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The Hidden Window Mystery

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Nancy is intrigued by a magazine article offering a large reward to anyone finding a missing medieval stained-glass window. She invites Bess and George to join her on a search in Charlottesville, Virginia. During the girls' investigation of Ivy Hall, an old rundown, southern mansion, rented by a superstitious actress, they encounter a hostile ghost. Eerie sounds come from Nancy is intrigued by a magazine article offering a large reward to anyone finding a missing medieval stained-glass window. She invites Bess and George to join her on a search in Charlottesville, Virginia. During the girls' investigation of Ivy Hall, an old rundown, southern mansion, rented by a superstitious actress, they encounter a hostile ghost. Eerie sounds come from a beautiful neighboring estate that is surrounded by a high brick wall. Could these mysterious noises and the ghost at Ivy Hall be connected? This book is the revised text. The plot of the original story (©1956) is similar with minor revisions.


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Nancy is intrigued by a magazine article offering a large reward to anyone finding a missing medieval stained-glass window. She invites Bess and George to join her on a search in Charlottesville, Virginia. During the girls' investigation of Ivy Hall, an old rundown, southern mansion, rented by a superstitious actress, they encounter a hostile ghost. Eerie sounds come from Nancy is intrigued by a magazine article offering a large reward to anyone finding a missing medieval stained-glass window. She invites Bess and George to join her on a search in Charlottesville, Virginia. During the girls' investigation of Ivy Hall, an old rundown, southern mansion, rented by a superstitious actress, they encounter a hostile ghost. Eerie sounds come from a beautiful neighboring estate that is surrounded by a high brick wall. Could these mysterious noises and the ghost at Ivy Hall be connected? This book is the revised text. The plot of the original story (©1956) is similar with minor revisions.

30 review for The Hidden Window Mystery

  1. 4 out of 5

    Victoria Goodbrand

    Not the biggest fan of this one yet it was pretty good. 😄

  2. 5 out of 5

    Whitney

    I would like to know which ghost writer composed this particular mystery. AND I would like to know what recreational substance they were enjoying while writing. I needed to keep returning to this book, to page through it, to remind myself if THAT many instances of ballyhoo and highjinx REALLY occurred here, or if I was actually thinking of a different book. Nope, it's all here! Mail scams, an unconscious postman, flying peacock feathers, an actual peacock strutting around and fleeing a crime sce I would like to know which ghost writer composed this particular mystery. AND I would like to know what recreational substance they were enjoying while writing. I needed to keep returning to this book, to page through it, to remind myself if THAT many instances of ballyhoo and highjinx REALLY occurred here, or if I was actually thinking of a different book. Nope, it's all here! Mail scams, an unconscious postman, flying peacock feathers, an actual peacock strutting around and fleeing a crime scene, bronzed bird feet (supposedly an obvious copy of a peacock's, as if peacock feet are shaped differently than all other bird feet) . . . The list goes on. Two car crashes, a purchase of new car, Southern hospitality*, a creepy attic, secret passage ways and a "ghost" . . . A class on stained glass making, tree climbing to escape an attacking dog, falling into an underground river and swimming to safety while wearing pajamas. It still continues! A luncheon party, a little flirtation with a young man who is NOT Ned Nickerson, followed by a date with, yes, Ned Nickerson. A mother and daughter who have bought aforementioned "haunted" manor house, needing to comfort the mother who often goes into hysterics and faints, needing to support the daughter who is trying to say NO to a creep who keeps asking for a date. A mysterious neighbor who lives in a manor house surrounded by huge walls: If he is not hatching some evil plan, the community would like him to open his gates and host a frikkin Garden party, come on, man, don't be a loser. *The "Southern hospitality" that is lavished about in this novel, supposedly placed somewhere in Virginia, is fake and sugar-coated. When Nancy and George navigate those underground tunnels, they happily mention things like, "Oh, the slaves used these to carry food between the kitchen and the manor house. This is not a good place to drop a giant turkey, lololol." The tone sweeps along like slaves were happy servants, glad to help their masters, yes ma'am and yes sir, what a beautiful day, we're so glad you take good care of us. But actually these days everyone needs to realize that slaves can be defined as "prisoners with jobs," and such a practice had no business happening so recently in history. It's horrid. Nonetheless, there are No boring moments in this Nancy book. Aside from that one rankling blitheness about an ugly history, the plot is madcap and unlike any other I've read so far.

