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Guero Davila is a pilot engaged in drug-smuggling for the local cartels. Teresa Mendoza is his girlfriend, a typical narco's morra-- quiet, doting, submissive. But then Guero's caught playing both sides, and in Sinaloa, that means death. Teresa finds herself alone, terrified, friendless and running to save her life, carrying nothing but a gym bag containing a pistol and a Guero Davila is a pilot engaged in drug-smuggling for the local cartels. Teresa Mendoza is his girlfriend, a typical narco's morra-- quiet, doting, submissive. But then Guero's caught playing both sides, and in Sinaloa, that means death. Teresa finds herself alone, terrified, friendless and running to save her life, carrying nothing but a gym bag containing a pistol and a notebook that she has been forbidden to read. Forced to leave Mexico, she flees to the Spanish city of Melilla, where she meets Santiago Fisterra, a Galician involved in trafficking hashish across the Strait of Gibraltar. When Santiago's partner is captured, it is Teresa who steps in to take his place. Now Teresa has plunged into the dark and ugly world that once claimed Guero's life-- and she's about to get in deeper...


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Guero Davila is a pilot engaged in drug-smuggling for the local cartels. Teresa Mendoza is his girlfriend, a typical narco's morra-- quiet, doting, submissive. But then Guero's caught playing both sides, and in Sinaloa, that means death. Teresa finds herself alone, terrified, friendless and running to save her life, carrying nothing but a gym bag containing a pistol and a Guero Davila is a pilot engaged in drug-smuggling for the local cartels. Teresa Mendoza is his girlfriend, a typical narco's morra-- quiet, doting, submissive. But then Guero's caught playing both sides, and in Sinaloa, that means death. Teresa finds herself alone, terrified, friendless and running to save her life, carrying nothing but a gym bag containing a pistol and a notebook that she has been forbidden to read. Forced to leave Mexico, she flees to the Spanish city of Melilla, where she meets Santiago Fisterra, a Galician involved in trafficking hashish across the Strait of Gibraltar. When Santiago's partner is captured, it is Teresa who steps in to take his place. Now Teresa has plunged into the dark and ugly world that once claimed Guero's life-- and she's about to get in deeper...

30 review for The Queen of the South

  1. 5 out of 5

    Mizuki

    Smuggling and double-crossing, were in-se-par-able. "Why should I tell you no, when the answer is yes?" You are still one smart hijo de puta, she thought, and I'm glad. I want you to understand why. All my men had died knowing why. If I can give this book 10 stars, I would gladly do it! One of the best books I'd read in 2011! Outline of the story: Teresa Mendoza was on the run for her life after her boyfriend was caught double-crossing his boss. She ran from Mexico to Spain to Smuggling and double-crossing, were in-se-par-able. "Why should I tell you no, when the answer is yes?" You are still one smart hijo de puta, she thought, and I'm glad. I want you to understand why. All my men had died knowing why. If I can give this book 10 stars, I would gladly do it! One of the best books I'd read in 2011! Outline of the story: Teresa Mendoza was on the run for her life after her boyfriend was caught double-crossing his boss. She ran from Mexico to Spain to start things over, and the hardship she'd endured transformed her from a girl who was more or less dependent on her boyfriend to a much hardened woman. As her fortune and influence on the drug traffic business grew, so was the danger she faced. I know next to nothing about Mexico and the drug trade but I do like how realistic the story and characters feel when I read the book, I also like The Count of Monte Cristo references in the story a lot. As to the ending, I like how the only person who (view spoiler)[remains loyal to the heroine in the end was her bodyguard (hide spoiler)] and how the heroine came to realise she had done running, she'd came back to her hometown to face the Challenge, to overcome what was likely going to kill her An insightful review by Sarah here: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    There are three books to be found within this book, three major storylines to follow. One is mostly well done, one is middling, but has issues, one is rather ridiculous, occasionally mildly offensive, and out of place. The first, which I found mostly well done, is Perez-Reverte's homage to the high adventure stories of the 19th century, specificially his modern update of The Count of Monte Cristo. The Count is remade into a Mexican woman of the 21st century, who is tied to the Mexican drug carte There are three books to be found within this book, three major storylines to follow. One is mostly well done, one is middling, but has issues, one is rather ridiculous, occasionally mildly offensive, and out of place. The first, which I found mostly well done, is Perez-Reverte's homage to the high adventure stories of the 19th century, specificially his modern update of The Count of Monte Cristo. The Count is remade into a Mexican woman of the 21st century, who is tied to the Mexican drug cartels through her drug running pilot boyfriend. She is set on the run for a crime she did not commit, and runs off to Spain, and we watch the relative naif follow the torturous path of Dantes, a path that is perhaps even more painful than his. It is a clever idea to cast the Count as a woman- it adds to the tale many obstacles and possibilities of obstacles that Edmund Dantes never had to face, and it complicates the progression of our main character to the triumphant protaganist that we all know is coming from the layout of the plot. I found the adventure story aspect of the novel all excellently done- there are several high speed boat chases that have the pages turning at a velocity to match the engines of the boats, there are unexpected shoot outs, there are moments with only one way out, gambles that hold the fate the characters in the palm of their hand to heart pounding effect. Perez-Reverte has always been able to swashbuckle his way into my affections, and this piece was no exception. However. And this is a rather annoying however- I do wish that he hadn't felt the need to constantly shove in our faces the fact that this was a version of The Count of Monte Cristo. He had characters refer to each other as their counterparts in the book. Really? You couldn't trust us to figure that one out, Arturo? Come on, man. I promise you, we're smart enough for that. The book becomes a major motif, and a jumping off point for the characters to make fun of each other for how much they are into it and how delusional that is. It was just a little too self-involved for me. It reads more like fan-fiction sometimes. It's lovely to see how giddy he is about Dumas' tale, and its life changing powers, but I wish he would just let us see it for ourselves rather than constantly insisting upon the truth of it and insisting that his characters enact his own fascination with it. It feels artificial, and sometimes a bit insulting. We get it. I promise. The second story contained within the book (and I should probably say that there are spoilers from here on out) is the story of the transformation of a woman. Teresa begins the book a girl totally dependent upon the whims of others- especially her "narco," boyfriend, Guero. She sits at home and waits for him, takes care of him, puts him first in every way. She doesn't know much about his business, and she doesn't ask. When she is forced to go on the run after Guero is killed by his bosses for committing several indiscretions, she has to slowly learn how to become independent. Perez-Reverte is truly fascinated by the thought of a truly independent woman, you can tell. I've said time and again that he has a dark lady obsession- this book is entirely about that, in fact (though at least we get to see the world from her perspective, and see why she is mysterious), but I think this is really what the obsession is. He worships the very idea of it, though he doesn't seem to quite believe that it can be true, or that women can completely seperate from what he clearly believes are their natural womanly urges, which turned out to be a problem. While she was learning to rely on herself, use her natural gifts (she's gifted with a head for numbers, for instance) and her intelligence and rely on and trust no one, Perez-Reverte feels the need to frame it in terms of gender. By the end of the novel, she has assumed the role of her narco boyfriend in her relationship with everyone she knows, and coldly addresses her business partner (who is in love with her) as a "nagging wife," who believes "her husband works too much and neglects her." He also has problems writing believably inside the head of a woman, sometimes laughably so. He frequently has Teresa feel things, "in her womb," when he wants to emphasize that it is a real feeling. No, for reals. 'Cause apparently that's what all we women are, one big vibrating womb. However, that all said, I did like the attempt at rendering a woman who truly does not need anyone, and even when betrayed by people she trusts, does not descend into a weeping mess, but handles the situation. She gets herself out of the last, tense corners of the novel without one single man left to help her in any way. I really, really appreciated that. So, if the development was uneven and somewhat unbelievable, I at least was with him on his goal, and the last 100 pages of her development. The third thing going on here, that was absolutely ridiculous, is Perez-Reverte's various personal opinions and feelings being put on display. I found it rather embarrassing, pedantic, and offensive, by turns. First of all, let's just note that there's a lot of weird attitudes towards ethnicity in this book. Yes, part of it is that he's writing about a world where people aren't exactly PC, but some of it comes from the omniscient narrator point of view (part of the story is told by a journalist trying to write a book about Teresa, part is told from her point of view). There's a really weird, somewhat twisted relationship with Mexico in the book. Perez-Reverte seems to be arguing for the fact that Spaniards shouldn't find their culture "superior" to Mexico in any way because Spain has just as many problems (which I didn't even know was a comparison that happened but okay). And yet, at the same time, he seems to be weirdly fetishizing, in a conflicted 19th century colonialist way, the Mexican ethnicity. At many points during the book characters tell Teresa that she looks best with her hair pulled back tightly and parted down the middle, "in the style of a Mexican peasant." Everyone who sees her is five times more attracted to her when she presents herself in as "Mayan" or "Indian" a way as possible (those are the descriptors used). And yet, she ends up being dressed up makeover style in a modern, more discreet European way. Everyone, including Teresa, looks down on the "garish" way that Mexican drug cartel people dress and live... and yet. The other Mexican character who is held up as an example refuses to let go of his "garish" ways, and listens to his "corridos" (songs about drug cartels) loudly and often. They are quoted frequently throughout the novel, seemingly as examples of poetry. It's this weird mixture of idealization and looking down his nose that I can't quite figure out. It just popped up uncomfortably often and I didn't quite get why that was there. Anyway, this has likely gone on for long enough, but the point is- its a lovely adventure novel, and a good "coming of age," tale in its way, but not without a good deal of complication. This is my least favorite of his books, though it is still not bad or anything. Just not representative of what he is capable of. Perez-Reverte tends to do better with historical settings, or characters who look back towards the past. This looks back... but still in a modern setting. And his way of looking at the world, well, it's just sometimes a little jarringly old fashioned for the modern world.

