hits counter The Knitgrrl Guide to Professional Knitwear Design - Ebook PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Knitgrrl Guide to Professional Knitwear Design

Availability: Ready to download

The Knitgrrl Guide To Professional Knitwear Design is the first-ever book targeted to designers of all experience levels who want to create, communicate and sell their work professionally to magazines, publishers, consumers and other markets. Written by an industry insider, the Guide takes a comprehensive, unflinching look behind the scenes that no knit or crochet designer The Knitgrrl Guide To Professional Knitwear Design is the first-ever book targeted to designers of all experience levels who want to create, communicate and sell their work professionally to magazines, publishers, consumers and other markets. Written by an industry insider, the Guide takes a comprehensive, unflinching look behind the scenes that no knit or crochet designer can afford to be without. Includes 30+ interviews with top designers, editors and professionals who tell it like it is so you can hit the ground running, a guide to responsible social media use, information on distribution, printing, online publishing and much, much more.


Compare

The Knitgrrl Guide To Professional Knitwear Design is the first-ever book targeted to designers of all experience levels who want to create, communicate and sell their work professionally to magazines, publishers, consumers and other markets. Written by an industry insider, the Guide takes a comprehensive, unflinching look behind the scenes that no knit or crochet designer The Knitgrrl Guide To Professional Knitwear Design is the first-ever book targeted to designers of all experience levels who want to create, communicate and sell their work professionally to magazines, publishers, consumers and other markets. Written by an industry insider, the Guide takes a comprehensive, unflinching look behind the scenes that no knit or crochet designer can afford to be without. Includes 30+ interviews with top designers, editors and professionals who tell it like it is so you can hit the ground running, a guide to responsible social media use, information on distribution, printing, online publishing and much, much more.

30 review for The Knitgrrl Guide to Professional Knitwear Design

  1. 5 out of 5

    Janet Wolfson

    I want to start off by saying that this book is great - it will be very useful for anyone who wants to turn pro with their knitting. However...there is very little info here about actually designing knitwear, in fact out of 247 pages, only 10 are about writing patterns, and most of that is about how to choose designing software. The breakdown of the book is: 1. Be professional 2. Social Media (how to use blogs, Twitter, FaceBook and Ravelry) 3. How to make money with your knitting (teaching, wri I want to start off by saying that this book is great - it will be very useful for anyone who wants to turn pro with their knitting. However...there is very little info here about actually designing knitwear, in fact out of 247 pages, only 10 are about writing patterns, and most of that is about how to choose designing software. The breakdown of the book is: 1. Be professional 2. Social Media (how to use blogs, Twitter, FaceBook and Ravelry) 3. How to make money with your knitting (teaching, writing, test knitting, providing a service) 4. Legal stuff (copyright and contracts) 5. Writing Patterns 6. Making Sales (wholesale or PDF?) 7. Publishing a Book 8. Advertising 9. Further Education 10. Professional Associations 11. Standing Out From the Crowd 12. Interviews with Knitting Professionals There is nothing here about how to turn an idea into an actual written pattern, or how to successfully submit to magazines, when/if to offer free patterns, etc. There is also no index, which is very frustrating. At the end of the book she has a list of resources, one of which is a list of 8 books on knitwear design. If learning how to design is what you really want, I would look at those books first, and then study Knitgrrl's book afterwards for the good info on advertising, networking and making a name for yourself in the knitting world.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Beverly

    Let's just call this the Knitwear Design Bible. I turn to this book over and over. I'll confess: I think Shannon is one of the smartest women I've met, and this book provides solid evidence for my claim. Reading this book makes me feel less like an outsider in this niche industry, and more like a savvy novice. I've been able to answer almost every question of my budding design career by turning to the Guide. Even if you're not interested in knitwear design, the interviews with the designers we a Let's just call this the Knitwear Design Bible. I turn to this book over and over. I'll confess: I think Shannon is one of the smartest women I've met, and this book provides solid evidence for my claim. Reading this book makes me feel less like an outsider in this niche industry, and more like a savvy novice. I've been able to answer almost every question of my budding design career by turning to the Guide. Even if you're not interested in knitwear design, the interviews with the designers we all admire are worth the price.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Paula

