hits counter Return of the Dapper Men - Ebook PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Return of the Dapper Men

Availability: Ready to download

Welcome to Anorev, a world in between time, where children have played so long it’s almost become work, machines have worked so long they have begun to play and all the clocks have stopped at the same time. This is how this land has remained, until 314 dapper-looking gentlemen rain down from the sky and set off in different directions to start the world again. Now Ayden, t Welcome to Anorev, a world in between time, where children have played so long it’s almost become work, machines have worked so long they have begun to play and all the clocks have stopped at the same time. This is how this land has remained, until 314 dapper-looking gentlemen rain down from the sky and set off in different directions to start the world again. Now Ayden, the only boy to still ask questions; Zoe, the robot girl all other machines hold dear; and the Dapper Man known only as "41” must discover what happened that made time stop, understand what their true places are in this world, and learn what "tomorrow” really means. The sun is setting for the first time in memory, and once that happens, everything changes. Return of the Dapper Men is a visually stunning fairy tale that combines steampunk with fantasy and science fiction with Renaissance style, brought to life from the minds of award-winning playwright and comic book writer Jim McCann (New Avengers: The Reunion) and critically acclaimed visual artist Janet Lee. Together these two have created a world where J.M. Barrie, Lewis Carroll and Maurice Sendak meet Jim Henson and Tim Burton. All sharply dressed in a pin-stripe suit and a dapper bowler hat. Tick tock, time is about to start.


Compare

Welcome to Anorev, a world in between time, where children have played so long it’s almost become work, machines have worked so long they have begun to play and all the clocks have stopped at the same time. This is how this land has remained, until 314 dapper-looking gentlemen rain down from the sky and set off in different directions to start the world again. Now Ayden, t Welcome to Anorev, a world in between time, where children have played so long it’s almost become work, machines have worked so long they have begun to play and all the clocks have stopped at the same time. This is how this land has remained, until 314 dapper-looking gentlemen rain down from the sky and set off in different directions to start the world again. Now Ayden, the only boy to still ask questions; Zoe, the robot girl all other machines hold dear; and the Dapper Man known only as "41” must discover what happened that made time stop, understand what their true places are in this world, and learn what "tomorrow” really means. The sun is setting for the first time in memory, and once that happens, everything changes. Return of the Dapper Men is a visually stunning fairy tale that combines steampunk with fantasy and science fiction with Renaissance style, brought to life from the minds of award-winning playwright and comic book writer Jim McCann (New Avengers: The Reunion) and critically acclaimed visual artist Janet Lee. Together these two have created a world where J.M. Barrie, Lewis Carroll and Maurice Sendak meet Jim Henson and Tim Burton. All sharply dressed in a pin-stripe suit and a dapper bowler hat. Tick tock, time is about to start.

30 review for Return of the Dapper Men

  1. 5 out of 5

    karen

    oh, great - one more thing that tim gunn is better at than me. tim gunn is unflappable and positive and patient and adorable and stylish, and apparently, quite good with anagrams. he wrote the introduction to this book, which he likens to the works of lewis carroll, and says that to get the full experience out of this book, it would help to have a dictionary and some anagramming skills at the ready. i read this seated on the floor behind someone's bike in the basement hallway of my workplace while oh, great - one more thing that tim gunn is better at than me. tim gunn is unflappable and positive and patient and adorable and stylish, and apparently, quite good with anagrams. he wrote the introduction to this book, which he likens to the works of lewis carroll, and says that to get the full experience out of this book, it would help to have a dictionary and some anagramming skills at the ready. i read this seated on the floor behind someone's bike in the basement hallway of my workplace while in the office behind me, what sounded like enormous and unruly men discussed the vicissitudes of their lives and whatnot, punctuated with a lot of grown-up language. so maybe i was not reading this under the best of circumstances, but i thought i was a pretty good anagrammer before this moment. i didn't see any anagrams. i missed any subtext. i was reduced to appreciating this book for its artwork alone, which is worth five stars at the very least, especially when you read the afterword which is all about her decoupage technique. it is very impressive. (i bet tim gunn is good at decoupage, as well) the story is fine, but i assume it becomes superfine when you are someone much more clever than i. (someone, perhaps, who encourages others to "make it work") for me, i will just clap my hands and laugh goofily and say "look at the purty pitchers!!!" and call it a day. tell me about the anagrams, tim... drooooooool........... come to my blog!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Morrell

