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The true gods of Earth existed long before our ancestors crawled mindless upon the shore: Yog-Sothoth, Shub-Niggurath, Nyarlathotep... insatiate, tenebrous monsters, whose ultimate throne is Chaos. Greatest of all is he called Cthulhu. Only in ancient, blasphemous manuscripts can that name be found... and those who decipher it are left pale and numb, aware that in the very The true gods of Earth existed long before our ancestors crawled mindless upon the shore: Yog-Sothoth, Shub-Niggurath, Nyarlathotep... insatiate, tenebrous monsters, whose ultimate throne is Chaos. Greatest of all is he called Cthulhu. Only in ancient, blasphemous manuscripts can that name be found... and those who decipher it are left pale and numb, aware that in the very act of decipherment they have become both pawn and prey of an ultra-worldly power that renders human existence both tenuous and trite. The Old Ones were, the Old Ones are, and the Old Ones shall remain... long after they have devoured us. Contents: "Introduction" by David Drake "Arkham" (poem) "The Black Stone" "The Fire of Asshurbanipal" "The Thing on the Roof" "Dig Me No Grave" "Silence Falls on Mecca's Walls" (poem) "The Valley of the Worm" "The Shadow of the Beast" "Old Garfield's Heart" "People of the Dark" "Worms of the Earth" "Pigeons From Hell" "An Open Window" (poem)


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The true gods of Earth existed long before our ancestors crawled mindless upon the shore: Yog-Sothoth, Shub-Niggurath, Nyarlathotep... insatiate, tenebrous monsters, whose ultimate throne is Chaos. Greatest of all is he called Cthulhu. Only in ancient, blasphemous manuscripts can that name be found... and those who decipher it are left pale and numb, aware that in the very The true gods of Earth existed long before our ancestors crawled mindless upon the shore: Yog-Sothoth, Shub-Niggurath, Nyarlathotep... insatiate, tenebrous monsters, whose ultimate throne is Chaos. Greatest of all is he called Cthulhu. Only in ancient, blasphemous manuscripts can that name be found... and those who decipher it are left pale and numb, aware that in the very act of decipherment they have become both pawn and prey of an ultra-worldly power that renders human existence both tenuous and trite. The Old Ones were, the Old Ones are, and the Old Ones shall remain... long after they have devoured us. Contents: "Introduction" by David Drake "Arkham" (poem) "The Black Stone" "The Fire of Asshurbanipal" "The Thing on the Roof" "Dig Me No Grave" "Silence Falls on Mecca's Walls" (poem) "The Valley of the Worm" "The Shadow of the Beast" "Old Garfield's Heart" "People of the Dark" "Worms of the Earth" "Pigeons From Hell" "An Open Window" (poem)

