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Keep Going: The Art of Perseverance

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Grandfather says this: “In life there is sadness as well as joy, losing as well as winning, falling as well as standing, hunger as well as plenty, bad as well as good. I do not say this to make you despair, but to teach you…that life is a journey sometimes walked in light and sometimes in shadow.” Grandfather says this: “Keep going.” These thought-provoking lessons, passed d Grandfather says this: “In life there is sadness as well as joy, losing as well as winning, falling as well as standing, hunger as well as plenty, bad as well as good. I do not say this to make you despair, but to teach you…that life is a journey sometimes walked in light and sometimes in shadow.” Grandfather says this: “Keep going.” These thought-provoking lessons, passed down by the author’s own Lakota grandfather, will inspire the hundreds of thousands who already know his work—and will tap into the market that has embraced such books as Oriah Mountain Dreamer’s The Invitation. When a young man’s father dies, he turns to his sagacious grandfather for comfort. Together they sit underneath the family’s cottonwood tree, and the grandfather shares his perspective on life, the perseverance it requires, and the pleasure and pain of the journey. Filled with dialogue, stories, and recollections, each section focuses on a portion of the prose poem “Keep Going” and provides commentary on the text. Readers will draw comfort, knowledge, and strength from the Grandfather’s wise words—just as Marshall himself did.


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Grandfather says this: “In life there is sadness as well as joy, losing as well as winning, falling as well as standing, hunger as well as plenty, bad as well as good. I do not say this to make you despair, but to teach you…that life is a journey sometimes walked in light and sometimes in shadow.” Grandfather says this: “Keep going.” These thought-provoking lessons, passed d Grandfather says this: “In life there is sadness as well as joy, losing as well as winning, falling as well as standing, hunger as well as plenty, bad as well as good. I do not say this to make you despair, but to teach you…that life is a journey sometimes walked in light and sometimes in shadow.” Grandfather says this: “Keep going.” These thought-provoking lessons, passed down by the author’s own Lakota grandfather, will inspire the hundreds of thousands who already know his work—and will tap into the market that has embraced such books as Oriah Mountain Dreamer’s The Invitation. When a young man’s father dies, he turns to his sagacious grandfather for comfort. Together they sit underneath the family’s cottonwood tree, and the grandfather shares his perspective on life, the perseverance it requires, and the pleasure and pain of the journey. Filled with dialogue, stories, and recollections, each section focuses on a portion of the prose poem “Keep Going” and provides commentary on the text. Readers will draw comfort, knowledge, and strength from the Grandfather’s wise words—just as Marshall himself did.

30 review for Keep Going: The Art of Perseverance

  1. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Kay

    This is, by far, the best book I've ever listened to. Hearing Joseph Marshall read his book was so incredibly comforting and touching that I can't possibly express my full gratitude. If you have children, read this to learn stories to tell them when they ask why life is so hard sometimes. If you miss your grandparents, read this to feel close to them. If you feel lost or ready to give up, read this to help you make the next step. I've very rarely finished an audiobook thinking, 'I will listen to This is, by far, the best book I've ever listened to. Hearing Joseph Marshall read his book was so incredibly comforting and touching that I can't possibly express my full gratitude. If you have children, read this to learn stories to tell them when they ask why life is so hard sometimes. If you miss your grandparents, read this to feel close to them. If you feel lost or ready to give up, read this to help you make the next step. I've very rarely finished an audiobook thinking, 'I will listen to this again and again,' but here I am thinking just that. I hope you will share my enthusiasm.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    This is a wonderful book to read, especially in today's tough times. The story is beautifully told and hopeful, which is what we all need at times -- hope. This is a wonderful book to read, especially in today's tough times. The story is beautifully told and hopeful, which is what we all need at times -- hope.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Choonghwan

