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There are more high-salaried women in the workforce today than ever before, yet most females remain seriously underpaid when compared to their male counterparts. Motivational speaker and financial journalist Barbara Stanny decided to find out why by identifying the differences between those who draw the big bucks and those who don't. In Secrets of Six-Figure Women she reve There are more high-salaried women in the workforce today than ever before, yet most females remain seriously underpaid when compared to their male counterparts. Motivational speaker and financial journalist Barbara Stanny decided to find out why by identifying the differences between those who draw the big bucks and those who don't. In Secrets of Six-Figure Women she reveals what makes the leading edge tick, as well as how others can use the information to boost their own paychecks and self-esteem. "For far too many women, financial limits have become a fact of life. The thought of making more is like climbing Mount Everest, a colossal, if not impossible task," writes Stanny. "That's exactly how I used to feel." By examining scores of top moneymakers, along with dozens of those earning below their potentials, Stanny discovered what works and what doesn't. After analyzing the subsequent lessons (i.e., you actually can boost your income without selling out, the requisite traits to do so can be developed by virtually anyone, money really can't buy happiness), she proposes specific strategies for maximizing their impact (intend from the start to succeed, stretch yourself, manage any payoff with care). Stanny professes throughout that she desires to offer "insight, hope and guidance to any of you who aspire to earn more." With this surprisingly practical and ultimately inspirational guidebook, she delivers. --Howard Rothman


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There are more high-salaried women in the workforce today than ever before, yet most females remain seriously underpaid when compared to their male counterparts. Motivational speaker and financial journalist Barbara Stanny decided to find out why by identifying the differences between those who draw the big bucks and those who don't. In Secrets of Six-Figure Women she reve There are more high-salaried women in the workforce today than ever before, yet most females remain seriously underpaid when compared to their male counterparts. Motivational speaker and financial journalist Barbara Stanny decided to find out why by identifying the differences between those who draw the big bucks and those who don't. In Secrets of Six-Figure Women she reveals what makes the leading edge tick, as well as how others can use the information to boost their own paychecks and self-esteem. "For far too many women, financial limits have become a fact of life. The thought of making more is like climbing Mount Everest, a colossal, if not impossible task," writes Stanny. "That's exactly how I used to feel." By examining scores of top moneymakers, along with dozens of those earning below their potentials, Stanny discovered what works and what doesn't. After analyzing the subsequent lessons (i.e., you actually can boost your income without selling out, the requisite traits to do so can be developed by virtually anyone, money really can't buy happiness), she proposes specific strategies for maximizing their impact (intend from the start to succeed, stretch yourself, manage any payoff with care). Stanny professes throughout that she desires to offer "insight, hope and guidance to any of you who aspire to earn more." With this surprisingly practical and ultimately inspirational guidebook, she delivers. --Howard Rothman

