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Lila and Ecco's Do-It-Yourself Comics Club

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Twelve-year-olds Lila and Ecco are obsessed with comics. Every summer, they dress up as their favorite characters to attend the local comic book convention. This year, after they stumble into a workshop of comics creators, Lila and Ecco come to an exciting realization --- they can make their very own comic books! Join Lila and Ecco as they embark on their exciting and rewar Twelve-year-olds Lila and Ecco are obsessed with comics. Every summer, they dress up as their favorite characters to attend the local comic book convention. This year, after they stumble into a workshop of comics creators, Lila and Ecco come to an exciting realization --- they can make their very own comic books! Join Lila and Ecco as they embark on their exciting and rewarding do-it-yourself adventure. Along the way, readers will see how comics can be used to share stories with their friends and say what they want to say. They'll also learn how to harness ideas and inspiration; create believable characters and stories; illustrate motion, suspense and time passing; tips and step-by-step instructions on inking, coloring, lettering, cover art and design, binding comics and much, much more.


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Twelve-year-olds Lila and Ecco are obsessed with comics. Every summer, they dress up as their favorite characters to attend the local comic book convention. This year, after they stumble into a workshop of comics creators, Lila and Ecco come to an exciting realization --- they can make their very own comic books! Join Lila and Ecco as they embark on their exciting and rewar Twelve-year-olds Lila and Ecco are obsessed with comics. Every summer, they dress up as their favorite characters to attend the local comic book convention. This year, after they stumble into a workshop of comics creators, Lila and Ecco come to an exciting realization --- they can make their very own comic books! Join Lila and Ecco as they embark on their exciting and rewarding do-it-yourself adventure. Along the way, readers will see how comics can be used to share stories with their friends and say what they want to say. They'll also learn how to harness ideas and inspiration; create believable characters and stories; illustrate motion, suspense and time passing; tips and step-by-step instructions on inking, coloring, lettering, cover art and design, binding comics and much, much more.

30 review for Lila and Ecco's Do-It-Yourself Comics Club

  1. 5 out of 5

    Whitney

    Fun and empowering, this book has almost everything anyone needs to create their first comic book. I love the way the characters will be discussing tips, like about how to shade an area, how different word balloons work, and perspective while the actual artist/writer demonstrates those exact concepts in that very panel. Very cool and useful.

  2. 4 out of 5

    The Book Girl

    review to come

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ally Copper

    “Lila & Ecco’s Do-It-Yourself Comics Club” by Willow Dawson is a how-to book that describes the steps for creating a comic book or graphic novel. The directions for creating a comic book reside within a story about Lila, Ecco, and Lila’s little sister Ruby, and this story is told in graphic novel format. Lila and Ecco attend a comic book conference and take part in a session where they learn the ins and outs of how to make comic books. Then they go home to practice and discuss what they learned. “Lila & Ecco’s Do-It-Yourself Comics Club” by Willow Dawson is a how-to book that describes the steps for creating a comic book or graphic novel. The directions for creating a comic book reside within a story about Lila, Ecco, and Lila’s little sister Ruby, and this story is told in graphic novel format. Lila and Ecco attend a comic book conference and take part in a session where they learn the ins and outs of how to make comic books. Then they go home to practice and discuss what they learned. Therefore, readers of this book learn the steps for making a comic book right along with the characters in the book. In addition, readers get to watch the entire process of Lila and Ecco creating their comic books, from the brainstorming stage all the way to the completed project. And lastly, readers get to see many of the comic book techniques that Lila and Ecco are learning displayed in the graphic novel in which Lila and Ecco exist. For instance, as Lila and Ecco discuss point of view in comics, the author of this book, Willow Dawson, draws Ecco from different points of view so readers can see in the illustrations what the characters are discussing via the word bubbles. This graphic novel incorporates a lot of showing and telling. This is a fascinating book with many layers that really will inspire readers to get started on a comic book or graphic novel of there own. Another strength of this how-to storybook is that the directions are accurate and detailed. Dawson has a way of showing the painstaking work that goes into creating a comic, but the hard work doesn’t detract from the fun of creating a comic. She portrays comic-book-making as difficult and rewarding. The content of many how-to books is dry and only lists the step-by-step directions for accomplishing a task. Dawson has done something creative by giving the step-by-step directions for accomplishing this particular task in a story format featuring likable characters. Readers who follow this book’s directions for creating a comic of their own will feel like they have two friends (Lila and Ecco) going through he process right along with them. The illustrations in this graphic novel are black and white and fairly basic. There isn’t a lot of detail or finesse, but that is purposeful. Dawson has kept the illustrations simple to show readers that the comics they create don’t need to be high-art with tons of shadow and light and color. Dawson has demonstrated the basic line and shading techniques with her illustrations that readers will need to use to create comics of their own. If she had provided more artful, impressive illustrations, readers may become discouraged because their art ability isn’t at the same level. Because of the length of the book and the somewhat complicated content, this text would be best for older readers (fourth through eighth grade).