    "Life, we think, measures us by how well we've succeeded or how miserably we have failed. On the other hand, perhaps life doesn't measure us at all, at least not in the same ways we measure over-selves." Life only can be learned not be taught. "Life, we think, measures us by how well we've succeeded or how miserably we have failed. On the other hand, perhaps life doesn't measure us at all, at least not in the same ways we measure over-selves." Life only can be learned not be taught.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Alix Judkins

    If only we all had an Old Hawk to sit under an ancient chestnut tree with and take advisements and learn of our family line. Life lessons galore, the most simple one being to keep going no matter the trials, is firm in it's roots and prevails most other lessons of life. Wise words I was blessed to have read, thank you Joseph for sharing. If only we all had an Old Hawk to sit under an ancient chestnut tree with and take advisements and learn of our family line. Life lessons galore, the most simple one being to keep going no matter the trials, is firm in it's roots and prevails most other lessons of life. Wise words I was blessed to have read, thank you Joseph for sharing.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Melinda Flaugher

    A simple read with important truths regarding life.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mimi

    Loved this book! "Keep Going" Loved this book! "Keep Going"

  7. 4 out of 5

    Stacie Kenney (she, her, hers)

    This was a good book that I read with a bookclub through work. I enjoyed the stories told by Old Hawk throughout.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Nicholas

    Written very simply, the stories and lessons shared in this little volume are good reminders of things which should be obvious but somehow are not. There are points where the layers get lost, one in particular about a village facing a flood comes to mind. The focus on was on the the taking of each step to save the village, but glosses over was that some people there were too pessimistic to help. That seemed to cry out for more to be said, how did they react to the partial success: did they see t Written very simply, the stories and lessons shared in this little volume are good reminders of things which should be obvious but somehow are not. There are points where the layers get lost, one in particular about a village facing a flood comes to mind. The focus on was on the the taking of each step to save the village, but glosses over was that some people there were too pessimistic to help. That seemed to cry out for more to be said, how did they react to the partial success: did they see the failure? did they see that with their help it would have been better? were they welcomed back when they returned? That one little tale was designed to tell one lesson, but could have contained so much more. Interspersed among the stories and lessons being shared are little tidbits of the life of the two main characters, even the major parts being thrown in almost as afterthoughts, allowing the two to be anyone even after those details come out, adding an element of universality. "It is true that wealth buys power and influence, but it does not buy morality, or kindness, or compassion. The pursuit of wealth can blind us to the fact that all of us, rich or poor, can be generous with our time, love, kindness, and compassion. Those virtues, and many more, we can all have in unlimited supply... Anyone who does not exercise compassion is ignorant of the reality that everyone needs it at some time in life; or we forget that someone has blessed us with compassion at a time when we needed it. That is the smallness of arrogance. It is a disease of the soul. It can be highly contagious. Ignorance is its carrier. It ravages the souls of those who think there is no reality beyond themselves." "But the most important word is *can*. Whatever doesn't kill you *can* make you stronger." "In truth, we begin dying the day we are born." "If you visit just about any cemetery in this country, you see that this society denies death."

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kris

    A friend gave me this book and then gently kept harping at me until I read it. After a particularly difficult day, I grabbed the book in a bit of huff and read it in two sittings. The book consists of a conversation between a native american man and his grandfather. It is actually true stories compiled into one running conversation. The crux of the matter is that without pain and sorrow, there cannot be happiness. The only way to proceed in life is to keep going - which is the central message of A friend gave me this book and then gently kept harping at me until I read it. After a particularly difficult day, I grabbed the book in a bit of huff and read it in two sittings. The book consists of a conversation between a native american man and his grandfather. It is actually true stories compiled into one running conversation. The crux of the matter is that without pain and sorrow, there cannot be happiness. The only way to proceed in life is to keep going - which is the central message of the book. Sometimes you go alone and sometimes with others but you always keep going. There is something for everyone to relate to but the words that resonated with me were the following: " A river begins its journey quietly as a small stream, usually in some obscure place. But it is a seeker determined to find its way. It does not know how to yield to obstacles, which can deter it for a time but cannot stop it. In a good season, a river grows and gathers strength from melting snows. Spring and summer rains also send down their encouragement. However, a bad season with less snow and rain may slow its flow to a mere trickle at times. Nevertheless, the river inexorably follows the path it has made for itself, or it carves a new course if necessary. It is unstoppable. A river can be wide or narrow, shallow or deep, swift or slow. But of all its characteristics, two are most distinctive: It creates its own path and it flows relentlessly. So long as there is winter snow in the mountains, spring rains and gravity, rivers will flow, they will persevere." I am in the process of carving a new path, and I have slowed to a mere trickle, and I am alone but I am a seeker. And still I flow. Lesson learned. Thanks for making me read the book.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Dave

