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Since returning from London, the three Incorrigible children and their plucky governess, Miss Penelope Lumley, have been exceedingly busy. Despite their wolfish upbringing, the children have taken up bird watching, with no unfortunate consequences--yet. And a perplexing gift raises hard questions about how Penelope came to be left at the Swanburne Academy for Poor Bright F Since returning from London, the three Incorrigible children and their plucky governess, Miss Penelope Lumley, have been exceedingly busy. Despite their wolfish upbringing, the children have taken up bird watching, with no unfortunate consequences--yet. And a perplexing gift raises hard questions about how Penelope came to be left at the Swanburne Academy for Poor Bright Females, and why her parents never bothered to return for her. But theirs are not the only families with mysteries to solve. When Lord Fredrick’s long-absent mother arrives with the noted explorer, Admiral Faucet, gruesome secrets tumble out of the Ashton family tree. And when the Admiral’s prized racing ostrich gets loose in the forest, it will take all the Incorrigibles’ skills to find her. The hunt for the runaway ostrich is on. But Penelope is worried. Once back in the wild, will the children forget about books and poetry, and go back to their howling, wolfish ways? What if they never want to come back to Ashton Place at all?


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Since returning from London, the three Incorrigible children and their plucky governess, Miss Penelope Lumley, have been exceedingly busy. Despite their wolfish upbringing, the children have taken up bird watching, with no unfortunate consequences--yet. And a perplexing gift raises hard questions about how Penelope came to be left at the Swanburne Academy for Poor Bright F Since returning from London, the three Incorrigible children and their plucky governess, Miss Penelope Lumley, have been exceedingly busy. Despite their wolfish upbringing, the children have taken up bird watching, with no unfortunate consequences--yet. And a perplexing gift raises hard questions about how Penelope came to be left at the Swanburne Academy for Poor Bright Females, and why her parents never bothered to return for her. But theirs are not the only families with mysteries to solve. When Lord Fredrick’s long-absent mother arrives with the noted explorer, Admiral Faucet, gruesome secrets tumble out of the Ashton family tree. And when the Admiral’s prized racing ostrich gets loose in the forest, it will take all the Incorrigibles’ skills to find her. The hunt for the runaway ostrich is on. But Penelope is worried. Once back in the wild, will the children forget about books and poetry, and go back to their howling, wolfish ways? What if they never want to come back to Ashton Place at all?

30 review for The Unseen Guest

  1. 5 out of 5

    Melki

    Lumawoo and the Incorrigibles are back from London for this volume, and they are bird-watching . . . a challenging task for small fry who find birds to be not only attractive, but tasty as well. This leads to the sighting of a large, unusual bird, which leads to a night spent in the woods, which leads to, of course, another mystery. (view spoiler)[This one borders on the disturbing - someone knew there were children living in a cave, and provided them with warm bedding, and yummy sandwiches . . Lumawoo and the Incorrigibles are back from London for this volume, and they are bird-watching . . . a challenging task for small fry who find birds to be not only attractive, but tasty as well. This leads to the sighting of a large, unusual bird, which leads to a night spent in the woods, which leads to, of course, another mystery. (view spoiler)[This one borders on the disturbing - someone knew there were children living in a cave, and provided them with warm bedding, and yummy sandwiches . . . yet did nothing to rescue them. Why? (hide spoiler)] I wish there had been a bit more interaction between Lord Frederick's mother, and Lady Constance - a visit from one's mother-in-law is always fraught with disquietude - believe me, I know. BUT, some likable characters from the previous book make an appearance, and there is a pretty funny seance, so all is forgiven. Onto the next book, where I will undoubtedly be entertained, but left scratching my head over all the swirling mysteries.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    This series is starting to aggravate me. Three books in, and there are still no answers to the big mystery but this book did provide a lot more questions (Surely the eminent Agatha Swanburne must have some useful advice about how rude it is to present questions but never answers). I feel like the series is still warming up to the story and, much as I enjoy Ms. Wood’s style, as a reader, I’m ready to move past the appetizers. Stop hinting and having people conveniently unavailable and, much as I This series is starting to aggravate me. Three books in, and there are still no answers to the big mystery but this book did provide a lot more questions (Surely the eminent Agatha Swanburne must have some useful advice about how rude it is to present questions but never answers). I feel like the series is still warming up to the story and, much as I enjoy Ms. Wood’s style, as a reader, I’m ready to move past the appetizers. Stop hinting and having people conveniently unavailable and, much as I love the off-topic rambles, please cut them down. I’m a good deal older than the target audience for this book, and even I was getting bored with some of the sidetracks. There’s a point where they go from being quirky to being cumbersome, and the drawn-out introduction for The Unseen Guest is a good example of that. Miss Lumley and her three charges go off on an ostrich hunt, which leads to a séance (really, it makes sense in the book), which leads to a resolution that’s not much of a resolution when you get right down to it. These books are fun, but I’m more and more stumped as to who the target audience is supposed to be. For that matter, at the rate the reveals are going, children reading this series are going to be parents themselves by the time we learn anything. Quasi-recommended.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sesana

