hits counter The Tin Ticket: The Heroic Journey of Australia's Convict Women - Ebook PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Tin Ticket: The Heroic Journey of Australia's Convict Women

Availability: Ready to download

Historian Deborah J. Swiss tells the heartbreaking, horrifying, and ultimately triumphant story of the women exiled from the British Isles and forced into slavery and savagery-who created the most liberated society of their time. Agnes McMillan and Janet Houston were convicted for shoplifting. Bridget Mulligan stole a bucket of milk; Widow Ludlow Tedder, eleven spoons. Fo Historian Deborah J. Swiss tells the heartbreaking, horrifying, and ultimately triumphant story of the women exiled from the British Isles and forced into slavery and savagery-who created the most liberated society of their time. Agnes McMillan and Janet Houston were convicted for shoplifting. Bridget Mulligan stole a bucket of milk; Widow Ludlow Tedder, eleven spoons. For their crimes, they would be sent not to jail, but to ships teeming with other female convicts. Tin tickets, stamped with numbers, were hung around the women's necks, and the ships set out to carry them to their new home: Van Diemen's Land, later known as Tasmania, part of the British Empire's crown jewel, Australia. Men outnumbered women nine to one there, and few "proper" citizens were interested in emigrating. The deportation of thousands of petty criminals-the vast majority nonviolent first offenders-provided a convenient solution for the government. Crossing Shark-infested waters, some died in shipwrecks during the four-month journey, or succumbed to infections and were sent to a watery grave. Others were impregnated against their will by their captors. They arrived as nothing more than property. But incredibly, as the years passed, they managed not only to endure their privation and pain but to thrive on their own terms, breaking the chains of bondage, and forging a society that treated women as equals and led the world in women's rights. The Tin Ticket takes us to the dawn of the nineteenth century and into the lives of Agnes McMillan, whose defiance and resilience carried her to a far more dramatic rebellion; Agnes's best friend Janet Houston, who rescued her from the Glasgow wynds and was also transported to Van Diemen's Land; Ludlow Tedder, forced to choose just one of her four children to accompany her to the other side of the world; Bridget Mulligan, who gave birth to a line of powerful women stretching to the present day. It also tells the tale of Elizabeth Gurney Fry, a Quaker reformer who touched all their lives. Ultimately, it is the story of women discarded by their homeland and forgotten by history-who, by sheer force of will, become the heart and soul of a new nation.


Compare

Historian Deborah J. Swiss tells the heartbreaking, horrifying, and ultimately triumphant story of the women exiled from the British Isles and forced into slavery and savagery-who created the most liberated society of their time. Agnes McMillan and Janet Houston were convicted for shoplifting. Bridget Mulligan stole a bucket of milk; Widow Ludlow Tedder, eleven spoons. Fo Historian Deborah J. Swiss tells the heartbreaking, horrifying, and ultimately triumphant story of the women exiled from the British Isles and forced into slavery and savagery-who created the most liberated society of their time. Agnes McMillan and Janet Houston were convicted for shoplifting. Bridget Mulligan stole a bucket of milk; Widow Ludlow Tedder, eleven spoons. For their crimes, they would be sent not to jail, but to ships teeming with other female convicts. Tin tickets, stamped with numbers, were hung around the women's necks, and the ships set out to carry them to their new home: Van Diemen's Land, later known as Tasmania, part of the British Empire's crown jewel, Australia. Men outnumbered women nine to one there, and few "proper" citizens were interested in emigrating. The deportation of thousands of petty criminals-the vast majority nonviolent first offenders-provided a convenient solution for the government. Crossing Shark-infested waters, some died in shipwrecks during the four-month journey, or succumbed to infections and were sent to a watery grave. Others were impregnated against their will by their captors. They arrived as nothing more than property. But incredibly, as the years passed, they managed not only to endure their privation and pain but to thrive on their own terms, breaking the chains of bondage, and forging a society that treated women as equals and led the world in women's rights. The Tin Ticket takes us to the dawn of the nineteenth century and into the lives of Agnes McMillan, whose defiance and resilience carried her to a far more dramatic rebellion; Agnes's best friend Janet Houston, who rescued her from the Glasgow wynds and was also transported to Van Diemen's Land; Ludlow Tedder, forced to choose just one of her four children to accompany her to the other side of the world; Bridget Mulligan, who gave birth to a line of powerful women stretching to the present day. It also tells the tale of Elizabeth Gurney Fry, a Quaker reformer who touched all their lives. Ultimately, it is the story of women discarded by their homeland and forgotten by history-who, by sheer force of will, become the heart and soul of a new nation.

