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The Redwall Cookbook

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Ever read a Redwall novel and wonder exactly what Abbot’s Special Abbey Trifle is? Or how to make Shrimp ’N Hotroot Soup, that delicacy of otters everywhere? Or Mole’s Favourite Turnip and Tater Deeper ’N Ever Pie? From the simple refreshment of Summer Strawberry Fizz to Great Hall Gooseberry Fool, they’re all here, along with dozens of other favorites sure to turn young h Ever read a Redwall novel and wonder exactly what Abbot’s Special Abbey Trifle is? Or how to make Shrimp ’N Hotroot Soup, that delicacy of otters everywhere? Or Mole’s Favourite Turnip and Tater Deeper ’N Ever Pie? From the simple refreshment of Summer Strawberry Fizz to Great Hall Gooseberry Fool, they’re all here, along with dozens of other favorites sure to turn young hands into seasoned chefs, illustrated in full color with all the charm and magic that is Redwall. A gift like no other for fans of the series, old or new.


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Ever read a Redwall novel and wonder exactly what Abbot’s Special Abbey Trifle is? Or how to make Shrimp ’N Hotroot Soup, that delicacy of otters everywhere? Or Mole’s Favourite Turnip and Tater Deeper ’N Ever Pie? From the simple refreshment of Summer Strawberry Fizz to Great Hall Gooseberry Fool, they’re all here, along with dozens of other favorites sure to turn young h Ever read a Redwall novel and wonder exactly what Abbot’s Special Abbey Trifle is? Or how to make Shrimp ’N Hotroot Soup, that delicacy of otters everywhere? Or Mole’s Favourite Turnip and Tater Deeper ’N Ever Pie? From the simple refreshment of Summer Strawberry Fizz to Great Hall Gooseberry Fool, they’re all here, along with dozens of other favorites sure to turn young hands into seasoned chefs, illustrated in full color with all the charm and magic that is Redwall. A gift like no other for fans of the series, old or new.

30 review for The Redwall Cookbook

  1. 5 out of 5

    Taylor

    One of the hardest and best things about Brian Jacques 'Redwall' series is surviving through the lavish descriptions of delicious feasts. They make the mouth water, and the only time to effectively read these books is during the holidays when leftovers and goodies are abundant. Or during a good garden harvest. Happily, there is this wee, handy cookbook with recipes and short Redwall stories. I haven't tried the recipes yet, but they look good and read well. And I am really looking forward to rea One of the hardest and best things about Brian Jacques 'Redwall' series is surviving through the lavish descriptions of delicious feasts. They make the mouth water, and the only time to effectively read these books is during the holidays when leftovers and goodies are abundant. Or during a good garden harvest. Happily, there is this wee, handy cookbook with recipes and short Redwall stories. I haven't tried the recipes yet, but they look good and read well. And I am really looking forward to reading Redwall or Mossflower (or any of the other zillion Redwall books) aloud to my kids, and then serving them "Shrimp & Hotroot Soup" or "Foremoles Deeper'n Ever Pie" for dinner. Lovely.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Josiah