    A bit better than the previous book. There are still far, far too many questions, and if you're looking for answers you're better off watching X-Files mytharc episodes. But I at least felt like more interesting and incisive questions were being posed by the text- Penelope is starting to wonder about the right things, and that's good. It's starting to get a little frustrating that we haven't actually had much forward momentum on any of this series' many mysteries, but at least the main character A bit better than the previous book. There are still far, far too many questions, and if you're looking for answers you're better off watching X-Files mytharc episodes. But I at least felt like more interesting and incisive questions were being posed by the text- Penelope is starting to wonder about the right things, and that's good. It's starting to get a little frustrating that we haven't actually had much forward momentum on any of this series' many mysteries, but at least the main character acknowledges there are mysteries! At this point, I'm halfway through the series, and I feel like we should have gotten further in the overarching story. I would be strongly considering stopping with the series, if not for the fact that it is only six books, after all, and because I dearly love Penelope and the Incorrigibles. I'm still more enchanted by the distinct style Wood has taken with this series than not, but the digressions are getting a bit out of hand.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jodi

    When I picked up the first of these books, I found it charming, witty, and utterly enjoyable. The second was the same, but it was darker than its predecessor. I was really disappointed with the direction taken in this third installment. A seance--however much a fiasco--is conducted, and a mysterious elderly medium takes a central role in the book, looked to as the only hope for a solution to the various dilemmas of the characters. I understand that in the setting and time period of these books f When I picked up the first of these books, I found it charming, witty, and utterly enjoyable. The second was the same, but it was darker than its predecessor. I was really disappointed with the direction taken in this third installment. A seance--however much a fiasco--is conducted, and a mysterious elderly medium takes a central role in the book, looked to as the only hope for a solution to the various dilemmas of the characters. I understand that in the setting and time period of these books fortune-telling, seances, and other dabbling into the occult were games, festivities, and curiosities of popular interest to the people of the time. They supposed it was all innocent (albeit spooky) fun, not realizing to what (and to whom) they were really making themselves vulnerable. Obviously, this is still prevalent today, but I think some of us have a better understanding now as to who we are really dealing with in these "harmless" amusements. As a Christian, I have to caution that, while seemingly innocent and harmless, stuff like this running like a dark thread through a charming, lovely book series that is otherwise so enjoyable, should not be taken lightly. It's an easy job to make something sinister look harmless and attractive, and even easier to believe that it IS harmless; not realizing the danger of this point of view and the pervading darkness it disguises. The occult has no place in a Christian's life, no matter how small the part, how brief the encounter. I admit it's taken me weeks of mulling over this book and a thought-provoking, cautionary sermon about playing with the dark side to help me come to this conclusion about the book. I wanted to like it, I really did, but my conscience warns me and I comply. Verdict: the delightfulness of the series cannot make up for, overshadow, or eliminate the underlying darkness it promotes. It's not worth it.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Catherine