    In a land stuck between the ticks of the clock, time stands still. Machines live on the surface and children work and play under the ground in a system that has no beginning and no end. Not until 314 Dapper Men float from the sky to set the world back amongst time. Really lovely art and a whimsical story make this seem a modern clockwork fairy tale, with style.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sesana

    There's no question that Return of the Dapper Men is beautiful. The art is often stunning, in fact, and I'd highly recommend it for just the art alone. The writing, however, left me cold. It is, I think, overexplained, in a way that doesn't trust the lovely art to do its part of the storytelling. This is a children's book, so it may work on that level, but for me, I would have rather that the art be given more freedom to stand on its own in the narrative. There's no question that Return of the Dapper Men is beautiful. The art is often stunning, in fact, and I'd highly recommend it for just the art alone. The writing, however, left me cold. It is, I think, overexplained, in a way that doesn't trust the lovely art to do its part of the storytelling. This is a children's book, so it may work on that level, but for me, I would have rather that the art be given more freedom to stand on its own in the narrative.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    I really wanted to enjoy this, I mean at it's center is a friendship between a curious boy and redheaded mute girl robot. Oh yeah, and time has stopped, there is no one over the age of 11, all kids live below ground, all robots live above ground and there is a giant mysterious clockwork angel floating over the town's harbor that is a mystery to everyone. Then 314 identically dressed dapper men float into town on umbrellas. The introduction (inexplicably written by celebrity stye maven Tim Gunn) I really wanted to enjoy this, I mean at it's center is a friendship between a curious boy and redheaded mute girl robot. Oh yeah, and time has stopped, there is no one over the age of 11, all kids live below ground, all robots live above ground and there is a giant mysterious clockwork angel floating over the town's harbor that is a mystery to everyone. Then 314 identically dressed dapper men float into town on umbrellas. The introduction (inexplicably written by celebrity stye maven Tim Gunn) introduces this as a modern day steampunk fairy tale with cleverly hidden meaning. Unfortunately, it fails as a fairy tale. In my opinion, fairy tales work because the setting, no matter how fantastic is clearly explained, as is the characters and their motivations. In this book very little is actually explained, and the dialogue tends towards the obtuse in the style of answering questions with questions, or even worse, with vague aphorisms that are frustratingly uninformative. I almost feel like the author is too caught up in trying to be clever, meaningful and artsy all at the same time. In the end, though, the artwork itself is fascinating and despite all my frustrations with the writing, I will enjoy anything with a redheaded girl robot.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin Wilkins

    In short, the art is incredible, but the story is weak. It is written in a style that at times crushes you with the weight of exposition, while nevertheless refusing to actually explain anything. It manages to be both vague and didactic. But Janet Lee's art is really really good. In short, the art is incredible, but the story is weak. It is written in a style that at times crushes you with the weight of exposition, while nevertheless refusing to actually explain anything. It manages to be both vague and didactic. But Janet Lee's art is really really good.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    I guess I'm an idiot (or I didn't want to sit and analyze every single sentence in this book for subtext), but this story just came across as pretentious faux philosophical dribble to me. It's like the author was deliberately trying to make every sentence a statement, and make it really "deep" and "meaningful." I skipped some of it because it just didn't seem to matter. For me it was basically about the importance of time, and how precious it is, and how it shouldn't be wasted with trivial argume I guess I'm an idiot (or I didn't want to sit and analyze every single sentence in this book for subtext), but this story just came across as pretentious faux philosophical dribble to me. It's like the author was deliberately trying to make every sentence a statement, and make it really "deep" and "meaningful." I skipped some of it because it just didn't seem to matter. For me it was basically about the importance of time, and how precious it is, and how it shouldn't be wasted with trivial arguments or problems. The sad part is that the art is AMAZING!! It was the only saving grace that led me to 3 stars. I will keep this one just because of the gorgeous illustration. Each page is inked, painted and drawn traditionally. They go into the artist's technique in the back of the book. The whole thing comes together in a lovely hardbound cover that is just beautiful.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Maggie

