Great novel...greater film...enjoy them both this Halloween season!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Nathan Mayer

    Excellent but only because the book follows the movie exactly. My rating is more for the movie than the book. Often, books deviate from their on-screen translations, but this was practically word for word the movie. I've loved the movie since I was a little kid and found the book, excitedly thinking it might be different from the movie. Nope. Exactly the same. But that's ok because it's still a great story that I thoroughly enjoyed reading and, once I was finished, it made me want to watch the m Excellent but only because the book follows the movie exactly. My rating is more for the movie than the book. Often, books deviate from their on-screen translations, but this was practically word for word the movie. I've loved the movie since I was a little kid and found the book, excitedly thinking it might be different from the movie. Nope. Exactly the same. But that's ok because it's still a great story that I thoroughly enjoyed reading and, once I was finished, it made me want to watch the movie again, which I plan to do tonight.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jason Wilson

    I'll be honest. I haven't seen the movie in quite some time. After reading the novelization of it, I'm definitely going to watch it again. The story was even better than I remember it! Also, reading a story based in the late seventies was a treat with some of the references in the book. I would highly recommend this book if you enjoyed the movie! I'll be honest. I haven't seen the movie in quite some time. After reading the novelization of it, I'm definitely going to watch it again. The story was even better than I remember it! Also, reading a story based in the late seventies was a treat with some of the references in the book. I would highly recommend this book if you enjoyed the movie!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Matt Tolentino

    My real rating is 2.5/5. I read the book first before I saw the movie. The concept is cool, but the writing's not very compelling. Honestly, the movie's more interesting, and the book is skippable. If you are from the Philippines, you can get a copy of this book here: https://shopee.ph/Close-Encounters-of... My real rating is 2.5/5. I read the book first before I saw the movie. The concept is cool, but the writing's not very compelling. Honestly, the movie's more interesting, and the book is skippable. If you are from the Philippines, you can get a copy of this book here: https://shopee.ph/Close-Encounters-of...

  16. 5 out of 5

    Huma

    It's been a while since I read a book this bad. Almost like reading a badly written kids book, except it's for adults. The characters are so hollow you can barely acknowledge their existence. The human relationships so unrealistic and shallow they feel like they are coming from someone who has never had any of their own. Ugh. I hope the movie is better. It's been a while since I read a book this bad. Almost like reading a badly written kids book, except it's for adults. The characters are so hollow you can barely acknowledge their existence. The human relationships so unrealistic and shallow they feel like they are coming from someone who has never had any of their own. Ugh. I hope the movie is better.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kurt Dahlke

    As a teen I often enjoyed movie novelizations, typically horror. (Friday the 13th Part 3 stands out.) This reads as though Spielberg's screenplay was shoved in a 'novelization machine' set at 5th-grade level. Not a pleasure but it made me want to rewatch the movie, and reread the much better You'll Never Eat Lunch in this Town Again. As a teen I often enjoyed movie novelizations, typically horror. (Friday the 13th Part 3 stands out.) This reads as though Spielberg's screenplay was shoved in a 'novelization machine' set at 5th-grade level. Not a pleasure but it made me want to rewatch the movie, and reread the much better You'll Never Eat Lunch in this Town Again.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Freesiab

    I’m not sure if the book came before or after the film but if you liked the movie you’ll enjoy the book. They are pretty much the same. It was well written, very tense and exciting. It did seem to miss the awe of the movie though. Still a fun and easy #scifi read when you need a fix.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Wouter van Halen

    The book is a nice expansion to the movie, to read about the thoughts the characters were having during some of the more intense moments. I'm not sure if the book would work as well as a stand alone novel, but for fans of the movie it's a fun read. The book is a nice expansion to the movie, to read about the thoughts the characters were having during some of the more intense moments. I'm not sure if the book would work as well as a stand alone novel, but for fans of the movie it's a fun read.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kerry

    This book was surprisingly good. I saw the movie years ago, even bought the book at a garage sale, but never took the time to read it because I didn't like the movie. I'm glad I finally decided to read some of my old, unread books. This was much much better than the movie to me. This book was surprisingly good. I saw the movie years ago, even bought the book at a garage sale, but never took the time to read it because I didn't like the movie. I'm glad I finally decided to read some of my old, unread books. This was much much better than the movie to me.

  21. 4 out of 5

    David Luna

    Having never seen the movie I had no idea what I was getting into! This book explores humans and their first interaction with terrestrial life and how one experience can bring multiple people together!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jay Wright

    Book from a movie and it explains this book. It follows the movie almost exclusively. There is no inner depth. The characters are not developed any further. It is simply there. But then again it was a good movie so it is an average book.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mel Flowers

    I usually prefer books to movies, but I did not in this case. This was fairly hard to follow. It read almost like a movie script and was very hard to visualize characters and details if you have not seen the movie. Skip the book and just watch the movie instead.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Nancy

    I saw the movie when it first came out and I enjoy reading the book. CE3K , how do we make contact and communicate with visitors from another world ( more advance than ours). We are not alone in this universe.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sean Harding

    Whilst it may be a good movie, it does not mean it is a good book. It felt very stilted and it did not flow., pretty ordinary and without the movie forgettable.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    writing was a little off but the story moved just fine. hated the ending. wanted more.

  27. 5 out of 5

    David Meyer

    Not the greatest writing ever, but it's a fun story. Not the greatest writing ever, but it's a fun story.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Angelica

    Recommended by my father, so of course I gave it a try. Even though Science Fiction isn't usually my cup of tea, it was a pretty okay read. Recommended by my father, so of course I gave it a try. Even though Science Fiction isn't usually my cup of tea, it was a pretty okay read.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Diana

    Close Encounters has always been one of my all time favourite movies. This novel captures the whole essence and magic of that film. I love it!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Erica

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. A great read! Having not seen the movie, I thoroughly enjoyed it. It delightfully predicable as an alien adventure, but why else would you have picked it up to read? It was a great, quick read.

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