    “Busy hands and idle minds have knitted many a sweater; Busy minds and idle hands have knitted many a brow.” When Lord Frederick Ashton's long-absent mother shows up, Lady Constance becomes even more hysterical than normal. That the elder Lady Ashton brings with her a new beau, the sketchy Admiral Faucet (pronounced faw-say), knocks Lord Frederick off keel as well. And when Admiral Faucet's imported racing ostrich escapes from its pen, the Incorrigible children are sent into the woods to track i “Busy hands and idle minds have knitted many a sweater; Busy minds and idle hands have knitted many a brow.” When Lord Frederick Ashton's long-absent mother shows up, Lady Constance becomes even more hysterical than normal. That the elder Lady Ashton brings with her a new beau, the sketchy Admiral Faucet (pronounced faw-say), knocks Lord Frederick off keel as well. And when Admiral Faucet's imported racing ostrich escapes from its pen, the Incorrigible children are sent into the woods to track it down before Lord Frederick. Along the way, Penelope discovers more details about the Incorrigibles' formative years in the forest. Let's just say they did indeed include a wolf, whom they call Mama Woof, and a lot of excellent sandwiches. This third installment moved the plot along nicely, but generated more questions than answers.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    Delightful, as usual with wordplay and nonsense, but I was hoping for more questions to be answered than raised. This book felt a bit more like it was stringing me along to the next one without resolving some issues along the way, leaving an ultimately unsatisfying feeling. Yes, we want a series to continue, but we want some resolutions too. Nonetheless, there was action and excitement, humor, surreptitious learning and, as stated, lots of wonderful wordplay. Ahwooo!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Dolores

    I really love this series, although this one wasn't quite as wonderful as the first two. 'Course, that's like saying the "Mona Lisa" isn't quite as wonderful as the "The Last Supper". This really is such a fun, quirky little series. From pie charts to rhetorical questions to absurd anagrams, I did enjoy this third entry. It just lacked a bit of optotoomuchoverthetopism, I guess. I really love this series, although this one wasn't quite as wonderful as the first two. 'Course, that's like saying the "Mona Lisa" isn't quite as wonderful as the "The Last Supper". This really is such a fun, quirky little series. From pie charts to rhetorical questions to absurd anagrams, I did enjoy this third entry. It just lacked a bit of optotoomuchoverthetopism, I guess.

  8. 5 out of 5

    MovieCritic

    This one was a little weird, but the writing is still so awesome and the story is cute!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

    Well, I just finished a very inteteresting read about a nanny who comes to care for three children whom she finds are feral children who've been raised by wolves. The main thing of the book is its irony: she is teaching them Latin and Literature while they are learning not to chase squirrels and howl. It has a big mystery at its core, and I thought it was a lot of fun....sort of like Sound of Music meets The Series of Unfortunate Events. The hyperbole and irony are great talking points! Well, I just finished a very inteteresting read about a nanny who comes to care for three children whom she finds are feral children who've been raised by wolves. The main thing of the book is its irony: she is teaching them Latin and Literature while they are learning not to chase squirrels and howl. It has a big mystery at its core, and I thought it was a lot of fun....sort of like Sound of Music meets The Series of Unfortunate Events. The hyperbole and irony are great talking points!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie P (Because My Mother Read)

    I listened to this one as an audiobook and the narration by Katherine Kellgren continues to be superb. It's such a fun and entertaining story and the clever writing of Maryrose Wood pairs perfectly with the dynamic narration on audiobook. I liked, but didn't love, the first book and I'm so glad I continued with the series because I have thoroughly enjoyed the second and third book and am looking forward to continuing on in the series! I listened to this one as an audiobook and the narration by Katherine Kellgren continues to be superb. It's such a fun and entertaining story and the clever writing of Maryrose Wood pairs perfectly with the dynamic narration on audiobook. I liked, but didn't love, the first book and I'm so glad I continued with the series because I have thoroughly enjoyed the second and third book and am looking forward to continuing on in the series!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Stephi

    The plot thickens...

  12. 5 out of 5

    Judy

    rating: 2.5 The School Library Journal called this "smart, surprising satire." But it crosses over the line into absurd and silly. Here's an example: Lady Constance kicked off both of her pretty silver shoes and began to haul herself into the low, spreading branches of a nearby tree. At the sight of her mistress shinnying up the gnarled trunk, Margaret, whose voice tended to rise in pitch when she was nervous, let out a squeak that only bats could hear and ... p 45 Why did she do this? Because a ca rating: 2.5 The School Library Journal called this "smart, surprising satire." But it crosses over the line into absurd and silly. Here's an example: Lady Constance kicked off both of her pretty silver shoes and began to haul herself into the low, spreading branches of a nearby tree. At the sight of her mistress shinnying up the gnarled trunk, Margaret, whose voice tended to rise in pitch when she was nervous, let out a squeak that only bats could hear and ... p 45 Why did she do this? Because a carriage was arriving with her mother-in-law, so Lady C was hiding. That would be tolerable except the text jumps from one such event to the next with minimal development of either character or storyline. Maybe it mirrors the minds of hyperactivity personalities. (And my intent is not to offend.) I did like parts of the plot, so it's too bad I struggled with this writing style. Numerous references to EA Poe's "The Raven."