    A very informative book about becoming and being a knitwear designer. After reading Ms. Okey's book I discovered how much that I wanted to continue designing knitting patterns privately and not professionally, due to time and expense constraints. Please read this book if you're thinking about becoming a knitwear designer. It will help you decide if designing professionally is worth all the time, effort and expense. A very informative book about becoming and being a knitwear designer. After reading Ms. Okey's book I discovered how much that I wanted to continue designing knitting patterns privately and not professionally, due to time and expense constraints. Please read this book if you're thinking about becoming a knitwear designer. It will help you decide if designing professionally is worth all the time, effort and expense.

  4. 5 out of 5

    NoBeatenPath

    This is generally a good book, in that it gives a clear idea of the work required by anyone who wants to make a living designing knitwear. The reason it has only three stars is that a lot of the book is devoted to the internet and social media, so much of it is no longer relevant or missing important tools for today’s designers (for example, no Instagram).

  5. 4 out of 5

    Marie Segares

    The book is a primer for getting started as a (hand) knitting or crochet designer. It addresses the business end of designing (e.g., writing up, testing, printing, marketing patterns) and is not a guide on how to design. Shannon compiles information from her own career; from extensive interviews with designers, editors, tech editors, publishers, and others in the industry; and from a range of web resources into an easily digestible package. Her writing style is both conversational and profession The book is a primer for getting started as a (hand) knitting or crochet designer. It addresses the business end of designing (e.g., writing up, testing, printing, marketing patterns) and is not a guide on how to design. Shannon compiles information from her own career; from extensive interviews with designers, editors, tech editors, publishers, and others in the industry; and from a range of web resources into an easily digestible package. Her writing style is both conversational and professional. The book provides many links to further reading on the internet. The first section of the book discusses different aspects of being a professional designer. Shannon shares her own opinions and also seeks out tips from others in the industry. The chapters in this section are: 1. What does it mean to be professional? 2. Social media 3. TCB, No PB&J Required, or: The Business Side of Things 4. Send in the lawyers 5. Writing patterns 6. Making sales 7. Proposals and Publishing 8. Advertising 9. Further education 10. Professional organizations and associations 11. Standing out The main themes Shannon emphasizes in this section are behaving professionally, promoting yourself and your brand/business, understanding your strengths and limitations (and therefore how and when to get help), and staying true to your own values. For example, is it more important to you that you have full control over your patterns or would you prefer to design while others deal with photography, distribution, and/or tech editing? While she clearly presents her own opinions, Shannon makes it clear that people can find success through many different paths so you will need to find what works for you. This section is slightly more than half of the book. Shannon doesn't claim to have invented the wheel, and much of this information is freely available online - she even provides links for you. You will probably consider this part of the book successful if you believe that: - as an emerging designer from outside of the industry, it would take you more time/money to gather this information on your own than to buy and read Shannon's book, - Shannon Okey as a success in the industry, and - you can trust Shannon and thereby, her advice. On the other hand, if you feel like Shannon is just building up her "cult of personality" through this book, or that she hasn't enjoyed the type of success you envision for yourself, or you are already aware of the many resources she includes in the book, then you may feel cheated. As a recent knitter, I am not as familiar with Shannon Okey (gasp!) as I am with many of the crochet designers profiled in the next section, so I started the book without a bias towards or against her. I did, however, play the mental game of wondering how I would have responded to the same material if it was presented by Crochet Designer X or Crochet Designer Y, and I know my response may have been different if another author presented the same information. The second section of the book, The interviews, includes profiles of over 30 professionals with various roles and tenure within the industry. The consistent messages in this section are about remaining professional and realizing that this is an industry where you are expected to work hard and long hours but may not reap financial rewards in proportion to those efforts. The interesting thing about this section is that, because so many voices are "speaking," there are many different messages. In a sense, this section reinforces the early point about staying true to your own values. I found the interviews fascinating - the "horror stories" in particular are real learning lessons. The final section of the book includes two appendices (book proposal and class listing templates) and yet more links to various resources. I would recommend this book to an aspiring/emerging crochet/knit designer. I personally had the benefit of a fabulous mentor, Mary Nolfi, through the Crochet Guild of America`s mentoring program, and I still learned a lot from reading The Knitgrrl Guide to Professional Knitwear Design. Yes, the information presented in the book exists out there in the world, but if you don't have it at your fingertips during the early stages of your career, you might make devastating mistakes. With that said, I do have some complaints about the book. In the second section, the editing changes. Sentences suddenly end without periods, or even mid-thought. It isn't clear to me if this is because the interviews were conducted online and Shannon is keeping them in the original, grammatically incorrect format, or...? I also had some issues with the formatting of the book in general. There are more blank pages than I'm accustomed to seeing. In the interview section, there are many parts where it seems like a page break was incorrectly inserted or removed. These weren't deal breakers for me, but contrast with Shannon's presentation of herself as a detail-oriented self-publisher. It would have been helpful to include a short chapter, or at least some discussion, about damage control if you've made mistakes early in your career (i.e., before reading this book) since there is a lot of talk about people who behave unprofessionally or act like divas.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Helen

