hits counter The Five Love Languages of Children - Ebook PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Five Love Languages of Children

Availability: Ready to download

Does your child speak a different language? Sometimes they wager for your attention, and other times they ignore you completely. Sometimes they are filled with gratitude and affection, and other times they seem totally indifferent. Attitude. Behavior. Development. Everything depends on the love relationship between you and your child. When children feel loved, they do thei Does your child speak a different language? Sometimes they wager for your attention, and other times they ignore you completely. Sometimes they are filled with gratitude and affection, and other times they seem totally indifferent. Attitude. Behavior. Development. Everything depends on the love relationship between you and your child. When children feel loved, they do their best. But how can you make sure your child feels loved? Since 1992, Dr. Gary Chapman's best-selling book "The 5Love Languages" has helpedmillions of couples develop stronger, more fulfilling relationships by teaching them to speak each others' love language. Each child, too, expresses and receives love through one of five different communication styles. And your love language may be totally different from that of your child. While you are doing all you can to show your child love, he may be hearing it as something completely opposite. Discover your child's primary language and learn what you can do to effectively convey unconditional feelings of respect, affection, and commitment that will resonate in your child's emotions and behavior. "


Compare

Does your child speak a different language? Sometimes they wager for your attention, and other times they ignore you completely. Sometimes they are filled with gratitude and affection, and other times they seem totally indifferent. Attitude. Behavior. Development. Everything depends on the love relationship between you and your child. When children feel loved, they do thei Does your child speak a different language? Sometimes they wager for your attention, and other times they ignore you completely. Sometimes they are filled with gratitude and affection, and other times they seem totally indifferent. Attitude. Behavior. Development. Everything depends on the love relationship between you and your child. When children feel loved, they do their best. But how can you make sure your child feels loved? Since 1992, Dr. Gary Chapman's best-selling book "The 5Love Languages" has helpedmillions of couples develop stronger, more fulfilling relationships by teaching them to speak each others' love language. Each child, too, expresses and receives love through one of five different communication styles. And your love language may be totally different from that of your child. While you are doing all you can to show your child love, he may be hearing it as something completely opposite. Discover your child's primary language and learn what you can do to effectively convey unconditional feelings of respect, affection, and commitment that will resonate in your child's emotions and behavior. "

30 review for The Five Love Languages of Children

  1. 5 out of 5

    Exina

    The concept of the five love languages is very inspiring, and it was fun to figure out which is the best way to express my love to each of my kids. Of course it’s not that simple, not that black and white: they – just like everyone else – are multilingual. The five love languages may seem oversimplified, and some examples fabricated, but the book has its merits. It’s about love after all.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kelli

    This book is brilliant! Beyond the fact that this is a book about how to love your child in the way that he or she best identifies and recognizes as love...because that alone is a smart and beautiful undertaking, this book begins by introducing the concept of learning to speak your child's love language and then includes a gentle list of things to remember about children. In this book, Chapman and Campbell explain each of the five ways a child expresses and receives love. They explain how to iden This book is brilliant! Beyond the fact that this is a book about how to love your child in the way that he or she best identifies and recognizes as love...because that alone is a smart and beautiful undertaking, this book begins by introducing the concept of learning to speak your child's love language and then includes a gentle list of things to remember about children. In this book, Chapman and Campbell explain each of the five ways a child expresses and receives love. They explain how to identify your child's primary love language and provide numerous examples of how to speak it through various actions targeting specific age groups. Guidance is also given for using this method when there is a need to discipline and when teaching life rules to young children. A perfect gift for a mother of young children, I wish I had read this earlier. This will be my go-to gift this year. Though I was already aware of the love languages for marriage, I hadn't considered this for children. Upon reading this, it was painfully obvious which languages my two speak (both different) and what I can do differently. I will follow up and note later if some adjustments I plan to make effect change. Also, the copy I read was reprinted in 2016 and has a more modern cover. 5 stars.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Wedemeyer