    I love this author and especially audiobooks--he narrates his books himself and has such a voice that is so rich and sounds so authentic. Listening to native American stories abroad--living in the UAE, away from the US--has been comforting. Listening to native American stories in the US could also be comforting and enlightening. Such grounded, timeless wisdom for individuals, for society. Collections of human lessons are beautiful and useful both. Now as I confront brain cancer, I looked for a bo I love this author and especially audiobooks--he narrates his books himself and has such a voice that is so rich and sounds so authentic. Listening to native American stories abroad--living in the UAE, away from the US--has been comforting. Listening to native American stories in the US could also be comforting and enlightening. Such grounded, timeless wisdom for individuals, for society. Collections of human lessons are beautiful and useful both. Now as I confront brain cancer, I looked for a book I could read before bed to wind down, stop my gears from turning, quiet my anxiety and desire to furiously read and learn more about what I can do to get rid of this cancer and never let it return. I picked up a few books by Paolo Coelho I hadn't read yet, and I remembered Joseph Marshall and found this book. What a great book. Easy to rjust open up and let Marshall tell you stories and deep lessons for dealing with hardship and even making sense of it, taking pride in it, learning from it and pushing through it to gain all the positive that comes from it. Things have been going very well for me through treatment after surgery, which I'm grateful for, but they won't always be. When times are hard, I will keep going and this book will be a big, strong foundation for me to rely on for strength for hope, for standing and facing the storm, and for taking one more step. Always one more step.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Shaunesay

