hits counter Christians Get Depressed Too: Hope and Help for Depressed People - Ebook PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Christians Get Depressed Too: Hope and Help for Depressed People

Availability: Ready to download

Many Christians mistakenly believe that true Christians don t get depressed, and this misconception heaps additional pain and guilt onto Christians who are suffering from mental and emotional distress. Author David P. Murray comes to the defense of depressed Christians, asserting that Christians do get depressed! He explains why and how Christians should study depression, Many Christians mistakenly believe that true Christians don t get depressed, and this misconception heaps additional pain and guilt onto Christians who are suffering from mental and emotional distress. Author David P. Murray comes to the defense of depressed Christians, asserting that Christians do get depressed! He explains why and how Christians should study depression, what depression is, and the approaches caregivers, pastors, and churches can take to help those who are suffering from it. With clarity and wise biblical insight, Dr. Murray offers help and hope to those suffering from depression, the family members and friends who care for them, and pastors ministering to these wounded members of their flock.


Compare

Many Christians mistakenly believe that true Christians don t get depressed, and this misconception heaps additional pain and guilt onto Christians who are suffering from mental and emotional distress. Author David P. Murray comes to the defense of depressed Christians, asserting that Christians do get depressed! He explains why and how Christians should study depression, Many Christians mistakenly believe that true Christians don t get depressed, and this misconception heaps additional pain and guilt onto Christians who are suffering from mental and emotional distress. Author David P. Murray comes to the defense of depressed Christians, asserting that Christians do get depressed! He explains why and how Christians should study depression, what depression is, and the approaches caregivers, pastors, and churches can take to help those who are suffering from it. With clarity and wise biblical insight, Dr. Murray offers help and hope to those suffering from depression, the family members and friends who care for them, and pastors ministering to these wounded members of their flock.

30 review for Christians Get Depressed Too: Hope and Help for Depressed People

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jeanie

    With less than 125 pages, this packs a punch. Every Christian should read, whether you suffer from depression or not. It is something that can be hard to understand because it is so complex. The table of contents are as follows; The Crisis, The Complexity, The Condition, The Causes, The Cures, The Caregivers. He also has an Appendix on the sufficienty of scripture, salvation, sanctification and Spectacles. Their are 3 extreme positions in the cause of depression, one is all physical, all spiritu With less than 125 pages, this packs a punch. Every Christian should read, whether you suffer from depression or not. It is something that can be hard to understand because it is so complex. The table of contents are as follows; The Crisis, The Complexity, The Condition, The Causes, The Cures, The Caregivers. He also has an Appendix on the sufficienty of scripture, salvation, sanctification and Spectacles. Their are 3 extreme positions in the cause of depression, one is all physical, all spiritual or all mental. The book describes the danger of such an outlook and goes into each one and how they affect the other. Because of depression, false thought patterns often occur and can cause even a deeper darkness that sometimes calls for medication. A balanced solution is the key to recovery, along with patience, a williness to recover, and to understand God loves you and uses depression in your life to reveal himself.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Greg Wilson

    Is it a sin problem or a sinus problem? I have noticed that when I am sick, so is the Holy Spirit. The fruit of the Spirit seems to spoil when I don’t feel well. I am not saying that it’s ok to sin because I don’t feel well. Sin is not ever justified. Sin is always a choice. However, we are complicated creatures. The physical, emotional and spiritual are intertwined. Sometimes there are physical reasons I don’t feel spiritual. Sometimes there are emotional reasons I don’t “feel” good. And someti Is it a sin problem or a sinus problem? I have noticed that when I am sick, so is the Holy Spirit. The fruit of the Spirit seems to spoil when I don’t feel well. I am not saying that it’s ok to sin because I don’t feel well. Sin is not ever justified. Sin is always a choice. However, we are complicated creatures. The physical, emotional and spiritual are intertwined. Sometimes there are physical reasons I don’t feel spiritual. Sometimes there are emotional reasons I don’t “feel” good. And sometimes there are spiritual reasons why my emotions are off. How does this play into depression? This is the theme of David Murray’s small book Christians Get Depressed Too. Murray is Professor of Old Testament and Practical Theology at Puritan Reformed Theological Seminary in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Although he is a professional theologian, he writes with a pastor’s heart. Anybody who has ever struggled with depression or has cared for someone who has been depressed should read this book. In six chapters, Murray deals with the crisis, complexity, condition, causes, and cures of depression and concludes with some advice for caregivers. Murray advises balance. He wants to avoid dogmatism. “Unfortunately, Christian preachers and writers have often taken a dogmatic attitude into areas where the Word of God is not dogmatic” (p 11). We should seek humility. There are two extremes when it comes to dealing with depression. One extreme is that the causes are all physical. This leads to medication being the preferred solution. The other extreme is that the causes are all spiritual. Jay Adams, the founder of the Christian counseling movement, popularized this. A more middle of the road approach is best represented by (according to Murray) the CCEF (Christian Counseling and Education Foundation). The fall brought sin and sickness. If other parts of our body can get ill, why can’t our brains? Isn’t it an organ just like our hearts and livers? We take medications all the time to fix chemical imbalances. Sometimes this is necessary for the brain. However, sometimes the problem isn’t chemical, it is spiritual. The challenge is to discern which is which. This book strives to help us ask the right questions. Certainly there are more in depth books on this complicated subject. However, I would recommend this book as a good primer.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Bob Hayton