  13. 5 out of 5

    Victoria

    The plot is s-l-o-w, but I love the style.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Bailey

    I highly enjoy the style of the books but um... Answers? Where are you? These books do not fail to give funny views and words and are in fact rather educational. They are not lacking in funny but true bits of wisdom but are rather lacking in answers. I think that before starting this book I was slightly optoomuchstic.(did I spell it right?)

  15. 4 out of 5

    Faith Hough

    Maybe 4.8 stars? I didn't love it as much as the first two...but it's probably suffering from being a sequel to such a remarkably fun first book. The Audio book is incredible! Maybe 4.8 stars? I didn't love it as much as the first two...but it's probably suffering from being a sequel to such a remarkably fun first book. The Audio book is incredible!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Patricia Powell

    If you want a good laugh, a chortle, a chuckle, read “Unseen Guest” by Maryrose Woods (Scholastic 2010), the third in the series of “The Incorrigible Children of Ashton Place.” Really you should start with the first, “The Mysterious Howling” then “The Hidden Gallery.” If you’ve already read them listen to the book on disc read by Katherine Kellgren (Listening Library). Kellgren’s regal over-the-top oh-so-dramatic reading is uproarious. What a terrific pairing—Wood’s writing and Kellgren’s reading If you want a good laugh, a chortle, a chuckle, read “Unseen Guest” by Maryrose Woods (Scholastic 2010), the third in the series of “The Incorrigible Children of Ashton Place.” Really you should start with the first, “The Mysterious Howling” then “The Hidden Gallery.” If you’ve already read them listen to the book on disc read by Katherine Kellgren (Listening Library). Kellgren’s regal over-the-top oh-so-dramatic reading is uproarious. What a terrific pairing—Wood’s writing and Kellgren’s reading. This would be a great book on a family trip where everyone could listen to the same thing. Together. The overarching story is that of three children who were raised by wolves and are being educated to become more child-like, less doggy. The job falls to teenaged governess Miss Penelope Lumley who herself has been educated at the Swanburne Academy for Poor Bright Females. But who are these children really? In the “Unseen Guest,” plucky Penelope must divert a money-hungry admiral from making her wolfy students--Alexander, Beowulf, and Cassiopeia Incorrigible--into a circus sideshow. And if that weren’t enough, she does her work while they are all hunting down the admiral’s runaway ostrich through the English countryside. The children, having been raised by wolves, are remarkably fine trackers. And we learn a little about their former lives as wolves, but the mystery is still…well, mysterious. The reader receives smashing good advice handed down from the Academy’s founder, Agatha Swanburne, such as: “Nest eggs do not hatch unless you sit on them for a good long time.” And in the course of this Victorian melodrama, we are educated to Victorian ways. For instance, after dinner the gentlemen retire to the study for cigars and brandy. The children’s guardian, Lord Ashton says, “Let the ladies play whist, or stitch advice onto pillows, or whatever it is they do when we’re not around.” I giggled throughout, but I let out a particularly rude guffaw when Lady Constance Ashton saw a mouse and “let out a squeak that only a bat could hear.” I’ve reviewed the first and second of the series in April 2011. That’s how good it is. I’m steering it your way again, but this time you might want to listen to it. Patricia Hruby Powell (www.talesforallages.com) is a nationally touring speaker, dancer, storyteller, librarian and children’s book author. You can enter a discussion or see the book covers on her blog at www.talesforallages.com/reviews/