  3. 5 out of 5

    will

    I'm on holiday - hurrah! This means it is time to turn my attention to the (very important) task of learning Spanish. I made two "New Year's Resolutions". One was to learn some Spanish before the year was out, the other was to keep a running list of the books I have read on this here blog. So, time to work on one of my resolutions. Instead of learning Spanish I have been reading! The Queen of the South by Arturo Perez-Reverte is the latest book that I have finished. The best way to describe it is I'm on holiday - hurrah! This means it is time to turn my attention to the (very important) task of learning Spanish. I made two "New Year's Resolutions". One was to learn some Spanish before the year was out, the other was to keep a running list of the books I have read on this here blog. So, time to work on one of my resolutions. Instead of learning Spanish I have been reading! The Queen of the South by Arturo Perez-Reverte is the latest book that I have finished. The best way to describe it is "a page turner". On the opening page the heroine, Teresa Mendoza, receives a call on a phone, a phone that she has been told that: "If it rings start running. And don't stop running. Ever." The book covers the next twelve years of her life as she flees Mexico, ends up in Africa, spends time in jail, moves to Spain and then finally returns home. It is really difficult to explain how much I liked this book. It's strange, I am sat here at the computer, reading as I type and I realise that I am being slightly "flat" in my description - which isn't fair to the book because it is a fast-paced, thrilling ride. Teresa starts the book as a girlfriend of a drug runner and ends up building a huge drug-running empire. The book is written in a very clever way, the author acts as an investigative journalist, writing the "biography" of "The Queen of the South" (as Mendoza becomes know). However, the book is written in such a way that at the end I googled Teresa Mendoza because I really, really thought she was a real person. The book includes many situations, many people that have happened or existed. And by the end of the book I had become so involved with the main character that I wanted her to be real. I wanted her to find the peace that she deserved. And yes, I realise that wanting a major drug runner to escape and live in peace is not the way I normally feel but the author makes you become invested in the characters. Hell, by the end of the book I had fallen in love with most of the drug runners and dealers and actually hated the authorities and their "witch hunts". The other wonderful thing about this book was it gave me an insight into how Mexicans think and behave. Obviously I live with one (a Mexican that is) and have a small handle on her behaviour patterns but it was fascinating to discover that instead of Maria being a totally unique individual, she is also a product of her country. There was a lot of familiarity, for me, in the book. Place names, Spanish/Mexican expressions, a general understanding of "that's the way they think" and a total recognition of "that's the way they dress and wear their hair". I loved this book. Because of the world I now occupy, drugs (running and dealing) are part of my life background - not because I am involved but because I come across it most every day, it exists in my life - and the history of drug cartels is something that I have become interested in. The fact that my nickname at Maria's office is that of a famous drug dealer might have something to do with my fascination. The fact that three times a week I cross the border knowing that as I do, there is a good chance that right next to me is someone smuggling drugs interests me. This review probably doesn't do the book justice. I really enjoyed it, would recommend it.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Madeline