30 review for Cthulhu: The Mythos and Kindred Horrors

  1. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    For some time now I’ve had the vague idea that I’ve “read” Robert E. Howard. Oh, I’ve read most of the Conan stuff, as well as several stories. But after a weekend of reading Cthulhu: The Mythos and Kindred Horrors, it’s clear I’ve got a ways to go. I ran across this 1987 gem in a used bookstore, and I was intrigued right away. Other than the oft anthologized “Pigeons from Hell” (which is not a Cthulhu story), I didn’t really note any stories that I had read before (as it turns out there was one For some time now I’ve had the vague idea that I’ve “read” Robert E. Howard. Oh, I’ve read most of the Conan stuff, as well as several stories. But after a weekend of reading Cthulhu: The Mythos and Kindred Horrors, it’s clear I’ve got a ways to go. I ran across this 1987 gem in a used bookstore, and I was intrigued right away. Other than the oft anthologized “Pigeons from Hell” (which is not a Cthulhu story), I didn’t really note any stories that I had read before (as it turns out there was one). Prefacing the collection was a too-brief, but perceptive, introduction by David Drake. In fact, it’s fairly hard hitting, stating that for all of the blood and thunder in his fiction, Howard was a fragile man, one who tried suicide at the death of his dog, and who would in fact do the deed with his mother’s fatal illness. Drake doesn’t spend much time discussing Lovecraft, but does mention that Howard’s pulpy world was a mask for a dark worldview. But that’s probably all that is needed. What follows are many Cthulhu related stories that are as good as anything Howard wrote. What’s interesting is how Howard takes another man’s creation (Lovecraft’s Mythos), and makes it his own. There’s some wonderful atmosphere and dread – Lovecraft strengths, married up with Hot Damn Howard action. Also interesting is how Howard set out to create his own subset of the Mythos, complete with his mad poet, and a particular focus on Tsathoggua (the nasty frog thing). There are a few other stories related to ghosts and black magic, but this book is overwhelmingly Mythos related. It's also one of the best books I’ve read this year, and one that quickly goes on my “Treasured Finds” shelf. These stories are probably available in more recent reprints (The Horror Stories of Robert E. Howard being one), but this particular edition has a focus that really makes it special. Also, it has a few poems by REH. My favorite on that front (despite a glaring typo) was “Silence Falls on Mecca’s Walls.” Clearly, he was a big fan of Kipling, and it shows. Not a bad thing, especially when it takes a Weird Tales direction. A few notes on the stories below: “The Black Stone.” Set in eastern Europe, this one was clearly influenced by Stoker. Turkish raids on an evil town, the search for ancient stone, the writings of a mad man, and a night time dance before a demon. Also reminded me of the John Silence stories by Blackwood. Whoa! “The Fire of Asshurbhal.” Sort of an Indiana Jones meets Cthluhu story. American adventurer and his faithful Afghan guide battle nasty Arabs in a demon haunted city. Excellent. “The Thing on the Roof.” A jewel or carving that should not have been brought back from the jungles of Yucatan. Terrific. “Dig Me No Grave.” This story reminded me a bit of M.R. James, with a character that’s obviously using Aleister Crowley as a model. Black magic, deals with demons, and other horrible things. Excellent. “The Valley of the Worm.” The first of several “worm” stories in this book. Also the first of the sword and sorcery efforts in the collection. Here we have the (reincarnated) account of Niord and the Worm. As Niord tells it, Beowulf learned it all from him. A hideous valley with a secret, and an ass kicking hero. “The Shadow of the Beast.” This one involves an abandoned house in the “piney” woods, and a bad man who should not have hid there. Weakest story in the collection, and probably an early attempt at what would become “Pigeons From Hell.” It’s not a bad story, but given the company in the collection, definitely not on the same level. Non-Mythos story. “Old Garfield’s Heart.” A story with a western setting, which involves a bully, an Indian magician, and a very old man who doesn’t look that way. I liked this. It’s not great Howard, but it’s pretty good. Non-Mythos story. “People of the Dark.” Bizarre and crowded story that involves reincarnation, revenge, Conan, and a running battle in a cave with Descent like creatures. I had read this before. Pretty good. “Worms of the Earth.” A Bran Mak Morn story. A long, and seemingly convoluted story, that involves the Pictish King on a mission of vengeance against a Roman governor. This one has it all. Black magic, revenge (and its limits), and sword play. One of my favorite stories in the collection. Excellent. I need to read more Bran Mak Morn. A lot like Conan, but a bit subtler. “Pigeons From Hell.” A nasty horrible haunted house story set in the South. One of Howard’s best stories, and one that also illustrates Howard’s pulpish range. I’ll say no more. Cover Art: 3 1/2 stars.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Marc Manley

    One of my personal letdowns about H.P. Lovecraft was his overt racism in his horror writings. What made me appreciative of this volume was that I was able to read works in the same vein as Lovecraft-indeed, Howard proved to be just as adept at approaching Lovecraft's mythos as was Lovecraft himself-but without the blatant bigotry that undermined Lovecraft's genius. Howard manages to appropriate the language and atmosphere of Lovecraft's "cosmic horror" with fidelity and articulation. I highly re One of my personal letdowns about H.P. Lovecraft was his overt racism in his horror writings. What made me appreciative of this volume was that I was able to read works in the same vein as Lovecraft-indeed, Howard proved to be just as adept at approaching Lovecraft's mythos as was Lovecraft himself-but without the blatant bigotry that undermined Lovecraft's genius. Howard manages to appropriate the language and atmosphere of Lovecraft's "cosmic horror" with fidelity and articulation. I highly recommend this short volume to dedicated Howard/Lovecraft fan's and the uninitiated alike.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Timothy Boyd

    An excellent collection of the Howard stories related to H. P. Lovecrafts mythos. I am usually more a fan of Howard's action stories but these were very good reads. Very recommended An excellent collection of the Howard stories related to H. P. Lovecrafts mythos. I am usually more a fan of Howard's action stories but these were very good reads. Very recommended

