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1–2 Peter

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Peter wrote two letters to encourage churches to stand firm under persecution. The apostle Peter himself was familiar with persecution, as he probably wrote the letters from Rome, awaiting his death. From his own suffering Peter joins in fellowship with "elect exiles of the dispersion" by urging them to "rejoice, though now for a little while… you have been grieved by vari Peter wrote two letters to encourage churches to stand firm under persecution. The apostle Peter himself was familiar with persecution, as he probably wrote the letters from Rome, awaiting his death. From his own suffering Peter joins in fellowship with "elect exiles of the dispersion" by urging them to "rejoice, though now for a little while… you have been grieved by various trials." His inspired challenges to live a life worthy of the gospel hold great relevance for us today. Pastor and scholar R. C. Sproul has preached through Peter's letters and has now compiled these sermons into one volume. This St. Andrew's Expositional Commentary will enable readers to glean from Sproul's wisdom and perspective on 1-2 Peter. The St. Andrew's Expositional Commentary series is the result of years of careful preparation and Bible-centered preaching. Delivered from a pastor's heart for his congregation, readers will find this volume readable, applicable, appropriately paced, and thoroughly biblical. Here is an opportunity to sit at the feet of an eminent scholar and teacher, encountering the Word of God. Volumes on John, Acts, and Romans have already appeared.


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Peter wrote two letters to encourage churches to stand firm under persecution. The apostle Peter himself was familiar with persecution, as he probably wrote the letters from Rome, awaiting his death. From his own suffering Peter joins in fellowship with "elect exiles of the dispersion" by urging them to "rejoice, though now for a little while… you have been grieved by vari Peter wrote two letters to encourage churches to stand firm under persecution. The apostle Peter himself was familiar with persecution, as he probably wrote the letters from Rome, awaiting his death. From his own suffering Peter joins in fellowship with "elect exiles of the dispersion" by urging them to "rejoice, though now for a little while… you have been grieved by various trials." His inspired challenges to live a life worthy of the gospel hold great relevance for us today. Pastor and scholar R. C. Sproul has preached through Peter's letters and has now compiled these sermons into one volume. This St. Andrew's Expositional Commentary will enable readers to glean from Sproul's wisdom and perspective on 1-2 Peter. The St. Andrew's Expositional Commentary series is the result of years of careful preparation and Bible-centered preaching. Delivered from a pastor's heart for his congregation, readers will find this volume readable, applicable, appropriately paced, and thoroughly biblical. Here is an opportunity to sit at the feet of an eminent scholar and teacher, encountering the Word of God. Volumes on John, Acts, and Romans have already appeared.

30 review for 1–2 Peter

  1. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Geaney

    2021 Book 61 ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️1-2 Peter - An Expositional Commentaryby R.C. Sproul @ligonier 1 Peter (2:1–8a)  "We know that rebirth is necessary, because the Scriptures tell us that, by nature, we are dead in our sin. This description of our condition is not biological but spiritual. We are born in this world DOA, dead on arrival. We may be alive biologically, but we are dead spiritually." "In order to embrace the things of God—spiritual things—a new birth is required, a birth wrought in our souls by the 2021 Book 61 ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️1-2 Peter - An Expositional Commentaryby R.C. Sproul @ligonier 1 Peter (2:1–8a)  "We know that rebirth is necessary, because the Scriptures tell us that, by nature, we are dead in our sin. This description of our condition is not biological but spiritual. We are born in this world DOA, dead on arrival. We may be alive biologically, but we are dead spiritually." "In order to embrace the things of God—spiritual things—a new birth is required, a birth wrought in our souls by the supernatural power of the Holy Spirit." "No one can be brought to spiritual life without also being fundamentally changed." 2 Peter(2:1–7) "False doctrine produces ungodly living." (2:18–22) "When you declare your emancipation from the law of God, you are not free; you become a slave." (2:18–22)"Truth divides because it is important, and it is important because the consequences are eternal." (3:1–9)"In order to correctly grasp the context of “us” in 1 and 2 Peter, we need only look to whom these epistles are addressed—Peter is writing to the elect. Therefore, the “any” and the “us” are the elect." (3:10–18)"When we become disciples of Christ, we enter His school for the duration. Our pilgrimage of growth in the knowledge and grace of God will not be over until we get to heaven. Every day we should be seeking to learn new things about God and His kingdom."