    I don't really understand this book. Let me start this off with a little background. I went to a comic book event with my family when I was 7. They give out a lot of free stuff so we ended up picking up a tiny anthology of graphic novels. A little sequel type thing of the Return of the Dapper Men was included. The story always interested me and I ended up rereading it a lot while growing up. I'm now 15 and I finally ordered this book from the library! So I was really excited to finally conclude I don't really understand this book. Let me start this off with a little background. I went to a comic book event with my family when I was 7. They give out a lot of free stuff so we ended up picking up a tiny anthology of graphic novels. A little sequel type thing of the Return of the Dapper Men was included. The story always interested me and I ended up rereading it a lot while growing up. I'm now 15 and I finally ordered this book from the library! So I was really excited to finally conclude the story I've been reading for years. I read this in 40 minutes. The art was very beautiful, so that's a plus. But, I didn't get any answers. I read the introduction and I thought there would be a mystery in the book but I didn't see it at all. The world is interesting I guess but I feel like it was just saying how important it is to take advantage of the time you have. Cool message but I would like an actual story.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Angelina

    It feels like a retold fairy tale, but for the life of me, I can't figure out which one. Very reminiscent of Lewis Carroll's Wonderland where things don't make sense and yet can pierce you to the center. It feels like a retold fairy tale, but for the life of me, I can't figure out which one. Very reminiscent of Lewis Carroll's Wonderland where things don't make sense and yet can pierce you to the center.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Tracey

    This is a hard book to review. First, while it's obvious that the artwork is beautiful, it was hard to appreciate it fully when every page of the digital preview copy I received through Netgalley was imprinted with an extremely obtrusive watermark. I understand the desire to prevent piracy, but this huge, very obvious image distracted and detracted. But that aside, I love the look of it. It's classic picture book wonder with a splash of comic book visual language, and solid underpinnings of fine This is a hard book to review. First, while it's obvious that the artwork is beautiful, it was hard to appreciate it fully when every page of the digital preview copy I received through Netgalley was imprinted with an extremely obtrusive watermark. I understand the desire to prevent piracy, but this huge, very obvious image distracted and detracted. But that aside, I love the look of it. It's classic picture book wonder with a splash of comic book visual language, and solid underpinnings of fine art. In short, it's beautiful to look at. Into a world in which the clocks no longer tock, and thence stopped ticking, and thence time stopped; where children 11 and under play amongst the gears below ground while machines work above, and there is no one else; where a clockwork angel watches over them all from the harbor while one of the machines, in love with her, works very hard to reach her - into the stasis, on the echoes of the first bell chimes in forever, come 314 dapper men, flying in on open umbrellas. All are silent identical redheads who wear green bowlers and uniform frowns - except for one, who is cheerful and engaging and zooms in on the two most unusual folk of the land: a boy named Ayden and his friend, a machine named Zoe. They are friends where for the most part children and machines do not mingle. And everything changes. With the advent - the return - of the dapper men, time has started up again, and the sun begins to set for the first time anyone remembers, and Ayden and Zoe begin to find their destinies. It's a dreamlike story, with a steampunk edge, but with all it has going for it it is oddly unsatisfying. Without details of the climax I can say that the reasons for it completely escaped me. With details: (view spoiler)[Why did the angel abruptly fall into the sea? Did time catch up with her? Why her and no one and nothing else? How was Zoe her replacement, when she stood not quite as tall as the clockwork angel's head? Why did 41 die - and, more, why did he kill himself? There was no apparent point to it, and nothing gained. Why did the Dapper Men come back right then, and where have they been, and why did time begin again with their return - and, most annoying to me, why did it stop in the first place and where is everyone over the age of 11? (hide spoiler)] I'm fine with mystery and unresolved questions - but not when I'm promised answers and they never come. It's distinctly possible that the answers I'd like to have are hidden somewhere in the text; Tim Gunn says in his introduction that there are puzzles and anagrams throughout the book. I dislike being made to feel stupid by what I read, and ... well, the closest thing I found to the kind of wordplay he talks about is the place name Anorev, which is Verona backwards, and Zoe is shown standing on a pile of books including Romeo and Juliet. There are layers of reference there (though a bit facile, in a way: this is no Romeo and Juliet story). Otherwise ... "Zoe" means "life". Ayden/Aiden means "little fire". 41 is one less than Douglas Adams's 42. And so either I missed a whole level of the story, or, to quote Nicholas Stuart Gray, "It ducked". I like the idea. I love the artwork. The adjuncts were charming: the introduction by the dapperest man of all, Tim Gunn; guest artwork which ranged from adorable to gorgeous; and, my favorite, a behind-the-scenes making-of featurette detailing how one page came to life. It just felt like the idea still remains just that: an idea, not quite communicated.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Aaron