    Immediately, I realized that I wasn't meeting each of my children's individual love need. I thought my son's main love language was physical touch but it's also words of affirmation. This is so obvious in that he is always touching, always wrestling, and always in your personal space and now that I realize it he's also always asking if everything is ok, did he do this ok, am I all right and he is so happy after receiving positive words of affirmation from myself and my husband. After reading Gar Immediately, I realized that I wasn't meeting each of my children's individual love need. I thought my son's main love language was physical touch but it's also words of affirmation. This is so obvious in that he is always touching, always wrestling, and always in your personal space and now that I realize it he's also always asking if everything is ok, did he do this ok, am I all right and he is so happy after receiving positive words of affirmation from myself and my husband. After reading Gary Chapman and Ross Campbell's tips, I began to incorporate more touch into every moment that I was near my son and a lot more words of affirmation. Whenever he is near, my hand can be found on his head, his back, or engaging in learning manners such as shaking hands. I have learned to use touch in all of his learning activities and his acting out has gone down considerably as well as his verbal skills have soared. My daughter was a little harder to discover but I quickly discovered that her love languages are acts of service and time. She wants to be with you yet she wants to do something with you. Playing games with her, baking with her, doing crafts with her, and even cleaning or doing laundry together are all reaching her needs. She also loves to work on Punky Monkey Misisons projects together like crocheting, passing out Blessed to Bless bags to the needy and taking food to the homeless. As a mom, I found that The 5 Love Languages of Children was one of the best books I could have read. I wish I would have had this as a new mom! Gary Champan and Ross Campbell use biblical principles, personal illustrations, and personal application to really open up your eyes to your child's needs. I highly recommend this book to any parent - new or old. It might just be the charge your family needs to go from average to exemplary. If every child had their love languages met just think of what a better place we would live in.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jessie

    I've read the original 5 Love Languages and so this one was sort of a waste of my time. I did find some valuable tips and interesting insights, but the 5 languages are the same for kids as adults, so it was the same book all over again. With an adult, you can say, "Here honey, take this quiz to let me know what your primary love language is." With kids, you can't do that as easily. This book (politely) says to the reader, "Hey, dummy. Try quality time and see how your kid responds. Then try word I've read the original 5 Love Languages and so this one was sort of a waste of my time. I did find some valuable tips and interesting insights, but the 5 languages are the same for kids as adults, so it was the same book all over again. With an adult, you can say, "Here honey, take this quiz to let me know what your primary love language is." With kids, you can't do that as easily. This book (politely) says to the reader, "Hey, dummy. Try quality time and see how your kid responds. Then try words of affirmation and observe. Then try…" Now I told you the secret and you don't have to read this book. Probably the most helpful part was the chapter on discipline and the love languages. The fact that if you use their love language against them, it can be traumatizing. When their language is physical touch and you spank them, it's devastating. If their language is quality time and you send them to their room, they're crushed. To another kid, being sent to their room is play time. It was a good reminder to be sensitive to love languages when your kid misbehaves. Most times when your children misbehave, it's because they're asking for love anyway.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    I am a blue, type - A, ESTJ, who likes to be shown love through quality time, and likes long walks on the beach and....WAIT, no I'm not. I'm Karen, a girl with lots of personality quirks, one of which is that I dislike pop psychology books that tell me I and everyone else fits into one of their created, ficticious descriptions. I have to admit, I didn't even finish this book (I did read almost all of it though). Probably most of us are familiar with the five love languages, they have enjoyed bei I am a blue, type - A, ESTJ, who likes to be shown love through quality time, and likes long walks on the beach and....WAIT, no I'm not. I'm Karen, a girl with lots of personality quirks, one of which is that I dislike pop psychology books that tell me I and everyone else fits into one of their created, ficticious descriptions. I have to admit, I didn't even finish this book (I did read almost all of it though). Probably most of us are familiar with the five love languages, they have enjoyed being very discussed pop psychology for the past 10 years. This book applies those same love languages to children. My issue is not with this book specifically, but with the idea in general. All this labeling, catagorizing, pigeon-holing, and simplifing people, into tidy little groups. I know we all have similarities, but if you really want to love someone, get to know them. It takes time and effort, but that would be a better use of your time than reading this book.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Rachael

    I think this book is fascinating! I've noticed that my children, my spouse and I all have a love language that relates to them. The love language is your preferred way of giving & receiving love. What I loved most about this book is the knowledge that when you discipline a child in their love language it cuts really deep. For example, my daughter is a words of affirmation child, and when I correct her actions, she shuts down (even when I do it in the nicest way 'we can't touch that sweetie') My I think this book is fascinating! I've noticed that my children, my spouse and I all have a love language that relates to them. The love language is your preferred way of giving & receiving love. What I loved most about this book is the knowledge that when you discipline a child in their love language it cuts really deep. For example, my daughter is a words of affirmation child, and when I correct her actions, she shuts down (even when I do it in the nicest way 'we can't touch that sweetie') My son is a physical touch child, and if I punish him by not letting him sit on my lap, it really hurts his feelings. But if I correct him with words, he doesn't care. It talks a lot about how parents can do everything they want to show their children love, but if they are not showing the child love in the way they prefer it, the child may feel unloved, even to the most attentive parent