  2. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Maxwell

    Having studied at three different seminaries over the past two decades, most of the works that I've studied have listed heavily toward the dry and intellectual end of the spectrum. In contrast, Dr. Sproul's commentaries are as refreshing and enervating as a spring of Living Water in a dry and thirsty land. This commentary on 1-2 Peter is no exception. Because it's so packed with information, it has taken me several months to finish it -- in part, because I've read it in triplicate: (1) read a pa Having studied at three different seminaries over the past two decades, most of the works that I've studied have listed heavily toward the dry and intellectual end of the spectrum. In contrast, Dr. Sproul's commentaries are as refreshing and enervating as a spring of Living Water in a dry and thirsty land. This commentary on 1-2 Peter is no exception. Because it's so packed with information, it has taken me several months to finish it -- in part, because I've read it in triplicate: (1) read a paragraph; (2) highlighted the important points; (3) underlined key words within the highlighted section. Also, this isn't the type of book that you can pick up and put down easily. You can't read it while waiting in line at carpool or while you're waiting for your highlights to process at the salon. It's a book that requires not only time, but attention. A couple of things to note: (1) Dr. Sproul addresses the text from a Reformed point-of-view, so expect that his commentary is steeped in doctrine -- and that's not a bad thing. Every commentary is underpinned by a bit of subjectivity, which makes for an informed POV. (2) The commentary is heavily weighted by historical context -- and that's not a bad thing, either. It helps to know the world to which these letters were originally written, as well as the background from which they were theologically formed. Dr. Sproul connects the text to both Old and New Testament Scriptures to foment his position. (3) Peppered within the commentary are bits of personal experience from Dr. Sproul's own life, which makes his work somewhat (endearingly) folksy and relatable. (4) This book is designed for lay-people, so a lot of terms (i.e., monarchical modalism, homoousios, homoiousios ) are defined and illuminated, which is helpful. Highly recommended for the lay-person who is looking to improve his/her grasp of Scripture. Loved it!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Rev Reads

    Once again reading a Sproul commentary is a frustrating endeavor. At times Sproul gives beautiful and powerful insight into the texts. As other times Sproul runs down rabbit trails that have nothing to do with the passage in context and I am shocked an editor allows his side paths to make it into the commentary. It is especially frustrating when you can read a lengthy chapter of Sproul that never gives any useful information on the text itself. Reading this commentary can give you the finest ins Once again reading a Sproul commentary is a frustrating endeavor. At times Sproul gives beautiful and powerful insight into the texts. As other times Sproul runs down rabbit trails that have nothing to do with the passage in context and I am shocked an editor allows his side paths to make it into the commentary. It is especially frustrating when you can read a lengthy chapter of Sproul that never gives any useful information on the text itself. Reading this commentary can give you the finest insight one week and no insight on the next. Here are my I Peter commentary rankings of the 4 books I completed: 1. Peter David’s NICNT The First Epistle of Peter 2. David Wall’s Holman New Testament Commentary of I & II Peter 3. R. C. Sproul’s 1-2 Peter: An Expositional Commentary 4. Joel Green’s Two Horizons: I Peter

  4. 4 out of 5

    Matt Lee

    An expositional commentary for laymen, Dr Sproul tackles the two epistles of the Apostle Peter with rich and helpful exegesis, while addressing pastoral issue in the text, both contemporary and historical alike. In following with the other volumes in the St. Andrew's Expositional Commentary, the book is an edited collection of Dr. Sproul's sermons, with each chapter being a small chunk of the whole text. The format is exceptionally clear: the text is presented in full at the beginning of each cha An expositional commentary for laymen, Dr Sproul tackles the two epistles of the Apostle Peter with rich and helpful exegesis, while addressing pastoral issue in the text, both contemporary and historical alike. In following with the other volumes in the St. Andrew's Expositional Commentary, the book is an edited collection of Dr. Sproul's sermons, with each chapter being a small chunk of the whole text. The format is exceptionally clear: the text is presented in full at the beginning of each chapter, the commentary then follows and the verses to which Dr. Sproul is speaking are highlighted at the beginning of each subsection in bold. This, coupled with Dr. Sproul's gift for teaching through both written and spoken word, makes the book incredibly easy to read. The commentary is so rich and clearly written, that it would be a benefit to all Christians to read Dr. Sproul's series.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Rodney Tripp