  3. 4 out of 5

    John Yelverton

    Yet another great mystery story to this add to this great book series.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Orinoco Womble (tidy bag and all)

    The whole time I was reading this, I kept hearing the chase music from the original series of Scooby Doo, Where Are You? in my head. From George exclaiming "Hypers!" (Yoicks!) every five minutes to the girls sliding down a hidden chute in the middle of the night (probably going "Whoooops!" like the gang from the Mystery Machine), this instalment felt much more 1966 than 1956. Particularly when one of the adults has hysterics from a car accident, and the doctor injects a sedative saying she'll "s The whole time I was reading this, I kept hearing the chase music from the original series of Scooby Doo, Where Are You? in my head. From George exclaiming "Hypers!" (Yoicks!) every five minutes to the girls sliding down a hidden chute in the middle of the night (probably going "Whoooops!" like the gang from the Mystery Machine), this instalment felt much more 1966 than 1956. Particularly when one of the adults has hysterics from a car accident, and the doctor injects a sedative saying she'll "sleep for an hour and wake up much steadier." Where can I get me some of that? At another point the "escape scene" for Nancy and co. owes more to Westerns of the period. Nancy and her pals head south in this story, and the ghostwriter propagates the old legend of Jefferson's bed that could be "raised up to the ceiling" to get it out of the way during the day. This tale was made up by someone in the 19th century and doubted even then, as it appears in only one very doubtful source. Wonder why the writer put it in? Ned and his pals, football players all, turn up from college for one short evening. Not once are they referred to as "college students"--but of course you know Nancy would be dating the captain of the football team! Curiously enough, she is 18 and "has already attended art school"--when did she find time for that between the prom and all the sleuthing and travelling around she's done so far in her short life? Of course we have the delightful (!) ND meme of the police bringing her to the suspects and allowing her to question them at length--and of course the baddies answer right up and tell all! Three stars because it made me laugh so hard--in all the wrong places.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    Another delightful trip down memory lane! And as a side note - Ned's status is downgraded here. While he is usually referred to as Nancy's "special friend" and MAYBE as her boyfriend once or twice, here we are told "they had been friends for years." Just friends. Poor Ned.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kathyanngallagher

    I believe I read an original version with 214 pages, but it didn't appear in the choices I had to pick from. That being said, it was another Nancy Drew book. Full of mystery and suspense, sort of.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Christy

    I know I read this when I was younger, but when I realized that it was sent in the city I now live in, I had to read it again. A typical Nancy Drew mystery that is short and simple to read. Kept me entertained and reminded me of how much I loved these books as a young girl.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Claire S