  17. 5 out of 5

    Pamela

    Audiobook narrated by Katherine Kellgren I still love the writing and the wit of the author, especially when she inserts educational facts in a very entertaining way, but the reason I had to rate this book lower is because the last half of the book focused so much on the seance. I would've liked one of the mysteries to be revealed in another way. ___________________________ This review from Jodi hit the nail on the head for me. She said it much better than I. I am disappointing as well because we w Audiobook narrated by Katherine Kellgren I still love the writing and the wit of the author, especially when she inserts educational facts in a very entertaining way, but the reason I had to rate this book lower is because the last half of the book focused so much on the seance. I would've liked one of the mysteries to be revealed in another way. ___________________________ This review from Jodi hit the nail on the head for me. She said it much better than I. I am disappointing as well because we were really loving these books: "When I picked up the first of these books, I found it charming, witty, and utterly enjoyable. The second was the same, but it was darker than its predecessor. I was really disappointed with the direction taken in this third installment. A seance, however much a fiasco, is conducted and an elderly, mysterious medium takes a central role in the book, looked to as the only hope for a solution to the various dilemmas of the characters. I understand that in the setting and time period of these books fortune-telling, seances, and other dabbling into the occult were games, festivities, and curiosities of popular interest to the people of the time. They supposed it was all innocent (albeit spooky) fun, not realizing to what (and to whom) they were really making themselves vulnerable. Obviously, this is still prevalent today, but I think some of us have a better understanding now as to who we are really dealing with in these "harmless" amusements. As a Christian, I have to caution that, while seemingly innocent and harmless, stuff like this running like a dark thread through a charming, lovely book series that is otherwise so enjoyable, should not be taken lightly. It's an easy job to make something sinister look harmless and attractive, and even easier to believe that it IS harmless; not realizing the danger of this point of view and the pervading darkness it disguises. The occult has no place in a Christian's life, no matter how small the part, how brief the encounter. I admit it's taken me weeks of mulling over this book and a thought-provoking, cautionary sermon about playing with the dark side to help me come to this conclusion about the book. I wanted to like it, I really did, but my conscience warns me and I comply. Verdict: the delightfulness of the series cannot make up for, overshadow, or eliminate the underlying darkness it promotes. It's not worth it."

  18. 4 out of 5

    Charlyn

    Oh, this series is maddening! So many questions still unanswered and new ones appearing. In this third book in the series, Miss Penelope Lumley is still attempting to civilize her three charges who have been raised by wolves in the wild. She has been hired by Lord Frederick to be the children's governess, but both he and his wife are extremely detached from the parenting process. The mistress of the manor, Lady Constance, receives word that Lord Frederick's long-absent mother is soon to arrive Oh, this series is maddening! So many questions still unanswered and new ones appearing. In this third book in the series, Miss Penelope Lumley is still attempting to civilize her three charges who have been raised by wolves in the wild. She has been hired by Lord Frederick to be the children's governess, but both he and his wife are extremely detached from the parenting process. The mistress of the manor, Lady Constance, receives word that Lord Frederick's long-absent mother is soon to arrive with her beau, explorer Admiral Faucet. They arrive but without precious cargo that has somehow escaped--an ostrich named Bertha. It takes Faucet very little time to perceive the unique abilities of the children to trail wild beasts and make their sounds so he chooses to employ them in tracking down Bertha in the forest outside the estate. Miss Lumley always has the children's best interests in mind, but she is unable to dissuade the Admiral from this plan of action. And that is how she finds herself accompanying the Admiral and the Incorrigibles on their trek into the forest. Bertha is very important to the the Admiral's plans to use the Widow Ashton's money to finance a scheme to raise and breed ostriches as racing animals. Once out on the search, however, he realizes that the children would make excellent specimens for a circus or a sideshow. Will Penelope be able to make the wealthy widow aware of his devious plans? Will the children want to return to Ashton Place after their jaunt in the woods? Will Penelope ever locate her own parents and the parents of the children? Questions, questions and I've refrained from mentioning the seance or the elk or from wondering about the possibility that Lord Ashton might be a werewolf. I'm ready for book four.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Becky

    I really got into this series, it's fun and exciting and sort of like the Unfortunate Events series by Lemony Snicket. At the end of book 2 I was still left with a lot of unanswered questions and I was desperate for this one so I could get some answers. I requested this book at the library and they were very good and ordered it for me, it actually came in quite quickly. So I settled down to find out what was behind the mysteries. In that respect I was slightly disappointed, nothing is really answe I really got into this series, it's fun and exciting and sort of like the Unfortunate Events series by Lemony Snicket. At the end of book 2 I was still left with a lot of unanswered questions and I was desperate for this one so I could get some answers. I requested this book at the library and they were very good and ordered it for me, it actually came in quite quickly. So I settled down to find out what was behind the mysteries. In that respect I was slightly disappointed, nothing is really answered in this book. More mysteries and questions are created but nothing is really solved. We still don't know where the children came from, why Lord Frederick has illness of a werewolf, who Judge Quinzy really is or why Penelope has to disguise her real hair colour. All of these questions are driving me mad! The plot thickens in this book, we find a bit more about the children's earlier years in the wood and get closer to some of the other characters but I'm still left wondering!!! Whilst I am frustrated, I did still enjoy the book. The children are growing up and learning new skills and developing individual personalities, they captivate you and make you want to know more about them. You also see Penelope really mature in this book and it was refreshing. She still maintains a certain about of childhood innocence but she is definitely becoming more mature. Filled with charming illustrations to go with the story, this book is delightful to read, it holds your attention and the plot flows well so you are never bored or waiting for something to happen. Some bits are very silly and unbelievable, but it's all part of the books charm. I hope there will be another one out soon because I really want to solve this whole mystery and these books are strangely addictive.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Mel B.