    I'm having trouble fully deciding how I feel about this book. On the one hand, it's incredibly creative, starting out of the gate with a fantastic, relevant premise and a beautifully imagined world by artist Janet Lee. On the other, the dialogue is intentionally vague, with the titular Dapper Men frustratingly withholding information throughout in order to maintain mystery. The characters are paper thin archetypes with no motivations, instead having their hands held by magical Willies Wonka who I'm having trouble fully deciding how I feel about this book. On the one hand, it's incredibly creative, starting out of the gate with a fantastic, relevant premise and a beautifully imagined world by artist Janet Lee. On the other, the dialogue is intentionally vague, with the titular Dapper Men frustratingly withholding information throughout in order to maintain mystery. The characters are paper thin archetypes with no motivations, instead having their hands held by magical Willies Wonka who tell them what their own personal revelations should be. This ultimately feels more like an old-time fable than a modern morality tale, which is a shame, because it could've been much more. The setup is great: in a magical world, time has stopped. No one ages, progress has ceased, everything remains exactly as it always is. In contrast, no one is ever challenged or made better. There's no risk and therefore no reward. It's a great metaphor for people becoming entrenched in their ways to a degree that they fear any change whatsoever. From here, though, things get very muddy. The characters are so thinly defined that it's hard to know what any one of them wants or represents, and they speak in such idiosyncratic ways that's hard to track exactly what's going on in any given scene. It feels like McCann wants this to feel very weighty and allegorical, but I don't really know what the allegories are after a certain point. This is one of the bigger issues for me. The complexity and strangeness of the message makes this book, which looks and feels like it should be aimed at children, much harder to convey to them. I'm not sure what age range this is appropriate for. I felt like it was certainly too young for me, but a teenager wouldn't like it, either. Beyond that, a younger child is not going to understand the concepts put forth here. So, effectively, it's not really for anybody. The book is blessedly short and to the point, though, and its art style is interesting enough to elevate the material significantly. I can't necessarily recommend it, but it's not terrible. It's perfectly in the middle, I guess.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Dustin Crazy little brown owl

    To anyone who ever fell down a rabbit hole, walked to the sidewalk's end, danced the wild rumpus, or followed the second star to the right, may you find adventure, wonder and little something form which dreams are made in these pages. Return of the Dappermen is an artful tale of Anorev, a futuristic place where time has stopped. I like the magical quality to this work, but would have liked a little more clarity - but of course if we had all the answers, we wouldn't have the mystery. Here are som To anyone who ever fell down a rabbit hole, walked to the sidewalk's end, danced the wild rumpus, or followed the second star to the right, may you find adventure, wonder and little something form which dreams are made in these pages. Return of the Dappermen is an artful tale of Anorev, a futuristic place where time has stopped. I like the magical quality to this work, but would have liked a little more clarity - but of course if we had all the answers, we wouldn't have the mystery. Here are some favorite passages: Those few books that remained were not for learning or reading at all, but to stand upon. For a great many things in Anorev lay just out of reach. If yesterday could be forgotten, did it ever truly exist at all? And if sleep never comes, then what is real and what is a dream? Something's about to end. Or start. I'm not sure. I just know we're not in the middle anymore. It's safer in the middle. Imagination was reality and reality was not tolerated. A place of make-believe where what was believed could be made. I don't usually like being wrong. Except when it's right to be. The Clockwork Angel hung in the sky as she always had, a massive symbol whose meaning was long lost. How she came to be and why was a mystery to all. Some obsessed over her, others passed her by without a thought. She was a question that flew, a riddle to be pondered on the ground. And yet the answer was so close that the boy could touch it if he only reached in the right direction. We walked to form the ground beneath us. Today is anything but usual. I bought this book when Borders was going out of business in 2011 - at that time I bought anything that looked interesting. Return of the Dappermen also has a nice built in red bookmark ribbon - I'm always a sucker for those :-)