30 review for Secrets of Six-Figure Women

  1. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    Good book -- I initially thought I'd just skim it as a quick-and-easy self-help book, but it actually offers a substantial amount of material that prompts self-reflection, as well as useful references to other material. This book is as much about developing and projecting belief in oneself as it is about earning power, and it's as applicable to men who may also fall into the "under-earner" trap. The author notes that "under-earning" doesn't necessarily mean low-pay but really means earning less Good book -- I initially thought I'd just skim it as a quick-and-easy self-help book, but it actually offers a substantial amount of material that prompts self-reflection, as well as useful references to other material. This book is as much about developing and projecting belief in oneself as it is about earning power, and it's as applicable to men who may also fall into the "under-earner" trap. The author notes that "under-earning" doesn't necessarily mean low-pay but really means earning less than your value in the marketplace. This book is really about gaining power over your life and increasing your choices in life. This book describes many different reasons and belief patterns for why people (and women in particular) sabotage themselves in salary negotiations and career advancement. During two job interviews within the last week, I low-balled my salary requirements because I choked on stating the market salary range for such positions. It also offers some exercises to get over our own mental hurdles. Notes re: patterns of success: 1. Feel the fear. Have the doubts. Go for it anyway. * Many people feel fear at the brink of success -- that's when you really need to push forward. Nelson Mandela: "Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate. Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure. It is our light, not our darkness that most frightens us. We ask ourselves, Who am I to be brilliant, gorgeous, talented, fabulous? Actually, who are you not to be? You are a child of God. Your playing small does not serve the world. There is nothing enlightened about shrinking so that other people won't feel insecure around you." * "Where your intention goes, so goes you. Your intention becomes your reality." Gary Sukav, Seat of the Soul Focus on working passionately, not working hard -- view tradeoffs rather than sacrifices. 2. Maintain positive attitude and gratitude. 3. Ignore nay-sayers ("let the dogs bark") -- they're not necessarily mean-spirited, but simply test your commitment 4. Develop a thick skin -- don't take rejection or criticism personally 5. There are always two games that we can play -- playing the game "To Win" or playing the game "Not to Lose" (playing it safe, avoiding risk). Play the game "To Win" / Live with an attitude of abundance/audacity rather than fear/avoidance/scarcity (contrary to the message of "Moneyball"). 6. Women are often afraid of coming across as a b*tch, but think of it as "Being In Total Control of Herself". Don't be afraid to speak out, walk through fire, be a lioness. * In negotiations, silence or "hmmm" can be more effective than talking. * "Asking for more is an act of self-love. Saying no is a show of self-respect. Refusing to settle is a statement of self-worth. And walking away is a sign of self-trust." 7. Resilience is as important as audacity -- when you fall on your face, pick yourself, reflect on lessons learned, and start again. 8. Obey the rules of money -- focus on building wealth rather than monthly salary/spending * Spend less than you earn (budget don't allow debt) * Pay yourself first (save) * Put your money to work (invest -- max out 401k and IRA contributions) Give generously Patterns of Under-earners: * Debt is about giving away your energy, choosing chaos rather than success and control. * Change begins with a challenge or problem. Use your challenges as stepping stones rather than as stumbling blocks

  2. 5 out of 5

    Niecie

    Challenged me to suck less with my money. It's a bit too focused on exceptional women without taking cultural, economic, and other environmental factors into account... which definitely affect how much power you have in a situation and how much money you can make.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Macy_Novels at Night

    Great book to get your off your ass and help you realize that you are worth so much more than you probably think that you are! This book opened my eyes to so much stigma that I have unknowingly been carrying around my whole life! I looked at my husband last night and told him that I was just as capable as he was, and it felt great! I may need to revisit this in the future as a good reminder as I build my empire! off, off and away!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Cathy Allen

    So I was 44 years old and deep in debt when Suze Orman finally got my attention and convinced me that my financial security was my responsibility. Six years later I have savings, a retirement account, and no debt. Thank you Suze. But it was Barbara Stanny who showed me that the adjustments I needed to make were not all on the expenses side of the ledger... I was a chronic UNDEREARNER... I was not making what I was worth. Worse, I wasn't even trying. Sometimes people need a kick in the head to do So I was 44 years old and deep in debt when Suze Orman finally got my attention and convinced me that my financial security was my responsibility. Six years later I have savings, a retirement account, and no debt. Thank you Suze. But it was Barbara Stanny who showed me that the adjustments I needed to make were not all on the expenses side of the ledger... I was a chronic UNDEREARNER... I was not making what I was worth. Worse, I wasn't even trying. Sometimes people need a kick in the head to do the right thing for themselves. That's Orman's approach... and it helped me. Stanny's approach is more subtle but equally effective: provide role models. Show readers that women who earn good money are not male-defined, sold-out automatons with mixed up priorities. By finding them, interviewing them, and presenting their stories, Stanny shows us that high earning women can be passionate about their work and deeply invested in advancing social welfare. They also work with an intent to make money. They are paid well often because they have confidence in their ability to do well and they clearly express their worth to those who decide the pay rate, whether it be boss or client. I gave a copy of this one to my niece as a high school graduation present. My brother, who knows me as a struggling academic with a bent toward poverty, was amused. But these authors have changed my outlook, and by changing my outlook they have changed my life for the better. There is no greater gift and I am forever grateful. If you are a woman who can't pay the bills each month, go get this one and do the exercises. You will be glad you did.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Shaun