    I read a bunch of these as a girl, along with a few Hardy Boys, and even a few.. was it 'Bobbsey twins'? Not sure if I read this one or not, but came across it as a grown up. Thought I'd explore how well they stood the test of time with my daughter - not well. In our case. But perhaps some others do still find them fun. For that instance, thought I'd mention a few things. This one takes place in a mansion in Charleston, SC; which has a number of interesting features. One set of features has to do w I read a bunch of these as a girl, along with a few Hardy Boys, and even a few.. was it 'Bobbsey twins'? Not sure if I read this one or not, but came across it as a grown up. Thought I'd explore how well they stood the test of time with my daughter - not well. In our case. But perhaps some others do still find them fun. For that instance, thought I'd mention a few things. This one takes place in a mansion in Charleston, SC; which has a number of interesting features. One set of features has to do with its history as a plantation house during the slave days. There is a long tunnel that goes below the house: "When the girls reached the pool into which George had fallen, she laughed. "Probably this was where the slaves paused to fill pitchers on their way to serve meals." Finally, at the end of the tunnel, there is a bolted door; and beyond that - the slave quarters. None of which is of note to the characters in the book, which was bizarre to me as a grown-up. Maybe it's a Southern thing. The other thing is that this mystery centers on peacock feathers. They keep popping up in the story, which has to do also with parts of the house that were decorated by peacock feather designs originally. Turns out, one of the characters in the book is from India, and he had been hiding the peacocks because he thought Americans were superstitious about them, believing them to bring bad luck. Earlier on in the book is mentions that the feathers in their fantails, especially, are said to bring bad luck. That notion is scoffed at (they use words like 'scoff' in these books). Actually in the text, "Nancy remarked that in India peacocks are held to be sacred. 'That's right," Mr. Ritter agreed. "And so are the cow and the monkey.' " " 'This bird is sacred to us Indians,' Mr. Honsho said, gazing affectionately at the beautiful feathered creature." Anyway, the mystery had to do with an antique stained-glass window (which showed a Knight riding off to battle, holding the family shield which has a peacock emblazoned on it), which had been covered up with brick in order to preserve it during the Civil War. Alls well that ends well: "'Well, Nancy,' she said, 'besides solving this whole mystery and exonerating innocent people, you've even proved that peacocks are above suspicion!'" So, those are some elements involved in this one instance..

  9. 4 out of 5

    Olivia

    **I read the original, 25 chapter version** this was my second time reading this book. i recall finding it a bit boring the first. upon rereading it i found it a bit annoying for the normal Nancy Drew reasons but mainly immense amounts of coincidences, theres more in this than in most books. I do have to say it was a little funny when the process of making stained glass windows was explained as it's something I have experience with. Although it was accurate it was amusing how the description was d **I read the original, 25 chapter version** this was my second time reading this book. i recall finding it a bit boring the first. upon rereading it i found it a bit annoying for the normal Nancy Drew reasons but mainly immense amounts of coincidences, theres more in this than in most books. I do have to say it was a little funny when the process of making stained glass windows was explained as it's something I have experience with. Although it was accurate it was amusing how the description was drawn out to try to make it seem more complicated that it really is.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Melanie

    Secret passageways and a hidden tunnel! And not available for kindle! Someone breaks into a house where the girls are staying and steals their lingerie. No joke. Nancy destroys yet another boat. Racism! I think this rewrite probably turned the house help from black to unambiguously raced, but they talk like mammies. Also, apparently peacocks are evil and bring bad luck. Nancy loses consciousness when hit by a rock thrown by an unknown assailant. George cuts her hand on glass and falls into water.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Evelyn

    After reading "The Hidden Window Mystery" by Carolyn Keene, I am completely speechless. This book is beyond amazing. This book has me reading non-stop, one page after another. The best features of this book are the way the author completely develops them. Nancy, the detective, and a friend, George are always wanting to see what happens next in solving the hidden window mystery. Where Bess is more of a cautious person. You would have never thought one specific event happened because of the beginn After reading "The Hidden Window Mystery" by Carolyn Keene, I am completely speechless. This book is beyond amazing. This book has me reading non-stop, one page after another. The best features of this book are the way the author completely develops them. Nancy, the detective, and a friend, George are always wanting to see what happens next in solving the hidden window mystery. Where Bess is more of a cautious person. You would have never thought one specific event happened because of the beginning. You are always eager to see what happens next, which I why I recommend this to mystery lovers!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Stacey