    Today’s Church has been beset with numerous challenges. Few have been so distressing as the problem of depression. Good people are weighed down with their own depression or perplexed about that of friends and family members. In some sectors of the Church, this is complicated by a stigma associated with depression. Sin ultimately causes depression, it is assumed. And the conclusion follows that good Christians don’t get depressed. To counter these notions about depression, David P. Murray has writ Today’s Church has been beset with numerous challenges. Few have been so distressing as the problem of depression. Good people are weighed down with their own depression or perplexed about that of friends and family members. In some sectors of the Church, this is complicated by a stigma associated with depression. Sin ultimately causes depression, it is assumed. And the conclusion follows that good Christians don’t get depressed. To counter these notions about depression, David P. Murray has written an incredibly helpful book entitled, "Christians Get Depressed Too". Murray, Professor of Old Testament and Practical Theology at Puritan Reformed Theological Seminary, has encountered depression in ministry and personal contexts enough to be both well versed on the topic and sensitive to the need for sound resources. The book he has written is intentionally short: since “depressed people cannot read hundreds of pages.” (pg. xi). It serves as a resource for caregivers as well as a source of hope for the depressed who consciously decide they want to get better. Murray explains what depression is and what it signifies. He counters the approach which assumes as a default that behind most bouts of depression lie hidden sin problems. The picture is much more complex than that, he claims. He exposes the faulty thinking patterns which often contribute to depression, and finds examples of such thinking, and even the depression which results, in the lives of people in Scripture. In defense of the physiological nature of much of depression, Murray appeals to Puritans such as Richard Baxter. On the role of medicine, Murray finds two unhelpful extremes: too much dependence on medicine, and the aversion of any use of it at all. Along these lines, he says: "Treating a depressed person with medication is often no different from giving my eight-year-old daughter one of her many daily injections of insulin for diabetes. I am not merely alleviating symptoms, but addressing the cause–depleted insulin due to dying or dead cells in her pancreas. And if she is lethargic, weepy, or irrational due to low sugar levels, I do not ask her what commandments she has broken or what “issues of meaning and relationship” she has in her life. I pity her, weep for her, and thank God for His gracious provision of medicine for her." (pg. 64-65). This is not to say, Murray merely refers Christians suffering from depression to their local psychiatrist. Rather, he offers an abundance of help from the Scriptures on how to correct thinking patterns and learn to receive even depression as a gift from God’s very hand. He points to a little remembered passage where Scripture says, “God left” Hezekiah, “that he might know all that was in his heart” (2 Chron. 32:31). Murray elaborates: "This is not an objective leaving, but a subjective leaving. God withdrew Himself from Hezekiah’s spiritual feelings so that he lost his sense of God’s presence, protection, and favor… But God had a wise and loving purpose in this…. Sometimes… [God] may wisely, temporarily, and proportionately withdraw the sense of His favor and presence to remind us of our state without Him and to lead us to greater thankfulness and appreciation for Him. He may do this… by lovingly afflicting our brain, disrupting it’s chemistry and electricity, just as He does when He lovingly afflicts one of His dear children with epilepsy, or any other disease." (pg. 65). This small book of 120 or so small-sized pages, will prove an immense help to both caregivers and those suffering from depression. It is a primer on depression and in it, Murray offers a careful list of recommended resources, for those looking to continue their study of this topic. The book’s attractive cover, and handy, almost “pocket” size, make it an ideal book to giveaway to friends dealing with this issue. I’ve already loaned or given out copies of this inexpensive book, and plan on using this as a resource for years to come.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Rose Elliott