    After 23 years working in managed care, I decided it's time to get out. To help with my transition, I hired a career coach, who has inspired me to do a great deal of self-reflection. I came across this author in my research and chose this book, though a little outdated, because I could get it from the library. OMG...LOVED IT!! This is more than a self-help, how to get rich/increase your income book, and interestingly despite being somewhat dated, I felt the content was extremely relevant. Stanny in After 23 years working in managed care, I decided it's time to get out. To help with my transition, I hired a career coach, who has inspired me to do a great deal of self-reflection. I came across this author in my research and chose this book, though a little outdated, because I could get it from the library. OMG...LOVED IT!! This is more than a self-help, how to get rich/increase your income book, and interestingly despite being somewhat dated, I felt the content was extremely relevant. Stanny interviews several dozen high-earning (six figure) women in the hopes of understanding why they were making so much more than a number of women she referred to as underearners, given the fact that all the women were smart, educated, and hard working. If anything the book inspires a lot of self-reflection about value, the values we serve as well as the way we value or undervalue ourselves. Had I read this book a few years ago, much of the message might have been lost on me. But this really was the perfect book at the perfect time. I felt as if I derived a tremendous amount of insight from Stanny's research.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Gwen

    I'm returning this book to audible. Lots of platitudes, obvious points, and magical thinking. Are you holding yourself back by believing you can never be rich? Fuck off.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Geraldine Gray

    I have read this book and passed it on and bought it (secondhand) for several friend. It's not about how to make more money and be greedy - it's about how to recognize your worth, increase your confidence and get your career and earnings on track with your "seemingly" more successful peers.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

    This was a great read! Stanny starts by explaining that more women than ever are becoming high earners chiefly due to the fact that they were absent in the workforce for so long. She next turns to the issue of underearners - women who don't believe or who are unwilling to ask for what they are truly worth. To highlight her point she asks, "How can we ever expect to earn as much as a man if we can't even earn as much as we ourselves are capable of making?" However, there's a raging double standar This was a great read! Stanny starts by explaining that more women than ever are becoming high earners chiefly due to the fact that they were absent in the workforce for so long. She next turns to the issue of underearners - women who don't believe or who are unwilling to ask for what they are truly worth. To highlight her point she asks, "How can we ever expect to earn as much as a man if we can't even earn as much as we ourselves are capable of making?" However, there's a raging double standard here - when men lobby for raises or negotiate a starting salary, they are seen as aggressive, which is typically a good trait in the business world. When a women does the same, she is seen in a far less positive light. It honestly blows my mind that we're still dealing with this issue in the 21st century. On that same note, when Stanny begins walking the reader why and how she should negotiate a starting salary, raise, bonus, duties, etc. she does a wonderful job. I particularly loved this statment: "Asking for more is an act of self-love. Saying no is a show of self-respect. Refusing to settle is a statement of self-worth. And walking away is a sign of self-trust." I realize that without reading the book or fully understanding her arguments, this may sound pie-in-the-sky and totally unrealistic. But I'm a believer; you're not doing yourself any favors in selling yourself short. Being a martyr isn't the goal in business. It isn't going to help your family if you're overworked, underpaid, stressed to the max, and bitter over your situation. I work to make money; it's not a charity event for me. I took extensive notes on this book that I plan to refer back to often. Stanny's strategy is as follows: 1. Declaration of intent 2. Letting go of the ledge 3. Get in the game 4. Speak up 5. The stretch 6. Seek support 7. Obey the rules of money (spend less than you earn, pay yourself first, and put your money to work) I love, love, LOVE that Stanny covered that last topic; it really gives the book a holistic feel and puts the reader in a good mindset. Some may initially find Stanny's relentless focus on money off-putting. But she consistently reminds the reader that money is only a means to an end. Money provides security, freedom (if you want to quit your job, you can), the ability to help others, etc. When speaking about philanthropy, one of the women Stanny interviewed said, "Money is like manure. If you pile it up it stinks. But if you spread it around, it does a lot of good." The strategies are a little different than the "secrets" Stanny alludes to in the title. Those are: 1. Working hard doesn't mean working all the time 2. Focus on fulfulling your values rather than financial gain 3. Loving what you do is much more important than what you do 4. Feel the fear. Have the doubts. Go for it anyway. 5. Think in terms of trade-offs. mot sacrifices, to find a workable equilibrium. 6. Sometimes you just have to shrug it off and have a good laugh. 7. Appreciate abundance I found it interesting that Stanny's father was the founder of H&R Block. She had a disastrous first marriage where she stuck her head in the sand when it came to financial matters. As a result, her trust fund was basically squandered by the guy. Before she completed this book, Stanny had joined the ranks of six-figure women, herself. If there was thing I dind't like about this book, it was the heavy emphasis on getting your frame of reference in place; the "think good thoughts and they will manifest in your life" type thing ala The Secret. Fortunatley, that passes rather quickly and Stanny gets to the meat of the material. As the book progresses, though, I came around a little. You're never going to make six-figures if you're not confident in yourself, your abilities, and what you're worth. I wish, though, that she had stressed a little more than that was just like the pre-req for everything else; it won't get you there on its own. Overall, I would recommend this book to any woman. We all deserve to be paid what we're worth and have confidence in our skills and abilities. I may end up purchasing this book (which I hardly ever do) and can definitely see myself picking it up again. A great read! Facts: * Women's chances of high incomes are increasing faster than men's. From 1996 to 1998, the number of female high earners jumped 68% while the number of males in that category increased only 36%. * Wealth doesn't come from what you make, but from what you don't spend. * The glass ceiling at work is nothing compared to the lead ceiling in my head. * Luck is a frequent companion of a firmly fixed focus.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sonya