    I guess I'm glad I read this, if only to satisfy a long-burning curiosity about The Queen of the South that's been in the back of my head ever since my mom hid the book from me at age fifteen so I couldn't read the dirty parts. (for the record, Mom, I probably would have been able to handle it) That said, it could have been a lot cooler than it is. And considering the book is about a woman who goes on the run after being targeted by Mexican hitmen and eventually becomes the most powerful drug lor I guess I'm glad I read this, if only to satisfy a long-burning curiosity about The Queen of the South that's been in the back of my head ever since my mom hid the book from me at age fifteen so I couldn't read the dirty parts. (for the record, Mom, I probably would have been able to handle it) That said, it could have been a lot cooler than it is. And considering the book is about a woman who goes on the run after being targeted by Mexican hitmen and eventually becomes the most powerful drug lord in the Mediterranean, that's saying a lot. The story itself was really cool, and had a lot of potential - Teresa Mendoza starts out as just some low-level drug runner's girlfriend, but when he gets killed by his employers and they come after her (resulting in the single best opening line of any book, ever: "The telephone rang, and she knew she was going to die") she runs to Spain, gets involved with another smuggler, goes to prison, comes out, and then begins selling and shipping cocaine all over the place. Sex, drugs, and shooting ensues. It's good in a trashy, guilty-pleasure, living-vicariously-through-books kind of way. My problem is the format of the book - it's partially narrated by a reporter doing a story on Teresa once she's become the so-called Queen of the South, and he butts into the story every few chapters so we can watch him interviewing people Teresa interacted with during her career. They hint at what is about to happen next in the story, and then it happens. As far as I could tell, the reporter served absolutely no purpose as a second narrator and all of his chapters should have just been cut out completely. Also Perez-Reverte is really, really terrible at writing from a female mindset, but this review is already long enough so I won't bother getting into that rant.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Werner

    Update, May 28, 2016: I gave this one a second try, after a lapse of some seven years, only because a review of it was needed for another site where the movie and telenovela adaptations are going to be reviewed later this year. My first reading had gotten through Chapter 3; I'd quit reading because I didn't like it, but figured that if it got no worse it would be bearable to finish, so fully intended to do so this time. By the time I got into Chapter 7, however, for me the cumulative "Ewww!" fac Update, May 28, 2016: I gave this one a second try, after a lapse of some seven years, only because a review of it was needed for another site where the movie and telenovela adaptations are going to be reviewed later this year. My first reading had gotten through Chapter 3; I'd quit reading because I didn't like it, but figured that if it got no worse it would be bearable to finish, so fully intended to do so this time. By the time I got into Chapter 7, however, for me the cumulative "Ewww!" factor was too high to continue. I promised a review to the site administrator at the other site, and I'll skim the rest of the text enough to write one (with an explanation of what I did); but it's going back to the started-not-finished shelf again, this time to stay there permanently. [My original comments start below.] A friend of mine (who's not on Goodreads), who's reading this book, recommended it to me as one I might like. Whether or not I actually would, I don't know --I admire strong heroines, but not villainesses, and it sounds like Perez-Riverte's title character here would be more apt to be the latter. But I told him I'd give it a try sometime later on, so I'll give her the benefit of the doubt in the meantime! Aug. 24, 2009 Well, I gave this book an honest try; but I'm not going to finish it, and will be putting it back on BookMooch where I got it. It has all the usual characteristics of the contemporary noir school (which effectively reminded me of why I don't like that school in the first place :-)): a general tone of moral cynicism, an unremitting emphasis on the sordid and the grungy, exploitative sexual content, and an off-putting plethora of bad language, including the f-word --which is probably highly unrealistic in the mouths of Spanish-speaking characters! While I didn't wish Teresa any ill, and felt sorry for her in much of what she went through, her drug use and her choice of a second drug-running boyfriend, after the first one was killed (the label "learning-disabled" comes to mind --though, granted, we're all slow studies at times, and we all make mistakes) made her hard for me to relate to, as did a certain distancing effect just from the author's self-consciously "literary" style. Perez-Reverte's books have gotten a lot of favorable notice in library circles, so I'm glad to have had the opportunity to investigate his work; but I wouldn't see myself reading any more of it. (Modified March 14, 2012.)

  6. 4 out of 5

    Allison

    This book is a book for history-lovers. Anyone who wants the who/how/where/when/why will love the detail and precision with which every event in this book is told. Unless you truly grew up in the culture about which it is written, and know about drug runs and border crossings and vacuum-packing marijuana in bricks to stow away in speedboats, I would wager than Perez-Reverte could convince any reader that he has done his homework. And if you did grow up in that culture, perhaps that would merely This book is a book for history-lovers. Anyone who wants the who/how/where/when/why will love the detail and precision with which every event in this book is told. Unless you truly grew up in the culture about which it is written, and know about drug runs and border crossings and vacuum-packing marijuana in bricks to stow away in speedboats, I would wager than Perez-Reverte could convince any reader that he has done his homework. And if you did grow up in that culture, perhaps that would merely strengthen this book’s case, because perhaps you would merely provide validation. The problem is that writing a good novel isn’t just about convincing a reader that you’ve done your homework. It isn’t just including every minute detail to show that you know exactly how an operation is performed. The Queen of the South doesn’t “show off,” exactly, like some books do, but it does include more detail than I, a “what’s next!? what’s next!?” kind of reader, deem necessary For me, all of the details get in the way. Sure, they made the book “authentic,” made the characters seem extremely knowledgeable, and helped Teresa grow as her knowledge grew, but as a reader who wanted to remain gripped in suspense, those long passages of who-did-what-where-how took me out of the “rush” of the novel. I often felt as though I were reading a history textbook, when I wanted to be watching an action movie inside my head. The Queen of the South has definite appeal for a certain kind of reader: a patient, painstaking, detail-oriented reader who isn’t looking to necessarily be “swept away” and doesn’t mind interruptions in the flow of the story. This ability to tolerate interruptions is important because, aside from the frequently interruptive overly-detailed explanations, Perez-Reverte uses a very interruptive structure to tell his story: a seemingly dual point of view, coming firstly from an omniscient third-person narrator following Teresa Mendoza chronologically and secondly from an anonymous first-person journalist situated in “current time.” The novel would have flowed much more seamlessly without the “present-day” interruptions of the journalist, who seemed as unnecessary as he was intrusive. All of this being said, Teresa’s story was a gripping one, and one worth being told. Perez-Reverte has a talent for creating mood in a scene while using very little in the way of “literary flourish,” and also for maintaining consistently believable, dynamic characters. Teresa’s various relationships with men and with her cellmate Patty all strike genuine and complex, even as Teresa herself reflects on them little and tries to block them from her mind. It will be interesting to see what other work Perez-Reverte will produce after this novel.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kim Kaso