    Very helpful resource!!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Brad

    A short and necessary read. For twelve years Murray served as a minister in northwest Scotland, which contains some of the highest rates of depression in the world. He writes, then, not as a dispassionate observer, but as a caring pastor serving hurting people. His pastoral sensibilities and insights certainly emerge in this brief work and provide much of the value for it. Murray's book contributes a helpful (and charitable) counterbalance to those trained in the NANC counseling "method." (But h A short and necessary read. For twelve years Murray served as a minister in northwest Scotland, which contains some of the highest rates of depression in the world. He writes, then, not as a dispassionate observer, but as a caring pastor serving hurting people. His pastoral sensibilities and insights certainly emerge in this brief work and provide much of the value for it. Murray's book contributes a helpful (and charitable) counterbalance to those trained in the NANC counseling "method." (But he is no respecter of counseling schools of thought, for he also takes issue with CCEF on occasion.) The book is addressed to the depressed person as well as to those caring for the depressed. It's far more descriptive than prescriptive, and far more introductory and pastoral-handbook like than exhaustive and definitive. As a good Presbyterian (or a "bad" one), the author engages more with the Westminster Confession and historical theology than he does with the Biblical text. Helpful to be sure, and certainly not neglectful of Scripture, it simply unpacks more of the WCF than it does the sacred text. The result is he may fall victim to his own critique, viz. that much of the counsel and approach to the depressed arises from personal experience rather than medicinal or biblical reality. There are still questions unanswered for me, but as a minister I am thankful for the work Murray has done here and will certainly recommend it to friends and congregants. It will free minsters and congregants from some false-guilt and point us all to the only one who was truly forsaken and abandoned so that we don't have to be.

  6. 4 out of 5

    John Rakshith Prabhakar

    Dr. Murray does a fantastic job in writing the book. He lays out theological principles, practical insights, and offers sound wisdom to those suffering and those who desire to serve those suffering with depression and anxiety. As one who struggles with them both, I have found the book enormously helpful and encouraging. He is an excellent narrator too, and reads at a good pace at 1.5 :)

  7. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    This was one of my new Kindle books. I was hoping for a lot more. Oddly, the first thing I read when I got this book was the appendix. I don't usually read appendices at all, but this one was really good. Mr. Murray wrote a really good article about how Christians should view secular science. He said that we should not take everything we hear, see and read as Gospel truth. Instead, we should be steeped in the knowledge of the Word of God and view everything we see through the lens of Scripture. This was one of my new Kindle books. I was hoping for a lot more. Oddly, the first thing I read when I got this book was the appendix. I don't usually read appendices at all, but this one was really good. Mr. Murray wrote a really good article about how Christians should view secular science. He said that we should not take everything we hear, see and read as Gospel truth. Instead, we should be steeped in the knowledge of the Word of God and view everything we see through the lens of Scripture. How great is that? Then I went back and read the book. In many ways the book was very good. It did a good job of pointing out various characters in the Bible who suffered from depression for various reasons. Mr. Murray had spend many years with depressed people and so he knew what depression was. The down side was that other than observing that Biblical characters were depressed, he almost totally took the non-Christian medical model as the standard for explaining depression. He said over and over again that depression and anxiety should be viewed as a medical condition rather than as a result of sin or of sin itself. He never addressed the fact that the Bible specifically commands us not to be anxious (Mt. 6:25-34; 10:19; 1 Cor. 7:32; Phil 4:8). Even in those situations in the Bible when people are depressed he didn't ever examine the contexts of those cases and see if sin was involved in any way. He just mentioned them and went on to tell Christians that depression is primarily a medical, biological and chemical problem. I don't know what happened to the lens. I always find it interesting, even when reading specifically non-Christian literature on so called mental disorders, how often they are compared to clearly physical diseases. For example, Mr. Murray, on several occasions compared depression with polio, diabetes, and cancer. He said that we should think of depression in the same way we think of those kinds of physical maladies. But then when he went on to talk about how to "treat" depression, he mentioned examining yourself to see where the depression came from, confessing any sin in your life, making restitution where it is needed, and walking with God. But that is not how you treat cancer. You try to find it and kill it. You don't change your behavior to avoid polio, you get a shot. If you were to take a person off the street and give him a simple blood test, you could tell him, when the tests results came in, whether he had diabetes or not. It is testable. You can test for cancer. You can test for polio. With depression where is the test? It is a completely different animal from a disease. Am I saying that depression is not a chemical, biological and physical event in a person's life? Not at all. I know that depression has physical components, but I also know that when you ask the question, "What was going on in your life when the depression first hit you?" and the person always comes up with some stressful event I would look at the event, or the response to the event before I would begin pumping the person full of an anti-depressant. There are aspects to this that are not even about the difference between a Biblical Counselor and non-Christian counselor. This is simple logic. Even after Mr. Murray explained that the problem is first chemical and biological, he goes on to help the depressed person eliminate sinful responses and behaviors from the person's life. He says it is chemical, but then treats it as if it were not chemical. There is one area in all this I tend to agree with Mr. Murray. He said that people are different from one another. I'm with him on that. He also said that different people's bodies react differently to different kinds of stimulation. I'm with him on this too. Some people get ulcers from worry. Some people get heart attacks, when others have strokes, when others get various forms of dementia. People are different, we're all dying, all falling apart in different ways. I'm with him on this. And some people get depressed when others, going through the same life events, don't. I'm there with him too. His conclusion is that therefore depression is unavoidable and just comes on some folks and not on others. On this last point, the jury is out on. There is no proof that anyone gets depressed independently from the things going on around them. And even if there was proof, given the world we live in, it would be the exception, not the rule. This means that even if some people do get depressed apart from anything else going on in their lives, this should not be the first thing we think when we seek to minister to them. It should be in the back of our minds, but not the assumption that Mr. Murray is suggesting. The vast majority of people who come to us for counsel concerning depression are depressed for reasons other than that their body is falling apart. Their bodies are falling apart and maybe even because of the depression, but usually there are things going on with them. These things that are going on with them are usually related to handling the situations of their lives in unwise and sinful ways. They are often angry, bitter, hurt, in grief, or a myriad of other things, all piled up and crushing the person into bitterness. Overall the book was thought provoking, but I disagree with the premises and with Mr. Murray's attempt to apply what he said about viewing non-Christian science through the lens of Scripture. It didn't appear that he read his own appendix before writing his book. I would love to discuss these things with him in person some time.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Mark Barnes

