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Molly's Story Collection - Limited Edition

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Introducing an American Girls keepsake story collection to treasure. For the first time, girls can enjoy all six classic tales of their favorite historical heroine in one beautiful volume. With exquisite covers, vellum dust jackets, gorgeous full-color illustrations, gilded-edged pages, and a gold ribbon bookmark, these richly designed hardbound books will delight American Introducing an American Girls keepsake story collection to treasure. For the first time, girls can enjoy all six classic tales of their favorite historical heroine in one beautiful volume. With exquisite covers, vellum dust jackets, gorgeous full-color illustrations, gilded-edged pages, and a gold ribbon bookmark, these richly designed hardbound books will delight American girls everywhere. It's the gift book she'll cherish for years.


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Introducing an American Girls keepsake story collection to treasure. For the first time, girls can enjoy all six classic tales of their favorite historical heroine in one beautiful volume. With exquisite covers, vellum dust jackets, gorgeous full-color illustrations, gilded-edged pages, and a gold ribbon bookmark, these richly designed hardbound books will delight American Introducing an American Girls keepsake story collection to treasure. For the first time, girls can enjoy all six classic tales of their favorite historical heroine in one beautiful volume. With exquisite covers, vellum dust jackets, gorgeous full-color illustrations, gilded-edged pages, and a gold ribbon bookmark, these richly designed hardbound books will delight American girls everywhere. It's the gift book she'll cherish for years.

30 review for Molly's Story Collection - Limited Edition

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Evans

    To my husband's shock, the boys and I listened to this collection on audio. But she's not too girly and the boys love stories set in WWII. Not that the boys will be asking for her doll for Christmas or anything. The writing and stories actually exceeded my expectations. I guess I was being snobby because of the whole doll tie-in and everything. But this is a solid early chapter book series. Molly's character is realistic and matures nicely over the course of the books. While we don't get to know To my husband's shock, the boys and I listened to this collection on audio. But she's not too girly and the boys love stories set in WWII. Not that the boys will be asking for her doll for Christmas or anything. The writing and stories actually exceeded my expectations. I guess I was being snobby because of the whole doll tie-in and everything. But this is a solid early chapter book series. Molly's character is realistic and matures nicely over the course of the books. While we don't get to know the secondary characters deeply (this is early chapter book land), Molly's relationships with them reveal a variety of experiences and responses to the era. The historical details are nicely folded into the story with a summary of differences between now and then.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Natasha