    This is a difficult book to review. How exactly does one rate or review a cookbook, especially one that is just as much a fictional narrative as a collection of effective recipes? Both story and recipes were very good, in my opinion. I'm not sure how exactly the recipes in the book were created, though; did Brian Jacques do it himself (probably not, I'd assume), or at least help with it? Was a chef hired by the publishing company to work up some recipes that fit within the guidelines of the food This is a difficult book to review. How exactly does one rate or review a cookbook, especially one that is just as much a fictional narrative as a collection of effective recipes? Both story and recipes were very good, in my opinion. I'm not sure how exactly the recipes in the book were created, though; did Brian Jacques do it himself (probably not, I'd assume), or at least help with it? Was a chef hired by the publishing company to work up some recipes that fit within the guidelines of the foods described in the Redwall books? Was some entirely different method used? I don't know, but I can tell you that the recipes really do work, and some of them are as good as what I expected when I read about them in the books, which is significantly high praise. We had originally planned to make more than half a dozen of these recipes as an experimental Redwall feast, but in the end, we tried three of them. The Summer Strawberry Fizz was a good carbonated drink, leaning sort of toward the desserty side. I would recommend adding a bit more ice cream than the proportion listed in the book, and maybe going a shade light on the strawberries; as we finished the pitcher, we ended up with only a small amount of liquid at the bottom, and a lot of semi-solid strawberry mixture. For all of these recipes, I would suggest the cook tweak it to best suit their own needs. The second dish that we made was the Loamhedge Nut Bread. It had some mild spiciness to it, but could have definitely used some butter or jelly (or both) to enliven it. The third dish was the Hare's Haversack Crumble, and it was spectacular. Now I can see what Basil Stagg Hare was raving about when he talked about how great it is! This is a fantastic dessert that will impress anyone who eats it, whether or not they've ever read about the famous Redwall Abbey created by Brian Jacques. I love the Hare's Haversack Crumble! One should not forget that The Redwall Cookbook is a story, too. Brian Jacques leads us back to the golden days of Matthias, Constance the Badgermum, Basil Stagg Hare and Mattimeo, days that I'm sure most Redwall fans miss very much. These are happy days described in the book, days without war and death and dire threats to the peaceful Redwall Abbey. We see Matthias, his son Mattimeo and the others living quietly and at peace, able to simply have fun at the abbey and revel in the lives that they have fought hard and sacrificed for so memorably to build for themselves and their young ones. Redwall is a wonderful place during peacetime; it probably makes more than a few readers almost wish in a tiny corner of their hearts that they were a little animal, so that they could live there. The Redwall Cookbook is a fine offering in every possible way, and I give it my full recommendation. I would rate it at at least two and a half stars.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Nostalgia Reader

    Redwall books aren't complete without the mouth-watering feasts, so a cookbook companion is quite fitting for the series! The recipes are split up into four feasts, one for each season, with desserts and entrees, an appetizer, and a drink for each. Recipes include the perennial favorites October Ale, Summer Strawberry Fizz, Shrimp' n' Hotroot Soup, Deeper' n' Ever Turnip' n' Tater' n' Beetroot Pie, Cheese' n' Onion Hogbake, and Afternoon Scones. All recipes are relatively simple, but quite delic Redwall books aren't complete without the mouth-watering feasts, so a cookbook companion is quite fitting for the series! The recipes are split up into four feasts, one for each season, with desserts and entrees, an appetizer, and a drink for each. Recipes include the perennial favorites October Ale, Summer Strawberry Fizz, Shrimp' n' Hotroot Soup, Deeper' n' Ever Turnip' n' Tater' n' Beetroot Pie, Cheese' n' Onion Hogbake, and Afternoon Scones. All recipes are relatively simple, but quite delicious. What makes this even better is that each season has a story line*, highlighting the preparations for the feast. Many characters make an appearance, but I was especially delighted by Bungo the molebabe: MOST ADORABLE THING EVER. The illustrations that accompany the book are some of my absolute favorites of the entire series. Very highly recommended if you like the Redwall series. Even if you don't cook, the stories and illustrations still make it a worthwhile! *It seems like this is set in early Redwall times, as Matthias makes an appearance. I haven't read the original trilogy in a very long time, but some of the other names of characters do sound familiar to the first book as well.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Can’t wait to cook everything in it 🥰

  5. 5 out of 5

    X

    Wonderful, of course! What else could a Redwaller think? The book is divided into four sections - one for each season - with a little story and recipes for each. The stories and poems are nice, the illustrations darling, and the recipes simple but good (at least the one's I've tried!). Wonderful, of course! What else could a Redwaller think? The book is divided into four sections - one for each season - with a little story and recipes for each. The stories and poems are nice, the illustrations darling, and the recipes simple but good (at least the one's I've tried!).

  6. 5 out of 5

    Shane

    The Redwall books are all very similar to one another, which is great, because the Redwall formula has so much to love. One of the most enjoyable characteristics of these books is their detailed descriptions of feasts and picnics full of delicious-sounding food. In this cookbook, familiar recipes are categorized into the most appropriate season; for example, Hare’s Pawspring Soup is in Spring and Veggible Molebake is in Autumn. The recipes are generally excellent and great for discovering vegetab The Redwall books are all very similar to one another, which is great, because the Redwall formula has so much to love. One of the most enjoyable characteristics of these books is their detailed descriptions of feasts and picnics full of delicious-sounding food. In this cookbook, familiar recipes are categorized into the most appropriate season; for example, Hare’s Pawspring Soup is in Spring and Veggible Molebake is in Autumn. The recipes are generally excellent and great for discovering vegetables you might not be familiar with like parsnips and rutabagas. On top of all that every recipe is accompanied by a short story or poem from Jacques and every page has beautiful original artwork by Christopher Denise.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Danielle