  7. 4 out of 5

    Meredith

    This book, like the other "Five Languages of Love" book, takes an interesting concept that could have been detailed in a 3-5 page essay but is instead stretched miserably with vague example stories and filler recaps so they could publish an entire book. Also, the section that declared that not all women work, so they should talk to their husbands about receiving a monthly budget to buy them gifts was particularly weird.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Joshua Park

    With any book that's designed to help parents be better parents for their kids, it's easy to fall into the trap of defining the success of the book by whether its advice was successful in the reader's family. The fact that every child is different is actually the highlight of this book. This helps people understand why two kids might react completely differently to the same gifts, the same activities, and the same punishments. It has to do with how the people involved show and express love. Most With any book that's designed to help parents be better parents for their kids, it's easy to fall into the trap of defining the success of the book by whether its advice was successful in the reader's family. The fact that every child is different is actually the highlight of this book. This helps people understand why two kids might react completely differently to the same gifts, the same activities, and the same punishments. It has to do with how the people involved show and express love. Most of the explanations from this "5 Love Languages" book were more instructive to me than the examples from Gary Chapman's main book in this vein, The Five Love Languages: How to Express Heartfelt Commitment to Your Mate. One problem: I expected this book to help with my toddler. In the book, Chapman and Campbell say that if the child is under the age of 5 that I should just not try to figure out the love language. They also say that parents should not discipline or punish the child with methods related to the child's love language. (E.g., a child in dire need of Quality Time could be emotionally damaged by punishing them with isolation.) This presents a problem: I am not to discipline in my child's love language, but I can't know what my child's language is until he's older? Should I simply hope that my discipline tactics are not in the same language as my son's understanding of love? Sadly, the authors do not offer a solution to this. It seems that the book is geared primarily toward school-aged children. Still, the advice seems good and I'd hate to fault the book with a lower rating simply because of the book's scope. I wish the publisher had clarified the appropriate age range of the book in its list description.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    I am really torn over what I thought of this book. While I like the concepts and I think it had valuable information I had a hard time with it. For some reason I couldn't get into the writing style. I constantly found my mind wandering and having to go back and re-read portions. The last several parenting books that I have read have been very readable so I found this hard to reconcile. For the most part I felt like the "love languages" were well explained but in the later chapters when examples I am really torn over what I thought of this book. While I like the concepts and I think it had valuable information I had a hard time with it. For some reason I couldn't get into the writing style. I constantly found my mind wandering and having to go back and re-read portions. The last several parenting books that I have read have been very readable so I found this hard to reconcile. For the most part I felt like the "love languages" were well explained but in the later chapters when examples are given of putting it into action the authors would say things like: speak their love language and then introduce the discipline and then speak their love language to end the conversation. The problem I have with this is what if their love language is "gifts" or "acts of service"? You give them a gift discipline them and then give them another gift? Sew a button on their shirt discipline them and then help them clean their room? It didn't make sense to me. My other big hang up was that the book began by saying that it's hard to determine the love language of children 5 and under. My oldest is 5. I didn't feel like this book applied to my family. Most of the examples sounded like conversations with teenagers, and yet their is another book titled "The Five Love Languages of Teenagers". I feel like I would have gotten more out of reading the book about couples and then applying some of what I read to the rest of my family. All of this being said I still put the book on CD on hold at the library for my brother because I think it would be beneficial for him with his 9 and 11 year-old (and possibly the 7 year old too). It did bring a few tears to my eyes when I thought back to my childhood and realized why I never really felt loved by my parents because they have never spoken my love language to me. I KNOW that they love me and reading this helped me forgive them for some lingering feelings I have. After all they have no idea why I would not feel loved, they did their best. This is getting really long. I could say more but I think you get the general idea. Valuable information, didn't love the writing.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Rock Rockwell

    Now that you know my love language, will you use it against me? Seriously, compartamentalizing love into five expressions is a bit limited. To some it may help to understand why those "special" people don't meet our expectations, and how to accept their love expression (even though it may not mean much to my love language receptor). I was one of the unusual ones that couldn't figure out my love language... sort of like those personality/gift tests (dinc) that put me in the "I don't know" range. Now that you know my love language, will you use it against me? Seriously, compartamentalizing love into five expressions is a bit limited. To some it may help to understand why those "special" people don't meet our expectations, and how to accept their love expression (even though it may not mean much to my love language receptor). I was one of the unusual ones that couldn't figure out my love language... sort of like those personality/gift tests (dinc) that put me in the "I don't know" range. Just think how frustrated my wife must be?!? Maybe there are 5 more love languages out there we have not discovered yet...