    I discovered this little book in our collection the other day as I was poking through our basement books as I often do, just to remind myself of what is there. I didn't remember buying it, or even seeing it there before, but as my family is going through some difficulties right now it seemed that it may have appeared in front of me for a reason. I chose to honor the sign, if that's what it was, and give it a read. This is a gentle, down to earth book of encouragement. It does not sugar coat reali I discovered this little book in our collection the other day as I was poking through our basement books as I often do, just to remind myself of what is there. I didn't remember buying it, or even seeing it there before, but as my family is going through some difficulties right now it seemed that it may have appeared in front of me for a reason. I chose to honor the sign, if that's what it was, and give it a read. This is a gentle, down to earth book of encouragement. It does not sugar coat reality but instead emphasizes the duality of all aspects of life and the importance of taking another step, no matter how weary you are, or how small that step is. Life is difficult, and those steps will be hard, but you must keep going, and in facing down those storms, you will gain strength.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    Keep Going. A simple message, a simple book. "If knowledge is strength of mind, then wisdom is the strength of the soul." Native American wisdom is, to me, some of the greatest there is. I read this twice, skimmed it once more, and appreciated it more each time. I think anyone who reads this can find some wisdom that resonates in these pages. These are some of the things that I appreciated. The understanding of reality and balance: "There is love to overcome hate; generosity can diminish greed; tr Keep Going. A simple message, a simple book. "If knowledge is strength of mind, then wisdom is the strength of the soul." Native American wisdom is, to me, some of the greatest there is. I read this twice, skimmed it once more, and appreciated it more each time. I think anyone who reads this can find some wisdom that resonates in these pages. These are some of the things that I appreciated. The understanding of reality and balance: "There is love to overcome hate; generosity can diminish greed; truthfulness can reveal lies in the same way the wind dries the flood and rains end the drought." "Without sadness we would not yearn for joy, and strive to find it, and treasure it when it comes. It is also a fact that neither sadness or joy is with us constantly. And how often one or the other is part of our journey is not always within our control." Both good times and bad are part of the reality. "Difficult experiences, whether they are sadness, loss, hunger, poverty, illness, or death, rarely occur because you invited them into your life. But when life does place hardship in your path it always offers a chance to learn strength." "Life is a journey sometimes walked in light, sometimes in shadow." "Remember that anything that causes the shadow is smaller than the source of the light." Keep going. Compassion: "Anyone who does not exercise compassion is ignorant of the reality that everyone needs it at some time in life; or we forget that someone has blessed us with compassion at a time when we needed it. That is the smallness of arrogance. It is a disease of the soul. It can be highly contagious. Ignorance is its carrier. It avenges the souls of those who think there is no reality beyond themselves. "Those who suffer from the smallness of arrogance think that ill fortune is the fault of those who suffer it; that good fortune is a privilege that belongs to them. Whatever path you take, Grandson, do not succumb to arrogance and endanger your soul. " The tempering process: "sometimes we are suddenly immersed in a crisis, or an event that- if we use it- can make us stronger. But that tempering process means that it is necessary to deal with the hard facts of disappointment, sadness, and grief. Part of that process is not to deny those feelings. No one embraces disappointment, sadness, or grief, but neither should we deny ourselves the necessity of experiencing the entire array of human emotions. When our spirit tells us it is time to weep, we should weep." "Grieving is part of the tempering process." Endurance. Adversity. "Rising to face the storm once again may seem foolish, perhaps even self-destructive. But I like to think that in some corner of our spirit there is a spark of defiance. That may be how storms teach us to be strong, by awakening that spark of defiance. "Standing up to the storm, no matter how many times it blows us down, should teach us that we don't need to be as powerful as the storm to defy it. We only need to be strong enough to stand. Whether we stand shaking in fear or shaking our fist, as long as we stand, we are strong enough." I liked some of the stories more than others. My favorite is the Three Suitors, about finding the strength and spirit to try one more time, even though all you can do is fall on your face. "We will always serve ourselves best to take one more step.." "Every step is a spark that defies the darkness of despair." "Defy the darkness." On the great strength in the ability to laugh: "Laughing and weeping should both have a place in our lives." The NEXT step. "The most important step isn't the first step or last step, but the steps inbetween... the "next step." Keep going. Not the length of your stride or the number of steps, only that you take the steps, one after another." Perseverance in the form of hope: "Hope is always one more step. There will always be those of us who will succumb to hopelessness, and those who act on hope. I like to believe that most of the time hope will make a difference. " Keeping hope alive is to know how to keep going.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Eva Tipps

    So much of Grandfather's advice is obvious, but being human, sometimes a gentle reminder can help us back onto the path of a well-lived life. I liked the layout... the advice, often followed by a short, simple story that helps me remember the advice. A couple of stories that really made an impression on me were the following: the one of the women decorating their grey blankets to answer their own questions about the direction their life took, and the one about the women who led the village into So much of Grandfather's advice is obvious, but being human, sometimes a gentle reminder can help us back onto the path of a well-lived life. I liked the layout... the advice, often followed by a short, simple story that helps me remember the advice. A couple of stories that really made an impression on me were the following: the one of the women decorating their grey blankets to answer their own questions about the direction their life took, and the one about the women who led the village into protecting the town from severe flooding leading by example with a single rock. There were several quotes that I want to share. The first is this: "It is true that wealth buys power and influence, but it does not buy morality, or kindness, or compassion.... Anyone who does not exercise compassion is ignorant of the reality that everyone needs it at some time in life; or we forget that someone blessed us with compassion at a time when we needed it. That is the smallness of arrogance. It is a disease of the soul. It can be highly contagious. Ignorance is its carrier. It ravages the souls of those who think there is no reality beyond themselves. Those who suffer from the smallness of arrogance think that ill fortune is the fault of those who suffer it; that good fortune is a privilege that belongs to them." Another talked about leadership and how we the people should choose a leader based on his past deeds, not upon his promises. Also, the more one promises, often the less able he or she is likely to deliver on that promise! A third quote I liked was this: "If knowledge is strength of mind, then wisdom is the strength of the soul." I am giving this book to my friend to read so that we may discuss it. That is one reason it gets four stars. I would have given it five but sometimes it seemed depressingly repetitive as Grandfather reiterates over and over again how we have to suffer to appreciate joy.