30 review for The Tin Ticket: The Heroic Journey of Australia's Convict Women

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kavita

    Take an interesting story, do impeccable research, then ruin it all with extravagant prose and over-emotional drama – that’s The Tin Ticket. Nothing speaks more for the need of a good editor than this book. The writing is bad. There are too many adjectives used and after a while one does get tired of the ‘stately Quaker’ and the ‘grey eyed lass’ and would prefer a return to the simpler Elizabeth and Agnes. Also, I know you are talking about a Scottish girl but can you dispense with the ‘lasses’ Take an interesting story, do impeccable research, then ruin it all with extravagant prose and over-emotional drama – that’s The Tin Ticket. Nothing speaks more for the need of a good editor than this book. The writing is bad. There are too many adjectives used and after a while one does get tired of the ‘stately Quaker’ and the ‘grey eyed lass’ and would prefer a return to the simpler Elizabeth and Agnes. Also, I know you are talking about a Scottish girl but can you dispense with the ‘lasses’ bit, please? It’s intensely irritating. On the plus side, the research is awesome. There is also a detailed appendix laying out different documents such as rules applicable to prisoners and records of the women described in this book. The in-depth research is somewhat spoilt by the author claiming that all rich people (except Elizabeth Fry, who is quite obviously a saint!) are horrible bastards and all poor people must be excused for turning to theft. I would have better appreciated a book that based its premise on the fact that the punishments were excessively harsh for petty crimes and not completely excusing people for committing crimes! The attempts at humour also fall flat because the author’s anger against anything ‘authority’ is so blatant that it gets very annoying for the reader. What’s worse is that you have to be poor, convicted, female AND the author’s protégée to gain her sympathy. Other convicts could be very vengeful and were pretty much ‘low-life troublemakers’. The story also jumps all over the place. It deals with different women but it’s not woven well together. The last protégée of the author was not represented properly. She might as well have been left out. The ending seemed rushed and while the chapter on the gold rush was really out of context for this book, I enjoyed reading it the most. The sudden rush of the author to finish the book actually made reading the ending so much better than the rest of the book since she had to leave out her flowery emotional crap and focused on facts. Basically this is a highly fictionalised account of female transports to Australia and is well researched but written badly.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Moira

    A fascinating, thoroughly researched topic but a difficult book to rate. Do I give it a four for it's research and details, or a three for the irritating writing and lack of balance? What happened to the editor? The initial pages are so full of florid writing (no noun appears without several adjectives attached!) and, for goodness sake - her name was AGNES - why do we need "the grey eyed girl" again and again? I nearly gave up but the topic is so interesting that I gritted my teeth, put off my Tu A fascinating, thoroughly researched topic but a difficult book to rate. Do I give it a four for it's research and details, or a three for the irritating writing and lack of balance? What happened to the editor? The initial pages are so full of florid writing (no noun appears without several adjectives attached!) and, for goodness sake - her name was AGNES - why do we need "the grey eyed girl" again and again? I nearly gave up but the topic is so interesting that I gritted my teeth, put off my Tutor's hat and pressed on. Lo and behold, the writing becomes more lucid! Did the editor not intervene or not notice the change and demand a retro revise? Then the ending seems rushed, Bridget is introduced right near the end and the other women became confused in my mind. Finally I have decided on a four because of important segment of history thoroughly researched but I did not "really enjoy it."

