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Pink Noises brings together twenty-four interviews with women in electronic music and sound cultures, including club and radio DJs, remixers, composers, improvisers, instrument builders, and installation and performance artists. The collection is an extension of Pinknoises.com, the critically-acclaimed website founded by musician and scholar Tara Rodgers in 2000 to promote Pink Noises brings together twenty-four interviews with women in electronic music and sound cultures, including club and radio DJs, remixers, composers, improvisers, instrument builders, and installation and performance artists. The collection is an extension of Pinknoises.com, the critically-acclaimed website founded by musician and scholar Tara Rodgers in 2000 to promote women in electronic music and make information about music production more accessible to women and girls. That site featured interviews that Rodgers conducted with women artists, exploring their personal histories, their creative methods, and the roles of gender in their work. This book offers new and lengthier interviews, a critical introduction, and resources for further research and technological engagement.Contemporary electronic music practices are illuminated through the stories of women artists of different generations and cultural backgrounds. They include the creators of ambient soundscapes, “performance novels,” sound sculptures, and custom software, as well as the developer of the Deep Listening philosophy and the founders of the Liquid Sound Lounge radio show and the monthly Basement Bhangra parties in New York. These and many other artists open up about topics such as their conflicted relationships to formal music training and mainstream media representations of women in electronic music. They discuss using sound to work creatively with structures of time and space, and voice and language; challenge distinctions of nature and culture; question norms of technological practice; and balance their needs for productive solitude with collaboration and community. Whether designing and building modular synthesizers with analog circuits or performing with a wearable apparatus that translates muscle movements into electronic sound, these artists expand notions of who and what counts in matters of invention, production, and noisemaking. Pink Noises is a powerful testimony to the presence and vitality of women in electronic music cultures, and to the relevance of sound to feminist concerns. Interviewees: Maria Chavez, Beth Coleman (M. Singe), Antye Greie (AGF), Jeannie Hopper, Bevin Kelley (Blevin Blectum), Christina Kubisch, Le Tigre, Annea Lockwood, Giulia Loli (DJ Mutamassik), Rekha Malhotra (DJ Rekha), Riz Maslen (Neotropic), Kaffe Matthews, Susan Morabito, Ikue Mori, Pauline Oliveros, Pamela Z, Chantal Passamonte (Mira Calix), Maggi Payne, Eliane Radigue, Jessica Rylan, Carla Scaletti, Laetitia Sonami, Bev Stanton (Arthur Loves Plastic), Keiko Uenishi (o.blaat)


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Pink Noises brings together twenty-four interviews with women in electronic music and sound cultures, including club and radio DJs, remixers, composers, improvisers, instrument builders, and installation and performance artists. The collection is an extension of Pinknoises.com, the critically-acclaimed website founded by musician and scholar Tara Rodgers in 2000 to promote Pink Noises brings together twenty-four interviews with women in electronic music and sound cultures, including club and radio DJs, remixers, composers, improvisers, instrument builders, and installation and performance artists. The collection is an extension of Pinknoises.com, the critically-acclaimed website founded by musician and scholar Tara Rodgers in 2000 to promote women in electronic music and make information about music production more accessible to women and girls. That site featured interviews that Rodgers conducted with women artists, exploring their personal histories, their creative methods, and the roles of gender in their work. This book offers new and lengthier interviews, a critical introduction, and resources for further research and technological engagement.Contemporary electronic music practices are illuminated through the stories of women artists of different generations and cultural backgrounds. They include the creators of ambient soundscapes, “performance novels,” sound sculptures, and custom software, as well as the developer of the Deep Listening philosophy and the founders of the Liquid Sound Lounge radio show and the monthly Basement Bhangra parties in New York. These and many other artists open up about topics such as their conflicted relationships to formal music training and mainstream media representations of women in electronic music. They discuss using sound to work creatively with structures of time and space, and voice and language; challenge distinctions of nature and culture; question norms of technological practice; and balance their needs for productive solitude with collaboration and community. Whether designing and building modular synthesizers with analog circuits or performing with a wearable apparatus that translates muscle movements into electronic sound, these artists expand notions of who and what counts in matters of invention, production, and noisemaking. Pink Noises is a powerful testimony to the presence and vitality of women in electronic music cultures, and to the relevance of sound to feminist concerns. Interviewees: Maria Chavez, Beth Coleman (M. Singe), Antye Greie (AGF), Jeannie Hopper, Bevin Kelley (Blevin Blectum), Christina Kubisch, Le Tigre, Annea Lockwood, Giulia Loli (DJ Mutamassik), Rekha Malhotra (DJ Rekha), Riz Maslen (Neotropic), Kaffe Matthews, Susan Morabito, Ikue Mori, Pauline Oliveros, Pamela Z, Chantal Passamonte (Mira Calix), Maggi Payne, Eliane Radigue, Jessica Rylan, Carla Scaletti, Laetitia Sonami, Bev Stanton (Arthur Loves Plastic), Keiko Uenishi (o.blaat)