    9/10 (excellent): This brief book is ideal for Christians who want a better understanding of the roles of the spiritual, the physical and the psychological in depression and anxiety. In six short chapters (only 100 small pages in total), Murray guides readers away from extremes, and to a balanced, biblical position that helps sufferers and carers understand depression, its causes, and what can be done to help. I've bought multiple copies, as I know it will be useful to give to many others.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Such a balanced and helpful book for Christians who are either walking through depression or trying to support someone who is. Excellent!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Steve Hemmeke

    Excellent, balanced and short. Murray knows the difference between depression that is physically or chemically caused, and depression that irresponsibly mishandles feelings or difficulties. Sometimes the two are intertwined. Medication can be wrongly prescribed when the cause is spiritual. Rebuke can be wrongly administered when the cause is medical. Murray’s main point in writing is in the title. Christians should not load themselves with false guilt simply for noticing they are depressed. Christ Excellent, balanced and short. Murray knows the difference between depression that is physically or chemically caused, and depression that irresponsibly mishandles feelings or difficulties. Sometimes the two are intertwined. Medication can be wrongly prescribed when the cause is spiritual. Rebuke can be wrongly administered when the cause is medical. Murray’s main point in writing is in the title. Christians should not load themselves with false guilt simply for noticing they are depressed. Christians can and do suffer from all forms of depression. This doesn’t mean it is always a sickness for which they bear no responsibility, but sometimes it is. His main point leads Murray to argue against assuming as a default starting point that depression has a sinful cause. That may be where you wind up, but when the counselor starts his investigation from that viewpoint, it can harm the one suffering. Being diagnosed with depression doesn’t mean God doesn’t love you. One of the best parts of the book is the way Murray applies a Reformed view of God’s sovereignty to depression. God afflicts us with diseases and difficulties for a reason – a holy reason that is for our good, though we cannot see it. The church does not handle afflictions like this well. How do you raise and face deeply personal problems publicly, and live with them for years, when they have no simple solution? The church needs to extend and show much patience and love through this. Murray offers lots of practical help in a short space, for the sufferer and their caregivers both. Highly recommended.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Thad Noyes

    This book takes a balanced look at the physical, psychological, and spiritual components of depression. The writer does not at all deny the possibility of sin as one possible contributing factor to depression. However, those who believe the only explanation for their depression is their own wrong behavior (and are thus trapped in a cycle of guilt and further hopelessness) will be most helped by this book. It is succinct and clear enough to help both those going through depression and those (past This book takes a balanced look at the physical, psychological, and spiritual components of depression. The writer does not at all deny the possibility of sin as one possible contributing factor to depression. However, those who believe the only explanation for their depression is their own wrong behavior (and are thus trapped in a cycle of guilt and further hopelessness) will be most helped by this book. It is succinct and clear enough to help both those going through depression and those (pastors/spouses/friends) who are trying to bring help and counsel to someone going through a difficult time.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Bess

    Depression can be a complicated issue for the Christian to tackle. This book, l felt, simplified the issue. I read it a while back when I had a friend dealing with depression. It is very helpful in that it does not try to convince the reader to take on any particular perspective, yet sticks to the facts while staying Biblical. I highly recommend for anyone, be it for someone who is depressed, has a friend or family member who struggles with it, or even the therapist who deals with depression on Depression can be a complicated issue for the Christian to tackle. This book, l felt, simplified the issue. I read it a while back when I had a friend dealing with depression. It is very helpful in that it does not try to convince the reader to take on any particular perspective, yet sticks to the facts while staying Biblical. I highly recommend for anyone, be it for someone who is depressed, has a friend or family member who struggles with it, or even the therapist who deals with depression on a professional level.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Anthony Alvarado