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ramie

    As a big kid who prefers Young Adult books and comic books generally... As someone who still buys toys, for herself... etc. Well, it's not often that my mom pipes in to let me know I've made a made a mistake. No, not in making a purchase. Instead she wanted to let me know I had it sent to the wrong house. Mine. I clearly meant to send it to her house when I ordered this one. She took one look at the preview of this one and decided comics aren't all bad. Needless to say, she somehow magically doe As a big kid who prefers Young Adult books and comic books generally... As someone who still buys toys, for herself... etc. Well, it's not often that my mom pipes in to let me know I've made a made a mistake. No, not in making a purchase. Instead she wanted to let me know I had it sent to the wrong house. Mine. I clearly meant to send it to her house when I ordered this one. She took one look at the preview of this one and decided comics aren't all bad. Needless to say, she somehow magically does have it on the way to her door as well. I don't think she'll be disappointed. This is definitely a book for kids of all ages. Whether it's comics you love. Or art. Or getting lost in a world that makes no sense. I happen to love all of these things, which caused a real dilemma. I'd read a panel but ooh now I have to exam the art closely and maybe re-read the panel after really looking at the art so closely. Yeah, it's that kind of a book. There are enough recaps of the story itself available that I'll spare you that in my review. I will say that it's also beautifully bound (hardcover is all that is available as I write this), reminiscent of an older style of book, and for a price I often see much lesser paperbacks sell for. Definitely a must have if you love this medium or if you need that one comic to prove to someone that yes, there's even one for THEM, like my mom....

  13. 5 out of 5

    Maddie O.

    In Anorev, lives two friends: Ayden, the human, and Zoe, the robot. They live above ground and most people who live above ground don’t get along with the people who live below. Above are the robots, who work so much they think it’s play and below are the humans who play so much they think it’s their work. One of the only things they have in common is they both don’t know what the idea of “time” is. But, when 314 dapper men “rain down” from the sky, everything changes. These men have taught Ayden In Anorev, lives two friends: Ayden, the human, and Zoe, the robot. They live above ground and most people who live above ground don’t get along with the people who live below. Above are the robots, who work so much they think it’s play and below are the humans who play so much they think it’s their work. One of the only things they have in common is they both don’t know what the idea of “time” is. But, when 314 dapper men “rain down” from the sky, everything changes. These men have taught Ayden and Zoe what time is and how treasured it should be, but isn't,. Now they as well as a dapper known as “41” , must figure out how it was lost, where their place in the world is, and what the meaning of “tomorrow” really is. If they don’t do it before sunset…who knows what kind of things can happen! I give this book five stars!  If you like a story of adventure, alternate worlds, and exceptional graphic design, you should definitely pick this book up! While the story was a bit empty in some places, the pictures came in at the perfect timing. As more of a reader of novels (with words ;), this book definitely showed me what a true graphic novel should be!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Victoria Whipple

    This is the most gorgeously illustrated book I have seen in a long time, and it certainly stands out as one of my all time favorites as far as illustrations. The story itself is about a boy, Ayden and a robot girl named Zoe. They live in a land where time has stopped so that the children never age. The children live underground among machinery built by the robots who now live aboveground. Zoe and Ayden are the only two who seem to cross between the two worlds, though they are not always welcome This is the most gorgeously illustrated book I have seen in a long time, and it certainly stands out as one of my all time favorites as far as illustrations. The story itself is about a boy, Ayden and a robot girl named Zoe. They live in a land where time has stopped so that the children never age. The children live underground among machinery built by the robots who now live aboveground. Zoe and Ayden are the only two who seem to cross between the two worlds, though they are not always welcome in both. They are the only two inhabitants of this land who seem to know that things aren't quite right, and a change is needed. Just what that change is, however, is the question; at least until 314 "dapper men" fall from the sky a la Mary Poppins with their umbrellas, green hats and striped jackets. One of these dapper men, who often seems to speak in riddles, helps Ayden and Zoe discover what they must do once time has restarted. This book is an absolute treat for the eyes! Janet Lee's decoupage illustrations are full of color, life, and movement. McCann's text and Lee's illustrations work perfectly together to tell this tale of hope and imagination.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    Return of the Dapper Men is a stunning book that will appeal to readers of all ages. (I fully intend to purchase a copy for my elementary school library.) Children, teens, and adults will find something to love in this enchanting tale. Jim McCann's evocative words paired with Janet Lee's amazing visuals combine to create not only an astounding graphic novel but also a breathtaking work of art. The imagination is stimulated by this story, and, in my opinion, that is the mark of all great art and l Return of the Dapper Men is a stunning book that will appeal to readers of all ages. (I fully intend to purchase a copy for my elementary school library.) Children, teens, and adults will find something to love in this enchanting tale. Jim McCann's evocative words paired with Janet Lee's amazing visuals combine to create not only an astounding graphic novel but also a breathtaking work of art. The imagination is stimulated by this story, and, in my opinion, that is the mark of all great art and literature. Return of the Dapper Men, while showcasing the essence of steampunk fantasy, also brings to mind such favorite tales as The Wizard of Oz, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Alice in Wonderland, Peter Pan, and other beloved fairy tales. When a book is in such company, it is no wonder that it won this year's Eisner Award for best graphic album. I know I haven't really told anything about the actual story here, and that is intentional. This is one you need to experience for yourself. I hope you will find the journey as magical as I did.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Caitlin