  3. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    The reviews from readers of this book are all over the map, some harsh, others full of praise. The book did not seem overwrought to me, but rather a page turner. That said, of course there is fictionalization of the experience of the women who were forced into transport. And, yes, the author makes it quite clear that she found the evidence of what happened to them appalling. But also there is hope, since many of these convicts became productive and resourceful settlers in Australia. For me this The reviews from readers of this book are all over the map, some harsh, others full of praise. The book did not seem overwrought to me, but rather a page turner. That said, of course there is fictionalization of the experience of the women who were forced into transport. And, yes, the author makes it quite clear that she found the evidence of what happened to them appalling. But also there is hope, since many of these convicts became productive and resourceful settlers in Australia. For me this was an eye opening read. I knew about this chapter in history, but not that much about it. It was ground I had not covered in any depth. Swiss wrote her book after researching the subject and tells her story through the lives of several real women who were transported to Van Diemen's Land (Tasmania) for petty crimes necessitated by dire poverty. An unmerciful justice system and rigid class system in England ensured a ready supply of poor women, as well as children, whose lives counted for very little. In Victorian England, these women faced exile and imprisonment, providing free labor in the newly opening lands "down under." Of course, we cannot know exactly what the real Agnes McMillan, Janet Houston, Bridget Mulligan, or Ludlow Tedder thought and exactly what they did. The author fills this in with her own speculation, and this serves to make the book read like a novel not a dissertation. At the very end, the story becomes a little less about the persons and a bit more about the events in a historical sense--I felt I was reading about the past, not experiencing it with the women as I did in the greater part of the book. It's a good read for someone to learn about "herstory" and especially so because injustice and cruelty towards women, and indeed those considered lesser humans, is still with us today.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Brooke

    2.5 stars. I think Deborah Swiss should be commended for giving voice to women transported to Van Diemen's land in the the mid 19th century. I read "The Fatal Shore" by Robert Hughes several years ago and found his narrative on the settling of Australia's mainland to be well-researched and dispassionate. I was hoping to find in this book a similar nonfiction account. Swiss follows three women transported from England for petty crimes. She winds their tale from their inauspicious beginnings in va 2.5 stars. I think Deborah Swiss should be commended for giving voice to women transported to Van Diemen's land in the the mid 19th century. I read "The Fatal Shore" by Robert Hughes several years ago and found his narrative on the settling of Australia's mainland to be well-researched and dispassionate. I was hoping to find in this book a similar nonfiction account. Swiss follows three women transported from England for petty crimes. She winds their tale from their inauspicious beginnings in various slums in Glasgow and London, through the farcical judicial system, onto transport ships, and to Van Diemen's land. She also touches on Elizabeth Frye, the wealthy Quaker prison reformer. The writer (and the reader) would have benefited greatly from some emotional distance from these characters. 21st century ideas of victim were drawn so heavily across each women (and current day ideas of right and wrong were very important to the author), it was difficult to discern a personality. The moneyed Christian Lady Frye, mother of 11 who so reminded me of Dicken's Mrs. Jellyby I couldn't really take her seriously, was presented as such a saint I blinked at the soft light. Frye was known for entering Newgate prison to read for hours among the freezing, starving, illiterate prisoners from her bible and to distribute the holy book. Swiss thought that was great (really, really great. Pages upon pages great). I thought maybe the prisoners were hoping the lady wearing a dress that cost more than they would earn in a lifetime might bring some bread. Or maybe not - maybe they were happy someone came to visit them, I don't know. This book did read quickly and perhaps it was difficult for the author to learn about such constant depravity and injustice without becoming impassioned. Perhaps she felt the need to make the reader understand IN CAPS what had happened to these women. I felt that the facts surrounding the Transportation Act and what the women went through were so dreadful, their stories of survival so astonishing, they needed no embroidery. Leave off the purple and scarlet paragraphs, Swiss, it was unconscionable what occurred. Facts speak for themselves.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jenny Brown