    A nice short very practical book. One of his key points is that depression is not always or even most of the time related to sin and we should not be so quick to assume so. Yes, it may be but we need to respond to folks dealing with depression more the way we respond to our kids when they're sick or have a broken arm. My son may have busted his arm because of foolishness but that does not give me room to have no compassion on him.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    An intentionally small book on the various aspects and factors of depression. Murray does an excellent job of taking a balanced, yet biblical, approach to the topic. Almost everyone is affected in some way by depression and this book has value for all.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Brian Freytag

    Attempting to correct both errors that depression is always a physical problem and depression is always the direct result of personal sin, Murray hits the mark with this tiny book. Well worth the several hours it takes to consume it.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jesvin Jose

    This is another tremendous book by David Murray. He gives us eight reasons why we must study depression; the attitude with which we must approach this subject; how depression relates to and is reflected in our life situation, thoughts, feelings, bodies and behavior; the causes and cures of depression, and finally a chapter for caregivers to help those who are depressed. Many of these chapters are solidly Biblical and consistently practical. Each chapter uses insights from Scripture and the medic This is another tremendous book by David Murray. He gives us eight reasons why we must study depression; the attitude with which we must approach this subject; how depression relates to and is reflected in our life situation, thoughts, feelings, bodies and behavior; the causes and cures of depression, and finally a chapter for caregivers to help those who are depressed. Many of these chapters are solidly Biblical and consistently practical. Each chapter uses insights from Scripture and the medical world to give hope for the depressed. As Dr. Murray rightly points out, Christians can get depressed too, but there is hope and healing available for those wanting to come out of it. For me, the best chapter in the book was chapter 3 where Dr. Murray identifies ten false thought patterns that contribute to the symptoms of depression. Each of these thought patterns is very well thought out and they show us how they tend to distort the depressed person's view of reality in a false and negative way. In chapter 4, outlining the causes of depression, he rightly shows us that blaming depression always on our personal sin is not just wrong, but harmful as well. But he does admit that we must leave open the possibility that depression may be the result of specific sin or sins. One way to identify if this is the case for a believer is if the depressed person consistently and deliberately is in rebellion against God. Other triggers to depression that he discusses include: stress, psychology, sickness and sovereignty. In chapter 5, he gives four practical steps to heal from depression, each of which is possible by the grace of God for the believer. Overall, this short book is an excellent introductory (and emergency) guide for those struggling with depression (and for those counselling them)! I recommend it!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Allison Anderson Armstrong