    This is a fascinating and beautifully written book about so many things. On the surface, it is the tale of the unlikely rise of a young girl through the world of the drug trade, her survival and success. But, as in any book by Pérez-Reverte, it is meticulously researched and crafted, and gives the reader layer upon layer. Teresa Mendoza is a superb character, and the book uses everything from The Count of Monte Cristo to the narco corridos to illustrate both her examined and unexamined life. I c This is a fascinating and beautifully written book about so many things. On the surface, it is the tale of the unlikely rise of a young girl through the world of the drug trade, her survival and success. But, as in any book by Pérez-Reverte, it is meticulously researched and crafted, and gives the reader layer upon layer. Teresa Mendoza is a superb character, and the book uses everything from The Count of Monte Cristo to the narco corridos to illustrate both her examined and unexamined life. I came to this book because of the excellent series on the USA Network, but after some initial similarities, the 2 stories went off in different directions. The one on tv decided to stay in the US & Mexico, while the original story moved to Spain and Morocco, which I thoroughly enjoyed...it added a fish out of water element and a homesickness to Teresa's character. This book is a lovely example of how a great story can be told with the unlikeliest of elements, this book transcends genre. It is engaging & fascinating, & I found myself following each twist and turn of Teresa's rise, caring deeply for her complex character. Very highly recommended.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Maya B

    This was a good, solid read. It reminded me of the Godfather series that I read years ago and loved. I recommend to any readers that like Mario Puzo. I did have an issue with the way the author changed up the point of view. I would have liked if the whole story was told by Teresa Mendoza (1st person) the entire time I was reading but the author switched it up. He had the reporter (3rd person) talking as well and I had to at times go back to re-read certain parts so I could keep up with who is ta This was a good, solid read. It reminded me of the Godfather series that I read years ago and loved. I recommend to any readers that like Mario Puzo. I did have an issue with the way the author changed up the point of view. I would have liked if the whole story was told by Teresa Mendoza (1st person) the entire time I was reading but the author switched it up. He had the reporter (3rd person) talking as well and I had to at times go back to re-read certain parts so I could keep up with who is talking. I look forward to watching the spanish movie version, as well as the U.S. tv show

  9. 4 out of 5

    Daren

    There are a lot of reviews available here which outline the plot, so I won't attempt to do so here, other than to say: cocaine smuggling, logistics, deals and double crossings, Moroccan hashish, fast boats, cargo ships, dirty politics, shootouts, Mexican drug cartels, the Colombians, indiscretions and revenge. Teresa Mendoza is our lead character. She starts off as a simple narco's morra, quiet and unassuming. Her boyfriend is murdered, and she is on the run. It is a high speed read, almost a gui There are a lot of reviews available here which outline the plot, so I won't attempt to do so here, other than to say: cocaine smuggling, logistics, deals and double crossings, Moroccan hashish, fast boats, cargo ships, dirty politics, shootouts, Mexican drug cartels, the Colombians, indiscretions and revenge. Teresa Mendoza is our lead character. She starts off as a simple narco's morra, quiet and unassuming. Her boyfriend is murdered, and she is on the run. It is a high speed read, almost a guilty pleasure read for me, and it was enjoyable - for the most part. There was the narration style, which was fairly annoying - half narrated by a reporter who interviews various people throughout the book. His sections set up the following sections where the action is explained from Teresa's point of view. The story rolls out in various stages, and gathers momentum until the very end, where a conclusion is met. There are other things going on - a parallel to the Count of Monte Christo, which admittedly I have not read and therefore could not track, there is the Mexican cartels unwritten rules, there is the international smuggling, the deals the doublecrossing. I haven't read other books by Arturo Pérez-Reverte, and I may pick up another if the opportunity arises, as I did enjoy this as a fictional romp, with some basis for reality, in the drug underworld. 4 stars.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Catherine

    This story is told in two styles; from an omniscient perspective following the main character, and from the first-person point of view of a journalist researching her story. At first I was quite bored by the latter story. Later on, however, I began to feel like Perez-Reverte was trying to coax me into a state of mind whereby I would begin to use Teresa Mendoza's story as a truer reality. Throughout the book Teresa discovers that through books she can live more fully, and understand her life more This story is told in two styles; from an omniscient perspective following the main character, and from the first-person point of view of a journalist researching her story. At first I was quite bored by the latter story. Later on, however, I began to feel like Perez-Reverte was trying to coax me into a state of mind whereby I would begin to use Teresa Mendoza's story as a truer reality. Throughout the book Teresa discovers that through books she can live more fully, and understand her life more by applying stories as filters to her own life. I began to feel that Perez-Reverte was trying to create a mindset so that I would apply Teresa's story as a filter to my own life in order to gain greater understanding from it. Maybe this is too deep, but that's what I've been getting from it. I'll go into greater depth later, but suffice it say I found a lot of truth about humanity in this story. I very much enjoyed it, and will read more by this author.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Natasa

    It was very well written and an entertaining read. I thought the characters were complex and real. The plot was good, and it was real, too. The writing was done well. The questions left in my mind were what really detracted from the book.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Wynker