    The topic of this book was compelling, but the writing was so emotionally overwrought it was difficult to read. No noun appeared without an unnecessary adjective, and Swiss's outrage bristles on every page, ironically making it hard for the reader to learn about what it is that got her so enraged. Lacking much in the way of sources, she seems to have fallen into the trap of elaborating in a fictional way on what she imagined might have happened, creating scenes that aren't based on anything but The topic of this book was compelling, but the writing was so emotionally overwrought it was difficult to read. No noun appeared without an unnecessary adjective, and Swiss's outrage bristles on every page, ironically making it hard for the reader to learn about what it is that got her so enraged. Lacking much in the way of sources, she seems to have fallen into the trap of elaborating in a fictional way on what she imagined might have happened, creating scenes that aren't based on anything but a sentence here and there, and attributing emotions to her subjects that are the emotions she would have felt if she had been in their place. If her novelization had been readable, the book would at least have been enjoyable, but the wretched writing was so hard to read I gave up three quarters of the way through. I was taught many years ago by a brilliant bestselling biographer that the trick in writing biography is to never tell the reader what they are supposed to think about the things you are describing. Instead, give them enough facts that they draw the conclusion you want them to draw. The material Swiss was recounting was horrifying enough that had she not kept telling the reader how evil and dreadful the system was that she described, the reader would have said, "This was so evil and dreadful!" But the nagging voice announcing that on every page actually detracted from my ability to draw my own conclusions, and her authorial voice was so annoying, it made me lose, rather than gain empathy with her subjects.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    Middle of the road. It's clear that the author did a wonderful job researching this era, the transportation of women, and the specific women she follows. She can really bring the time period to life with vivid details. She was handicapped by the fact that her main subjects have all been dead for over 100 years and don't appear to have left any written diaries or other records. And it's here where the book fails for me. Sometimes when she starts embellishing their stories (based on the facts she Middle of the road. It's clear that the author did a wonderful job researching this era, the transportation of women, and the specific women she follows. She can really bring the time period to life with vivid details. She was handicapped by the fact that her main subjects have all been dead for over 100 years and don't appear to have left any written diaries or other records. And it's here where the book fails for me. Sometimes when she starts embellishing their stories (based on the facts she does have), the book gets a little overly dramatic to me. It changes its tone in a way that was very jarring for me as a reader. I preferred when she stuck a little closer to the facts even though she may have perceived it as too dry. There are wonderful family photos of the descendants of theses ladies. Obviously the author researched these families to the present day. I wish she would have included an afterward with some updates on these families. She just kind of stopped abruptly without really giving any sense of closure.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Camille

    Good book but I wasn't' impressed with the writing. She would go off on tangents and not get back to the story for pages. Several facts were repeated several times, making the book quite a bit longer than it should have been. However, it really brought to light the horrific conditions in the 1800's. It made me very grateful for my life and freedoms. Good book but I wasn't' impressed with the writing. She would go off on tangents and not get back to the story for pages. Several facts were repeated several times, making the book quite a bit longer than it should have been. However, it really brought to light the horrific conditions in the 1800's. It made me very grateful for my life and freedoms.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Angelique Simonsen

    Three woman three threads making up the rich tapestry of Australia. God they had it hard!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Stefanie

    This book should have been a novel. Instead it is a very flawed and ultimately horribly failed attempt at historical non-fiction, because the author is unable to refrain from inserting passages that directly infer feelings of her protagonists in a way suitable only for fiction. Perhaps worse than the author's narrative dithering between novel and historical biography are the constant repetitions of already mentioned facts such as eye colour, the number of prisoners deported to Australia and many This book should have been a novel. Instead it is a very flawed and ultimately horribly failed attempt at historical non-fiction, because the author is unable to refrain from inserting passages that directly infer feelings of her protagonists in a way suitable only for fiction. Perhaps worse than the author's narrative dithering between novel and historical biography are the constant repetitions of already mentioned facts such as eye colour, the number of prisoners deported to Australia and many other things. It appears the author also wrote several different accounts of the same occurences and then instead of choosing the best phrased one for the the book, scattered all of them throughout the book in randomly chosen intervals. The meeting between Agnes and her future husband is described at least three or four times in this way. The reader also gets a repetetive ship journey because the book follows two different characters' monthlong seatravel in detail, once about a third into the book and asecond time when the author introduces a completely new character in the latter third of the book. All of this should have been rectified by a good editor but the women the author thanks in her acknowledgments for their editing must have been asleep throughout the entire process and the book makes for a disjointed unguided read. A shame because the book has introduced me to a very interesting part of history I knew nothing about before and the author has clearly spent years on research.