30 review for Pink Noises: Women on Electronic Music and Sound

  1. 5 out of 5

    Mentai

    Ohh why wasn't this book around when I was in high school!!? Or music undergrad for that matter? I love the conversational tone Rodgers takes with her interview subjects. (and she lets the reader know if this is done via email.) Although the musical focus 'electronic music and sound' a range of genre, subgenre and context is covered. Very useful is a glossary of terms at the back of the book. This book is very user friendly but also doesn't shy away from technical details if that's what an artis Ohh why wasn't this book around when I was in high school!!? Or music undergrad for that matter? I love the conversational tone Rodgers takes with her interview subjects. (and she lets the reader know if this is done via email.) Although the musical focus 'electronic music and sound' a range of genre, subgenre and context is covered. Very useful is a glossary of terms at the back of the book. This book is very user friendly but also doesn't shy away from technical details if that's what an artist or musician is into. The interviews display the creativity of the women, their journey toward their breaks successes and their attraction to technologies. The hows and the whys. This should be in every high school library... If there's any criticism or questioning I have of the book it is that nearly every one represented did have a mentor or family that helped them step up in the studio for the first time, who showed them what to do. I wonder about those who never had the lucky studio break, who ended up with a different kind of journey into music or electronic music. anyway (that's my own little bugbear).

  2. 5 out of 5

    nie

    Super livre qui contient des tonnes d’interviews de tonnes de femmes dans la musique électronique. C’est juste passionnant à lire, et plein de sujets sont abordés. C’est tout à fait accessible à des non-musicien-nes curieux de lire plein de vécues de femmes artistes des années 90-00 et antérieur. C’est aussi super bien pour les musiciens-nes qui veulent un regard critique du monde de la musique, les interviewées étant des femmes, souvent queer et non-blanches et ont des trucs beaucoup plus innov Super livre qui contient des tonnes d’interviews de tonnes de femmes dans la musique électronique. C’est juste passionnant à lire, et plein de sujets sont abordés. C’est tout à fait accessible à des non-musicien-nes curieux de lire plein de vécues de femmes artistes des années 90-00 et antérieur. C’est aussi super bien pour les musiciens-nes qui veulent un regard critique du monde de la musique, les interviewées étant des femmes, souvent queer et non-blanches et ont des trucs beaucoup plus innovants et intéressants à dire que les milles mecs blancs lambda habituellement au cœur de la scène électronique. J’aurais aimé le lire à sa sortie, c’est super inspirant et empowering.

  3. 4 out of 5

    flannery

    I'm not an electronic musician so I have no frame of reference for some of this. But it's inspiring to read interviews with women at the fringes who take their art seriously and think about it complexly. I'm not an electronic musician so I have no frame of reference for some of this. But it's inspiring to read interviews with women at the fringes who take their art seriously and think about it complexly.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Cody

    An important book. Pink Noises is worth seeking out even just for the introduction, which turns a much needed critical eye toward the gendered culture of modern music. But it's also a wonderful chance to gain direct insight from some of the most crucial composers, performers, and sound artists of the past fifty years, many of whom remain woefully underrepresented in discussions and considerations of contemporary music. An important book. Pink Noises is worth seeking out even just for the introduction, which turns a much needed critical eye toward the gendered culture of modern music. But it's also a wonderful chance to gain direct insight from some of the most crucial composers, performers, and sound artists of the past fifty years, many of whom remain woefully underrepresented in discussions and considerations of contemporary music.

  5. 5 out of 5

    モーリー

    This is an interesting book and full of important oral history. But, and this is probably my shortcoming, I couldn't plug through a whole book of nothing but interviews. A little more context and questions more attuned to the interviewees' experiences (rather than generic and rather uncritical ones about gender impacting work) would have added a lot. This is an interesting book and full of important oral history. But, and this is probably my shortcoming, I couldn't plug through a whole book of nothing but interviews. A little more context and questions more attuned to the interviewees' experiences (rather than generic and rather uncritical ones about gender impacting work) would have added a lot.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ian Schiffman