    I love these books. They combine the typical (almost orphan) governess of the Victorian era with atypical charges, humor and mystery. Penelope Lumley in this third book has learned how to better control the children -- though she's not more than a child herself. At the very end of the book, she realizes that there's a time for growing up, even for herself. In the meantime, she has to divert a money-hungry admiral from making her charges into a circus sideshow. Love love these books. My biggest c I love these books. They combine the typical (almost orphan) governess of the Victorian era with atypical charges, humor and mystery. Penelope Lumley in this third book has learned how to better control the children -- though she's not more than a child herself. At the very end of the book, she realizes that there's a time for growing up, even for herself. In the meantime, she has to divert a money-hungry admiral from making her charges into a circus sideshow. Love love these books. My biggest complaint isn't much of one: it's such a fast read that I finished it very quickly and must wait for the next one. I suppose it's like the Giddy-Yap Rainbow books, only much much better. My other real complaint is occasionally the moralizing of the narrator gets slightly convoluted where I really had to think about it. Though I did like the comparison with acronyms and lasers -- giving the audience just a hint that we know we're not expected to believe this is really a Victorian-era book, despite its plucky governess trappings. Dying for the next one. Dying for more answers. I can see this could take a while. Maryrose Wood can't write them fast enough for me, apparently.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Mayda

    The Incorrigible children are actually becoming more civilized and it’s clear that they possess abilities and talents beyond what their limited beginning would suggest. But it doesn’t take much to make them revert to their former ways. When Lord Ashton’s mother arrives at Ashton Manor with a suitor, it sets in motion a series of events that forces Governess Penelope Lumley to use all her strengths and cunning to save the children and herself. When the children and Penelope set off in search of a The Incorrigible children are actually becoming more civilized and it’s clear that they possess abilities and talents beyond what their limited beginning would suggest. But it doesn’t take much to make them revert to their former ways. When Lord Ashton’s mother arrives at Ashton Manor with a suitor, it sets in motion a series of events that forces Governess Penelope Lumley to use all her strengths and cunning to save the children and herself. When the children and Penelope set off in search of a runaway ostrich, the children, being more and more at home in the woods, end up saving their governess. Could it be that the children, reunited with Mama Wolf, would want to stay and live in the woods again? Great adventures await them and the reader in this gentle but exciting novel, well written with wondrous imagination.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Cyndi

    Very well written, the overall mystery keeps the reader moving quickly from book to book. Promoting reading. Yay! Makes me want to haul out the embroidery floss and get to work on the adages of Agatha onto pillows. Maybe I could add some of my own, could use stuff for the next yard sale. Then my witticisms could be molding in basements throughout town. Yay! But, I digress, cute book. The series is fun reading. Doesn't involve a lot of deep thoughts or feelings, and it doesn't put out terrible mes Very well written, the overall mystery keeps the reader moving quickly from book to book. Promoting reading. Yay! Makes me want to haul out the embroidery floss and get to work on the adages of Agatha onto pillows. Maybe I could add some of my own, could use stuff for the next yard sale. Then my witticisms could be molding in basements throughout town. Yay! But, I digress, cute book. The series is fun reading. Doesn't involve a lot of deep thoughts or feelings, and it doesn't put out terrible messages to young girls, like so many YA books are prone to do. 'Twilight' I'm talking to you.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Daphne

