hits counter Hira Singh by Talbot Mundy, Fiction, Historical - Ebook PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Hira Singh by Talbot Mundy, Fiction, Historical

Availability: Ready to download

The underlying theme of the story is the nature of leadership, as Ranjoor Singh struggles to control his semi-rebellious force under conditions of great difficulty. Hira Singh was originally published (under the title Hira Singh's Tale) as a four-part serial in Adventure Magazine in October and November 1917 and published in book form in 1918. The hero of the story is a Sik The underlying theme of the story is the nature of leadership, as Ranjoor Singh struggles to control his semi-rebellious force under conditions of great difficulty. Hira Singh was originally published (under the title Hira Singh's Tale) as a four-part serial in Adventure Magazine in October and November 1917 and published in book form in 1918. The hero of the story is a Sikh officer, Ranjoor Singh, an earlier adventure of whom is recounted in the novel The Winds of the World.


Compare

The underlying theme of the story is the nature of leadership, as Ranjoor Singh struggles to control his semi-rebellious force under conditions of great difficulty. Hira Singh was originally published (under the title Hira Singh's Tale) as a four-part serial in Adventure Magazine in October and November 1917 and published in book form in 1918. The hero of the story is a Sik The underlying theme of the story is the nature of leadership, as Ranjoor Singh struggles to control his semi-rebellious force under conditions of great difficulty. Hira Singh was originally published (under the title Hira Singh's Tale) as a four-part serial in Adventure Magazine in October and November 1917 and published in book form in 1918. The hero of the story is a Sikh officer, Ranjoor Singh, an earlier adventure of whom is recounted in the novel The Winds of the World.

47 review for Hira Singh by Talbot Mundy, Fiction, Historical

  1. 5 out of 5

    Madhulika Liddle

    Talbot Mundy's Hira Singh: When India Came to Fight in Flanders is told as a first-person narrative by a Sikh cavalryman who is recuperating at a camp in India. Hira Singh, talking to an American journalist, tells of how he, along with his regiment, was sent to Europe (to Flanders) to fight during the Great War. The major of the troop, Ranjoor Singh, is an enigmatic man whom most of the men of the regiment (including Hira Singh himself) believe to be a traitor. When Ranjoor Singh gets his men to Talbot Mundy's Hira Singh: When India Came to Fight in Flanders is told as a first-person narrative by a Sikh cavalryman who is recuperating at a camp in India. Hira Singh, talking to an American journalist, tells of how he, along with his regiment, was sent to Europe (to Flanders) to fight during the Great War. The major of the troop, Ranjoor Singh, is an enigmatic man whom most of the men of the regiment (including Hira Singh himself) believe to be a traitor. When Ranjoor Singh gets his men to surrender to the Germans, it seems as if their worst fears have come true. I began reading this book in the hope that I'd learn a bit more about the thousands of Indians who fought overseas during the war, men who mostly go overlooked, even in the history of India itself. But no, while Hira Singh begins with them going to Flanders, the scene soon shifts, taking the regiment eastward. The war ends up being a backdrop to some confusing adventures as the troop goes very far from Flanders, and seemingly completely on Ranjoor Singh's initiative, orders, and whims. I didn't like this book. Ranjoor Singh's mysterious behaviour was odd, and I couldn't see any reason for it. The machinations, the adventures, the hectic travelling and fighting and parleying: why, really, did it all happen, and what was the motivation for it? Plus, who was up there at some military headquarters, sending orders for this regiment to follow? This was war, dammit, it wouldn't have been easy for a regiment to simply wander off wherever it wished. Or wherever Ranjoor Singh wished, it seems. What's more, the characters just didn't work for me. I got the impression that Ranjoor Singh and Hira Singh were modelled on some idealistic notion of the perfect Sikh warrior (and his sidekick, respectively) without much else. They, as well as the nasty Gooja Singh, are all pretty one-dimensional figures (the only Westerner who has an important part is Tugendheim, and he is relatively interesting--which goes to show). Very ho-hum.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Becca

    This is a difficult book to rate. It’s a fictional book with dated dialogue and the action doesn’t really kick in until almost halfway through, but it focuses on a Sikh troop captured by the Germans in WWI. This is a hugely underrepresented group in the history of WWI. One in 6 troops in the forces of the British Empire were from India and even though Sikhs were (and still are) a fairly small part of the population 33% of the troops from India were Sikhs. So this book can be frustrating to read This is a difficult book to rate. It’s a fictional book with dated dialogue and the action doesn’t really kick in until almost halfway through, but it focuses on a Sikh troop captured by the Germans in WWI. This is a hugely underrepresented group in the history of WWI. One in 6 troops in the forces of the British Empire were from India and even though Sikhs were (and still are) a fairly small part of the population 33% of the troops from India were Sikhs. So this book can be frustrating to read sometimes but worth it IF it’s used as a supplement or starting point for real history.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Simpreet Kaur