    The illustrations are cute and the recipes all sound delicious. I made the raspberry rock cakes and they were really good. My family enjoyed them for breakfast and tea. A great cookbook for fans of the Redwall series like me!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Cydni Perkins

    This is such a cute little cookbook that is basically a story with recipes. It brings back many of my favorite Redwall characters, like Matthias and Cornflower, just for a big feast where everyone is exchanging little stories and recipes. Some trickery is involved when some beasts try to eavesdrop on another beat's recipes. I found several recipes that I know will be keepers, like Stones Inna Swamp (vegetable soup with dumplings). The recipes are mostly vegetarian, which I think is appropriate b This is such a cute little cookbook that is basically a story with recipes. It brings back many of my favorite Redwall characters, like Matthias and Cornflower, just for a big feast where everyone is exchanging little stories and recipes. Some trickery is involved when some beasts try to eavesdrop on another beat's recipes. I found several recipes that I know will be keepers, like Stones Inna Swamp (vegetable soup with dumplings). The recipes are mostly vegetarian, which I think is appropriate because otherwise at least some of the Redwall animals would end up in the stew. The only recipe I think I won't try is October Ale, while is a mixture of ginger ale and fruit juice. All the others look wonderful to me, and I'm excited to try some of the delicious Redwall food I've read so much about.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Amity DeAngelis

    I spent most of 5th and 6th grade inhaling all of the Redwall books and still enjoy them now and then as an adult. The descriptions of Abbey food has always made me drool! I just recently got this cookbook and tried out the stuffed mushrooms and Savory Squirrel Bakes (mashed potato and cheese balls) for Thanksgiving and they were delicious! The only difficulty I found is that a lot of the recipes contain cheese, which some picky eaters in my family won't eat. I also do not enjoy cooking very muc I spent most of 5th and 6th grade inhaling all of the Redwall books and still enjoy them now and then as an adult. The descriptions of Abbey food has always made me drool! I just recently got this cookbook and tried out the stuffed mushrooms and Savory Squirrel Bakes (mashed potato and cheese balls) for Thanksgiving and they were delicious! The only difficulty I found is that a lot of the recipes contain cheese, which some picky eaters in my family won't eat. I also do not enjoy cooking very much so was thrilled that the recipes are simple and not very time consuming. The illustrations are beautiful and adorable. I liked reading the excerpts and reminiscing about my childhood daydreams. I do not have kids yet but some day I will definitely be using this cookbook with them!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lissa

    At the suggestion of my third-born son, we purchased this book. As a cookbook goes, there are a plethora of simple, yet scrumpious foods to enjoy. They are organized by season of the year; like soups in the fall, hot tea and scones in the winter and fruit desserts for summer. Each of my children have favorites from this book for their birthdays. I love how Mr. Jacques explains the significance of the simple recipes as the result of food rationing during WWII. Everyone had to find ways to use wha At the suggestion of my third-born son, we purchased this book. As a cookbook goes, there are a plethora of simple, yet scrumpious foods to enjoy. They are organized by season of the year; like soups in the fall, hot tea and scones in the winter and fruit desserts for summer. Each of my children have favorites from this book for their birthdays. I love how Mr. Jacques explains the significance of the simple recipes as the result of food rationing during WWII. Everyone had to find ways to use what they had on hand. Each recipe Mr. Jacques has personally selected, created & tasted (he worked as a cook at one point). They don't disappoint!

  11. 5 out of 5

    ☺Trish

    Another beautiful collaboration from author Brian Jacques and illustrator Christopher Denise. I could live on Hare's Pawspring Vegetable Soup and/or Shrimp 'N Hotroot Soup (curry!). What I'd really like to try next, though, is the Rubbadeedubb Pudd . . . baby Bungo definitely has a way with words! Oh, and after reading (and enjoying) Josiah's review and his high praise for Hare's Haversack Crumble, I can't wait to try that recipe, too! Another beautiful collaboration from author Brian Jacques and illustrator Christopher Denise. I could live on Hare's Pawspring Vegetable Soup and/or Shrimp 'N Hotroot Soup (curry!). What I'd really like to try next, though, is the Rubbadeedubb Pudd . . . baby Bungo definitely has a way with words! Oh, and after reading (and enjoying) Josiah's review and his high praise for Hare's Haversack Crumble, I can't wait to try that recipe, too!