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    There are some real problems with this book. I finished it, because there were a few helpful nuggets I could take away, but in general, I have some serious objections. First, maybe I live under a rock, but it's not immediately apparent from the front cover, back blurb, or early chapters that this book has religious undertones. Religious nonfiction is great for some people and has an important place, but, as I've said with novels that try to sneak a message in in the last quarter, be upfront about There are some real problems with this book. I finished it, because there were a few helpful nuggets I could take away, but in general, I have some serious objections. First, maybe I live under a rock, but it's not immediately apparent from the front cover, back blurb, or early chapters that this book has religious undertones. Religious nonfiction is great for some people and has an important place, but, as I've said with novels that try to sneak a message in in the last quarter, be upfront about it. No mention of religion in the first four chapters, then one mention in chapter five, and three in chapter seven strikes me as dishonest. Second, like many self-help books, this presents a one-perfect-solution sell. If we only love our children hard enough, problems will miraculously vanish. The "scenarios" presented are patently ridiculous: children are instantly repentant and apparently change their ways when presented with loving correction. Third, the book fails to mention that there might be something actually wrong with your child. Every parenting book should include, regularly throughout the book, that if your child doesn't respond within a few weeks, that you should request a referral or further medical observation. For example: "The mishandling of anger is related to every present and future problem your child may have-- from poor grades to damaged relationships to possible suicide... Most of life's problems will be averted and your child will be more able to use anger to his advantage, rather than have it work against him" (p. 160). It is my uneducated opinion as his parent that my child's problems are almost exclusively related to his anxiety, his ADHD, his hearing deficiency, and his vision problems. All of these affect his schooling to a much greater degree. If this book is to be of any value, it would be to first-time parents of very young children who are expected to be neurotypical.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Molly

    I appreciate the aims of this book. My biggest worry as a parent--or rather, ONE of my many biggest--is that my daughter will not feel sufficiently loved/appreciated/proud of/etc. Love was a complicated and fraught thing in my home growing up, which has led me to be overly-concerned and ready to consume the books offered at the library in hopes of not missing out. This is another one of those books that could have been covered in a nice article rather than a lengthy book and the elaborations seem I appreciate the aims of this book. My biggest worry as a parent--or rather, ONE of my many biggest--is that my daughter will not feel sufficiently loved/appreciated/proud of/etc. Love was a complicated and fraught thing in my home growing up, which has led me to be overly-concerned and ready to consume the books offered at the library in hopes of not missing out. This is another one of those books that could have been covered in a nice article rather than a lengthy book and the elaborations seemed to treat the reader as if no interpretation abilities were present. I think this will help most in conflict, which is perhaps the best place it can be used--a reminder of what my kids might need more of at a particular time and how I might offer it to her. She needs to feel loved and unconditionally and on all levels. The implications of knowing a person's love language could be deep manipulation, which is a bit unfortunate. Fortunately, I think my partnership would never resort to that, which I hope will carry over to my daughter and any future littles. I appreciate the pointing out of how one must have a solid partnership and other good adult relationships in order to model and pass on good feelings and behavior. And I think it's important to process anger and upset situations wisely. But I find the pigeonholing a bit silly.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Hilary

    This was a joint read, so we could read and discuss our parenting tactics, but it became much more than that. We'd worked through The Five Love Languages before and I remember being blown away by that, not expecting the same thing here - and for a very different reason. Our experimental test subject (first child) is still a toddler, under the key age for this book; the specific tactics aren't really applicable for under 4s, and you probably want to implement them before the teenage years begin ( This was a joint read, so we could read and discuss our parenting tactics, but it became much more than that. We'd worked through The Five Love Languages before and I remember being blown away by that, not expecting the same thing here - and for a very different reason. Our experimental test subject (first child) is still a toddler, under the key age for this book; the specific tactics aren't really applicable for under 4s, and you probably want to implement them before the teenage years begin (for everyone's sanity), so instead of plotting evil loving parental strategy we found ourselves mulling over our own childhoods and seeing them in an entirely new light. You could almost use this as a pre-counseling book, if needed. Although nominally a Christian book you won't find it out of place anywhere - this is a parenting book, first and foremost. Anything else is by-the-by. I dinged a star because it was too repetitive in some places, but then I suspect it was also designed to allow people to just read one chapter here or there and still make sense of it. Highly recommended to anyone who has children or plans to.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Tiffany