  10. 5 out of 5

    LibraryCin

    In the early to mid-1800s, women “criminals” were transported from England, Scotland, Ireland, and Wales to Tasmania (a small island off Australia) to serve their time. Of course, almost none of them came home when they served their time. Not only that, a large number of these criminals were merely stealing food or clothing because they couldn’t afford it. This book takes a look at a few of these women throughout their lives – how they grew up and what caused them to steal, which caused them to In the early to mid-1800s, women “criminals” were transported from England, Scotland, Ireland, and Wales to Tasmania (a small island off Australia) to serve their time. Of course, almost none of them came home when they served their time. Not only that, a large number of these criminals were merely stealing food or clothing because they couldn’t afford it. This book takes a look at a few of these women throughout their lives – how they grew up and what caused them to steal, which caused them to be sent to Tasmania; it followed them into the horrible gaols of the time; and it followed them to Tasmania – their time imprisoned, as well as a short section on how they lived after they were freed. There was also a Quaker woman who, ahead of her time, realized the horrible conditions these women were living in in the jails, and worked hard to make things better for them, as much as she could. I found this very interesting. I knew that criminals had been sent to Australia, but I had never before read any of their stories. It’s pretty sad how little it took to be charged and sent away.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Velvetink

    This book was recommended to me by Shellie - Layers of Thought. Thanks Shellie! There were several Female Factories not just in Tasmania. Two of my female Irish (Co. Cavan) ancestors were sent to the Parramatta Female Factory during the last years of transportation. http://www.parragirls.org.au/female-f... Co.Cavan Ireland was hard hit by the Great Famine in the mid-19th century. In the winter of 1847, the local landlord in Mountnugent parish decided to evict over 200 people. The famous ballad "B This book was recommended to me by Shellie - Layers of Thought. Thanks Shellie! There were several Female Factories not just in Tasmania. Two of my female Irish (Co. Cavan) ancestors were sent to the Parramatta Female Factory during the last years of transportation. http://www.parragirls.org.au/female-f... Co.Cavan Ireland was hard hit by the Great Famine in the mid-19th century. In the winter of 1847, the local landlord in Mountnugent parish decided to evict over 200 people. The famous ballad "By Lough Sheelin Side" is based on this event witnessed by the local Catholic priest. A large number of people from Cavan were transported to Australia for stealing food etc. It seems from my readings of the mid 1800's that it appears a fair number of those starving actually committed minor crimes so that they could get transported to a better climate, more food etc or to be reunited with other family members..

  12. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    Too often the historical contributions and achievements of women have been overlooked, or at best given 'token' status in textbooks. Deborah Swiss has done something incredible with the Tin Ticket. Here she uncovers the stories of 4 women who were victimized by the British crown, and transported to Van Dieman's land for crimes bred by abject poverty to assist in the 'taming' of her Majesty's colonial outliers between 1788 and 1868. Amazingly, these women, despite the desperation of their forced Too often the historical contributions and achievements of women have been overlooked, or at best given 'token' status in textbooks. Deborah Swiss has done something incredible with the Tin Ticket. Here she uncovers the stories of 4 women who were victimized by the British crown, and transported to Van Dieman's land for crimes bred by abject poverty to assist in the 'taming' of her Majesty's colonial outliers between 1788 and 1868. Amazingly, these women, despite the desperation of their forced circumstances, managed to not only survive, but thrive, and Deborah Swiss traces their contributions down to their great-great-great-etc. grandchildren. The Tin Ticket is meticulously researched and lushly written; it's a necessary addition to historical canon, and a great tribute to the founding mothers of Australia.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kayla