    This books is full of great information and tips for not only knitter designers, but anyone who is interested in independent publishing. The technical information is fairly current, given how fast the electronic media/communications tools are evolving. She talks about Ravelry, Facebook, Twitter, blogs, websites -- as do the interviewees. Lots of valuable advice. The interviews with designers were mostly useful and fun reading -- reality knitting shows. My criticism is technical -- many of the desi This books is full of great information and tips for not only knitter designers, but anyone who is interested in independent publishing. The technical information is fairly current, given how fast the electronic media/communications tools are evolving. She talks about Ravelry, Facebook, Twitter, blogs, websites -- as do the interviewees. Lots of valuable advice. The interviews with designers were mostly useful and fun reading -- reality knitting shows. My criticism is technical -- many of the designers talk about the importance of a technical editor but Shannon doesn't seem to have used a professional/experienced proof reader and instead relied on Spellcheck and formatting programs. As a result there are missing words, wrong words, missing punctuation and inconsistent use of line spacing (sometimes single spacing and sometimes double spaces in the answer to the questions in italics). I could be more sensitive to this because this type of proofreading error is the bane of my working life, but this type of error made it harder to read. Why is this in bold? Is this "1" supposed to be an "I?"

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen

    This book was not what I was expecting. I thought this was an introduction to professional pattern making. Really, it's an introduction to starting your own independent fiber related business. I want to recreate a sweater that I had when I was younger and loved. I don't really have ambitions (right now) on leaving academia to pursue a career in the fiber arts. But, I suppose if I ever do become so ambitious, I'll return to this book. It seemed quite useful. There are also interviews at the end o This book was not what I was expecting. I thought this was an introduction to professional pattern making. Really, it's an introduction to starting your own independent fiber related business. I want to recreate a sweater that I had when I was younger and loved. I don't really have ambitions (right now) on leaving academia to pursue a career in the fiber arts. But, I suppose if I ever do become so ambitious, I'll return to this book. It seemed quite useful. There are also interviews at the end of the book with independent designers. I didn't read all of them, just the designers I know and like. It was interesting to hear them talk about their process and experience in the industry.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Irene

    Interesting read. Not what I expected (a how to design book), but a how to manage a knitting business book. The interviews with established designers was especially interesting.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    Still admirably up to date. Not a lot of info on tech editing, but still good stuff.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

    Absolutely amazing resource for anyone looking to break into the knitting business!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Wendy

  12. 5 out of 5

    Amy

  13. 5 out of 5

    Brenda

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sophia Beaumont

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lobug

  16. 4 out of 5

    sianna

  17. 4 out of 5

    Linda

  18. 5 out of 5

    Corrina Ferguson

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jason

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jen

  21. 5 out of 5

    Connie Kephart

  22. 5 out of 5

    Karen

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Vekert

  24. 4 out of 5

    Lindy

  25. 4 out of 5

    Anna

  26. 5 out of 5

    Laurie

  27. 5 out of 5

    Katie

  28. 4 out of 5

    Christine

  29. 4 out of 5

    Janet

  30. 5 out of 5

    Cooperative Press

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...