    My oldest child is much like me, but my second felt so different! But for the first time I'm understanding him, and this book may be the difference between a close relationship with him during these formative years, and a distant one. This is the best parenting book I've read. In a nutshell: everyone shows love and desires love in return, but we do it in different ways. Those "ways" are called languages, and are condensed into five types. Receiving love in YOUR language fills your love tank. Kids My oldest child is much like me, but my second felt so different! But for the first time I'm understanding him, and this book may be the difference between a close relationship with him during these formative years, and a distant one. This is the best parenting book I've read. In a nutshell: everyone shows love and desires love in return, but we do it in different ways. Those "ways" are called languages, and are condensed into five types. Receiving love in YOUR language fills your love tank. Kids whose love tanks are full learn better, are disciplined more easily, and manage anger more appropriately. A great analogy for the whole thing: Someone can be screaming as loud as possible in Chinese, but if you don't speak Chinese, you're not going to understand them.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jacki

    This was fine. I'm super familiar with the love languages, so I don't really know what I thought would be different about this book. It was literally the exact same thing, just with examples pertaining to kids and then some thoughts later about how these apply to learning and discipline and so on. It did say that in kids under 5, it is impossible to tell what their love language is, so in some ways major parts of the book didn't apply to me yet since my kids are 3 & 5. It was good food for thoug This was fine. I'm super familiar with the love languages, so I don't really know what I thought would be different about this book. It was literally the exact same thing, just with examples pertaining to kids and then some thoughts later about how these apply to learning and discipline and so on. It did say that in kids under 5, it is impossible to tell what their love language is, so in some ways major parts of the book didn't apply to me yet since my kids are 3 & 5. It was good food for thought but nothing that will revolutionize my parenting or anything.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Tammy

    3.5 Stars This had a lot of good information and helped me to see what my children's love languages are, but I think it could have been half the length. I felt like they added extra chapters at the end, especially the one for single parents and the children of divorce horror stories, just to fill up the pages. Popsugar Challenge 2020 - A book with a made-up language

  17. 5 out of 5

    Connie Kuntz

    I enjoyed this, not just because it gives me ideas about how to better communicate with my children, but also because it sheds insight about how to better communicate with my spouse, co-workers, and friends. However, because this book is about the love languages of children, I will try to write about only that. This book is about exploring how your children (or spouse or co-worker or friend or what-have-you) communicates and how best to match your appreciation of that person to that person's pref I enjoyed this, not just because it gives me ideas about how to better communicate with my children, but also because it sheds insight about how to better communicate with my spouse, co-workers, and friends. However, because this book is about the love languages of children, I will try to write about only that. This book is about exploring how your children (or spouse or co-worker or friend or what-have-you) communicates and how best to match your appreciation of that person to that person's preferred love language. According to this book, there are five love languages, that is to say, expressions of love. Here they are: (1) gifts (giving a person a present), (2) service (doing something/a chore for a person), (3) private time (spending time with that person), (4) affirmations (expressing verbal appreciation), (5) physical touch (snuggling, hugging, kissing, etc.). Chapman mentions that a child is usually five or older before it is clear what his or her preference is. I asked my own children (ages 5-10) what their preferences are and none of them knew that they had a singular, specific preference, except for Angelo. Angelo would like more presents. :) Now that I've completed the book, I'll think about the love language needs in more detail. I know that I like all five, but if I could only have one, it would be (4) affirmations. I love to chat, yak, talk, discuss, meet, bounce ideas, brainstorm, argue, explain, listen, detail, and decompress which is a lengthy way of me saying, I like to talk about being a hooman. :) So, yes, this book has inspired me. It is fun to think about ways to improve communication. And since I'm here, I might as well say that sometimes I do think adults over-complicate language and make things intentionally difficult, but I never feel this way about children. At what age to we stop being clear about our needs? And why? The Five Love Languages of Children was nice to have a reminder that I can express love for my children and it not be interpreted as anything but love. Signed, Tell don't Show