    I struggle with what to say about this book. It was an easy read, and not without enjoyment. I think it was mainly the writing style that bothered me the most. The author spends most of the book pointing out again and again and again, how women depended on one another for strength after being transported. While this is clearly the case, the length to which the author will go to state it time after time grew dull. I do wonder where the phrase "true blue pal" entered the authors mind, and why it t I struggle with what to say about this book. It was an easy read, and not without enjoyment. I think it was mainly the writing style that bothered me the most. The author spends most of the book pointing out again and again and again, how women depended on one another for strength after being transported. While this is clearly the case, the length to which the author will go to state it time after time grew dull. I do wonder where the phrase "true blue pal" entered the authors mind, and why it took such a hold there.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Geophile

    I have divided feelings about this book. On one hand, I found it fascinating, because it is an unusual topic and well researched. On the other hand, while reading I kept thinking that the author must have had access to family records or diaries to know what the women were thinking. I felt cheated when I realized that the author had fictionalized the book somewhat, as it calls into question the accuracy of the rest.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jimmy

    Finished it last weekend. Basically skimmed the last few chapters.Not a fav but it did enlighten me about the lives of British petty thieves who were shipped to Australia in the 19th century and imprisoned there for years--something about which I had known almost nothing. The mixture of fact and fiction did not thrill me.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Isern

    Began this book, got about 50 pages in, and had to quit. Two reasons. First, the breathless cliches are wearisome. Second, too much stuff is just made up--what is known these days as creative nonfiction. Kind of a waste, because the author clearly has done research.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    The subject of this book is so interesting – England's deportation of female convicts to Tasmania, Australia, from the late 1700s to the late 1800s – that it's too bad the book itself isn't more rewarding. The Introduction is excellent, laying out the political, economic, and classist origins of this horrible episode (among so many) in England's history; the rest of the book focuses on four women condemned to the voyage, and the author does a really good job of describing the grinding poverty an The subject of this book is so interesting – England's deportation of female convicts to Tasmania, Australia, from the late 1700s to the late 1800s – that it's too bad the book itself isn't more rewarding. The Introduction is excellent, laying out the political, economic, and classist origins of this horrible episode (among so many) in England's history; the rest of the book focuses on four women condemned to the voyage, and the author does a really good job of describing the grinding poverty and deprivation of these young women's lives that led to the petty crimes of which they were convicted. Privy to amazing primary source material and clearly compassionate towards her subjects, she probably could have written a pretty good historical fiction novel based on her research – instead, she employs one of my least favorite approaches to writing “history”: telling the story as though she was there and inside the women's heads, therefore able to narrate thoughts and conversations that she can only surmise. Plus, she relies on some amateurish devices (such as repeatedly referring to one character as “the grey-eyed girl” and others as “lassies”) that become annoying. That said, it is still satisfying to read about this unfamiliar and compelling chapter of history.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    4- Very painful to read about the terrible treatment of lower class families ,especially widowed and children in British Isles 1800s. Remarkable that they survived horrible prison conditions, and then the conditions on board the convict ships. The abysmal care for pregnant and also the sea sick passengers led to many burials at sea. Conditions weren't much better with the "owners " in Australia but resilience and perseverance were key to surviving 7-10 year sentences and then finally making new l 4- Very painful to read about the terrible treatment of lower class families ,especially widowed and children in British Isles 1800s. Remarkable that they survived horrible prison conditions, and then the conditions on board the convict ships. The abysmal care for pregnant and also the sea sick passengers led to many burials at sea. Conditions weren't much better with the "owners " in Australia but resilience and perseverance were key to surviving 7-10 year sentences and then finally making new lives for themselves. Fresh air and cleaner water plus fresh foods upped their survival rates as well.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Heidi