    Of all the American Girl books, Molly's stories were the ones that bridged the generation gap between me and my mom. She and I cried together at Changes for Molly and laughed ourselves silly at Meet Molly. Changes for Molly still brings a tear to my eye with a re-read as a young adult. It probably always will. Of all the American Girl books, Molly's stories were the ones that bridged the generation gap between me and my mom. She and I cried together at Changes for Molly and laughed ourselves silly at Meet Molly. Changes for Molly still brings a tear to my eye with a re-read as a young adult. It probably always will.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    I used this title to review a book my great-grandmother wrote and had published titled, "Just Molly." Her name was Marguerite Nye Bell and the book was published in 1980. You can actually search for it on Amazon and it will list some places you can buy it used. So, it is a real book, even if Goodreads says it isn't. I have had a copy of this book in my possession for most of my life, although I never read it in its entirety until about five or six years ago. I just reread it on the heels of Half- I used this title to review a book my great-grandmother wrote and had published titled, "Just Molly." Her name was Marguerite Nye Bell and the book was published in 1980. You can actually search for it on Amazon and it will list some places you can buy it used. So, it is a real book, even if Goodreads says it isn't. I have had a copy of this book in my possession for most of my life, although I never read it in its entirety until about five or six years ago. I just reread it on the heels of Half-Broke Horses, because I saw a few similarities between my great-grandmother, Molly, and Lily. Both raised during the turn of the century, both "trailblazers" in my mind. I needed to read this book again to refresh my memory, and this time take notes on what I think was a pretty interesting life. Molly was born in 1888 in Minnesota and is my father's mother's mother. She lived into her nineties and I actually went to her 90th birthday, although I was only four, so I don't have any memory of the party. Molly starts her story with her earliest memory ("flying" down a flight of stairs) and continues on with stories about her siblings and parents. She was a red head and was fortunate enough to go to college to become a teacher. She studied under the "famous" Stella Wood who played a part in bringing Kindergarten to The United States. Molly became close friends with Stella Wood and was ultimately asked to write her biography after she (Stella) passed away. "With Banners" is the first book my great-grandmother wrote and it, too, can be found on Amazon. Molly taught just a year or two until she married, Dwight, whom she was married to for 53 years. They started their family and had seven children, though one passed away as a child. My grandmother, Louise, was the second youngest. The story continues in quite an ordinary way until Molly's first grandchild was born. Molly's daughter complained of the baby kicking off her blankets at night and Molly decided to "invent" something to keep the baby covered. It is hard to picture exactly what she came up with, but it involved snaps and clips for the diapers. Molly continued making the "Nap-Jac" for family and friends and was eventually encouraged to sell it publicly and filled many orders from department stores. She was very careful to research the safety of the product herself and visited many pediatricians and hospitals to show it to professionals and get their approval. She even secured a patent for the invention (I need to do some research on this.) Unfortunately, due to WWII, the factory that was producing the Nap-Jac had to be used for the war effort, and it never saw as much success as it may have had. Molly's family grew and her children moved out, and some back in, over the years. Her eldest daughter's husband was struck with polio at one point and Molly was actually his main care taker. She worked with him for hours daily, for many months until he regained some use of his legs and he eventually moved to California. At the age of 67, Molly decided to enter the work force as a secretary. She persevered and was eventually hired by a music company. The owners loved her and she worked there for many years. When Dwight died in 1964, Molly was worried her children would see her as a burden, so she booked an indefinite trip to Europe. Alone. She booked passage on a Norwegian cargo ship, which welcomed a limited amount of passengers. Molly spent time in Amsterdam and England during her four month stay abroad. She was 76. On another solo trip to Florida several years later, Molly asked each of her children to write her with some of their childhood memories. Both Molly and Dwight often kept diaries and both kept carbon copies of all of they letters they sent! She had a wonderful written history of her family and decided it was time to organize it all. She was disappointed by the lack of content in the letters her children returned to her with their memories, but she started writing anyway. What it turned into was the story of "an American life." And in the end, a book about the "celebration of freedom in personal relationships." Of course, reading this passage from the last chapter, left me feeling the book was written for me. "I wondered, after it was rejected by publisher after publisher, if anyone but my children would really find it interesting. I consoled myself by thinking that it might mean something special to my great grandchildren, as a record of what life was like long before their time....After all, I had lived in that ancient period when there were no automobiles and no airplanes--what could be more historic than that in the eyes of today's children?"

  4. 5 out of 5

    Rosemarie

    As I'm sure I've said before, I LOVE the American Girls! I especially love the history characters and have read several full sets of books, such as Samantha's stories, (my favorite girl), Julie's stories (her time period is my own childhood) and Kaya's stories (fascinating to learn about Native Americans), to name a few. But even though I read Molly's Christmas story in a Christmas anthology, I guess I always put off reading Molly's other stories because of the time period. I have never liked wa As I'm sure I've said before, I LOVE the American Girls! I especially love the history characters and have read several full sets of books, such as Samantha's stories, (my favorite girl), Julie's stories (her time period is my own childhood) and Kaya's stories (fascinating to learn about Native Americans), to name a few. But even though I read Molly's Christmas story in a Christmas anthology, I guess I always put off reading Molly's other stories because of the time period. I have never liked wartime stories because they are usually very sad, and World War II was perhaps the most tragic of all. I know that these books do a good job of focusing on the positive lessons of any time period, but I knew I would be able to read between the lines, so to speak. However, when a friend gave me a book of Molly's stories recently, I decided to read them and was stunned to realize how relatable her stories are to the current Covid-19 situation! We are using war language to talk about the virus outbreak, and as a result, Molly's stories can be read in a whole new light. There are shortages of every day products that are needed for the war effort, there are sentiments emphasizing how people must "all work together" and "are in this together" and lots of concern for loved ones "on the front lines." Reading these stories turned out to be quite amazing and very comforting. Also, most of the stories are very well written. In one story, an English girl comes to live with Molly's family. Through this character, we learn what the war was like in England and how English people have different views of the war than Americans. The girls talk a lot about wanting to be princesses like the English princesses Margaret Rose and Elizabeth. It was fun to imagine the Queen, whom I've only ever known as an old woman, as the young and much admired princess she used to be. :) In another story, Molly and her friends go to summer camp and have to play a game called Color Wars. The game is basically a war simulation and a very ingenious way of explaining war strategy to young readers. With campers broken up into two teams, one team has to capture the other team's flag. There are a lot of lessons to learn, for example, one of Molly's friends is on the other team and cannot act like her friend while the game is on. Only the last story did I feel was a bit weak. In it, Molly is sick with a fever that she gets from going to bed with wet hair (and attempt to curl her straight hair.) She has to stay in bed and miss the show that she was to have a starting role in. While everyone is at the show, Dad arrives home and Molly is the only one home to greet him. I'm not sure if the point of this story was that preparing a special show for Dad to see was not as important as him being home safe? It was a bit strange and ended a quite abruptly - we didn't get to know Dad at all or hear anything he might have had to say to Molly. I really would have liked a little more here, but this was the only weak point in a very strong collection of stories. Over all, I think Molly's stories are very well done. I have believed for a long time that some books just find us when the time is right, and that was definite the case with Molly McIntire's stories. There is a lot of hope in the fact that Molly got through her time period and things got better. I have to believe we will do the same.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea Gouin