    3.5 stars. I found the last 15-20% of the book a bit weaker than the rest. I felt like the plot was loosing steam and the author seemed to struggle to imbue his work with tension. Teresa was much more intelligent than everybody and there were no twists or anything. Everything was kind of a foregone conclusion. Mario Puzo did the same thing in the Godfather, but he did it better and he could rely on strong characters. This isn't saying that the characters were bad in Queen of South, but at some p 3.5 stars. I found the last 15-20% of the book a bit weaker than the rest. I felt like the plot was loosing steam and the author seemed to struggle to imbue his work with tension. Teresa was much more intelligent than everybody and there were no twists or anything. Everything was kind of a foregone conclusion. Mario Puzo did the same thing in the Godfather, but he did it better and he could rely on strong characters. This isn't saying that the characters were bad in Queen of South, but at some point in the third act, some characters became a bit two-dimensional. For example, I never felt like I really got to know who was Teo or what he wanted to do. Same for Pote who seemed a bit simple-minded. Even Oleg who I actually liked felt like a plot device. What disappointed me a little too was the romance in the book. Even though Guerro is dead by the time the book starts, the author managed to make him alive on the pages. Fisterra, too, had a pretty nice personality. However, Teo was empty and the author didn't really develop his relationship with Teresa. And then, there was Patty. Idk, Patty and what happened to her towards the end of the book is weird. The way the author wrote the relationship between Patty and Teresa, it's like they were quasi lover but Teresa wouldn't admit her love (I could be reading the subtext wrong). Or as if Patricia's downfall was caused by the fact that Teresa wouldn't/ didn't love her back in the way she wanted. Let me get this straight, Teresa wasn't into girls and second, their relationship always felt like a deep friendship. Also, I think it seemed to me as if the author kind of misunderstood the characters he had created a little. Patty to me always felt like a spoiled rich girl who couldn't find a place in the world she was born into and so decided to dive into a darker society where she felt she could fit. However, it always felt like she was doing a kind of role playing. As Teresa says at some point, when Patty was shot, she was wearing Caroline Herrera. Anyway going back to the role playing I mentioned earlier. To me it seemed more as if Patty's spiral downward was orchestrated by the fact that when all is said and done she was just a rich girl doing role playing, but the game became too deep and serious for her to handle and she couldn't cope. And this lead to her destroying herself. In my opinion, it wasn't so much what Teresa did or didn't do, as much as the fact that Patty simply didn't belong. At the beginning of their relations, Patty was the one teaching Teresa and she was feeding off that, but by the end the student had surpassed the master, and Patty was left without a role. Now moving to Teo, I felt like the author could have explored many different things. By the time, Teresa meet Teo, she's lost two men she loved and she's a fractured woman. Honestly, on some occasions, she came across as a borderline sociopath because sometimes, it didn't seem like she had any feelings - or rather she pushed away any emotions to the point where she seemed empty. Also, I think the author could have used the pregnancy for a catalyst for something or at least developing his characters. In some ways, I guess Teresa's story mirrors the Count of Monte Cristo. She wins but she's also lost so, so much. While I have nothing against how Teresa was portrayed, I do wonder how a woman author would have approached the relationship with Teo and the pregnancy. Especially, I wonder if there would have been more feelings, more inner musings. In any case, all in all, it was a pretty good book and it helped learn a lot about drug trafficking. I know it's never going to happen, but I wish the author would write a sequel.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Erth

    now i am hooked. This was such a great, easy and creative book. i was hooked after the first page. The characters were easy to fall in love with and follow, along with the story. the author made the mental visions so easy and vivid of the surroundings and the characters actions felt so real. i would highly recommend this author and this book.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kathy

    The story of Teresa Mendoza "she had acquired only three certainties about human beings: that they kill, that they remember, and that they die. Because there comes a moment, she told herself, when you look ahead and see only what you've left behind--dead bodies all along the road you're walking down. Among them, your own, although you don't know it. Until you come upon it, and then you know. and then the many pages of a final shoot-out written in heartbreaking prose and yet she walks out of that a The story of Teresa Mendoza "she had acquired only three certainties about human beings: that they kill, that they remember, and that they die. Because there comes a moment, she told herself, when you look ahead and see only what you've left behind--dead bodies all along the road you're walking down. Among them, your own, although you don't know it. Until you come upon it, and then you know. and then the many pages of a final shoot-out written in heartbreaking prose and yet she walks out of that alive not familiar with USA production of this book but I shall look

  15. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    The Queen of the South by Arturo Perez-Reverte Teresa Mendoza was once attached to a talented drug smuggler in Mexico. That is, until he started skimming off the top and got himself killed. She had to flee to the back end of Spain. But her story doesn’t settle down into a quiet life there. More drugs, organized crime, and heart break ensue. Set in the 1980s, this is a sweeping story about endurance. Teresa was born into a world where there are few paths out of poverty. When fortune gave her a cha The Queen of the South by Arturo Perez-Reverte Teresa Mendoza was once attached to a talented drug smuggler in Mexico. That is, until he started skimming off the top and got himself killed. She had to flee to the back end of Spain. But her story doesn’t settle down into a quiet life there. More drugs, organized crime, and heart break ensue. Set in the 1980s, this is a sweeping story about endurance. Teresa was born into a world where there are few paths out of poverty. When fortune gave her a chance, she took it, though it eventually cost her dearly. Teresa was a fascinating character. She starts off relatively innocent. She’s not above doing a little weed now and then or getting drunk or having sex with her drug smuggling boyfriend. But she herself has nothing to do with the business. She still has her little job, is young, and just having fun. But once he’s killed and the narcos come after her (because they not only take out the man, but also his woman) she can either lay down and die, or pick up that handgun and even the playing field. She makes it to Spain partly because she is smart and lies low but also because a friend owed her now dead man a favor. There she works at a seedy bar and has sworn off the drug smuggling life completely. That is until a Gaucho shows up and makes her heart flutter. Once again, she is pulled back into that world. However, this time she refuses to be an ignorant hanger-on. She makes it her business. Every step she takes, she gets tougher. She’s really very practical about it all by the end, like nearly all the emotions have been wrung out of her through the years. It is an amazingly well done story arc. I so enjoyed watching her transformation. Her time in prison was especially interesting because it was filled with inner reflection and a sad humor, and books. So obviously I am in love with Teresa Mendoza. Let’s talk about everything else. The plot, the pacing, the side characters, the sex – they too are also very well done. I loved all the Spanish and Mexican vocabulary and cultural references tossed in. I was never too sure where the plot was going, but I was thoroughly entertained and totally engrossed in finding out what would happen next. The tale is told in two voices: Teresa’s and a reporter who is tracing her life for an in-depth biography. So sometimes we know that Teresa must have made it through some pinch because the reporter is talking to her or someone else about the incident in the past. Using the reporter character allowed us readers to see sides of Teresa or the collateral damage of her work that we wouldn’t see through Teresa’s eyes. It was clever. This was a very satisfying book and I look forward to enjoying more of Perez-Reverte’s works. Narration: Lina Patel was the perfect voice for Teresa. She has a beautiful Mexican accent and I loved her fluid pronunciation of all the Spanish words, including the long strings of insults. She had distinct voices for male and female side characters as well.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Tara Chevrestt