  18. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    The authors expound on their theory that there are five different ways that people express and experience love: physical touch, words of affirmation, quality time, gifts and acts of service. By the time kids are five or so, they say, the kids have started to have a preference (before then children just need love in all the languages all the time). Knowing your child's love language can help you to be sure that they know that you love them, which leads to all kinds of good things they'd like to t The authors expound on their theory that there are five different ways that people express and experience love: physical touch, words of affirmation, quality time, gifts and acts of service. By the time kids are five or so, they say, the kids have started to have a preference (before then children just need love in all the languages all the time). Knowing your child's love language can help you to be sure that they know that you love them, which leads to all kinds of good things they'd like to tell you more about. For example, if a parent expresses love by acts of service, but the child experiences love through physical touch, then they may feel unloved even while the parent bends over backward for them. Similarly, if they experience love through words of affirmation, but a parent disciplines by yelling, the child may not get the message "You made a bad choice" but may instead hear "I don't love you." The book is mildly, though overtly, Christian. Non-Christians will probably roll their eyes occasionally, though I still think that the basic message of the five love languages and how to discover and use them will ring true and be useful. I think this is actually one of the more useful parenting books I've read, and recommend it quite highly.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    I listened to this book as an audiobook and I couldn't get enough of it, I was so into almost everything Chapman had to say. I truly believe that I am loving my children fully but this book gave me some ideas on how certain love languages speak to each of them differently. After hearing it, I know that it is true, and I just didn't know why before. Most people probably read this when their kids are younger, I never had, but I think that heading into the teen years, when the kids are changing and I listened to this book as an audiobook and I couldn't get enough of it, I was so into almost everything Chapman had to say. I truly believe that I am loving my children fully but this book gave me some ideas on how certain love languages speak to each of them differently. After hearing it, I know that it is true, and I just didn't know why before. Most people probably read this when their kids are younger, I never had, but I think that heading into the teen years, when the kids are changing and growing and developing into their own little adults, this was a great time for me to read it. I feel better prepared to keep their love tanks full. The end of the book had a chapter on the importance of love languages in a marriage, so I should probably seek out that book next ;)

  20. 4 out of 5

    Oceana

    An informative read, but mostly directed towards parents. Still got some good nuggets of advice from it though.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Aaron

    If you are already familiar with the 5 Love Languages Concept, the format and content of this book will be familiar to you. The difference here is that this book is written for parents to better understand how their children best feel loved. Although the Love Languages books have been out for some time now, I only became acquainted with it myself a few months ago. I had been hearing about the book for many years and was finally compelled to take the test myself online to discover my own love lang If you are already familiar with the 5 Love Languages Concept, the format and content of this book will be familiar to you. The difference here is that this book is written for parents to better understand how their children best feel loved. Although the Love Languages books have been out for some time now, I only became acquainted with it myself a few months ago. I had been hearing about the book for many years and was finally compelled to take the test myself online to discover my own love language. I can't say that it changed my life much but I did find it interesting. This edition however, written with children in mind, shows more promise because it helps us to discover how to better express our love to those who are the most important to us outside of our spouse. Although most of the book will not be new to those already familiar with the concepts, the chapter on discovering your child's primary love language was very useful. It not only includes helpful ideas on what to look out for, but also suggestions for different age groups. The book also includes useful chapters for single parents and on using love languages in marriage. Most of the time I found myself agreeing with the authors on how to appropriately use the knowledge of love languages. However, I did disagree with them in a couple areas. Primarily in their assertion that when a child misbehaves it is because he/she does not feel loved. While this certainly may be the case, disobedience is rebellion... which is sin. The root of rebellion is not a lack of feeling loved but an overindulgence in the self. This is not to say that we don't lovingly discipline. Our discipline must always be characterized by love. However, we must be very careful to not confuse sin with anything. Regarding this, Chapman & Campbell rightfully point out that our discipline and guidance will be more effective when a child knows they are loved. Overall I really enjoyed this book and believe that it can be a helpful resource in the parental toolbox. Used with an understanding of the human condition that leads to rebellion, this can be a wonderful way to build trust and assurance between you and your children so that when discipline does take place, the child is assured that it is for their well-being. Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Moody Publishing in exchange for an online review. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

  22. 5 out of 5

    Mary-Anne Swift

    "The wonderful thing about human relationships is that they are not static. The potential for making them better is always present." This book was wonderful! I thought it was the most helpful "parenting" book I've read yet. While a few of the examples were really extreme, most of them were great. It was so informative and eye-opening to me to read about the 5 love languages with my children in mind. It was also a great refresher for me since I read the original 5 Love Languages book back in colle "The wonderful thing about human relationships is that they are not static. The potential for making them better is always present." This book was wonderful! I thought it was the most helpful "parenting" book I've read yet. While a few of the examples were really extreme, most of them were great. It was so informative and eye-opening to me to read about the 5 love languages with my children in mind. It was also a great refresher for me since I read the original 5 Love Languages book back in college. I'd recommend this book to all parents with children of any age, and grandparents too! I'm glad I read it. I want my husband to read it too. Now just to apply what I've learned...