    Molly McIntyre was my American Girl doll so I've been looking forward to rereading her books. She is an American Girl from the 1940's, she lives with her mother, sister, and two brothers while her father serves as a medic in England taking care of wounded soldiers during World War 2. Molly starts the series as a 9 year old but celebrates her 10th birthday through the series. Molly is so down to Earth, she's a dreamer and a schemer but she's also kind and hard-working, always looking to be a good Molly McIntyre was my American Girl doll so I've been looking forward to rereading her books. She is an American Girl from the 1940's, she lives with her mother, sister, and two brothers while her father serves as a medic in England taking care of wounded soldiers during World War 2. Molly starts the series as a 9 year old but celebrates her 10th birthday through the series. Molly is so down to Earth, she's a dreamer and a schemer but she's also kind and hard-working, always looking to be a good friend. This was a very emotional series as she waits to hear how her dad was doing and when he'd come home. There was the wacky schemes Molly came up with with her friends Linda and Susan. The hair curlers and the poison ivy and the turnips were scenes I remembered from my childhood. The change in illustrators was a little disconcerting but only because I read it as a whole collection instead of individual books. Valerie Tripp has made each girl unique and fantastic and I think any young girl can easily pick a favorite or see themselves in these girls even if they're from different walks of life.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Libby

    I got this series intending to read it out loud to my 4-year old daughter, but my 6-year old son loved listening to it as well! (and I didn't mind reading it, unlike Magic Treehouse books. The dialogue is sooo annoying in those...) I was really surprised that he would enjoy them beforehand, but after reading it, it's not overtly "girly", despite being for "american girls". We are going to read the Felicity series next and he is looking forward to it just as much as she is. I think it's a great i I got this series intending to read it out loud to my 4-year old daughter, but my 6-year old son loved listening to it as well! (and I didn't mind reading it, unlike Magic Treehouse books. The dialogue is sooo annoying in those...) I was really surprised that he would enjoy them beforehand, but after reading it, it's not overtly "girly", despite being for "american girls". We are going to read the Felicity series next and he is looking forward to it just as much as she is. I think it's a great introduction to WWII for young kids. I wish there was more great historical fiction engaging for young, young kids. I didn't realize there were other "Molly books" until I searched for this series on goodreads. I wouldn't mind checking out some of the others as well.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

    Oh, such a lovely set of books! The illustrations are captivating! Wonderful books, and highly recommended for all ages!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Annalise