    "Women are not a monolith" might as well be the tagline for Tara Rodgers' conversational and friendly series of interviews Pink Noises (love the pun). Most often, in fields where there is little female representation, those already in the field are considered standins for their gender by the white cis men that make up the majority. (This is literally talked about in the book.) Thus their styles and tastes are coded as female despite being individual people with their own individual quirks. Pink "Women are not a monolith" might as well be the tagline for Tara Rodgers' conversational and friendly series of interviews Pink Noises (love the pun). Most often, in fields where there is little female representation, those already in the field are considered standins for their gender by the white cis men that make up the majority. (This is literally talked about in the book.) Thus their styles and tastes are coded as female despite being individual people with their own individual quirks. Pink Noises attacks this bias directly by showcasing the diversity and color within the demographic of female electronic musicians. Rodgers talks with DJs, academics, electronic dance musicians, composers; people of different ethnicities, racial backgrounds, classes, ages, nationalities; and experts in areas ranging from software to hardware to deep listening to performance. And as such, there is a diversity of opinions about musical aesthetic, technique and style. It is an eye-opening, enlightening and inspiring read for any one interested in electronic music but perhaps more touching to readers who have just found their artistic role models. P.S. Where are all the trans women?

  7. 5 out of 5

    Meg

    As a self-taught electronic musician with not a lot of resources (very limited gear, bog-standard laptop) I found this book so validating and encouraging. The message I received from the interviews is that there are many ways to do electronic music, and no one way is more valid than the other.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Maya Francis

    A perfect collection of interviews

  9. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    Pink Noises consists of a lengthy introduction followed by 24 interviews with women working in the medium of electronic music. It spans celebrated figures of contemporary music like Pauline Oliveros and Annea Lockwood to people working in dance and electronica to women working as DJs. It was a very interesting book, not only providing insight into the work of women whose work I already knew but also introducing me to work of those I had never heard of. However, Pink Noises does suffer from the d Pink Noises consists of a lengthy introduction followed by 24 interviews with women working in the medium of electronic music. It spans celebrated figures of contemporary music like Pauline Oliveros and Annea Lockwood to people working in dance and electronica to women working as DJs. It was a very interesting book, not only providing insight into the work of women whose work I already knew but also introducing me to work of those I had never heard of. However, Pink Noises does suffer from the downfall of most interview compilations: a lack of true trajectory. It's all fascinating, but there is not much in the way of a larger point. Nonetheless, this books is well worth the read for all the new musical discoveries.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Patty

    It's been a long time since I read a book published by the publisher I work for. Coworker Amy told me this book was good, and I read the whole thing on a flight to Phoenix. Loved it, even though I knew very little about any of the musicians. It made me want to go and listen to their music, which I will do as soon as I have time! It's been a long time since I read a book published by the publisher I work for. Coworker Amy told me this book was good, and I read the whole thing on a flight to Phoenix. Loved it, even though I knew very little about any of the musicians. It made me want to go and listen to their music, which I will do as soon as I have time!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ken

    I loved the book, and was quite inspired to get more creative in my own electronic music. I appreciate it when artists articulate their art in specifics and also express their artistic and wider concerns. Good job on the interviews, Tara Rodgers.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Chi Chi

    Good collection of interviews with women working in electronic music. I've got a lot more records to buy now. Good collection of interviews with women working in electronic music. I've got a lot more records to buy now.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Liliana

    Really inspiring ! Definitely one of the better music-related books I've read. Reading about women in general makes the topic easier to connect to. Really inspiring ! Definitely one of the better music-related books I've read. Reading about women in general makes the topic easier to connect to.

  14. 5 out of 5

    lindy

    This should be mandatory reading for anyone had ever made/written about/HELL, LISTENED TO electronic music. School yrself on the foremothers.

  15. 5 out of 5

    David

    SUCH A GREAT RESOURCE!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jess Gro

    interviews with awesome women. a book to jump in and out of.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Anastasia

    Solid overview of a history of women in electronic music of various mediums. Some technical jargon that I didn't understand, but overall very important/reverent work. Solid overview of a history of women in electronic music of various mediums. Some technical jargon that I didn't understand, but overall very important/reverent work.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

    Tara rodgers is cool

  19. 4 out of 5

    Stantontas

    Great to dip into. I wrote about this book here, still enjoying browsing it on bus journeys: http://www.diskant.net/blog/2011/01/0... Great to dip into. I wrote about this book here, still enjoying browsing it on bus journeys: http://www.diskant.net/blog/2011/01/0...

  20. 4 out of 5

    Camille

  21. 5 out of 5

    Julia

  22. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

  23. 5 out of 5

    Caroline Barber

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kewpie

  25. 4 out of 5

    Mark

  26. 4 out of 5

    Annie Szafranski

  27. 4 out of 5

    Allie

  28. 4 out of 5

    Flip

  29. 4 out of 5

    Cindy

  30. 5 out of 5

    Stefanie Lubkowski

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