  14. 4 out of 5

    John McAndrew

    A contrast to many self-help or inspirational books, this one lands, not as a revelation, but as a challenge that is also somehow comforting. A wise little book. Marshall recreates a long conversation with his grandfather as taking place between two fictional characters. There are a few good pull quotes that would go well on a meme; but mostly you want to settle in for each of the stories Grandfather tells in their entirety. Grief, pain, and disappointment don't yield to quick fixes, but to good A contrast to many self-help or inspirational books, this one lands, not as a revelation, but as a challenge that is also somehow comforting. A wise little book. Marshall recreates a long conversation with his grandfather as taking place between two fictional characters. There are a few good pull quotes that would go well on a meme; but mostly you want to settle in for each of the stories Grandfather tells in their entirety. Grief, pain, and disappointment don't yield to quick fixes, but to good, wise, trusted company and perseverance. There are echoes of the Stoics here, and of The Road Less Traveled. Marshall's tradition is Native American/Lakota, so he and his grandparents, who raised him, have known long, intractable sorrows. Most of the stories are from his own tradition, but there is one from the Celts, and as an German-Irish American, I found no cultural impediments to appreciating the wisdom he shared. This is an excellent book for those dealing with grief and loss. It is also for those who are sick or unfortunate and need encouragement grounded in knowing that life is hard, that trying does not guarantee winning, and that the ability to persevere often depends on the support we have from, or can give to, friends and family.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Madison Hand

    This book was so amazingly powerful to read. I read this book at a time when I was really struggling with school, family, and friends. In the beginning there is so many teachings, about how you have to “keep going” no matter how tired you may be. With each teaching in this book, there is a story to go with it, I think that is why I loved this book so much. Sometimes as human beings we want to give up when the going gets tough, this book taught me that when times are hard, it makes you stronger a This book was so amazingly powerful to read. I read this book at a time when I was really struggling with school, family, and friends. In the beginning there is so many teachings, about how you have to “keep going” no matter how tired you may be. With each teaching in this book, there is a story to go with it, I think that is why I loved this book so much. Sometimes as human beings we want to give up when the going gets tough, this book taught me that when times are hard, it makes you stronger as long as you keep going. I can connect with the characters and how they feel, and some of the stories that go along with it. In the story, the main character Jeremy is having a really hard time so he turns to his grandpa for help. I can relate to that so much because the elders are the ones with the most knowledge and life experience. This book helped put into perspective that I have to take that last step to the top of the hill, and I will have made it. When I finished This book I felt as If all of my troubles that I was feeling went away. I cant even put into words the sense of empowerment I now feel. I definitely recommend this book to anyone who needs a little break from the troubles life throws at us, and just sit back and relax and let these words take your mind off of things.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Johan Agstam

    So I first read this book before my depression hit or at least before the slog of getting out of it wore me down mentally. I really liked it then & I've thought to re-read it several times, but haven't until now. While before I saw it as you know a good lesson to as the title "Keep Going" now it was revolutionary to me. I cried basically throughout this reading. More than anything else it's a celebration of perseverance, of despite how tough things are, we still do our best, even if it's just a So I first read this book before my depression hit or at least before the slog of getting out of it wore me down mentally. I really liked it then & I've thought to re-read it several times, but haven't until now. While before I saw it as you know a good lesson to as the title "Keep Going" now it was revolutionary to me. I cried basically throughout this reading. More than anything else it's a celebration of perseverance, of despite how tough things are, we still do our best, even if it's just a little bit, that little bit is something to be celebrated. I can't put this as eloquent as the author, I recommend anyone having such struggles whether it be depression, disability, or something else to read it. It's amazing.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ymasumac