    A thriller about the adventures of a Sikh regiment from the time of World War 1. This book was penned by the author about a 100 years ago. Those two sentences are just enough to pique the interest of anyone interested in history. You don't really hear about the Indian contributions to both the World Wars, there were about a million soldiers from British India during WW1 and statistics put the number of lost lives at about 75,000. These soldiers were pretty much forgotten by the western world and A thriller about the adventures of a Sikh regiment from the time of World War 1. This book was penned by the author about a 100 years ago. Those two sentences are just enough to pique the interest of anyone interested in history. You don't really hear about the Indian contributions to both the World Wars, there were about a million soldiers from British India during WW1 and statistics put the number of lost lives at about 75,000. These soldiers were pretty much forgotten by the western world and it seems even the Indian historians forgot about it. We know so little about these brave soldiers who fought various battles in Europe (France and Belgium), Turkey, Afghanistan, Mesopotamia, Egypt, Gallipoli, Palestine and Sinai. Most of these soldiers were Sikhs. Now back tot he book, the author himself has a pretty interesting life story- runaway kid from England, travels across India, Africa and the Middle East and writes a bunch of books, mostly adventure thrillers. This book being one of them. The story takes you on the adventures of a Sikh regiment that gets captured in Belgium by the Germans and their journey to the British post in Afghanistan via Turkey. I won't put any spoilers in this review, the main characters Ranjoor Singh, a clever, strategic leader leading his troops outwitting his opponents while upholding the principles of Sikh faith and the narrator of the story, Hira Singh, a Sergeant under Ranjoor Singh takes you back in time and you hear all the shelling, feel the cold bunkers, see the grey days of war and feel the quiet efficiency of the Germans, the plight of the Armenians dying at the hands of the brutish Turkish soldiers. But most of all, you get to feel what the typical Indian soldier went through while fighting in a war which was not his own but he still fought because of the valor in his heart, for want of respect and to earn a hard living.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Debbie Zapata

    This book is a sequel of sorts to The Winds Of The World, detailing the adventures of Ranjoor Singh, Hira Singh, and the other members of Outram's Own regiment in the First World War. Supposedly it was based on true events, but in doing a bit of research when I first began the book, I discovered that the author's preface (which claimed the story was based on actual Army reports) was actually added for the American market. But even though this was "merely" a novel after all, it was still a cracki This book is a sequel of sorts to The Winds Of The World, detailing the adventures of Ranjoor Singh, Hira Singh, and the other members of Outram's Own regiment in the First World War. Supposedly it was based on true events, but in doing a bit of research when I first began the book, I discovered that the author's preface (which claimed the story was based on actual Army reports) was actually added for the American market. But even though this was "merely" a novel after all, it was still a cracking good one, and highlighted the participation of Sikh soldiers in WWI, which has been an under-appreciated subject, from what I read in my research. I hope to find more books on that subject. This was not as much of a breathless page turner as other Mundy books I have read: there was more thinking going on, especially with nearly the entire book concerned with the loyalty or lack thereof of Ranjoor Singh, and whether or not he would prove to be true to The Empire. Obviously he represented India and the concerns about that country's attitude at this particular point in history. I did enjoy the book but I could not call it amazing, because I had come to expect a different type of adventure from Mundy, therefore it did not get that 5th star. But I recommend it for anyone interested in WWI and India.....and the final few paragraphs would bring a proud tear to anyone's eyes.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Paul J.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ajay Sharma

  7. 5 out of 5

    Nanauatl

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mac

  9. 4 out of 5

    Saurabh Dhir

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ruth Friedheim

  11. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn

  12. 4 out of 5

    Brian Beard

  13. 4 out of 5

    Deborah Riley

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lynne

  15. 4 out of 5

    sukhminder singh

  16. 4 out of 5

    Zoheb Mashiur

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sam Schulman

  18. 4 out of 5

    G. Hugh Bodell

  19. 5 out of 5

    George Gray

  20. 5 out of 5

    Timothy Evavold

  21. 4 out of 5

    Vikas Krishan

  22. 5 out of 5

    Mary

  23. 4 out of 5

    Iniyavan Karthik

  24. 4 out of 5

    Amit Sharma

  25. 5 out of 5

    William J. Griffin, Jr.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Peter

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ben

  28. 5 out of 5

    J

  29. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Schaffter Schaffter

  30. 5 out of 5

    J.W. Wright

  31. 4 out of 5

    Steve Anderson

  32. 5 out of 5

    Miss M

  33. 4 out of 5

    Trupti

  34. 4 out of 5

    Pramod Nair

  35. 5 out of 5

    Veeral

  36. 5 out of 5

    Judith Kang

  37. 4 out of 5

    BookDB

  38. 4 out of 5

    Shilpabk

  39. 4 out of 5

    HARSUMIT SINGH

  40. 4 out of 5

    Kennedy

  41. 4 out of 5

    Angel Vivero

  42. 5 out of 5

    Divyang Mehta

  43. 5 out of 5

    Daria

  44. 4 out of 5

    Samantha Embrey

  45. 5 out of 5

    Swapna Chakrabarti

  46. 5 out of 5

    Neena

  47. 4 out of 5

    Coralee

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...