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This would make a terrific movie. I can see Salma Hayek as Teresa and maybe Angelina Jolie as her partner in crime... As a book, however, it didn't work for me. I didn't like Teresa. Throughout the entire novel, I could not muster any sympathy or like for her. When her drug dealin, Cessna flying boyfriend is killed, Teresa runs for her life. She finds safety in Spain and what does this chica do? She finds another drug dealer boyfriend. What follows is a lot of speed boat and helicopter high speed This would make a terrific movie. I can see Salma Hayek as Teresa and maybe Angelina Jolie as her partner in crime... As a book, however, it didn't work for me. I didn't like Teresa. Throughout the entire novel, I could not muster any sympathy or like for her. When her drug dealin, Cessna flying boyfriend is killed, Teresa runs for her life. She finds safety in Spain and what does this chica do? She finds another drug dealer boyfriend. What follows is a lot of speed boat and helicopter high speed chases and some jail time. When she gets out of jail, what does this chica do? She buddies up with another chick and digs up a bunch of drugs. Back to a life of crime again. Good grief. There were parts I liked and actually rooted for Teresa but all her cocaine sniffing and bed hopping started to bug me after a while. On top of that, the narrative goes back and forth between third person focusing on Teresa and first person POV from a reporter doing research on her. Top THAT off with overly descriptive details about the beaches and scenery and every character's past history and you got a dull read once the speed boat chases are over. If they ever make this into a movie tho, I will watch it.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Harold

    I've read several of APR's books before and enjoyed them greatly, but for some reason thought this would be his commercial effort. Maybe a little trashy and cliched. Perhaps because of the Mexican novela on TV? In any event I approached this as somewhat of a guilty pleasure, after watching the novela with subtiltles and being totally hooked. I decided to read the book and see how closely the novela stuck to the plot. It did, but threw in some extra characters to add to the melodrama. The US tv s I've read several of APR's books before and enjoyed them greatly, but for some reason thought this would be his commercial effort. Maybe a little trashy and cliched. Perhaps because of the Mexican novela on TV? In any event I approached this as somewhat of a guilty pleasure, after watching the novela with subtiltles and being totally hooked. I decided to read the book and see how closely the novela stuck to the plot. It did, but threw in some extra characters to add to the melodrama. The US tv series seems not very close to either. I was surprised. I loved the book, loved the way it was presented and loved the plot. APR tells us very early on that this is his take of "The Count Of M0nte Christo" and he does a good job re-imagining it and recasting the characters. An enjoyable read that turned out not to be the guilty pleasure I thought it would be, instead being a totally engaging and enjoyable book.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Idaliz

    I would actually give this book a rating of 3.5. This book was recommended to me by my older sister. It was really hard for me to get too far in this book and force myself to continue because it was written, though very well detailed, a bit tedious. It's as if the author got a little distracted and continued onto a few paragraphs about something a little off subject. So it was all over the place, as intersting as I found that style, it was difficult to stay on track. It wasn't until the second h I would actually give this book a rating of 3.5. This book was recommended to me by my older sister. It was really hard for me to get too far in this book and force myself to continue because it was written, though very well detailed, a bit tedious. It's as if the author got a little distracted and continued onto a few paragraphs about something a little off subject. So it was all over the place, as intersting as I found that style, it was difficult to stay on track. It wasn't until the second half of the novel, that I really started to get into it. Enticing and well written for sure. By the end I was able to enjoy the story but did not need the drawn out first half.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Bird

    Argh, he's trying to write from a woman's perspective with no real concept of what that means. At the point where he says her womb shuddered I threw the book across the room. Does even even know anatomy? Argh, he's trying to write from a woman's perspective with no real concept of what that means. At the point where he says her womb shuddered I threw the book across the room. Does even even know anatomy?

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sam Reaves

    Or, The Queen of the South in English. Read it in Spanish if you can; you'll learn lots of Mexican slang and nautical jargon, broadening your linguistic horizons. If not, Andrew Hurley's English translation from Penguin will no doubt keep you turning the pages. Pérez-Reverte has sold lots of books in a number of languages; of the ones I've read, this is the one I liked best, because it seemed the most firmly rooted in reality. The South in question is the south of Spain, and the reality is the in Or, The Queen of the South in English. Read it in Spanish if you can; you'll learn lots of Mexican slang and nautical jargon, broadening your linguistic horizons. If not, Andrew Hurley's English translation from Penguin will no doubt keep you turning the pages. Pérez-Reverte has sold lots of books in a number of languages; of the ones I've read, this is the one I liked best, because it seemed the most firmly rooted in reality. The South in question is the south of Spain, and the reality is the international drug trade, a multi-billion dollar business that spans oceans and continents, enriching diverse criminal groups and corrupting law enforcement wherever it reaches. The novel was published in 2002, but things haven't changed much; Mexico is still rotten with corruption and in thrall to ruthless drug cartels, and the south of Spain is still a playground for international mafias and the main entry point for illegal drugs, pouring across the Strait of Gibraltar from Morocco. A poor Mexican girl becomes the girlfriend of an ace drug cartel pilot; when he is whacked for obscure reasons, she knows it's time for her to run, because the custom is to kill a victim's whole family; in Sinaloa those are the rules. She flees to Spain with a friend-of-a-friend introduction to criminal elements there, takes up with another ace, this one a speedboat skipper running merchandise across the Strait, and eventually is in the business up to her neck. No spoilers, so I won't detail her path to becoming the Queen of the South, but it is that journey that for me made the book so absorbing. The twin pillars of the novel are psychology and culture, and Pérez-Reverte paints both masterfully. How does a poor Mexican girl not only survive but prosper in an utterly ruthless business? What does it do to her? Over twelve years (and five hundred pages) we learn what makes Teresa Mendoza tick. And yes, we find ourselves rooting for her, whatever we may think of the business she's in. As for the culture, there are few environments with such a rich tapestry of international criminal activity as the south coast of Spain, and it is obvious Pérez-Reverte knows the territory. The characters are vivid and convincing; the locales are concisely drawn; the complex networks of corruption and obligation are deftly sketched. The emotional cost of operating in a completely amoral world is the impression we come away with. It's a page-turner but not a quick read; there's a lot of story and a lot of delving into Teresa's consciousness. More than a thriller, it's a substantial novel about a world we find morbidly fascinating but are glad we don't live in.