  4. 4 out of 5

    Leothefox

    There is a lot of good stuff here, and you know it's good since it all gets collected so often. The only ones I think were new to me here were “The Shadow of the Beast” and “Old Garfield's Heart”. “Beast” is a ghost story, the twist being that it is not the ghost of a human being, and falls into the category of “creepy abandoned house with an evil history” as well as the classic Howard “it's night in the pines and angry guy wants another guy's blood”. “Heart” also runs along typical supernatura There is a lot of good stuff here, and you know it's good since it all gets collected so often. The only ones I think were new to me here were “The Shadow of the Beast” and “Old Garfield's Heart”. “Beast” is a ghost story, the twist being that it is not the ghost of a human being, and falls into the category of “creepy abandoned house with an evil history” as well as the classic Howard “it's night in the pines and angry guy wants another guy's blood”. “Heart” also runs along typical supernatural Howard lines with the immortal guy with decades of memories and mystical stuff. “People of the Dark” and “Valley of the Worm” have past lives themes and alien monsters, “Worms of the Earth” has Bran Mak Morn and shadowy underground people things and a witch, “Dig Me No Grave” has another immortal guy and possibly the devil, “The Fire of Asshurbanipal” has Middle Eastern adventure and a demon gem, and “The Black Stone” is reprinted too often (find it just about anywhere with Clark Ashton Smith's “Return of the Sorcerer”). “Pigeons from Hell” I've read before too, but it is still a freakin awesome horror with an abandoned house and voodoo. Really scary shit on this one. Your murdered friend just stood back up and he's coming after you! As usual with these collections, three poems are included to pad things out. The “Cthulhu” title is perhaps a little misleading, since not all the tales contain Lovecraft elements. Oddly enough, you find those more often in the Conan type stories. Although, Howard is a wonderful horror trip for anyone who likes Lovecraft's sphere by finds the man himself too stuffy. These angry protagonists might not have been looking for unspeakable shadowy horror, but they'll try and lick it with bare fists anyhow.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Charles

    I'm putting this in fantasy to hang out with the rest of the Robert E. Howard stuff on my list. It's a collection of short stories influenced by or involving the Cthulhu Mythos of H. P. Lovecraft. As contemporaries, Howard and Lovecraft often played off of each other's work in their own stories. Howard really put himself into these tales, though, making them unique within the Mythos stories. "The Black Stone" is the most powerful tale here. I'm putting this in fantasy to hang out with the rest of the Robert E. Howard stuff on my list. It's a collection of short stories influenced by or involving the Cthulhu Mythos of H. P. Lovecraft. As contemporaries, Howard and Lovecraft often played off of each other's work in their own stories. Howard really put himself into these tales, though, making them unique within the Mythos stories. "The Black Stone" is the most powerful tale here.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Charles

    A collection of the stories that Robert E. Howard wrote that used and extended the Cthulhu mythos ideas of H. P. Lovecraft. Lovecraft invited other writers to use his tropes and Howard did so to great effect in these stories, especially in "The Black Stone." This also contains "Pigeons from Hell," Howard's best horror story, and "The Valley of the Worm," one of his best ever fantasy stories. A collection of the stories that Robert E. Howard wrote that used and extended the Cthulhu mythos ideas of H. P. Lovecraft. Lovecraft invited other writers to use his tropes and Howard did so to great effect in these stories, especially in "The Black Stone." This also contains "Pigeons from Hell," Howard's best horror story, and "The Valley of the Worm," one of his best ever fantasy stories.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Nick Wallace

    In some of the stories, Howard seems out of his depth in another's world. Some of the stand-outs are The Black Stone, The Valley of the Worm, People of the Dark, and Worms of the Earth. Valley and People are great reading in the vein of the Conan stories, with Worms mixing Howard's Bran Mak Morn with Lovecraft's universe. In some of the stories, Howard seems out of his depth in another's world. Some of the stand-outs are The Black Stone, The Valley of the Worm, People of the Dark, and Worms of the Earth. Valley and People are great reading in the vein of the Conan stories, with Worms mixing Howard's Bran Mak Morn with Lovecraft's universe.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    A good though somewhat small collection of Howard's horror works. A good though somewhat small collection of Howard's horror works.