    Joseph M. Marshall III is an excellent writer and listening to him read his book through audio is one of the best ways to read his books! I find a great deal of wisdom in the books I've read so far and this one is definitely one of them. There are nuggets in hear of advice you will want to keep in your back pocket. I found the way the story was set up a little contrived - a grandfather talking to his grandson. I think I would have preferred to have him tell of his experience with his grandfather Joseph M. Marshall III is an excellent writer and listening to him read his book through audio is one of the best ways to read his books! I find a great deal of wisdom in the books I've read so far and this one is definitely one of them. There are nuggets in hear of advice you will want to keep in your back pocket. I found the way the story was set up a little contrived - a grandfather talking to his grandson. I think I would have preferred to have him tell of his experience with his grandfather. For this reason it gets 3 stars, otherwise the content is 4 star quality! Nonetheless, the book is appreciated and I think it's worth a read!

  18. 4 out of 5

    John Maurer

    Keep Going. Simple, short and sweet. A beautiful story told between Grandfather and Grandson about the opposites and balance we all find in life. Powerful, thoughtful lessons from the Lakota Native American people we all must take to the heart. This was the second book I have read by this author. While I enjoyed this read very much, it was sometimes hard for me to focus on the subject or lesson at hand by the way it was written. I felt it moved around to quick and could have been a little bit lo Keep Going. Simple, short and sweet. A beautiful story told between Grandfather and Grandson about the opposites and balance we all find in life. Powerful, thoughtful lessons from the Lakota Native American people we all must take to the heart. This was the second book I have read by this author. While I enjoyed this read very much, it was sometimes hard for me to focus on the subject or lesson at hand by the way it was written. I felt it moved around to quick and could have been a little bit longer.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ashleigh

    This book is pretty amazing. I’m only giving it 4 stars because you have to be in the right mood for it. It’s pretty deep but easy to read if that makes sense. I kept wanting to underline things but it wasn’t my copy so I may need to get my own. Just some good reminders about being persistent in life.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Katharine

    "We should always remember that anything that causes the shadow is smaller than the source of the sunshine." Our weaknesses are part of us. "Weakness and strength are necessary for balance." Know your weaknesses well. "Accept who you are, in the moment you are living." "Strength is the child of effort and pain." "We should always remember that anything that causes the shadow is smaller than the source of the sunshine." Our weaknesses are part of us. "Weakness and strength are necessary for balance." Know your weaknesses well. "Accept who you are, in the moment you are living." "Strength is the child of effort and pain."

  21. 5 out of 5

    Hominhquan

    this is the first book that i read when i was 13 years old and i feel it helped me a lot in my life . since i have read this book i always try the best i can so now i have been mature so much . so anyway thanks to Joseph M. Marshall III

  22. 4 out of 5

    Shelley

    I quick read that gives insight to pushing through the difficult times in life using the Lakota beliefs.

  23. 4 out of 5

    SeaKing

    Nice food for thought, beautifully simple.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jamie Suter

    Loved this book! A great read if you are currently or have ever experienced grief from loosing a loved one. Although it is based on Native American beliefs, it still has some great messages for all.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Teacatweaves

    A lot of wisdom in this book. It’s the kind of reference you can keep going back to as you face different adversities in life.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    Cannot express how much i loved and am affected by this thoughtful little book..and by all the writings of the wonderful Joseph Marshall III.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Bryan D.

    I think I will come back to some of the stories in this book, when I need a little encouragement, from time to time.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Nancysballs

    I was moved by this book. Very quick read.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Yeevkimntxhee Lee

    My supervisor gave me this book to read when someone important in my life passed away. It really helped me and I hope it will help others as well!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Eduardo Rincón Gallardo

    Such an amazing book, with a lot of truth in its pages!

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