  21. 4 out of 5

    eleventeen

    This was quite the ride. A bit slow-moving at the beginning, Perez-Reverte's writing eventually grabs hold of you and takes you on the ride of Teresa Mendoza, drug transport....queenpin? While Teresa is never quite a sympathetic character, you still end up rooting for her as her life is revealed on the pages, told in alternating "journalistic investigation" and narrative style. The crowning achievements of this book were the descriptions of characters - the author has an AMAZING knack for distil This was quite the ride. A bit slow-moving at the beginning, Perez-Reverte's writing eventually grabs hold of you and takes you on the ride of Teresa Mendoza, drug transport....queenpin? While Teresa is never quite a sympathetic character, you still end up rooting for her as her life is revealed on the pages, told in alternating "journalistic investigation" and narrative style. The crowning achievements of this book were the descriptions of characters - the author has an AMAZING knack for distilling physical characteristics and small nuances of character in less than a few sentences. He does it so well that despite the large cast of characters, when people were reintroduced I remembered them perfectly, and if you all know my shitty memory, this is quite the feat. There is a certain psychology to this book, of take or be taken contrasted with the contrasting images of Teresa Mendoza she keeps in her own head, that serve as central themes and guide the story. It's a means of pulling things together that sometimes worked and sometimes bored tf out of me. It is those slow moments that dragged things down for me, the esoteric inaction. Still a fantastic read that I 1000% can see why it was made into a tv show.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Magali Blanco

    I really love the versión of the book story because I’ve watched the novel of this book and it’s amazing how they are both unique in there own ways very different but at the same time the same story.

  23. 5 out of 5

    CYIReadBooks (Claire)

    I read this book because I watched the Spanish series -- La Reina del Sur. Not much change between the two. Sometimes a bit tedious, but overall, a very good read.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Classy

    A very interesting story that I believe I would have enjoyed more without the journalistic viewpoint. I am now interested in the television show and we'll watch it to compare it to the book. I did enjoy the strong female characters altbeit drug dealers. I also believe some of the story got lost in translation but the audio version did help in that area. A very interesting story that I believe I would have enjoyed more without the journalistic viewpoint. I am now interested in the television show and we'll watch it to compare it to the book. I did enjoy the strong female characters altbeit drug dealers. I also believe some of the story got lost in translation but the audio version did help in that area.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Nick

    I read the Spanish original, but I am writing here for a wider audience. I approached the book with some skepticism; Perez-Reverte was known to me chiefly for his literary mysteries, in which the resolution falls short of the spectacular and artificial beginnings. "The Queen of the South" seems to me to have the reverse problem. The wind-up to Teresa Mendoza's career (aside from the fireworks of the opening, about which more will be said) takes too long; and the part where she actually becomes t I read the Spanish original, but I am writing here for a wider audience. I approached the book with some skepticism; Perez-Reverte was known to me chiefly for his literary mysteries, in which the resolution falls short of the spectacular and artificial beginnings. "The Queen of the South" seems to me to have the reverse problem. The wind-up to Teresa Mendoza's career (aside from the fireworks of the opening, about which more will be said) takes too long; and the part where she actually becomes the key transporter of drugs across the Mediterranean is dispatched by showing a few key alliances and a little intimidation of competitors . The beginning is weighed down, too, by the interruptions of a narrator who is undertaking a Citizen Kane-like series of interviews. I will say that Perez-Reverte did his homework on Mexican turf; his control of Mexican idioms is assured, down to that habit of saddling almost everyone with a nickname (although I find "Potemkin" a stretch, "Batman" is on the mark). He knows the terms for the guns, drops the names of real drug-dealers, and offers a coherent account of the transition from the Colombians of Pablo Escobar to the Mexicans of the Sinaloa and Juarez cartels. His training as a mystery writer shows, if a little thickly. There is a chase at the beginning and at the end as if anticipating a film or better yet, a telenovela. (He got the telenovela, with a certified star in Kate del Castillo, and Humberto Zurita, the most charismatic Mexican actor of his generation). There are problems with the text, I find, from the beginning. Yes, it is clever to have Teresa answer the phone and be tipped off that someone is coming to kill her; of course, one of the assassins takes the time to rape her, during which act she shoots him, and runs off without pants (but with a significant appointment book). That opening is prurient enough, but Perez-Reverte is thereafter often more interested in her sex life than in the means of her ascent (except when they are the same thing). I have little faith in the bargain she strikes to save her life--in the shrine to Jesus Malverde, patron saint of traffickers, no less--a major drug dealer agrees to protect her for little apparent reason, in exchange for said appointment book. SPOILER ALERT: I am not convinced that undercover DEA agents keep that information in their appointment books anyway. The ending is formulaic--heroine places herself at completely unnecessary risk in order to allow Perez-Reverte a final battle. Teresa herself remains something of an enigma; highly intelligent, of course, but an obsessive reader--very fond of "The Count of Monte Cristo", perhaps, but unlikely to build a major library and internally discuss the comparative merits of "Pedro Paramo" and "100 Years of Solitude", arriving at the unusual conclusion (which I share) that the former is more powerful than that latter. Her upbringing, shared a little at the beginning (but only in its sexual violence, of course) and again at the end, is worthy of Stieg Larsson's heroine, but in some ways Teresa is even more feral, her allegiances to some well-drawn secondary characters (principally a Russian gangster, an assassin-turned-bodyguard, and a cellmate) notwithstanding. And that is my major issue with the book; Teresa is a convincing loner, but she operates in a world that has no room for solitude (and precious little for women except as ornaments and with a few key exceptions), and not only succeeds there, but masters that world. She is a literary character, and on those terms successful. The reportage on drug-dealers paints a world of people who are gregarious partygoers by nature and grow paranoid to the degree that the threat of violence requires and their dabbling in the product encourages. Sandra Avila earned the nickname "Queen of the Pacific" for her love affairs with drug dealers and management of their properties; after she was arrested in 2007, the journalist Julio Scherer sat down with her for interviews. A highly intelligent woman, clearly, but less a reader of Garcia Marquez than an aficionada of norteno party music.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Marina