  9. 5 out of 5

    yellowbird

    This book is worth having for the cover alone. It's a wonderful, almost Alien image of a statue of cthulhu by Stephen Hickman. This book is worth having for the cover alone. It's a wonderful, almost Alien image of a statue of cthulhu by Stephen Hickman.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Derek

    Robert E. Howard working in Lovecraft's yard. If you're a fan of either, you will enjoy this. Robert E. Howard working in Lovecraft's yard. If you're a fan of either, you will enjoy this.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Menno

    Robert E Howard writing Cthulhu stories. No need to say more!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Graham

    This is a fine anthology of Howard's horror stories, all of them Lovecraftian in tone. Actually, there are three great little poems collected here as well - ARKHAM, SILENCE FALLS ON MECCA'S WALLS and AN OPEN WINDOW - and they pad out the anthology nicely. Of the stories, OLD GARFIELD'S HEART is a straightforward bit of pulp horror about a heart that keeps beating after death. Nothing too unusual here. Similarly, DIG ME NO GRAVE is a southern gothic, a story of fire and brimstone and the selling o This is a fine anthology of Howard's horror stories, all of them Lovecraftian in tone. Actually, there are three great little poems collected here as well - ARKHAM, SILENCE FALLS ON MECCA'S WALLS and AN OPEN WINDOW - and they pad out the anthology nicely. Of the stories, OLD GARFIELD'S HEART is a straightforward bit of pulp horror about a heart that keeps beating after death. Nothing too unusual here. Similarly, DIG ME NO GRAVE is a southern gothic, a story of fire and brimstone and the selling of one's soul to the devil. THE SHADOW OF THE BEAST is a nice action-horror story with plenty of hunter-vs-hunted interplay. PEOPLE OF THE DARK is an odd story, one of Howard's time-travel efforts, in which a modern-day American suffers a bump on the head and finds himself reliving his past as 'Conan the Gael'. Troglodytes are the threat. This leaves the following classic stories: THE BLACK STONE - a cursed monolith is the backdrop for an unpleasant story of of human sacrifice. THE FIRE OF ASSHURBANIPAL - an Arabian adventure with two written endings. The original is worthwhile, but the rewrite, found here, is my favourite, throwing a nameless Cthuloid monstrosity into the mix. THE THING ON THE ROOF - a hulking toad-beast supplies the terror in a thoroughly effective little Lovecraftian effort. THE VALLEY OF THE WORM - arguably the author's best work of supernatural horror. An ancient Aryan warrior called Niord battles the vicious Picts before discovering true horror in the mysterious Valley of the Broken Stones. Top notch writing here. WORMS OF THE EARTH - one of the Bran Mak Morn stories and another true classic. This time, the Picts are the good guys, the Romans the enemy, and this is a grisly tale of the ancient serpent-men living beneath the moors of Britain. PIGEONS FROM HELL - zombies, curses and hatchets in the head. A rather silly title, but Howard's offbeat rendering of his curse storyline makes this another favourite. Strong stuff, just the way I like it. So, all in all you have a lovely little collection that will appeal to fans of Howard, Lovecraft and pulp horror alike.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ron

    A foray into his friend Lovecraft's invention. Not bad... probably would have been better with more stories, and continuing correspondence with Lovecraft. A foray into his friend Lovecraft's invention. Not bad... probably would have been better with more stories, and continuing correspondence with Lovecraft.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Stuart Dean

    A collection of short stories from Weird Tales. Would fit right in if they came on TV and were introduced by the Cryptkeeper. They cover many time periods, from Ancient Rome to modern times(early 1900s), and many genres, including several haunted house stories, some witchery, and some sword and sorcery tales. Most are decent, some are very good. The connection to the Cthulhu Mythos is fleeting at best. Mostly some name dropping is done and then the story proceeds apace without further reference. A collection of short stories from Weird Tales. Would fit right in if they came on TV and were introduced by the Cryptkeeper. They cover many time periods, from Ancient Rome to modern times(early 1900s), and many genres, including several haunted house stories, some witchery, and some sword and sorcery tales. Most are decent, some are very good. The connection to the Cthulhu Mythos is fleeting at best. Mostly some name dropping is done and then the story proceeds apace without further reference. Clearly not written by H.P. Lovecraft, they are not all easily identified as Robert E. Howard. REH was known for changing his writing style to meet his material and with the differing stories this can be seen. A good selection of horror stories, and really good when compared to what usually ran in Weird Tales.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Daria Dykes

    He's no Lovecraft, but Robert E. Howard stuff is great fun right up until it gets rapey. Which honestly isn't nearly as often as one might anticipate when they first start reading it. He's no Lovecraft, but Robert E. Howard stuff is great fun right up until it gets rapey. Which honestly isn't nearly as often as one might anticipate when they first start reading it.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Michael Caveney