  12. 4 out of 5

    J

    I have enjoyed reading a few of the Redwall books whenever I can find them and get my hands on them. Unfortunately it has been such a long time since I visited within the confines of the Abbey. As a result I was surprised to see that there was a cookbook and chose to snoop it out since as the majority of Redwall readers know food plays such a vital role within the books. The book started off with a great promise of things to come due to the introduction. When reading a book one finds themselves I have enjoyed reading a few of the Redwall books whenever I can find them and get my hands on them. Unfortunately it has been such a long time since I visited within the confines of the Abbey. As a result I was surprised to see that there was a cookbook and chose to snoop it out since as the majority of Redwall readers know food plays such a vital role within the books. The book started off with a great promise of things to come due to the introduction. When reading a book one finds themselves often wondering about bits and pieces of the book. How did this come along? What made the author to think up this crazy yet workable idea? And very rarely do we get an answer although in this case Brian Jacques proves to answer the main question of why food is such a large part as well as indirectly why so many books also involves fighting of forces - good versus evil. It was an eye-opener and one I appreciated getting to know. As for the book it is a split genre type, which makes it all the more intriguing. The general title leads the reader to believe that this is only a mere cookbook filled with recipes to take readers back to the nostalgic environs of the beloved series. Instead there isn't only a cookbook within the pages but a year's telling of Friar Hugo and his assistant Sister Pansy thus you have a new take on dinner and entertainment. For me personally I found it a lot easier to skip over the recipes while I read through the story itself. Each season starts off with a seasonal poem then progresses into the story of some type of preparation for a seasonal feast. And then depending on which way the story is going is how the recipes are presented whether it is through recipe trading, watching a special dish being made by its main contributor or explaining dishes that form the feast/picnic. This then is how the book cohesively works together the different genres. As for the recipes, most are pretty basic and simple without the need for a lot of ingredients or directions. Given the demographics of Redwall, the majority of the recipes run towards vegetarian and surprisingly a lot use honey instead of sugar for sweetening. Furthermore there is definitely more recipes leaning towards dessert foods rather than main courses or side dishes but at least what there is can help to flesh out your own meals. And I can't wait to try a few of these recipes out for myself. Finally the last thing about this book is that it carries on the Redwall characters by providing brightly colored and detailed illustrations that captures the essence of the characters. These characters are extended by using Bungo and Friar Hugo as markers to mark whether recipes need adult cooks or are dibbun (child-friendly), with the latter being so infrequent. On the other hand, though, unfortunately there are no pictures on what the recipes themselves are suppose to look like as an end result. In the end the book makes for a great Redwall addition if you like to learn more about the characters during their peacetime activities and a bonus to readers who are leaning towards a vegetarian-focused diet. Otherwise the book may be a hit or miss to other readers who aren't fans f either focus.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Greymalkin

    Utterly charming and delightful! Recipes are thoughtful and fit nicely with the books. No lazy recipes of peanut butter sandwiches called by some other name like "Horace's favorite sandwich". Tons of root vegetables and nuts and grains which is lovely. All of the recipes except one are vegetarian, though very few are vegan due to an extremely generous hand with the butter, cream and cheese in almost every recipe. Each recipe is preceded by a little scene/snippet that frames the recipe as part of Utterly charming and delightful! Recipes are thoughtful and fit nicely with the books. No lazy recipes of peanut butter sandwiches called by some other name like "Horace's favorite sandwich". Tons of root vegetables and nuts and grains which is lovely. All of the recipes except one are vegetarian, though very few are vegan due to an extremely generous hand with the butter, cream and cheese in almost every recipe. Each recipe is preceded by a little scene/snippet that frames the recipe as part of a simple storyline for each season. Familiar characters pop up many times, along with their accompanying dialects. Makes me want to go re-read the books again, even though I know they'll make me hungry.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Gretchen