    I can't remember why this book was on my to-read list but I felt it was more than time to get it off which, perhaps put me in the wrong mindset to read it. Ultimately it was all a bit nonsensical to me and I never really appreciated the story. The explanation of the artist's process at the end of this book is what bumps it to 2 stars for me, not kidding. I can't remember why this book was on my to-read list but I felt it was more than time to get it off which, perhaps put me in the wrong mindset to read it. Ultimately it was all a bit nonsensical to me and I never really appreciated the story. The explanation of the artist's process at the end of this book is what bumps it to 2 stars for me, not kidding.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Bea Elwood

    Some things were quotable, some of the illustrations were beautiful, some of the ideas were conversational, but there was no punch, nothing really stands out and I'm only left with a desire for watch pieces and fine tailored suits... Some things were quotable, some of the illustrations were beautiful, some of the ideas were conversational, but there was no punch, nothing really stands out and I'm only left with a desire for watch pieces and fine tailored suits...

  18. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    4.5 for the art. 3 - ish for the story, which was interesting and imaginative, but confusing at times.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Maggie

    Return of the Dapper Men was recommended to me twice by two different teens who came into the library. I'm not sure if it was required reading or what drew them both to this graphic novel, but the fact that more than one kid liked it enough to tell me to read it definitely piqued my interest. I had high hopes but I was disappointed...and honestly a bit befuddled on how this book not only fell into the hands of at least two teens, but what they saw in it that they thought it was so great. I think Return of the Dapper Men was recommended to me twice by two different teens who came into the library. I'm not sure if it was required reading or what drew them both to this graphic novel, but the fact that more than one kid liked it enough to tell me to read it definitely piqued my interest. I had high hopes but I was disappointed...and honestly a bit befuddled on how this book not only fell into the hands of at least two teens, but what they saw in it that they thought it was so great. I think my biggest problem with Return of the Dapper Men is the lack of backstory. The book presumably takes place in the future, but maybe in an alternate universe, where children and robots live, for lack of a better term, "together but separate" in a world where everyone has forgotten everything from the past. We don't know how the world got to this place; we only see present problem and see that story arc resolved. That wasn't enough for me. I need explanation. All that aside, there was a fun and whimsical feeling to the book. While reading, I was reminded of lots of magical books and characters: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, The Invention of Hugo Cabret, Mad Hatter from Alice's Adventures in Wonderland & Through the Looking-Glass, Wonka from Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, and even the Cat from The Cat in the Hat. I have great memories of all of those books, movies, and characters, so I guess I can understand the appeal to readers who don't feel the need to know more. So...I guess if you like those other books, you might like Return of the Dapper Men, as long as you're not like me and feel the need for a more developed story.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany Jieyi Zhao

    Breathtaking tale beautifully illustrated with a "decoupage art style combines steampunk fantasy and science fiction with Art Nouveau". Borrowed this from the library - Someone should definitely make a movie or animation from this charming book! Time has stopped in Anorev and there are only children left who never grow up, who live underground with their fantastical cogwheel playland. Above ground, robots keep empty homes pristine and take care of broken clocks and machines. One day, 314 Dapper Breathtaking tale beautifully illustrated with a "decoupage art style combines steampunk fantasy and science fiction with Art Nouveau". Borrowed this from the library - Someone should definitely make a movie or animation from this charming book! Time has stopped in Anorev and there are only children left who never grow up, who live underground with their fantastical cogwheel playland. Above ground, robots keep empty homes pristine and take care of broken clocks and machines. One day, 314 Dapper Men, odd Johnny Depp characters fall from the sky, dressed in impeccable pinstripe suits and bowler hats, with inscrutable expressions. Time returns with their arrival. Very strange and mesmerizing tale with amazing characters who come to life. One of the most stylish villain I've seen, Fabre dressed as a Spanish bullfighter with a clock's hour & minute hands as his mustache.