    I really enjoyed this book! Especially when she described the traits of an "underearner." A lot of times, your income doesn't really change until your attitude towards money changes. Once upon a time, I was a compulsive spender... I could have saved but I didn't because I grew up in a household where holding onto money was viewed as somewhat selfish and greedy. My parents spent every nickel and dime to raise 4 girls on less than blue collar salaries. I realized I was doing the same thing. I didn I really enjoyed this book! Especially when she described the traits of an "underearner." A lot of times, your income doesn't really change until your attitude towards money changes. Once upon a time, I was a compulsive spender... I could have saved but I didn't because I grew up in a household where holding onto money was viewed as somewhat selfish and greedy. My parents spent every nickel and dime to raise 4 girls on less than blue collar salaries. I realized I was doing the same thing. I didn't hold onto money because that was the norm for me growing up. Now, after adopting more healthy mindset towards wealth and valuing my skills more, I managed to switch from a low-income industry to a really well-compensated industry, leverage my previous work experience, and get a new job that boosted my income by 70%!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Irina Collazo

    Unfortunately I couldn't finish reading this book. I wish I paid attention to the publication date before buying, and read a sample on Amazon. It just feels outdated for this day and age. The material could have been condensed, by a lot. There is too much repetition, I felt like wanting to skip ahead all the time. There is also too much focus on why some women are afraid, unwilling or uncomfortable to make six figures. Afraid?! That's just crazy.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    "Feel the fear. Have the doubts. Go for it anyway."

  12. 4 out of 5

    Tavleen Kaur

    I am really glad I read this book. This book taught me to not dream small when it comes to money. Women are hardly ever encouraged or supported if they say they want to get rich. Why is that? Money equals to financial independence and according to me, it is something everyone should aspire for, especially women.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Ace