    Mostly okay Chulthu mythos-related stories from the Conan and Solomon Kane scribe. The sheer number of n-bombs make the last story, "Pigeons From Hell", not the funnest read. Mostly okay Chulthu mythos-related stories from the Conan and Solomon Kane scribe. The sheer number of n-bombs make the last story, "Pigeons From Hell", not the funnest read.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Floyd Liff

    Great work based off of lovecraft. A little slow but fits right in with cthulhu

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ezra Estephan

    An alright collection. The best story was probably “The Fire of Asshurbanipal”, but my personal favourite was “The Black Stone”. The rest didn’t floor me, but they were okay.

  19. 4 out of 5

    James Mourgos

    5.0 out of 5 stars Tales of Horror & Suspense by the Master Writer, December 4, 2009 I will on occasion pick up an old sci-fi or horror anthology and stuff it in my pocket for safekeeping. Such a book is "The Mythos and Kindred Horrors", a collection of stories originally appearing in Weird Tales back in 1930s America, when pulp was king and Robert E. Howard was tops. Howard, author and creator of the Conan series, also delved into Lovecraft territory. Lovecraft was a contemporary of Howard and 5.0 out of 5 stars Tales of Horror & Suspense by the Master Writer, December 4, 2009 I will on occasion pick up an old sci-fi or horror anthology and stuff it in my pocket for safekeeping. Such a book is "The Mythos and Kindred Horrors", a collection of stories originally appearing in Weird Tales back in 1930s America, when pulp was king and Robert E. Howard was tops. Howard, author and creator of the Conan series, also delved into Lovecraft territory. Lovecraft was a contemporary of Howard and they would often correspond. Unfortunately Howard committed suicide at a young age, so we will be forever rereading his wonderful horror stories. Here's the contents! Contents * Introduction by David Drake * Arkham (poem) * The Black Stone * The Fire of Asshurbanipal * The Thing on the Roof * Dig Me No Grave * Silence Falls on Mecca's Walls (poem) * The Valley of the Worm * The Shadow of the Beast * Old Garfield's Heart * People of the Dark * Worms of the Earth * Pigeons From Hell * An Open Window (poem) The Old Ones and ancient Gods, such as Cthulhu and others will seem familiar to Lovecraft fans. The stories were pretty scary in their time and still grab you by the heart and freeze it! What lurks in the abandoned mansion in "The Shadow of the Beast?" Why does Old Jim still live and looks like he hasn't aged a day in the last 100 years in the horror western, "Old Garfield's Heart"? The "Pigeons from Hell" is not a tale of white-spotted bronze statues! The "Black Stone" harkens to the horrors of ancient gods and the spirits that still worship them and still appear on Midsummer's Night during the full moon. The "Necromicon" appears throughout several of the tales, a book that just by reading it you go screaming insane! Recommended!

  20. 4 out of 5

    East Bay J

    Something that has always impressed and delighted me about Robert E. Howard was the variety of tales he told. His westerns are great, his tall tales impressive and, of course, his heroic fiction is legendary. His horror writing is a lot of fun, too. Horror elements certainly crept into his heroic fantasy and other genres, perhaps due to the association with H. P. Lovecraft and his writing. The stories in this volume are all entertaining. While they don't all deal with the so called "Cthulhu Mytho Something that has always impressed and delighted me about Robert E. Howard was the variety of tales he told. His westerns are great, his tall tales impressive and, of course, his heroic fiction is legendary. His horror writing is a lot of fun, too. Horror elements certainly crept into his heroic fantasy and other genres, perhaps due to the association with H. P. Lovecraft and his writing. The stories in this volume are all entertaining. While they don't all deal with the so called "Cthulhu Mythos," they do make for a good read. My particular favorites are "Valley Of The Worm" (a re-working of Beowolf) and the superb "Pigeons From Hell." That story has been been much anthologized but it's a pleasure to read it again. Other highlights were "The Shadow Of The Beast" and "Old Garfield's Heart." I also enjoyed David Drake's introduction, which communicates the bleak nature of Howard's psyche and hints at the dark forces within that led to him taking his own life. Cthulhu: The Mythos and Kindred Horrors is a solid collection of Howard's horror writing and a nice introduction to the uninitiated.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Sutch