    Molly is just a fun girl trying to do her part to help with world war II.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    I think the Molly books are my favorite of the 6 collections I have (though I also really enjoyed Josefina’s books), due in part to the setting (WWII, my favorite historical fiction setting), the focus of each book (book 5 has the best glorification of summer camp and team games ever, and I’m only slightly exaggerating), and my childhood nostalgia. The Molly books were New and Updated and Cool when I got them, so I really treasured them as a child, and that stuck with me even now. While exact det I think the Molly books are my favorite of the 6 collections I have (though I also really enjoyed Josefina’s books), due in part to the setting (WWII, my favorite historical fiction setting), the focus of each book (book 5 has the best glorification of summer camp and team games ever, and I’m only slightly exaggerating), and my childhood nostalgia. The Molly books were New and Updated and Cool when I got them, so I really treasured them as a child, and that stuck with me even now. While exact details about World War II are scarce in the novel (there’s a couple of casual mentions of Hitler and the Blitz, with the most of those details being in book 4), there’s a great deal about the patriotic attitude in America at the time, with its rationing, victory gardens, war bonds & stamps, etc. Molly struggles to reconcile the Old Times (pre-war, pre-dad leaving to care for wounded soldiers in England) with the New Times (war, dad gone) and learns a few things about change along the way. While the books focus a little on family, there’s a great deal more about friendship. Each book reads much more like a “school story,” with some small amount of jealousy, cattiness, etc. and book 5 takes place entirely at a summer camp. Molly’s book seem different than the other girls simply because of how much of them take place outside her home with her friends, as opposed to the other books where a great deal of the time the characters were with their families. Also, the illustrations really pay tribute to 1940s’ fashion, so if you love that time period in fashion, the illustrations are great in that regard. I don’t have much criticism against the series except for the overall concession that they’re tiny, simple books—they’re really great for a fast read, but they leave a lot to be desired for contemplation. They would be great read-aloud books for younger children. The historical notes in the back of the books are interesting, too, though sometimes they don’t match what happens in the book (the birthday book mentions the Blitz a fair bit, so you would expect the historical notes to mention it. Nope, they mention babies and growing up instead). In any case, Molly’s books, like the other American Girl books, are perfect for the times when you want a fast, short historical fiction book, or if you want a book to read aloud to small children (though boys likely wouldn’t be fans).

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kelley

    We're continuing our road trip tradition of American Girl and Lemony Snicket - a weird but workable combination for our family of listeners. Molly is a favorite for my 7-year-old daughter. She's listened to this collection so many times that she was constantly telling us when to pay close attention and listen for a favorite or funny part. I found the stories more endearing than Kit's, but I still didn't love them as much as the Addy stories we listened to first. I'm starting to wonder if that firs We're continuing our road trip tradition of American Girl and Lemony Snicket - a weird but workable combination for our family of listeners. Molly is a favorite for my 7-year-old daughter. She's listened to this collection so many times that she was constantly telling us when to pay close attention and listen for a favorite or funny part. I found the stories more endearing than Kit's, but I still didn't love them as much as the Addy stories we listened to first. I'm starting to wonder if that first experience was simply more than I had expected and that it's a matter of the rest of the books turning out to be exactly what I now know they are: less-than-subtle character lessons and well-researched history wrapped in a nice story that's engaging for children. What I'm missing is some snap. Some less predictable behavior and vocabulary. But what's here is enjoyable for what it is. I especially liked the relationship between Molly and her brother Ricky, which seemed to be the most lively and realistic of all the family connections. We all got a good laugh out of his expression "like fish you do!" It's going to pop up in conversation for some time, I think. I also appreciate that while the plots tend to work out for good, it's not always the good you go in expecting. The "trials" the girls face are plausible and the average kid will probably relate. That should mean that when Molly learns a lessons about give and take and not always being the star, those lessons ring true to young readers. And that's not a bad way to end a book.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Bianca Nabarrete-Lopez

    Molly is a girl living in Illinois with her family during WW2. She has to face many issues such as her dad being off in the war, rations, housing a English refugee, and many complicating morals about fighting. My favorite part was the ending when Molly's dad finally comes back home. It was more bittersweet than I expected. I really expected that Molly would be participating in the Veterans Thank You Show but it was a better twist in that she had to stay home sick but got to be first one to welc Molly is a girl living in Illinois with her family during WW2. She has to face many issues such as her dad being off in the war, rations, housing a English refugee, and many complicating morals about fighting. My favorite part was the ending when Molly's dad finally comes back home. It was more bittersweet than I expected. I really expected that Molly would be participating in the Veterans Thank You Show but it was a better twist in that she had to stay home sick but got to be first one to welcome her dad home. But it was sad in that many of her friends weren't so lucky, one of her friend's dad came back without his legs, while a neighbor and teacher lost loved ones. I think this book really made me appreciate more our people fighting overseas, or just encourage me to help our countries affected by feuds, Americans are very lucky to not face atrocities. I think many people are right to believe after WW2 and the creation of bomb that war should never happen again, although that hasn't been very successful in preventing others, and I don't know what much can be done to stop them, but the least I could do is still try to support those fighting, even if it's through something small like making one blanket or collecting tin.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Leah