    Review coming soon!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jayme

    Though the writing is a little muddled (a lot of adjectives for nonfiction) this well researched narrative nonfiction book explores the lives of 4 impoverished women who were convicted of minor crimes in Great Britain and sent to prison in Australia.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    The story of several convict women who were shipped by the British government to Australia for labor. I picked up this book not realizing it was considered nonfiction. It took me a while before I even noticed because I was wrapped up in reading about the first main character in the book, Agnes. I was expecting most of the book to be focused on the life in Australia, but the author author also details the "justice" system and socioeconomic environment that drove impoverished women and men to theft The story of several convict women who were shipped by the British government to Australia for labor. I picked up this book not realizing it was considered nonfiction. It took me a while before I even noticed because I was wrapped up in reading about the first main character in the book, Agnes. I was expecting most of the book to be focused on the life in Australia, but the author author also details the "justice" system and socioeconomic environment that drove impoverished women and men to theft and transportation. In fact, the first transportation of one of the main characters, Agnes doesn't occur until around page 100. I would have liked to focus on the lives of fewer women. There were a lot of people and different situations to keep track of towards the end of the book. This book was obviously well researched with just enough storyline to keep me interested. If more nonfiction books were written like this, then I would definitely read more nonfiction. Once in a while the book does get tedious. The author tends to describe characters as either good or bad. The Quaker Elizabeth Fry, for example, is practically saintly.

  22. 5 out of 5

    librarian4Him02

    This book chronicles the lifes of 3 women sent to Australia during the convict transports of the early to mid-1800s. It also relates the kindness of one Quaker woman who strove for prison reform for women prisoners, tells of the women's imprisonment in Australia, and what life was like after gaining freedom. Why I started reading - It caught my eye when a library customer returned it. I'd never read anything on this topic before. What kept me reading? The author's ability to tell the facts in a st This book chronicles the lifes of 3 women sent to Australia during the convict transports of the early to mid-1800s. It also relates the kindness of one Quaker woman who strove for prison reform for women prisoners, tells of the women's imprisonment in Australia, and what life was like after gaining freedom. Why I started reading - It caught my eye when a library customer returned it. I'd never read anything on this topic before. What kept me reading? The author's ability to tell the facts in a story-like fashion. She included rich detail that humanized the women who's life stories she related. I do wish, though, that she'd included a bit more about the ancestors of these women and maybe some of their thoughts on the women who played such an important role in their families' pasts. Recommended to history buffs, especially in the area of women's history. Also, to those interested in world or Australian history, British history, and maritime history, or just enjoy an entertaining work of non-fiction.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Peggy

    Just prior to the reign of Queen Victoria, the British government attempted to solve two of its problems (the threat of losing its Australian colonies due to a lack of colonists and a massive underclass of working poor forced to steal simply to survive) by transporting its prisoners to the far-flung colonies and forcing them to serve their time there. Some 25,000 of these transportees were women (their dependent children were often transported, too), most convicted of petty theft. Their lives in Just prior to the reign of Queen Victoria, the British government attempted to solve two of its problems (the threat of losing its Australian colonies due to a lack of colonists and a massive underclass of working poor forced to steal simply to survive) by transporting its prisoners to the far-flung colonies and forcing them to serve their time there. Some 25,000 of these transportees were women (their dependent children were often transported, too), most convicted of petty theft. Their lives in Britain were miserable and cruel, prison was worse, the transport itself was dangerous, and the life awaiting them was no improvement. Swiss uses the stories of a few women to illustrate the whole situation, and does a remarkable job. It's impossible to read about these women's lives and not be moved by their sheer stubborn survival. Awesome book.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mary Anne

    This book was written like a dissertation for a course on Australian history. It is the story of women from Scotland, Ireland and Britain who were sentenced to deportation to Tasmania to serve their terms of imprisonment…mostly for petty theft. There were characters’ stories woven into the book, but you had to wade through a lot of minutiae and errant details about Australian history. It took almost a third of the book for the first women to leave the British Isles. If you’ve read Dickens or kno This book was written like a dissertation for a course on Australian history. It is the story of women from Scotland, Ireland and Britain who were sentenced to deportation to Tasmania to serve their terms of imprisonment…mostly for petty theft. There were characters’ stories woven into the book, but you had to wade through a lot of minutiae and errant details about Australian history. It took almost a third of the book for the first women to leave the British Isles. If you’ve read Dickens or know any history of life at that time (early 19th century) you don’t need all that descriptive detail to set the scene. Swiss certainly did a great job of researching her facts. The characters were actual people, but she doesn’t know how to tell a story. The Tin Ticket was boring! I only finished it because it was my book club selection.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Dani Haviland