    This book has some pluses and minuses. The pluses: -Barbara highlights many areas where women fall short in helping themselves earn the money they deserve. It is certain characteristics that need to be acknowledged and dealt with in order for growth and she talks about ways some women broke the cycle. This would certainly be empowering to some women. -She also talks about how to have the money work for you instead of the other way around. I personally liked that part. - hearing the stories of the This book has some pluses and minuses. The pluses: -Barbara highlights many areas where women fall short in helping themselves earn the money they deserve. It is certain characteristics that need to be acknowledged and dealt with in order for growth and she talks about ways some women broke the cycle. This would certainly be empowering to some women. -She also talks about how to have the money work for you instead of the other way around. I personally liked that part. - hearing the stories of the other women was empowering and made me feel like earning 6 figures was obtainable and not something I could only dream of. The Minuses: - If you are looking for concrete directions on what you need to do or what the women in the book did, you will not find them. Granted, there isn't a universal step program for promotions in all jobs and so it will vary from person to person. The points made in the book are broad and may allow space for you to fit those stepping stones into your life/situation. - WAY too much fluff. I was hoping for more concrete methods these women used in obtaining 6 figures, but instead I found myself reading about how these women dealt with emotions. I understand why she felt the need to talk about this- but I felt it wasn't entirely necessary to talk about it as extensively as she did. - Anecdotal accounts of women who worked their way to 6 figures. Again, everyone is different and so the methods used were all different. Was it luck? Research wasn't mentioned as much as I would like... but that's just me. I like personal stories but I would prefer evidence that the methods will grant you at least semi-successful monetary gains in your life. - Secrets??? No secrets. A lot of the "secrets" were, in my opinion, no brainers. Again--- fluff. Would I recommend it? Of course. I feel every woman should read it. The psychological torment we women put ourselves in is really the main issue as to why we don't earn so much (when it's in our control). She talks about this extensively and it is because of this section that I highly recommend women to read it, at least once.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jenn Ash

    I'm an MBA from a top program and I still found this book helpful. It teaches you how to think and look for support. Good read, I finished in 2 days.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Denician

    Jump off the ledge. If you hate your job and don't believe you are earning your worth, do something about it. Motivating and encouraging. To change your life, you have to change your perspective.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ela

    Great book. Gives you enormous insight into regaining your own power, becoming a woman who knows how to speak up and ask for what she wants.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Johnson

    More interesting than I thought Picked out this book and was more interesting than I thought it would be. Has some valuable points anyone can use to empower themselves further.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Alyssa Duhé

    Motivational I suppose, but lacked depth on how six figure women stay six figure women.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Witt

    Was planning on giving this one star until the last 1/3-1/4 of the book. The end redeemed itself by talking about support systems (or lack thereof) and the difference between making money and having money. Generally I would not recommend this book. It’s probably partly my fault: first, I didn’t realize that the author is the heiress of HR Block, which just makes it lose credibility. I also thought it would be more about best practices of successful women, like routines, approaches, etc. but it w Was planning on giving this one star until the last 1/3-1/4 of the book. The end redeemed itself by talking about support systems (or lack thereof) and the difference between making money and having money. Generally I would not recommend this book. It’s probably partly my fault: first, I didn’t realize that the author is the heiress of HR Block, which just makes it lose credibility. I also thought it would be more about best practices of successful women, like routines, approaches, etc. but it was only about how to ask for more money which is irrelevant in my line of business (sales). I hated the way the author compared success in business to things that only ‘women’ could understand. Direct quote from the book below. ‘Fear and anxiety are to financial success what labor pains are to child birth. An unpleasant but unavoidable part of the process.’ VOMIT It was as if the author thought we could understand what she was saying if she put it in those types of terms? On top of that, it was just poor writing style — ‘i said x. He say y. Then i said Z. Then he said...’

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jenny

    This book would have been better suited to be a couple of blog posts. There was a lot of fluff and anecdotes that I skimmed through since they didn't contribute much to the overall point. However, I found myself highlighting a lot of key bullet-points. I admit I'm fascinated by money, and although I don't think I'll surpass the six-figure mark in my chosen career path, this book gave me some pointers on making sure I'm paid my worth for the work I do.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Gina Jo

    Yes, it’s a book about making more money...and so much more. It is ultimately about claiming your power and putting yourself in the mindset (and financial position) to achieve your goals no matter how wild they may seem to you now. I have read a number of books on this topic, but this one is realistic, interesting, and well written. Highly recommend, especially if you have a dream in mind that scares you and want help getting outside your comfort zone. Aha! Asking for help, one of the strategies Yes, it’s a book about making more money...and so much more. It is ultimately about claiming your power and putting yourself in the mindset (and financial position) to achieve your goals no matter how wild they may seem to you now. I have read a number of books on this topic, but this one is realistic, interesting, and well written. Highly recommend, especially if you have a dream in mind that scares you and want help getting outside your comfort zone. Aha! Asking for help, one of the strategies outlined in this book. :)