    Books 1, 2, 3, 5 I was particularly looking forward to these, remembering having liked Molly the best back when. But while they were still fun, I liked them least of the batch. I'm not sure why; maybe because WWII is the least unknown to me, out of all the historical periods represented in the American Girl series. Maybe because I felt like it was a bit of a repeat of Kit with rationing and making do, and I felt Kit was better executed? It was far from a bad experience - I did enjoy them - just n Books 1, 2, 3, 5 I was particularly looking forward to these, remembering having liked Molly the best back when. But while they were still fun, I liked them least of the batch. I'm not sure why; maybe because WWII is the least unknown to me, out of all the historical periods represented in the American Girl series. Maybe because I felt like it was a bit of a repeat of Kit with rationing and making do, and I felt Kit was better executed? It was far from a bad experience - I did enjoy them - just not as much as I thought I would. Plus it was a bummer to have two books missing; I was disappointed to miss out on reading about Emily.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Emily Schmader

    General: Currently reading through the American Girl series with my 5 year old daughter. We definitely enjoyed the Molly series, and I find this one to be my favorite still! Molly is growing up during WWII. Her father is a doctor in a British hospital, so Molly and her four siblings are being raised by their mother in a suburban neighborhood. Content: Brings up the subject of war, why her father might be away from home for a long time, etc. Otherwise, pretty easy content to work through with a 5 General: Currently reading through the American Girl series with my 5 year old daughter. We definitely enjoyed the Molly series, and I find this one to be my favorite still! Molly is growing up during WWII. Her father is a doctor in a British hospital, so Molly and her four siblings are being raised by their mother in a suburban neighborhood. Content: Brings up the subject of war, why her father might be away from home for a long time, etc. Otherwise, pretty easy content to work through with a 5 year old.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Goshen PL Childrens

    This collection follows the life of Molly McIntyre, who is girl in 1944 America. You follow what it was like to have food & clothing rations, victory gardens, and each person contributing the war effort both in the service and at home. At the end of book there is information about a snipet of history for that time. Good for 3rd grade and up. Younger readers could enjoy it if read aloud to them.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Marian

    I was a huge Molly fan as a kid, and I’m still a huge Molly fan today! She’s bubbly, adventurous, and eager to take charge! This is such a great series to get kids interested in the American home front during WWII. My favorite of the series is Molly’s Surprise, but that’s partly because I adore anything that’s vintage Christmas. Molly Saves the Day was also really excellent - I loved the summer camp storyline.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Debbie Haakenson

    These books help develop young girls minds to imagine how life was during time periods of the past and what ordeals girls in those times went through. My girls grew up loving these books which also drew out family stories of my mother and grandparents times.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Susanna Bowers

    The next girl in the American Girls podcast series. Molly is my least favorite so far. She was rude, arrogant, and wanted to make everything all about her. Maybe she’s the most like a real kid but she’s definitely the most obnoxious.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Amber the Human

    I read all of Molly's books as a kid. I saw that the library had this collection, which made it much easier than putting the books on hold one by one. The ending of the final book has always stayed with me. I read all of Molly's books as a kid. I saw that the library had this collection, which made it much easier than putting the books on hold one by one. The ending of the final book has always stayed with me.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    Actual rating: 4.5 stars

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kezziah McFarland

    As a little girl. I was opposed with American Girl. I still really enjoy the stories. American Girl really got me into reading. I started American Girl when I was 9. I loved them ever since.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Shelby

    ily olly molly

  22. 4 out of 5

    Joy

    Read aloud with Emily. Apart from Molly Saves the Day and Molly's Birthday, we didn't love this series. Read aloud with Emily. Apart from Molly Saves the Day and Molly's Birthday, we didn't love this series.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Molly Grimmius

    Read with Anne. Set during WWII... we meet Molly and her family has they live through World War Two and their father is over seas. I especially like the Christmas one and when the dad comes home!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kelsey H

    I've read this many times throughout my life. The stories and illustrations are a delight! I've read this many times throughout my life. The stories and illustrations are a delight!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Fann-Tucker

    Thank you AG!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    These were a really fun blast from the past and I had a really good time going back to them.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Becca!

    I remembered the most from Molly's stories. I really think this is where my love for WW2 historical fiction was born! I remembered the most from Molly's stories. I really think this is where my love for WW2 historical fiction was born!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn Herbert