    I want to give this five stars, because it involves medieval stained glass! Which was usually in churches, but whatevs. What led to the four stars is that this takes place in a romanticized South. Also, two mysteries become one, as usual. Nancy's mail carrier (who apparently reads the mail he delivers?) tips Nancy off about a English earl looking for a stained glass window that was probably taken stolen from his family and taken to America. Also, peacocks were once thought of as bad luck? I had no I want to give this five stars, because it involves medieval stained glass! Which was usually in churches, but whatevs. What led to the four stars is that this takes place in a romanticized South. Also, two mysteries become one, as usual. Nancy's mail carrier (who apparently reads the mail he delivers?) tips Nancy off about a English earl looking for a stained glass window that was probably taken stolen from his family and taken to America. Also, peacocks were once thought of as bad luck? I had no idea. This leads Nancy to visit her cousin Susan in Virginia in search of clues. Susan has obvs married a rich white guy and they live in a "colonial" style house with a servant, Anna. I'm thinking Anna is black, but the text didn't say. Nancy somehow manages to not encounter any POC in any of her travels. Except for the rich Indian gentleman who refuses to let people see his garden. What I found interesting was that the group visit Thomas Jefferson's and James Madison's plantations but only the house of the eccentric actress they're helping has slave quarters specifically mentioned. The eccentric actress is hilarious. I loved her daughter, Annette, who is more adult her than her mother. And there's a cowboy from Oklahoma, for some reason. And the Indian gentleman. Nancy gets tied up AGAIN, but frees herself and saves the day as usual. I loved the descriptions of how to make stained glass. I learned a lot. Ned shows up to get attacked by a dog and then leaves. Overall, pretty fun. I do wonder what happened to Mr. Dondo, though.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    Overall this is a good book. The suspense is decent and there's a good sense of progress and momentum. This is also one of the few yellow backs with multiple culprits with different motives, giving a bit of variety to the investigation. That said, there are two major detractors. The first is the faulty premise. The book is set in Charlottesville because Nancy is looking for a British artifact and 'That whole area was settled by English people', to quote Nancy's reasoning. I don't mind coincidenc Overall this is a good book. The suspense is decent and there's a good sense of progress and momentum. This is also one of the few yellow backs with multiple culprits with different motives, giving a bit of variety to the investigation. That said, there are two major detractors. The first is the faulty premise. The book is set in Charlottesville because Nancy is looking for a British artifact and 'That whole area was settled by English people', to quote Nancy's reasoning. I don't mind coincidences in these books, but that is an extremely shaky reason to visit Charlottesville. It probably would have been better if the whole thing had been a coincidence; say Nancy was visiting her cousin and happened to find evidence that the hidden window was there. Or if Nancy had a more concrete reason to suspect the town. Maybe her cousin had heard rumors about a window matching the description. The second detractor is the books' use of Peacocks for scares. I'm not aware of the stereotype that peacocks bring bad luck, so every time someone screamed because they saw a peacock feather, it felt fake. Second, there is no reason for real peacocks to be involved. Nancy is looking for a window with peacock artwork. Why does she keep coming across real peacocks? And why does she think the real peacocks will lead her to the window? Again, I don't mind coincidences, but I would like it if Nancy didn't pretend that these things were connected when they couldn't possibly be.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Story_Girl

    Nancy certainly had her hands full with the mystery, or should I say these mysteries? It all starts with a missing letter, and a new neighbor determined to sue the postman for losing it, or Nancy for steeling it. Then comes a hunt for a very old, very valuable stain glass window featuring a peacock. With a reward on the cards though, this mystery attracts the attention of some pretty dishonest people. Then there is Nancy's cousin's, Susan Carr's, car accident. Side-swiped by another car, was it Nancy certainly had her hands full with the mystery, or should I say these mysteries? It all starts with a missing letter, and a new neighbor determined to sue the postman for losing it, or Nancy for steeling it. Then comes a hunt for a very old, very valuable stain glass window featuring a peacock. With a reward on the cards though, this mystery attracts the attention of some pretty dishonest people. Then there is Nancy's cousin's, Susan Carr's, car accident. Side-swiped by another car, was it an accident or deliberate act? And why would anyone want to hurt Susan? Then Susan and her husband give Nancy yet another mystery - mysterious Mr Honsho has bought one of the nearby mansions but he refuses to open it for Garden Week. They want Nancy to find out why and change his mind. While she is at it, perhaps she can work out what the strange screaming sounds coming from the property are. And finally actress Shelia invites Nancy, Bess and George to stay with her and her daughter at their new home, Ivy Hall, because they here strange sounds in the house at night, strange footsteps and strange peacock related incidents. With so many mysteries to solve, this is a quite fast paced Nancy Drew story, with lots of secrets and dangerous situation. One of the better stories, I think anyway.