    The story starts from the end. The narrator is a journalist who writes a biography book for Teresa Mendoza, Queen of the south, or La reina del sur, the only woman among the narco-mafia in Southern Europe. Teresa‘s story starts twelve years ago, in Mexico. She was a girlfriend of local narco diller, Guero Davilla, who was killed. They were after her too. She had to run to save her life. Her childhood was really bad. Father, unknown. Mother, prostitute. Growing up in a bad neighborhood, raped when The story starts from the end. The narrator is a journalist who writes a biography book for Teresa Mendoza, Queen of the south, or La reina del sur, the only woman among the narco-mafia in Southern Europe. Teresa‘s story starts twelve years ago, in Mexico. She was a girlfriend of local narco diller, Guero Davilla, who was killed. They were after her too. She had to run to save her life. Her childhood was really bad. Father, unknown. Mother, prostitute. Growing up in a bad neighborhood, raped when she was just a little girl, she was dealling drugs as a teenager. Until, one day, a very expensive dark car stopped next to her on the street, and Guero Davilla came into her life. Teresa had a good life living as a girlfriend of a pilot who was smuggling drugs across the border. Until, one day, he was killed, and she had to run. She ran to Spain and there she met another local drug dealer, Santiago Fistera. She was living with him and started to help him with his work. Learning about boats and shipments, good with numbers, she was part of “the dynamic duo”. Until one day,they crashed into a rock during the running from the police. Santiago died, and Teresa was sent to prison. In the cell, she met Patty. And, it’s a classic “Count of Monte Cristo” story. Patty is an ex-girlfriend of a drug dealer who had hidden half tone cocaine. After leaving the prison, they both took the cocaine hidden in a cave, and sold it to the russian mafia. And the queen was born. I liked the character of Teresa. Strong woman. Always standing on her feet. Being no one, becoming someone. There were moment when she had several different personalities, couple of other Teresas watching her from a different angle. There were only three men into Teresa’s life. Guero, Santiago, and Teo. They were all liars and dealers, but in someway, they all loved her. At the beginning, I liked the character of Patty, too. In prison, she loved reading books. I always adore people who love books. She was like Abbé Faria from “Count of Monte Cristo”. But, after that, she disappointed me. This is a book for surviving. Book of international crime, drug dealing, corruption, smuggling. It is also book about love and friendship. Book about life. http://chicklibrarycat.blogspot.com/2...

  27. 5 out of 5

    Cat

    In this book, Pérez-Reverte tells us the story of Teresa Mendoza, a mexican woman who becomes an important drug dealer in the south of Spain. Having to run away from her hometown in Mexico, after learning her boyfriend (a drug transporter) has been murdered, Teresa takes refuge in Spain. Only to meet another drug transporter, start a relationship with him and eventually ally herself to him in drug transportation. But things go awry for them and Teresa ends up in jail. There she meets a clever wo In this book, Pérez-Reverte tells us the story of Teresa Mendoza, a mexican woman who becomes an important drug dealer in the south of Spain. Having to run away from her hometown in Mexico, after learning her boyfriend (a drug transporter) has been murdered, Teresa takes refuge in Spain. Only to meet another drug transporter, start a relationship with him and eventually ally herself to him in drug transportation. But things go awry for them and Teresa ends up in jail. There she meets a clever woman with money and a secret that may change their lives. Once they're out. And when that day comes, Teresa, aided by those willing to earn some risky money, starts building her own drug empire. But Teresa must not forget a few things: friends don't last forever, you must be really careful in whom you choose to trust, you can't buy everyone, and never leave debts from the past undue, or they'll come back to hunt you down. The story is told in two styles: a normal narrative, following the main character, and from the first-person point of view of a journalist doing research and talking to people connected to the whole affair, with the aim of writing a book about Teresa Mendoza. I really liked the book. When I started reading, I didn't know what to expect. The only book I had read by Arturo Pérez-Reverte was The Flanders Panel and that was some years ago. Besides, this book really gets inside the ways of the drug-dealing groups, which was something I had never read about. I found it pretty interesting and after the first few pages I was hooked. I am aware that other GR users didn't like the book that much, but for me it was a page-turner. The only "problem" I had was, like I said in my status update, in the beginning, were the mexican expressions I couldn't understand. But I was able to solve that (thank you internet!) and now I'm thinking how great it is that a spanish writer was able to write as if he were mexican. Because it's not just the way the book was written. This book is a bath of mexican culture. And, yes, drugs. And weapons. I can only imagine the research Pérez-Reverte must have done to be able to write about all this.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Deidre

    AMAZING! I don't usually go for thrillers, but the female lead character is so complicated and so foreign to me that I became fascinated in trying to relate to her. Cold, calculated, cunning, indestructible, she is the female drug cartel Bond. Yet through the narrative we get to hear her vulnerability and her fragmented displacement of her fears and denial of her own desires. The fantastic setting for the story and detailed description make you want to leave your day job and start running hash i AMAZING! I don't usually go for thrillers, but the female lead character is so complicated and so foreign to me that I became fascinated in trying to relate to her. Cold, calculated, cunning, indestructible, she is the female drug cartel Bond. Yet through the narrative we get to hear her vulnerability and her fragmented displacement of her fears and denial of her own desires. The fantastic setting for the story and detailed description make you want to leave your day job and start running hash in Morroco. Thrown into the narco world of Mexico and then Spain by her drug running boyfriend, when he is killed she must learn to survive without him or any man. Loved the homoerotic relationship and long term celibate partnership she develops with her Irish cellmate. Her rise from the streets of Sinoloa to the highest classes of Spain is terrifying and thrilling at once. Translated from the original Spanish, but all the curse words left in their original tongue for flair. LOVED IT!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Audrey (Warped Shelves)

    DNF @ 70% I just can't. I'm calling it. I'm so over this book that I have been trying for months to plow through. I only pick it up between finishing a book and finding something else that I actually want to read, and at those times when I do pick this up, I skim so narrowly that I am hardly getting any story at all. The writing is very good, there's no doubt about that. Perez-Reverte is a good author. However, the writing is so incredibly dense that if you aren't 100% invested in the fate of the DNF @ 70% I just can't. I'm calling it. I'm so over this book that I have been trying for months to plow through. I only pick it up between finishing a book and finding something else that I actually want to read, and at those times when I do pick this up, I skim so narrowly that I am hardly getting any story at all. The writing is very good, there's no doubt about that. Perez-Reverte is a good author. However, the writing is so incredibly dense that if you aren't 100% invested in the fate of the character it is agonizing. I hate Teresa Mendoza. She's obnoxious, whiny, holier-than-though, and straight-up vulgar. Some people love this kind of character, but I, 21-going-on-74 prudish cat-lady, absolutely do not. (Note: I only even attempted to read this because my mom liked the show and bought me the book. Sorry, Mom.) Popsugar 2020 Reading Challenge: A book you meant to read finsih in 2019 Around the Year in 52 Books Reading Challenge: A book that is between 400-600 pages

  30. 5 out of 5

    Traci Nicole

    DNF @17%

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