    Molly: An American Girl Doll is a children’s historical fiction book written by Valerie Tripp. Tripp, who is best known for her work with the American Girl series, wrote many of the books in the Felicity, Josefina, Kit, Molly, and Samantha series. Growing up in 1944, Molly is a 10 year old girl with a scheming but lovable personality. Molly: An American Girl Doll describes the ups and downs of life and lessons learned by Molly, who is living on the home front during World War Two. With Molly’s f Molly: An American Girl Doll is a children’s historical fiction book written by Valerie Tripp. Tripp, who is best known for her work with the American Girl series, wrote many of the books in the Felicity, Josefina, Kit, Molly, and Samantha series. Growing up in 1944, Molly is a 10 year old girl with a scheming but lovable personality. Molly: An American Girl Doll describes the ups and downs of life and lessons learned by Molly, who is living on the home front during World War Two. With Molly’s father being a doctor at war and her mother constantly working at the Red Cross, she misses her family tremendously. While struggling to make sacrifices in order to help her family and the war effort, she ends up learning many valuable life lessons and becomes a stronger woman. Although life is hard for Molly because the whole world is at war, she always makes the best of it. This book is a must for students of all ages because Molly is a character that they can identify with, despite the time difference. As a child, this story helped me learn a lot about the difficulties of being away from family members during war at such a young age. After re-reading this story, I noticed how Tripp used Molly’s story as a connection to what real American families went through during those emotionally exhausting years. Tripp truly captures the reader’s eyes because of the small but accurate details of World War Two. For example, Tripp ties in what families would do back home to help support their troops. In order to not buy canned foods since the material could be used for war equipment, families created their own Victory Gardens. Even after the story of Molly ends, Tripp includes a course mention of World War Two at the back of the book. In particular, this section explains the war into more depth and what life was like during Molly’s time. Because Molly’s story is still fiction, this section helps children make a connection between the story but more importantly, grasp the historical events that took place in American history. Furthermore, Tripp knows how to make it very informative for children without allowing it to become too dry. In terms of Tripp’s illustrations, every page is full of detail and color that add an element to the story line and provide the audience with a more clear mental image of the time period. Because of this, children can visualize a better understanding of what cars, clothes, and homes looked like. Overall, Tripp allows the reader to feel as if they really are apart of the story.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Taylor

    molly M.cintine life is full of change. her dad is at war, and her mom works at the red cross. The whole world is at war, so life is hard for molly. But she makes the best of it. Such as in the first book meet molly, molly and her family doesn't have much money so her halloween costume will have to do with what they already have. in molly learns a lesson, it is mostly about how her and her friends do a secret project for the schools lend a hand project. in molly's surprise, they face a disappoin molly M.cintine life is full of change. her dad is at war, and her mom works at the red cross. The whole world is at war, so life is hard for molly. But she makes the best of it. Such as in the first book meet molly, molly and her family doesn't have much money so her halloween costume will have to do with what they already have. in molly learns a lesson, it is mostly about how her and her friends do a secret project for the schools lend a hand project. in molly's surprise, they face a disappointing christmas. there dad has been off at war in england and there grandparents can't come so it isn't gonna be a very good christmas unless they make the best of it. in happy birthday molly, an English girl comes just in time for molly's birthday. Even though they are different and unique from each other they become best friends. In molly saves the day molly goes to camp gowanogin, where theres singing dancing fun with her friends and much more, also much adventure! In changes for molly her dad is gong to come and molly is really excited because he will be home in time to see her part in miss victory! Hope fully he comes on time and molly can be all ready for him! I LOVE THESE BOOKS! because each one has a unique message!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    Molly was my favorite, my baby, my American Girl doll who actually brought me closer to my grandmother and her own experiences of growing up during World War II. When I was a young American Girl, Molly's story was the most contemporary, which made her the most accessible to me (though sometimes, I wished I'd chosen something with a little more of that fantastical, historical feeling!) Molly's life was a lot like mine, actually- her mother worked, she went to school to learn English and Math, she Molly was my favorite, my baby, my American Girl doll who actually brought me closer to my grandmother and her own experiences of growing up during World War II. When I was a young American Girl, Molly's story was the most contemporary, which made her the most accessible to me (though sometimes, I wished I'd chosen something with a little more of that fantastical, historical feeling!) Molly's life was a lot like mine, actually- her mother worked, she went to school to learn English and Math, she fought off teasing from her sibling, she had girlfriends and wore pants, she felt shy and awkward and out of place a lot. She misses her father, and the easier world that existed before the war and it's rations. All of the stories are dear to me, but I think I have the most bittersweet relationship with book six, "Changes for Molly," where she gets sick, forcing her out of the pageant she worked so hard for, and yet, as she lies all alone at home, a familliar face comes back from war. <3 Damn, it still bothers me that author Valerie Tripp didn't write more of an interaction between Molly and her father. But that's one of the literary devices that makes the story so endearing, too.

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