    This commentary was outstanding. R.C. Sproul can go bit heavy in historical content. Close to the end of the book there was a heavy amount of historical content. For some of of us lay people we would have to muddle through it. Will I read other books by Sproul... you betcha. Also this commentary on Peter will be a key reference in my library. Good Day All

  6. 4 out of 5

    Rich Dailey

    Sproul never disappoints. His voice can be heard clearly on the page. I recommend the entire series. A+

  7. 4 out of 5

    Michael Schmid

    This is a good commentary, but it does not go into as much detail as I sometimes would have wished. Sproul makes various references to philosophers and their philosophies as well as to stories that illustrate a certain point or a certain truth. These were sometimes more and sometimes less helpful for me. Sproul's logic and reasoning when grappling with the biblical text was very insightful and helped me gain a better understanding of Scripture. This is a good commentary, but it does not go into as much detail as I sometimes would have wished. Sproul makes various references to philosophers and their philosophies as well as to stories that illustrate a certain point or a certain truth. These were sometimes more and sometimes less helpful for me. Sproul's logic and reasoning when grappling with the biblical text was very insightful and helped me gain a better understanding of Scripture.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ian

    I've read all of this series of commentaries by RC Sproul and I hope he continues to produce them. What I particularly like about them is they reflect sermons he has preached to his congregation. So they are thought-provoking, challenging whilst also practical as all good sermons should be. I struggled with some of Peter's meanings especially around the criticism of the Gnostics and such. Accordingly, it was very helpful to have this commentary to provide enlightenment and context. Once again an ex I've read all of this series of commentaries by RC Sproul and I hope he continues to produce them. What I particularly like about them is they reflect sermons he has preached to his congregation. So they are thought-provoking, challenging whilst also practical as all good sermons should be. I struggled with some of Peter's meanings especially around the criticism of the Gnostics and such. Accordingly, it was very helpful to have this commentary to provide enlightenment and context. Once again an excellent piece of work which I recommend highly.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Leandro Dutra

    It pains me to give ðis one ſtar leß than I firſt þought I would. It is ſolid, good & very uſeful. It only loſes a ſtar becauſe ſome of ðe more intereſtiŋ pieces are unſubſtantiated & underdeveloped; Sproul cites a juice hiſtorical or þeological tidbit, wiþout giviŋ us neiðer where it came from, nor where we can learn more, wiþout proviŋ or applyiŋ what indeed ſeems true. Yet, entirely worþwhile.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Matt Crawford

    I have to admit that I usually look over these couple of epistles in my own study. However this book shows why they are part of our Canon and should not be overlooked at all. This commentary shows how they tie into the narrative of the New Testament and even in the narrative of our current lives. I expect to refer back to this resource many times

  11. 5 out of 5

    Leslie Christopher

    I love Sproul's commentary series. They are actually collections of sermons he has preached at his home church, St. Andrew's, in Sanford, Florida. Not overly academic or exegetical, Sproul gives the historical background of these letters as well as making practical application to life today. His Romans commentary was excellent as well! I love Sproul's commentary series. They are actually collections of sermons he has preached at his home church, St. Andrew's, in Sanford, Florida. Not overly academic or exegetical, Sproul gives the historical background of these letters as well as making practical application to life today. His Romans commentary was excellent as well!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Josh

    You know, standard exegesis, conservative, classic Sproul, hyper-rational, driven to create structure and certainty unless impossible, good factual histories, constant attacks on modern liberal church and ideas.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Marjie

  14. 5 out of 5

    Robert Cox

  15. 5 out of 5

    Cecilia Dunbar Hernandez

  16. 5 out of 5

    William

  17. 5 out of 5

    David

  18. 5 out of 5

    Bevan Houston

  19. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

  20. 5 out of 5

    Peter Clegg

  21. 4 out of 5

    Barry Vavak

  22. 5 out of 5

    Hopson

  23. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

  24. 5 out of 5

    Billy

  25. 4 out of 5

    Alex Riester

  26. 4 out of 5

    Mark Lickliter

  27. 5 out of 5

    Megan

  28. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca McCaffrey

  29. 4 out of 5

    Dayton Hartman

  30. 5 out of 5

    Heather Miller

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