    After loving the first book and feeling a bit 'meh' about the second, this book is a step in the right direction again, even if it doesn't quite live up to the first book to me. I enjoyed the atmosphere and the characters a lot in this novel, as well as the writing style. I could easily imagine children enjoying the funny anecdotes and jokes in the narrative. But my biggest issue with this series right now is how few questions are answered. It's still keeping me interested, but I do wish we woul After loving the first book and feeling a bit 'meh' about the second, this book is a step in the right direction again, even if it doesn't quite live up to the first book to me. I enjoyed the atmosphere and the characters a lot in this novel, as well as the writing style. I could easily imagine children enjoying the funny anecdotes and jokes in the narrative. But my biggest issue with this series right now is how few questions are answered. It's still keeping me interested, but I do wish we would get a few more answers instead of only more questions to ponder. I'm very curious how everything will end up, but I do hope the next book will actually start answering a few things. Right now it feels a little bit too much like all these books have mostly been set-up, and three books is a lot of time to only set things up for later in the story. All in all, I enjoy this series but I am hoping for some revelations soon.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Karen Barber

    As with books one and two, this has the whimsical style that entertains and educates us. On this occasion, Penelope steps tantalisingly closer to working out what’s going on with her three charges. The arrival of Admiral Fawcet to Ashton Place creates a problem. Full of schemes to make money from exotic creatures, he is taking an unhealthy interest in the children and their affinity with wolves. Sadly, we get no answers and even more hints at a link between Penelope and the children. There’s a st As with books one and two, this has the whimsical style that entertains and educates us. On this occasion, Penelope steps tantalisingly closer to working out what’s going on with her three charges. The arrival of Admiral Fawcet to Ashton Place creates a problem. Full of schemes to make money from exotic creatures, he is taking an unhealthy interest in the children and their affinity with wolves. Sadly, we get no answers and even more hints at a link between Penelope and the children. There’s a strong suggestion of who might be involved, but nothing concrete. If you’re already a fan then this is part of the story. You’ll be entertained, but it’s just a moment in the bigger plot so we don’t get the answers we’re waiting for.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ginger

    It feels like the series is hitting its stride with this third book. I really enjoyed the return of characters (Simon, old Madame Ionesco) and the introduction of new characters (you'll have to read it to find out). I agree there are many questions and little answers but I think that's part of the fun. This is such a witty and entertaining story. It feels like the series is hitting its stride with this third book. I really enjoyed the return of characters (Simon, old Madame Ionesco) and the introduction of new characters (you'll have to read it to find out). I agree there are many questions and little answers but I think that's part of the fun. This is such a witty and entertaining story.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Amy Meyers

    Still frustrating to not get many answers to the mystery of Ashton Place's curse and who the children, and indeed, even Penelope herself, are. However, still delightfully written and wonderfully performed on audio by Kellgren, and I still love the little English lessons on things like anagrams or irony or rhetorical questions. Still frustrating to not get many answers to the mystery of Ashton Place's curse and who the children, and indeed, even Penelope herself, are. However, still delightfully written and wonderfully performed on audio by Kellgren, and I still love the little English lessons on things like anagrams or irony or rhetorical questions.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Susy *MotherLambReads*

    I am starting too love these more than the Littles. Hehe The mystery gets more and more intriguing. Love how the author really uses different and rich vocabulary. The book even goes into detail teaching the meaning behind words and puns. Deep etymology. Parental guidance suggested at certain points as the fortuna teller let makes another appearance.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Mira

    More filler than the previous books in the series and the reveals still come at a painfully slow pace. If these books weren't so quick to read I'd be resentful. On the whole I'm at odds with the cliffhanger as a concept. I can't handle them and yes I know that's saying way more about me than the book! More filler than the previous books in the series and the reveals still come at a painfully slow pace. If these books weren't so quick to read I'd be resentful. On the whole I'm at odds with the cliffhanger as a concept. I can't handle them and yes I know that's saying way more about me than the book!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Gaea

    And the plot continues to thicken! I'll admit, this series is becoming a lot less predictable with every book I read. It does get a little too drawn out at times, but it definitely keeps my interest engaged and my curiosity hooked. I hope the next book or two starts answering some of the (many, many, so many) questions I have! And the plot continues to thicken! I'll admit, this series is becoming a lot less predictable with every book I read. It does get a little too drawn out at times, but it definitely keeps my interest engaged and my curiosity hooked. I hope the next book or two starts answering some of the (many, many, so many) questions I have!

  30. 5 out of 5

    M

    Had a time of it explaining cannibals and seances but we quite enjoyed this one too, we are very excited to be moving on and we don't know about anyone else but we are both quite in love with the Incorrigbles and Lumawoo and Simawoo Had a time of it explaining cannibals and seances but we quite enjoyed this one too, we are very excited to be moving on and we don't know about anyone else but we are both quite in love with the Incorrigbles and Lumawoo and Simawoo

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