  4. 4 out of 5

    Nicola Mansfield

    Reason for Reading: This is a Cybils '10 nominee and required reading for me as a graphic novels panelist. This book is mostly a non-fiction guide on how to make your own comic book thinly guised within the framework of a fictional story. Lila and Ecco go to a Comic Con but they have to keep Lila's little sister with them. She runs off and they chase her into a room where a panel is discussing comics/graphic novels and how they are made. At the end of the presentation little how-to booklets are d Reason for Reading: This is a Cybils '10 nominee and required reading for me as a graphic novels panelist. This book is mostly a non-fiction guide on how to make your own comic book thinly guised within the framework of a fictional story. Lila and Ecco go to a Comic Con but they have to keep Lila's little sister with them. She runs off and they chase her into a room where a panel is discussing comics/graphic novels and how they are made. At the end of the presentation little how-to booklets are distributed. Once home, Lila and Ecco one day sit down and read the booklet cover to cover as they follow the instructions to make their own comics. The information is very detailed and easy to follow. If the reader is already a comfortable artist the information contained here will have them drawing their own comics in no time. The story format makes the book easy to read and entertaining but on the other hand will make finding specific information later hard to find. Whether the book will actually work as a how-to I'm not thoroughly convinced. I know myself I would prefer a non-fiction book with an index so I could look up topics again without having to search through the whole book. With that said, the book will certainly inspire budding graphic artists to stop dreaming and get to work on actually making their drawings and sketches into real, professional looking comics. The back of the book gives a list of suggested further reading. One other thing I personally couldn't get past was that I just did not like the artwork in this book. While the instruction panels were clear, the story panels were crowded, the drawing style was unimpressive veering towards sloppy and I just did not care for the faces at all finding them rather ugly and off-putting.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Nick

    This book is really about sequential storytelling, sort of like Scott McCloud's Understanding Comics, but aimed at a younger audience. Willow Dawson walks the characters through the process of creating their own short comic book, after they got inspired by a panel at a comic convention. This book would be very valuable to young creators who want to make their own comics or zines, but the explanation of the "standard" stylings would also be useful to explain comics and sequential art to adults who This book is really about sequential storytelling, sort of like Scott McCloud's Understanding Comics, but aimed at a younger audience. Willow Dawson walks the characters through the process of creating their own short comic book, after they got inspired by a panel at a comic convention. This book would be very valuable to young creators who want to make their own comics or zines, but the explanation of the "standard" stylings would also be useful to explain comics and sequential art to adults who have never read comics. The roughness of the art is a tiny minus, but on the other hand, truly wonderful art in the book might discourage beginners from even making the attempt. Dawson makes a few assumptions about the methods used in creating a story, and those conflict with other sources on the subject, but there are a lot of cool ideas included, for story prompts and character creation. Overall, very good.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sarah S