  23. 5 out of 5

    Emily Schmader

    I loved this book. Not just for its basic information about love languages in children, but also for its reminders to me as a mother about what my kids need from me. Of course I know they need love and diligent training, but it’s always refreshing to hear it again! Keep going! Keep training! In the marathon of parenting, I’ll be using this book as a “water break” for years to come!

  24. 4 out of 5

    drowningmermaid

    10%-- Erk. Pretty smarmy. Not sure I'm going to be enlightened beyond the title, which is-- use the five love languages on your kids. 100%-- Well, it's pretty much exactly what the title says. It's formulaic but a good reminder to seek out the way important people in your life like to be loved. Finished in one day.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jessica B.

    This books casts a beautiful vision for raising children and making family relationships a little better. In other words, this book is about making society a little better ❤️😭❤️😭❤️😭❤️

  26. 4 out of 5

    James

    In the Evangelical tribe I grew up in, The Five Love Languages by Gary Chapman provided the idiom to talk about how each us receive and give love. Because of our unique personalities and family of origin, we each have modes of expressing love which is particularly meaningful to us. For some it words of affirmation. Others feel particularly loved when you spend quality time with them. Giving and receiving gifts is another ‘love language.’ Others feel loved through physical touch or acts of servic In the Evangelical tribe I grew up in, The Five Love Languages by Gary Chapman provided the idiom to talk about how each us receive and give love. Because of our unique personalities and family of origin, we each have modes of expressing love which is particularly meaningful to us. For some it words of affirmation. Others feel particularly loved when you spend quality time with them. Giving and receiving gifts is another ‘love language.’ Others feel loved through physical touch or acts of service. My love language is gift giving (so keep them coming ;P ). Chapman’s original book has helped countless people understand their own love needs and how to best express love to their mates (and other loved ones) whose ‘love language is often different from their own. I don't typically read ‘spin-off’ books. The fact that there is a Love Language book for singles, men, children, teenagers etc, seems a little too much like “Chicken Soup for the Cat-Lover’s Soul.” It is more of a marketing ploy than something you expect to say something new. But then I am the father of three very different children and thought that The 5 Love Languages of Children would provide me with some insights on how to love my children well. I was pleasantly surprised by what I read inside. This is a great book. While Gary Chapman and his co-author, Ross Campbell, M.D., say that it is impossible to identify a primary love language for kids under the age of five, and warns that love languages can change at various stages, I gained some appreciation for the uniqueness of my three year old needs and some understanding of my five year old. My two-year-old son is still a mystery. Chapman and Campbell devote the first half of this book to describing the five love languages and how to recognize them in your children. In the last half of the book they describe how to discipline children, foster learning and help children manage their anger by responding to them in ways which ‘fill their love language’ when we give direction or correction. They also discuss some of the unique challenges of responding to a child’s love language for single-parent families and how modelling love languages in marriage helps your children. This is a quick read with a lot of insight. Every involved parent loves their children (hopefully!); however not every child feels their parent’s love. This book helps parents understand their children and offers sage advice on how to nurture them in love. My oldest daughter seems to have a primary love language of Quality Time and loves it when you spend time with her. My almost four year old, I would guess has a preference for acts of service. She loves it when you do things for her in a way that her independent older sister never did. This helps me respond with greater patience when she has me help her with something she is quite capable of. And of course Chapman and Campbell also encourage parents to nurture your children to express each of the love languages to others. But the most important chapters for me would be the chapters on discipline, learning and managing anger. My kids are unique with different personalities and I have learned that what works with one kid will not work with the others. Certainly there is a lot I still need to discover about my children but like the original Love Languages book, this gives me some words to talk about it. I recommend this book to parents. It may be a spin-off but it delievers the goods. I give this book four stars. : ★★★★☆ Thank you to Moody Publishers for providing me a copy of this book in exchange for this fair and honest review.