  22. 4 out of 5

    Shiloah

    I just recently started this book simultaneously with Sacred Success. I’m blown away. So many ah-ha’s and strategies to help change our paradigms and help us move into change-massive change.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Keshia Rollins

    I enjoyed this book. At times it reminded me of other books I have read on the topic but it was overall a good book that reinforced timeless principles of how to obtain wealth. I recommend it.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Brittany R

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. As women we often discount ourselves. Most of us know is bad for us mentally and physically, but it's also bad for our careers. As modern women, careers are a large part of our lives if not ourselves. It's time we start to refocus on ourselves. Reading this book is a step in the right direction. Secrets of Six-Figure Women is a quick, engaging read chock full of excellent advice. Stanny, whose father was a successful and recognized businessman, was a chronic underearner who set out to learn the s As women we often discount ourselves. Most of us know is bad for us mentally and physically, but it's also bad for our careers. As modern women, careers are a large part of our lives if not ourselves. It's time we start to refocus on ourselves. Reading this book is a step in the right direction. Secrets of Six-Figure Women is a quick, engaging read chock full of excellent advice. Stanny, whose father was a successful and recognized businessman, was a chronic underearner who set out to learn the secrets of successful women. What she learned was both surprising and expected. For example, I was surprised to learn that many of the six-figure women didn't work unGodly hours. Many have taught themselves to focus and work as little as four hours a day, and they're even more successful than when they'd worked four hours by 8:00 a.m. While surprising, I'm fully in support of this. What's the point of making six-figures if you can't enjoy it? (This is a rhetorical question. Life is meant to be lived; not worked.) It wasn't surprising at all that Stanny found belief in oneself, hard work, education, and talent to be the most important factors to her interviewees success. These are four marked characteristics that I would list for successful women. Stanny also found that six-figure women have a profit motive (they expect to be well compensated), audacity (they often step outside their comfort zones), resilience, and encouragement. She also learned that the women were self aware, were non-attached, and had financial know how. Stanny is quite quotable in this book. Her writing is strong and her insight deep. Her quotes are the type I'd want to embroider on a pillow, if I had the patience to embroider. Some of her most quotable lines include the following: "[T]he moment we stop waiting and start acting, we have the opportunity to walk through a doorway to a richer, fuller, more abundant life." (page 73) "Our state of mind shapes our way of life." (page 74) "To really change your financial situation, you have to let go of that part of yourself that stands in the way of greater abundance." (page 117) Of course you can't write a book about women succeeding in the workplace without addressing sexism. According to the women interviewed, there are two ways to handle sexism: 1) shake it off or 2) leave the organization. Shaking it off would be a good idea for minor instances of sexism, the cases in which proving oneself will help eradicate a sexist culture or superior. But sometimes the culture is so bad that you just need to leave. I know it's sometimes hard to leave when we want to change the culture, but it's not always possible, especially when the culprit is an older man. Some people need to age out of the workforce before we can change negative corporate cultures. This only addresses the cases when women have a choice to stay or leave. When a woman is forced out due to sexism, she has to do something about it. Stanny ends with a little last minute advice: "Claim your power. Value yourself, honor yourself, take all your desires to heart." http://thelemonadehouse.blogspot.com/...