    As someone who has never had much experience with depression or dealing with those struggling with depression, I picked up this little (audio) book because I'm noticing a growing trend in the world, among Christians, and even among friends that depression is a real hardship. Murray does an excellent job of explaining to amateurs of the subject some of the basic causes of depression. He maintains a strong middle of the road point of view that it may be caused by spiritual or non-spiritual reasons As someone who has never had much experience with depression or dealing with those struggling with depression, I picked up this little (audio) book because I'm noticing a growing trend in the world, among Christians, and even among friends that depression is a real hardship. Murray does an excellent job of explaining to amateurs of the subject some of the basic causes of depression. He maintains a strong middle of the road point of view that it may be caused by spiritual or non-spiritual reasons. Each case is different and broad generalizations cannot be drawn from just one persons' experience. He encourages the reader to make sure that accusing the depressed of having sin in their lives might cause an already distressed Christian to fall further into anxiety and sorrow. He doesn't rule it out as a possibility, but rather says that it just shouldn't be a starting point when questioning why. I thought this was a really wise point to make. He advocated for the use of medical help and drugs (to help balance chemicals in the brain), but still held that Christians should stay in Scriptures, focus on objective truths, not think too deeply too often, not feel guilty, and a number of other things. He didn't excuse wrong actions on the part of the depressed but sensitively points out to the reader (without depression) the things that a struggling Christian is trying to work through. He draws from Scripture often and reminds us that many heroes of the faith had times of deep sadness and grief in their lives and were not ashamed of it, but brought it to God and laid their case out before Him. (Job, Asaph in Psalm 77, Habakkuk) This is one of those books that I started re-listening to as soon as I finished it just to make sure I gleaned everything I could out of it.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    Summary 1 It is presumptuous to view one's own experience as the norm for everyone else. We must not overreact to one unhelpful extreme by adopting another. We have to fight against making that experience the default starting point. "Never ridicule the nervous and hypochondria cal, their pain is real, though much of the[ malady]lies in the imagination[thought-processes] it is not imaginary. "It is a sad case when our only hope lies in the direction of death. Under the influence of certain disorders Summary 1 It is presumptuous to view one's own experience as the norm for everyone else. We must not overreact to one unhelpful extreme by adopting another. We have to fight against making that experience the default starting point. "Never ridicule the nervous and hypochondria cal, their pain is real, though much of the[ malady]lies in the imagination[thought-processes] it is not imaginary. "It is a sad case when our only hope lies in the direction of death. Under the influence of certain disorders everything will wear a somber aspect, and the heart will dive in to the profoundest deeps of misery." -Charles Spurgeon      20     “Why is light given to him who is in misery, and life to the bitter in soul,      21     who long for death, but it comes not, and dig for it more than for hidden treasures,      22     who rejoice exceedingly and are glad when they find the grave? (Job 3:20-22)      15     so that I would choose strangling and death rather than my bones.      16     I loathe my life; I would not live forever. Leave me alone, for my days are a breath.      17     What is man, that you make so much of him, and that you set your heart on him, (Job 7:15-17) 21 Before I go whence I shall not return, even to the land of darkness and the shadow of death; 22 A land of darkness, as darkness itself; and of the shadow of death, without any order, and where the light is as darkness. (Job 10:20-22) 22 He discovereth deep things out of darkness, and bringeth out to light the shadow of death. (Job 12:22) 2 It is important for Christians in such situations to doubt, question, and even challenge the accuracy of their feelings, as they usually do not reflect the facts. Often damaged spiritual relationships and feelings are not the cause of depression, but the consequence of it. It is vital to avoid extremes and seek balance. 3 We cannot separate our thoughts from our feelings or our feelings from our behavior. What we think affects how we feel. What we think and feel affects our physical health. Our thoughts, feelings, and physical health affect what we do. While we often cannot change the providences we are passing through, we can change the way we think about them. False thinking in ordinary life is transferred into spiritual life. People suffering form depression tend to take their emotions as truth. They let their feelings determine the facts. Reverse false thinking patterns over time. However strange it may seem to you, God wants you to go through this depression- so look at it positively, not negatively. What does he want you to learn from it? What can you gain from going through it? 4 While we have little if any control over life events, we do have substantial control over our lifestyle. Use the psalms as your prayers. God withdrew himself from Hezekiah's spiritual feelings so that he lost his sense of God's presence, protection, and favor to test Hezekiah nad to reveal to him what was in his heart when God's presence was withdrawn, to remind Hezekiah of his state without him and to lead him to greater thankfulness and appreciation for Him. We are made up of body, mind, and spirit- interrelated and reactive; realize the place, function, and sphere of each one of these realms. 5 You have no hope of recovery unless you desire it. Restore order and discipline in your life. Relearn how to relax and breathe properly. Consider properly viewing God's world as serious as properly viewing God's word. Challenge falsehoods of excluding the good. Confront the tendency to dwell on and magnify dark distortions of reality. They feel nothing in their body, but all in their mind. Avoid your musings, and exercise not your thoughts too deeply, nor too much. Long meditation is a duty to some, but not to you. You may live in the faith and fear of God, without setting yourself to deep, disturbing thoughts. — Richard Baxter, the cure for melancholy and overmuch sorrow and Accept that depression has caused a general loss of feeling. Persevere in corrections. Question first your life situation, then your feelings about it, then the thought that flow therewith, followed by the analysis, the behavior, reasons. 6 Communicate that you truly understand the problem and the symptoms, and the you are deeply concerned, and the you will do all you can to help- this can have a powerful effect on the sufferer. Pride is one of the least dangerous sins for someone who is downcast. Deeply rooted self-doubt and self-criticism will often emerge and strengthen during prolonged melancholy. Encourage by highlighting God-given abilities, help to the lives of others, and industry in society. Without a proper self-confidence and self-respect, man cannot function properly. To focus on feelings, and thereby base beliefs and conclusions in a profoundly subjective manner tends only to shade the world in darker tones of pitch which is highly flammable. Move away from the subjective and toward the objective. Pill s might get you through this word, but they will not be available in hell, the place of ultimate torment, despair, and gnashing of teeth. However, the motor of the mind may be repaired through the use of physical as well as mental medicine. On the other hand, most of the best poetry of the world would probably not have existed had the poets been on anti-depressants. a There can always be found in the Bible a principle or guideline that can be applied to any given situation. "We will be careful. . . Not to reject or condemn truth wherever it appears. . . If the Lord has willed that we be helped. . . By the work and ministry of the ungodly, let us use this assistance." - John Calvin