    It has a lovely story and illustrations, and some good appetizer/dessert recipes, but the main dishes selection is pretty limited. It's all based on cooking basic root veggies and putting them all together in a baked dish or soup seasoned with salt and pepper (and nothing else). In other words, it makes me want to cook - but then nothing in it sounds like it'd be satisfying to have as a meal by itself. It has a lovely story and illustrations, and some good appetizer/dessert recipes, but the main dishes selection is pretty limited. It's all based on cooking basic root veggies and putting them all together in a baked dish or soup seasoned with salt and pepper (and nothing else). In other words, it makes me want to cook - but then nothing in it sounds like it'd be satisfying to have as a meal by itself.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Maggie

    A comfort and a joy - delightful recipes and short and sweet Redwall stories, all food-themed, just like the best bits of the Redwall books themselves. I'll always treasure this series because it was my first epic fantasy love affair, and this cookbook fits right into that legacy. A comfort and a joy - delightful recipes and short and sweet Redwall stories, all food-themed, just like the best bits of the Redwall books themselves. I'll always treasure this series because it was my first epic fantasy love affair, and this cookbook fits right into that legacy.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    I'm so excited to be able to make my own versions of the wonderful feast dishes from Redwall Abbey! And they're divided up by season! The sweet little stories, poems and illustrations between the recipes are delightful. (I tried making the Squirrel's Savory Bake first. Yum!) I'm so excited to be able to make my own versions of the wonderful feast dishes from Redwall Abbey! And they're divided up by season! The sweet little stories, poems and illustrations between the recipes are delightful. (I tried making the Squirrel's Savory Bake first. Yum!)

  17. 4 out of 5

    Melina

    Very cute, unique cookbook, and if you've read the books, you will be thrilled to have it so you can experience all the lovely Abbey fare. With one exception, it is vegetarian as well, which is great for me as my daughter has become vegetarian this year so this gives us some new dishes to try. Very cute, unique cookbook, and if you've read the books, you will be thrilled to have it so you can experience all the lovely Abbey fare. With one exception, it is vegetarian as well, which is great for me as my daughter has become vegetarian this year so this gives us some new dishes to try.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jaide B

    Recipes aren’t incredible, but always tasty and filling. The Shrimp & Hotroot Soup, however, has become a repeated family favorite (with extra shrimp and extra chili powder). I’d like to retry the Blackberry & Apple Cake—maybe with a glaze so it’s less dry.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Molten*Violet

    This was an adorable book from the story to the illustrations and certainly took me back to when I had been reading the series. The recipes look easy to follow and are easily recognizable from the books. Highly recommend!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    A wonderful book to help anyone in the kitchen. It even has a small story at the beginning of each chapter/season!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Marra

    A fun cookbook! I loved the Redwall books growing up so it was neat to see some of these recipes, and I recommend it if your a Redwall fan.

  22. 5 out of 5

    MysterySeeker

    amazing recipes! Everything we tried has turned out unbelievably good!!!!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Atefeh

    Definitely will try some of the recipes for sure.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Diane Boley

    What a fun book for any fans of the Redwall books! A sweet story along with many delicious recipes of Redwall favorites. Can’t wait to try them!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Annamarie

    Love it. Not every recipe is what I had hoped (alas Deeper 'n' Ever Pie), but all are homey and approachable. The book also follows a cute narrative, and has lovely art. Love it. Not every recipe is what I had hoped (alas Deeper 'n' Ever Pie), but all are homey and approachable. The book also follows a cute narrative, and has lovely art.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Dhanya Jothimani

    Feast for every season! Cute description of the characters and the feast. Detailed description of the recipe. Might try one or two recipes at some point. Great birthday present!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Russell Ives

    10/10 nunnymolers. make during the winter.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Alana/MiaTheReader

    Fun pictures and we enjoyed making some of the dessert recipes, but most of these won't appeal to a typical American child's palate. There are a lot of vegetables featured! =) Fun pictures and we enjoyed making some of the dessert recipes, but most of these won't appeal to a typical American child's palate. There are a lot of vegetables featured! =)

  29. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    I did not have a chance to actually make any of the recipes, but they look delicious and with the huge focus on food in the Redwall books, this is completely and utterly appropriate.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Arza

    A wonderful story to introduce recipes that bring the most fabled Redwall dishes to life? The only thing more you could hope for is more recipes.

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