    A comic book about making comic books that doesn't talk down to kids. Lila, Ecco, and Lila's tag-along little sister Ruby go to a comics convention and become inspired to make their own comics. The book goes through the inspirational and technical processes, using Lila's and Ecco's creations to demonstrate. So, as they discuss various ways to show time passing in a comic book, Ruby is shown in front of a clock in multiple panels. Then Ecco is shown in multiple positions in a single panel. This i A comic book about making comic books that doesn't talk down to kids. Lila, Ecco, and Lila's tag-along little sister Ruby go to a comics convention and become inspired to make their own comics. The book goes through the inspirational and technical processes, using Lila's and Ecco's creations to demonstrate. So, as they discuss various ways to show time passing in a comic book, Ruby is shown in front of a clock in multiple panels. Then Ecco is shown in multiple positions in a single panel. This is fun for any fan of graphic novels or writing in general who wants to understand the process and it's a great how-to for aspiring comix creators. Kids who like this will go on to read Scott McCloud's Understanding Comics. Grades 4-7.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Emilia P

    Way to use your powers for good Willow D. The other thing I read by you was kind of mediocre. This was kind of academic, businesslike -- write a draft! sequence well! Make a good cover with creator credits! Make a dummy! And then! And then! Go to your public library and read more comic books so you can get more ideas! Amen. I dunno -- another reviewer said "it doesn't talk down to kids" and that's true, it felt very direct, a little challenging and assuming kids are dedicated to their comix makin Way to use your powers for good Willow D. The other thing I read by you was kind of mediocre. This was kind of academic, businesslike -- write a draft! sequence well! Make a good cover with creator credits! Make a dummy! And then! And then! Go to your public library and read more comic books so you can get more ideas! Amen. I dunno -- another reviewer said "it doesn't talk down to kids" and that's true, it felt very direct, a little challenging and assuming kids are dedicated to their comix making. And it flowed fairly well between story and instructional stuff. Like oh and then the kids did this. And then they let the little sister draw a one page comic. Hoorah! Art!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Candice M (tinylibrarian)

    Lila and Ecco are comics-loving twelve-year-olds who, through their own adventures attending a comicon, show the reader how to make comics themselves. This nonfiction title disguised as a fiction title introduces teens and tweens to the basics of creating comics from scratch in a fun, non-overwhelming way.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    There's too much going on in this book for it to be either effective as a story or as nonfiction. There are definite nods to McCloud, whose approach set the standard for comics-formatted DIY manuals, but overall the attempt to replicate what he did, but for a younger audience, falls short. Characters often say too much for one speech bubble and it's not natural conversational speech.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    Packs in a wealth of info about creating comics, covering everything from inking and lettering to drawing perspective to managing without a long-arm stapler. Nice mix of characters explaining concepts alongside the panels showing them (those were fun and clever). Maybe a bit too prescriptive. Recommended for instruction, not so much the story itself.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sandy Brehl

    Lila and Ecco's story incorporates many helpful (and fun) tips on creating comics, embedding many of the author's own comic workshops for kids into the plot line. Plenty of kids will love it, and those who resist "regular" writing might buy into this approach.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    An excellent overview of how to create a comic, embedded inside an easy-to-read narrative. Great for interested middle grade students.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Scott Robins

    reviewing for Good Comics for Kids reviewing for Good Comics for Kids

  14. 5 out of 5

    Patty

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ashwini

  16. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

  17. 4 out of 5

    Snow

  18. 4 out of 5

    Gogospirit

  19. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

  20. 5 out of 5

    K_arashi

  21. 4 out of 5

    Dorcas

  22. 4 out of 5

    Emily

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

  24. 4 out of 5

    John

  25. 5 out of 5

    Susan

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sydney More

  28. 4 out of 5

    Aprils

  29. 5 out of 5

    Connor P

  30. 4 out of 5

    Glen Farrelly

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