  19. 4 out of 5

    Abigail

    I think this book accomplishes its goal of being a starting point for those learning about depression. I don't have it, but I want to know more about it/how I can best provide care and encouragement to those who do. This book was more geared for those who have depression, while only one chapter was written for those who are caring for those with depression, and I kind of wish he'd provided more recommendations for resources for people like me (anyone else have any suggestions?) Also, this book do I think this book accomplishes its goal of being a starting point for those learning about depression. I don't have it, but I want to know more about it/how I can best provide care and encouragement to those who do. This book was more geared for those who have depression, while only one chapter was written for those who are caring for those with depression, and I kind of wish he'd provided more recommendations for resources for people like me (anyone else have any suggestions?) Also, this book does not really lend itself well to audiobook (a lot of Scripture references that aren't read, and lists that are hard to keep track of non-visually). And I kind of felt like David Murray's reading of it had an unnatural cadence... which is sad, given his awesome accent ^_^

  20. 5 out of 5

    Rob Steinbach

    A great little book for anyone experiencing depression. Murray does a great job emphasizing the complexity of depression to a Christian audience who may simplify depression as a result of sin or spiritual failure. He rejects that notion. I especially appreciated chapter 3 on the causes of depression.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jacob London

    This book is a warm, sympathetic, but also forthright treatment of depression. Though Dr. Murray departs from Jay Adames on a few things, over all I felt this short book brought a lot of good and new thoughts to the subject of Christian counselling. Would recommend.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    This was a good, basic, grounded book. It makes both common and biblical sense, and I found it helpful. It is short and clear, and would be something helpful in the midst of dealing with depression or counseling those who are.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Matt Ediger

    On the whole, I found this book helpful. It has some practical ways to apply it as you read it.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Middlestead

    2019 Book Challenge: Christian Living. A nice overview of depression and anxiety with clear points to put into bulleted notes. It did feel at times like anxiety and depression could be healed by following a list of steps, though I do not believe that was the author’s intention.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jacob Young

    Extremely helpful, concise and careful. I appreciate that Murray sees the physical aspects of depression as real maladies that do not inherently have spiritual/sin causes, while also not removing those elements from the picture. My only “critique” would be that Murray does not engage how spiritual opposition/evil can be a factor in depression. If things like “the forgery darts of the evil one” (Eph 6:16) are not factored into our analysis and care for those experiencing depression, we are left w Extremely helpful, concise and careful. I appreciate that Murray sees the physical aspects of depression as real maladies that do not inherently have spiritual/sin causes, while also not removing those elements from the picture. My only “critique” would be that Murray does not engage how spiritual opposition/evil can be a factor in depression. If things like “the forgery darts of the evil one” (Eph 6:16) are not factored into our analysis and care for those experiencing depression, we are left with with a view that does not account for the fallen world around us, and are thus left with ourselves (body, soul, etc.) or God (providence, correction) being the root cause of our experience. Not a reason to dismiss the book since it speaks very helpfully on a topic not often dealt with well in Christian literature, just an area that would have helped strengthen the book.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Josh Morgan

    This review first appeared on my blog, Jacob's Café (jacobscafe.blogspot.com). As a psychologist and Christian with a particular speciality and passion for the integration of spirituality and behavioral health, I was hopeful when I started David Murray's Christians Get Depressed Too. While Murray explicitly admits this is a short text to introduce Christians to some of the facts about depression, he regularly oversimplifies things in a way that probably contributes to on-going stigma and discrimin This review first appeared on my blog, Jacob's Café (jacobscafe.blogspot.com). As a psychologist and Christian with a particular speciality and passion for the integration of spirituality and behavioral health, I was hopeful when I started David Murray's Christians Get Depressed Too. While Murray explicitly admits this is a short text to introduce Christians to some of the facts about depression, he regularly oversimplifies things in a way that probably contributes to on-going stigma and discrimination. He has an excellent intent to reduce such stigma from the Christian community, and the book starts out appropriately combating some common theological myths with regard to depression. However, he also quickly makes other statements that stigmatize and inaccurately represent other diseases (like addiction). He also gets many facts wrong about treatment options, often due to the theme of not acknowledging the complexities of behavioral health, including depression. Further, he makes assumptions about the readers, once even saying, "as Reformed Christians, we..." Not all Christians are Reformed, and not all Reformed Christians would agree with his more extreme theology that falls in line with people like John Piper. As I've noted in other blog posts and reviews, this theology is incredibly damaging. Murray makes several statements along these lines, including stating that if someone is depressed, God made them depressed and wants them depressed. He argues that God working all things for good supports this, which is a warping of this Scripture. Just because God can use something for good doesn't mean he made that something happen. This kind of explanation is what leads people away from Christ. I'm frankly conflicted about this book. For those coming from extreme views, it's probably helpful to validate their beliefs and help them be open to alternative explanations and understandings of the world. But again, Murray actually contributes to on-going stigmatization of the behavioral health community. I don't for a moment believe this is intentional. Especially as he narrated the audiobook, it is easy to hear his heart of compassion and true desire to help others. Therefore, I pray this book will be helpful to those who read/listen to it, but I would not recommend it for most people. Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