  15. 5 out of 5

    David Hines

    A notation inside the cover of this book indicates I purchased it on 22 August 1986, though I have not the slightest recollection of doing it or why, as I was then in the midst of collecting my Hardy Boys books. But this book has sat on my shelf of a small collection of Nancy Drew books ever since, and I thought I would re-read it since I have been reading the Nancy Drew books I own as an interlude to re-reading the Hardys. The Hidden Window Mystery is a very good book. Nancy searches for a long A notation inside the cover of this book indicates I purchased it on 22 August 1986, though I have not the slightest recollection of doing it or why, as I was then in the midst of collecting my Hardy Boys books. But this book has sat on my shelf of a small collection of Nancy Drew books ever since, and I thought I would re-read it since I have been reading the Nancy Drew books I own as an interlude to re-reading the Hardys. The Hidden Window Mystery is a very good book. Nancy searches for a long-lost stained glass window among old mansions in North Carolina while being harassed by a wanna-be artist conman and his sister. Historical clues lead them to a decayed old mansion whose inhabitants are also being harassed. It is a very cleverly written, engaging story, though having originally been written in the 1950s its references to old Southern servants may today be less than politically correct. Other than that, this book has aged well and is a great Nancy Drew story any fan of the series will enjoy. I have noticed that the interior Nancy Drew pencil sketches are not nearly as good as the Hardy Boys books ones however; though the cover painting for this book can hold its own with any of either series.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Suziey

    The postman tells Nancy about an advertisement in a local paper offering a reward for the location of a missing stained glass window. Nancy is quickly intrigued and decides to donate the money to a children’s hospital, if she finds the window. The mystery takes her, Bess and George to Virginia.  I liked this mystery. Nancy is basically trying to find a window before someone else. Yes, unscrupulous characters do appear and cause major trouble. But the stakes weren’t exceptionally high. It’s only a The postman tells Nancy about an advertisement in a local paper offering a reward for the location of a missing stained glass window. Nancy is quickly intrigued and decides to donate the money to a children’s hospital, if she finds the window. The mystery takes her, Bess and George to Virginia.  I liked this mystery. Nancy is basically trying to find a window before someone else. Yes, unscrupulous characters do appear and cause major trouble. But the stakes weren’t exceptionally high. It’s only a window, after all.  We also meet Nancy’s cousin, Susan Carr, who is married and lives in Charlottesville. The poor woman is caught up in Nancy’s mystery early on. She does take the girls to a lot of historical places like President Jefferson and President Monroe’s homes (Monticello & Highland, respectively). I always enjoy these moments. The girls doing ordinary touristy things.  A nice, simple mystery. Lovely.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Theresa

    I grew up reading and collecting the yellow bound 1970s versions of this series. A lot of them were lost through the years so I’ve slowly been recollecting them and recently was able to get 7 more giving me now 42 of them. This I one of them. Nancy finds out about an English Lord searching for a family heirloom: a lost 14th century stained glass window featuring a peacock. It was last seen in the Richmond, Virginia area, so Nancy and her friends set out to find it. I love peacocks and collect the I grew up reading and collecting the yellow bound 1970s versions of this series. A lot of them were lost through the years so I’ve slowly been recollecting them and recently was able to get 7 more giving me now 42 of them. This I one of them. Nancy finds out about an English Lord searching for a family heirloom: a lost 14th century stained glass window featuring a peacock. It was last seen in the Richmond, Virginia area, so Nancy and her friends set out to find it. I love peacocks and collect the feathers myself. And they’re so interesting to color in coloring books. Fave scene: visiting the peacocks. Footnote 1) One thing that always amazed me is how much money the Drew’s and friends must have. They have a live-in housekeeper and think nothing of just flying off someplace or paying for things right and left. Like money means nothing to them. Now that I think of it a lot of the families in TV shows, etc. of the era were like that.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Grace