    I read this book for research on my fifth book, FAIRIES DOWN UNDER (a time travel saga), but found myself enjoying it as a novel, entranced with the lives of the women who were transported from England to Australia in 1786. Most of them were guilty only of trying to survive in a harsh and unsympathetic world. I think every teenaged girl in a developed country should be required to read this book. Our daughters have so much and still complain that they are still being denied or neglected. Just be I read this book for research on my fifth book, FAIRIES DOWN UNDER (a time travel saga), but found myself enjoying it as a novel, entranced with the lives of the women who were transported from England to Australia in 1786. Most of them were guilty only of trying to survive in a harsh and unsympathetic world. I think every teenaged girl in a developed country should be required to read this book. Our daughters have so much and still complain that they are still being denied or neglected. Just being able to wash once a week and eat a real meal on occasion would have been a treat for the young girls and women portrayed in this book. I appreciated the author's manner of weaving the story of several women, using historical documents and diaries for authenticity, and employing a writer's skill for presentation and empathy.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Anna Engel

    At page 41, I told myself I'd give the book another three "grey-eyed lasses" before putting it aside. Turns out, I was frustrated enough with the prose that I gave up before that happened. This is a VERY romantacized version of history – bleak and full of hardship, but definitely with a thick, gooey layer of romanticism. "The Tin Ticket" is about the women who committed relatively minor crimes like stealing in Britain and were transported to Tasmania (similar to the convicts who were sent to Aust At page 41, I told myself I'd give the book another three "grey-eyed lasses" before putting it aside. Turns out, I was frustrated enough with the prose that I gave up before that happened. This is a VERY romantacized version of history – bleak and full of hardship, but definitely with a thick, gooey layer of romanticism. "The Tin Ticket" is about the women who committed relatively minor crimes like stealing in Britain and were transported to Tasmania (similar to the convicts who were sent to Australia). Being a pop history, you expect some level of imagination bordering on inaccuracy, but I can't stand when there are factual errors (in this case, that George's madness was caused by porphyria, which is hardly a settled matter). This is what happens when you have a history degree.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Chris Schaffer

    Meh. Some interesting on the English penal system reform of the early 1800s..kinda dull..was hoping for a Fatal Shore like read. Linked to the ending.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Marie Sandland

    There is a fascinating story about the thousands of women who were transported to the Antipodes, but Deborah J Swiss is really not the woman to tell it. To call her prose purple does not even begin to describe how awful her writing is. I've just read that she's a management consultant, which proves my suspicion that she's not a historian. The book is written almost like a novel which can be work (Schindler's Ark) but her tone of outrage and flowery adjectives really spoil what should have been a There is a fascinating story about the thousands of women who were transported to the Antipodes, but Deborah J Swiss is really not the woman to tell it. To call her prose purple does not even begin to describe how awful her writing is. I've just read that she's a management consultant, which proves my suspicion that she's not a historian. The book is written almost like a novel which can be work (Schindler's Ark) but her tone of outrage and flowery adjectives really spoil what should have been a great read.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ali Wenger

    I expected more from this book. “...women who created the most liberated society of their time. “ “...women who, by sheer force of will, became the heart and soul of a new nation. “ Instead it went into great detail of the backgrounds of these women and the crimes that earned them their tickets to Van Dieman’s Land and their time serving their sentences. While a somewhat interesting history I thought I was going to learn more about a fledgling colony becoming a great nation due to these women.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    This is a true horror story. Women and chilren sent to Australia as prisoners, 85%of England society were poor and starving. Children as young a 4 sent to live on the street. After arrest they were thrown into filthy living conditions in prison to await a ship transferring prisoners to Australia . A story that needed to be told. Chilling and disgusting. A story of the human spirit and the struggle to survive

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.