  27. 5 out of 5

    Carl Jenkins

    This book was fantastic, and in my opinion a must read for all Christians. Even if you are not someone that suffers from depression, this is a book that will help you better understand those who do, and give you ways to be an aid and support for them. I appreciated Murray considering medication as an actual solution to help handle depression, though he approaches it as something one should be cautious of before jumping into. It was also great to see someone defeat the idea that "depression is cau This book was fantastic, and in my opinion a must read for all Christians. Even if you are not someone that suffers from depression, this is a book that will help you better understand those who do, and give you ways to be an aid and support for them. I appreciated Murray considering medication as an actual solution to help handle depression, though he approaches it as something one should be cautious of before jumping into. It was also great to see someone defeat the idea that "depression is caused by sin and spiritual problems." While that may sometimes be the case, it is anti-Biblical to suggest that it is always, or even primarily the case. That being said, there were a few things I disagreed with Murray on. I disagree that depression could possibly be caused by demon position, and was also unsure how to take his somewhat vaguely written stance on God's sovereignty. At first he seemed to only indicate that God sometimes allows people to suffer depression for a higher purpose, but then seemed to go on to claim that God may sometimes give people clinical depression for a higher purpose, just as he might give someone epilepsy for the same reason. Finally, the appendix on the sufficiency of the scripture had a few ideas I disagree with, but overall I didn't really understand the need for it there. Overall though, I believe this book is still a must read for all Christians. It is a topic that affects many either personally or through friendships, so the topic ends up applying to all.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Molli

    First off, this probably isn't the book for a person with anything worse that a mild depression. This book is perhaps most helpful as a brief, academic sketch of sensitive, Biblical depression counseling for concerned friends, potential caregivers, and counselors. While Murray provides a chapter geared at the potentially depressed person, his solutions are far too generalized and brief to be of significant impact in their own right, though he does pepper his advice with next-step resources and r First off, this probably isn't the book for a person with anything worse that a mild depression. This book is perhaps most helpful as a brief, academic sketch of sensitive, Biblical depression counseling for concerned friends, potential caregivers, and counselors. While Murray provides a chapter geared at the potentially depressed person, his solutions are far too generalized and brief to be of significant impact in their own right, though he does pepper his advice with next-step resources and recommendations for further reading. Murray lays out and counters common assumptions and misconceptions surrounding the depressed Christians, most prominently that "depressed" Christians are either faithless pretenders or plagued by some secret sin since no REAL Christian suffers from depression. Regarding sources and treatment, Murray finds moderate ground between the extremes of too-secular counseling (which ignores or avoids Christian principles and/or the spiritual element completely), too-spiritual counseling (which ignores legitimate biological factors and solutions), and too-medicinal/biological solutions (which rely too heavily on medicinal treatment alone). The bulk of this book seems to be a counter to prominent Christian thinking that tends to err on assumption that depression must be sin-related and self-inflicted which, of course, is not always the case. Overall, the book is a helpful introduction to the subject, though not an exhaustive resource.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Horn

    This book handles depression primarily as a disease for which you need to seek treatment. I see scripture as treating it as sin. This doesn't mean that Christians are never depressed or that it is a horribly egregious sin or that some people's physical bodies incline them more towards it. But depression involves thought patterns the Bible defines as sin. Murray was lost me in the first paragraph where he connects anxiety with depression. Depression may not be directly addressed in the Bible, but This book handles depression primarily as a disease for which you need to seek treatment. I see scripture as treating it as sin. This doesn't mean that Christians are never depressed or that it is a horribly egregious sin or that some people's physical bodies incline them more towards it. But depression involves thought patterns the Bible defines as sin. Murray was lost me in the first paragraph where he connects anxiety with depression. Depression may not be directly addressed in the Bible, but anxiety sure is. Here are some verses that come to mind that he did not really deal with: Psalm 52:5 "Why art thou cast down, O my soul? and why art thou disquieted in me? hope thou in God:for I shall yet praise him for the help of his countenance." Philipeans 4:6-7 "Be anxious for nothing, but in everything by prayer and supplication, with thanksgiving, let your requests be made known to God; and the peace of God, which surpasses all understanding, will guard your hearts and minds through Christ Jesus." Murray probably does provide some helpful advice, but I believe he has a too low view of sin. Depression is one of many sinful thought patterns, and it needs to be brought into conformity to the ways of God.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Laramie Gildon

    Thoroughly enjoyed this read. I'm going to have to look for more books by this author. He's definitely piqued my interest on this topic. His insight is great and balanced. Didn't seem to have an agenda outside of trying to show Christians that depression is a real mental illness that affects not just those struggling with sin but those living in a fallen world. Definitely worth the time.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.