  21. 4 out of 5

    reni

    art is gorgeous but the story is weak as water EDIT: back again because i'm still thinking about this and i'm mad about it. apart from the place being an anagram of 'verona' and a slight allusion to two people from different places, that's all you're getting for romeo and juliet inspiration. is there much more? i'm not diving for it if there is. i came here for a story, not a 'where's wally?' for references, i'm not playing. what is there is poor. that the female lead can't talk and the male lead j art is gorgeous but the story is weak as water EDIT: back again because i'm still thinking about this and i'm mad about it. apart from the place being an anagram of 'verona' and a slight allusion to two people from different places, that's all you're getting for romeo and juliet inspiration. is there much more? i'm not diving for it if there is. i came here for a story, not a 'where's wally?' for references, i'm not playing. what is there is poor. that the female lead can't talk and the male lead just kinda interprets for her based on whatever atomic level friendship they have, i don't like it, red flags all around. i'm guessing the number of the dapper men has some significance, i don't care. i'm guessing this is the first of a series, i don't care. there is nothing in this and i'm demoting my rating down to one star.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Iida

    I love a good story, and based on the foreword I must say I expected a bit more from this book. Had the characters been deeper it would have helped. As advertised, there were a great deal of allusions to other works of art as well as texts, and I was happy to recognize at least some! Janet Lee's artwork was imaginative and rich, but I couldn't help being distracted at times when noticing some of the drawings and especially the coloring of was not quite as polished as it could have been. I love a good story, and based on the foreword I must say I expected a bit more from this book. Had the characters been deeper it would have helped. As advertised, there were a great deal of allusions to other works of art as well as texts, and I was happy to recognize at least some! Janet Lee's artwork was imaginative and rich, but I couldn't help being distracted at times when noticing some of the drawings and especially the coloring of was not quite as polished as it could have been.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Drea

    Five stars for the illustrations: Unique and beautiful art - like 60s/70s mod style gone steampunk. Truly cool. One star for the story: The storyline is boring and the writing is mediocre. I think this would’ve been better told only in art, rather than a didactic but vague tale with contrived conflict and a weak plot.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    The stars are a bit more for the illustration than the story. The art noveau gorgeousness of the art and hand lettering makes my heart swell. I do wish the story had been a bit creepier as I was hoping based on the cover, and I wish their trilogy had planned out to tell the whole story. Spare character details make this just a bit less than a “love.”

  25. 4 out of 5

    JoAnna

    Three-line review: I like the concept of this graphic novel — an inquisitive boy and a mute, robot girl live in a town where time has stopped — and the art is interesting and engaging. However, clearly I didn't understand the story as it unfolded. I'm not sure if that's the fault of the writing, the art, or me, but this one left me scratching my head. Three-line review: I like the concept of this graphic novel — an inquisitive boy and a mute, robot girl live in a town where time has stopped — and the art is interesting and engaging. However, clearly I didn't understand the story as it unfolded. I'm not sure if that's the fault of the writing, the art, or me, but this one left me scratching my head.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Chris Turner

    This was a fun story, but little going on under the surface. It's inspired by Wizard of Oz and Alice in Wonderland, but doesn't add much memorable to those great works. It's artwork is interesting, but the story could be stronger; it just ends too suddenly. This was a fun story, but little going on under the surface. It's inspired by Wizard of Oz and Alice in Wonderland, but doesn't add much memorable to those great works. It's artwork is interesting, but the story could be stronger; it just ends too suddenly.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Greg

    One of the most visually striking graphic novels of the last several years. It looks like a descendent of the great illustrated children's books of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Just gorgeous, and a nice tale about the importance of making choices. One of the most visually striking graphic novels of the last several years. It looks like a descendent of the great illustrated children's books of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Just gorgeous, and a nice tale about the importance of making choices.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Dan Clark

    Works as an elegant fairy tale with remarkable page designs and beautiful layouts. It has a narrative that is concise enough to work with kids but sophisticated to be fully appreciated by adults. Was really impressed with the balance this struck.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Blair

    The story doesn't quite live up to the beautiful illustrations, but this is still worth checking out. The story doesn't quite live up to the beautiful illustrations, but this is still worth checking out.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn C.

    Fun book, quick read. The art is wonderful.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.