  25. 5 out of 5

    Iliuta

    For some time, the title of this book put me off; I found it too commercial (and I still do). But when I finally came to it, I was pleasantly surprised. The book is an easy and enjoyable read. After having interviewed many professionally successful women (six figures women), the author presents their perspectives and opinions on how to become, and to remain, financially successful. Unsurprisingly, many of the women quoted in the book indicated self-doubt, or self-defeating behaviour, as the main For some time, the title of this book put me off; I found it too commercial (and I still do). But when I finally came to it, I was pleasantly surprised. The book is an easy and enjoyable read. After having interviewed many professionally successful women (six figures women), the author presents their perspectives and opinions on how to become, and to remain, financially successful. Unsurprisingly, many of the women quoted in the book indicated self-doubt, or self-defeating behaviour, as the main impediments to attain success. The author identifies the dominant traits that keep women in under-earning jobs and the must-have attributes of high earners. These include motive, audacity, resilience, and encouragement. She lays down seven strategies to bring these attributes into play: the declaration of intention, letting go of the ledge, get in the game, speak up, the stretch, seek support and obey the rules of money. The book also incorporates some simple, though revealing, self-reflection exercises. I would recommend this book to every woman interested in changing her attitude towards money and what money might entail, such as independence, security and the ability to do good.

  26. 4 out of 5

    LS

    What a waste of time. I should have known from the easily identifiable marketing tactic of using the word "secrets" that something fishy was going on. I wish I had stuck to my resolution not to read any more "self-help" books. Anyway, to be specific a more apt title for this book would have been the "Ladies Home Journal Secrets of ...." since that is what it reads like. For the first forty percent of the book the author keeps trying to sell us on why money is not bad. Hey if I select a book on t What a waste of time. I should have known from the easily identifiable marketing tactic of using the word "secrets" that something fishy was going on. I wish I had stuck to my resolution not to read any more "self-help" books. Anyway, to be specific a more apt title for this book would have been the "Ladies Home Journal Secrets of ...." since that is what it reads like. For the first forty percent of the book the author keeps trying to sell us on why money is not bad. Hey if I select a book on this subject, with this title I am already pretty convinced that money is not bad, because I am actively seeking to make a lot more of it. The second waste of time for me personally was the endless string of lurid stories, hence my quip about the "Ladies Home Journal." I was most uninterested in detailed scenes containing people screaming at each other in kitchens and what not. In the final analysis, the strategies that Stamy espouses would not fill a pamphlet. They are simple things such as starting where you are, re-pricing, altering your target market, using positive affirmations and visualizations, etc. The best lesson I obtained from this book--besides the one to steer clear of titles containing the word "secrets"--was in the chapter about myths. There the author reports that her research suggests women who make six figures do not necessarily work longer hours or harder than those who do not. There is a full spectrum of difficulty and work hours for both groups. All in all, I am glad this book exists. I am sure it is the right approach for some people, just not me.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Woodruff

    Just in time for tax day, I review books on money and money mindset. I share my own beliefs, ideas, and thoughts about money, and I share how I have been able to transform these over time. Overcoming Underearning: Overcome Your Money Fears and Earn What You Deserve & Secrets of Six-Figure Women: Surprising Strategies to Up Your Earnings and Change Your Life by Barbara Stanny helped me to overcome many of my personal limiting beliefs about money. I started with these books in 2016 and used her qu Just in time for tax day, I review books on money and money mindset. I share my own beliefs, ideas, and thoughts about money, and I share how I have been able to transform these over time. Overcoming Underearning: Overcome Your Money Fears and Earn What You Deserve & Secrets of Six-Figure Women: Surprising Strategies to Up Your Earnings and Change Your Life by Barbara Stanny helped me to overcome many of my personal limiting beliefs about money. I started with these books in 2016 and used her quizzes to journal about the thoughts in my head that were holding down my success. Being positive, abundant, and wealthy are available to all of us, but we need to work on our mindsets. This book helped me to cultivate my mindset to move up in my earning and in how I manage my money. Watch my full video review - available March 20 - at https://youtu.be/AkTxpzkYhSg

  28. 4 out of 5

    Nikki Knox

    I didn't even finish it. Too self-helpish for my style. I am all up for stories... but this was too much fluff with the stories. Sorry Stanny! Perhaps it was written for an older generation that didn't grow up with as much freedom or permission to be creative!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ruth

    Her strategies on negotiation and asking for more were quite helpful, but this book was filled with a lot of fluff. Hoping to find better books out there on financial literacy and improving ones relationship with (and giving up shame around) money

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kristina

    Engulfed this book. Motivating, but so hard to see it as being realistic...I sincerely wonder how many of the women interviewed are still "Six-Figure Women" in today's economic climate.

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