  27. 4 out of 5

    midnightfaerie

    The five love languages has had much acclaim for the use in parenting children as well in the aiding of marriages. I found the book slightly interesting, mildly helpful, and downright obvious in spots. While understanding the different love languages a person can have: Acts of Service, Words of Affirmation, Receiving Gifts, Quality Time, and Physical Touch, can move you worlds closer to getting along with someone, it doesn't necessarily always bridge the gap of personality comprehension. For chi The five love languages has had much acclaim for the use in parenting children as well in the aiding of marriages. I found the book slightly interesting, mildly helpful, and downright obvious in spots. While understanding the different love languages a person can have: Acts of Service, Words of Affirmation, Receiving Gifts, Quality Time, and Physical Touch, can move you worlds closer to getting along with someone, it doesn't necessarily always bridge the gap of personality comprehension. For children, I believe the language that each child responds to, is constantly changing and almost always not one of these languages but a combination of them. This makes it difficult to know and administer to. While making relationships better is never an easy undertaking, once you understand a love language, you would think it might simplify things. This isn't always so, either. Just because my husband knows my love language is Acts of Service, doesn't necessarily mean he's any more willing to do the dishes or clean up after himself. Now there's a book I can get behind, getting you husband and children to clean up after themselves. I'm not saying this book has no merit. By far it has some great ideas and ways of getting to the heart of relating to your children, and it can't possibly hurt or hinder your relationship with your children. Especially for those that have never considered that there are other ways to show your love for your children than what you're used to, it can give great insight into alternative methods for doing so. For someone like me, who is constantly analyzing my relationships with my family and how to make them better, it isn't altogether a new topic. At the very least, it's a good solid foundation of principles for those looking to gain a deeper connection with their children. ClassicsDefined.com

  28. 4 out of 5

    Yvonne

    If you enjoy being guilt tripped over not doing enough as a mother than this is the book for you! The answer to every problem is to love your children more. Give up more of your free time and responsibilities and simply love your children. All your problems will disappear! If you have a job, as a mother, or are a father than travels (because women don't travel for work), then you are certain to create children who deal drugs. So, give up that day job and start loving your children today! (That i If you enjoy being guilt tripped over not doing enough as a mother than this is the book for you! The answer to every problem is to love your children more. Give up more of your free time and responsibilities and simply love your children. All your problems will disappear! If you have a job, as a mother, or are a father than travels (because women don't travel for work), then you are certain to create children who deal drugs. So, give up that day job and start loving your children today! (That is literally in the introduction). Needless to say, this isn't the book for me. And if that description appeals to you, please consider looking into the book Boundaries with Children by Henry Cloud. You will honestly get much better results from it.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Danica

    **Update 10/19** - Still love the concepts in this book. Just finished listening to it. Applied what I re-learned to a child I’ve had a hard time lately and the change in our home!! Feeling grateful for this. I wish I had read this book a lot sooner in my parenting journey. Perhaps it's because I am lacking in so many ways as a mom, but I had so many light bulbs going off while reading this gem. Like always, I will take some advice and leave some advice, but what I will "leave" will be little! I' **Update 10/19** - Still love the concepts in this book. Just finished listening to it. Applied what I re-learned to a child I’ve had a hard time lately and the change in our home!! Feeling grateful for this. I wish I had read this book a lot sooner in my parenting journey. Perhaps it's because I am lacking in so many ways as a mom, but I had so many light bulbs going off while reading this gem. Like always, I will take some advice and leave some advice, but what I will "leave" will be little! I'm already noticing a big difference in my relationship with Carson as I've made a strong effort to use all the love languages with him (I was leaving some out entirely). I loved it.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Reem Hajjar

    children is a gift from god.. this book will teach you how to know your children needs. every child or every person has a different way of feeling love. get to know your child love language. we have to use all the languages with our children but focus on the one they feel loved through. my kareem feels it from quality time. but tooti through physical touch. to be honest this book will change your behavior. we need to discipline our children but with LOVE. LOVE your children and stop abusing them s children is a gift from god.. this book will teach you how to know your children needs. every child or every person has a different way of feeling love. get to know your child love language. we have to use all the languages with our children but focus on the one they feel loved through. my kareem feels it from quality time. but tooti through physical touch. to be honest this book will change your behavior. we need to discipline our children but with LOVE. LOVE your children and stop abusing them stop ABUSING them.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.