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I enjoyed reading The Hidden Window Mystery book. This one was about Nancy, who had found an article about a reward if you found a missing stained glass window that was most likely in Charlottesville. She and her friends traveled to her cousin's house in Charlottesville so she could try to find it. She found so many different clues and people to suspect, but in the end, it turned out to be Alonzo Rugby who was very mean to her and made a fake window to get the reward money. Nancy found the hidde I enjoyed reading The Hidden Window Mystery book. This one was about Nancy, who had found an article about a reward if you found a missing stained glass window that was most likely in Charlottesville. She and her friends traveled to her cousin's house in Charlottesville so she could try to find it. She found so many different clues and people to suspect, but in the end, it turned out to be Alonzo Rugby who was very mean to her and made a fake window to get the reward money. Nancy found the hidden window at a place called Ivy Hall and gave the reward money to the River Heights Hospital (she lives in River Heights). I enjoyed reading this book!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    Wow! I got interested in re-reading the Nancy Drew series after contemplating a writing project for a children's mystery...I picked this one up because I've always loved stained glass and I remembered that she spent some time in a studio working on a project. What I did NOT remember was that this one has to be one of the craziest event-after-crazy-event books in the series! So many of the classic tropes--and so many off the wall names! As much as I DID like it, after I finished it, I definitely Wow! I got interested in re-reading the Nancy Drew series after contemplating a writing project for a children's mystery...I picked this one up because I've always loved stained glass and I remembered that she spent some time in a studio working on a project. What I did NOT remember was that this one has to be one of the craziest event-after-crazy-event books in the series! So many of the classic tropes--and so many off the wall names! As much as I DID like it, after I finished it, I definitely see why I never bothered re-reading it much when I was younger (my favorites I read over and over, sometimes finishing it just to flip back to page 1).

  20. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

    I haven't read Nancy Drew since I was in Jr. High, over 60 years ago. I had always liked her mysteries and when I found a big collection about 20 years ago at an antique store I bought them for my granddaughter. She has them in a bookcase in her living room. I decided to read one for old time sake. The story was still a good mystery, after all these years. I have since moved on the Terri Blackstock and others, but it was fun reading Nancy Drew and I plan to read more of them. I am going to encou I haven't read Nancy Drew since I was in Jr. High, over 60 years ago. I had always liked her mysteries and when I found a big collection about 20 years ago at an antique store I bought them for my granddaughter. She has them in a bookcase in her living room. I decided to read one for old time sake. The story was still a good mystery, after all these years. I have since moved on the Terri Blackstock and others, but it was fun reading Nancy Drew and I plan to read more of them. I am going to encourage my great granddaughter to read them too.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    I think this is one of my new favorite Nancy Drew reads! This was a super fun mystery, with a spooky house, fun adventure and solid villains. I really enjoyed this book, and it really re-invigorated my love for this series, though I haven't really lost my love for this through 34 books. I recommend this book to fans of Nancy Drew, those looking to experience Nancy Drew for the first time, and young readers looking to expand into chapter books.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Savannah Helmer

    "The Hidden Window Mystery" wasn't quite the same as Nancy Drew's other mysteries. Instead of having the usual one or two mysteries that intertwine this one had 4! Very exciting and lots of fun characters that were hard to tell at times who were the suspects and who were the victims!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Carole

    The mailman shows Nancy Drew a magazine article about a long-lost stained glass window that the descendent of the owner is offering a reward to be found. Nancy and her friends Bess and George decide to try to find the missing window and solve a few more mysteries too.

  24. 5 out of 5

    IrishFan

    I do remember reading this one when I was younger. I liked it this time around as well.

  25. 5 out of 5

    MysteryReaderLee

    This book was another great edition to the series!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    Brought me back to being a teenager and reading these books! I loved Nancy Drew.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kerry

    This was quite good. The intrigue was present and Nancy and her friends got into and out of trouble as they solved yet another mystery. Does anyone say sleuthing these days?

  28. 4 out of 5

    Abigail

    Slightly better than the last.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Lyssa

    3.5 Nancy is actually suspicious of people outside the realm of usual suspects.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn

    Love how Nancy wrecks cars and canoes etc and goes blythely on.

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