    I know there's a movement afoot, academic or not, to rehabilitate Howard as a "serious" writer. But the more I read of his work the less of literary merit I find in it. His writings have about as much worth as Edgar Rice Burroughs's, and for the same reasons Burroughs's work will never be redeemed as great literature: Howard was mainly a writer of adventure stories and he wrote an incredible volume of material in a short time because he needed the money. That last doesn't necessarily exclude a w I know there's a movement afoot, academic or not, to rehabilitate Howard as a "serious" writer. But the more I read of his work the less of literary merit I find in it. His writings have about as much worth as Edgar Rice Burroughs's, and for the same reasons Burroughs's work will never be redeemed as great literature: Howard was mainly a writer of adventure stories and he wrote an incredible volume of material in a short time because he needed the money. That last doesn't necessarily exclude a writer from producing quality work, but it does in both Burroughs's and Howard's output. The stories in this collection are extremely uneven and none of them measure up to Lovecraft, who was a far superior writer with a much more vast imagination. There are moments of Lovecraftian horror in the best of these stories, particularly "The Black Stone" and "The Thing on the Roof," but too often Howard's need to advance the plot hurriedly leads to some deadly dull stuff. And his continual fascination with his a-historical "Picts" and metempsychosis doesn't help.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Peregrine 12

    23 Dec 2010. Now THAT was fun. Good guys win, bad guys get killed, monsters and demons lurk in every dusty crypt. These are short stories written for the pulp fiction market of 1920's and 30's. Thus: plots are predictable, hyper-masculine characters are all similar if not identical, racism and sexism abound. The writing repeats itself in some places, contradicts itself in others. All action, no insight. If you can accept that and take these stories for what they are - a fun, adventurous read - t 23 Dec 2010. Now THAT was fun. Good guys win, bad guys get killed, monsters and demons lurk in every dusty crypt. These are short stories written for the pulp fiction market of 1920's and 30's. Thus: plots are predictable, hyper-masculine characters are all similar if not identical, racism and sexism abound. The writing repeats itself in some places, contradicts itself in others. All action, no insight. If you can accept that and take these stories for what they are - a fun, adventurous read - then you won't be disappointed. Nov 2010. I read this when it first came out (1987) and loved it. After rediscovering it in others' reviews here on Goodreads, I have finally been reacquainted with one of my lost childhood loves. I grew up a big fan of Howard (Conan, etc), but this collection of stories was so different from everything else that I never forgot it.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    I remember listening to an audiobook of Robert E. Howard's collected short stories back in 2011/2012 but I just don't remember which one....the ToC for this one includes the main stories I remember listening to, so this will have to do. I was genuinely freaked out by some of these. Credit must go to the audiobook narrator, as well, but Howard can certainly weave an engrossing and spine-chilling scenario. BUT, big caveat, Howard definitely held some racist viewpoints. This especially comes throug I remember listening to an audiobook of Robert E. Howard's collected short stories back in 2011/2012 but I just don't remember which one....the ToC for this one includes the main stories I remember listening to, so this will have to do. I was genuinely freaked out by some of these. Credit must go to the audiobook narrator, as well, but Howard can certainly weave an engrossing and spine-chilling scenario. BUT, big caveat, Howard definitely held some racist viewpoints. This especially comes through at times in his characterizations. If it weren't for that I would have certainly given these stories a solid 4* or even 4.5*. bummer.

  24. 5 out of 5

    John Montagne

    Some great short stories in here... and I'm scared to say it (eh eh eh), but I found some of the stories more intriguing/scary than Lovecraft's work. I realize the two corresponded and that probably helped in Howard's knack for writing such tales so well, but I think that in a way, the presentation of these horrific tales flow faster than HP's. I believe its because Howard's no-nonsense approach to his Conan writings comes across so we have a more 'direct' (?) narrative of Cthulu tales. I enjoye Some great short stories in here... and I'm scared to say it (eh eh eh), but I found some of the stories more intriguing/scary than Lovecraft's work. I realize the two corresponded and that probably helped in Howard's knack for writing such tales so well, but I think that in a way, the presentation of these horrific tales flow faster than HP's. I believe its because Howard's no-nonsense approach to his Conan writings comes across so we have a more 'direct' (?) narrative of Cthulu tales. I enjoyed every singe story in here.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    I wanted to like this book. I enjoy a lot of classic pulp writers. But Howard's dialogue is unnaturally wooden and in general horrible. This would be forgivable if, like his Conan stories, most of the narrative was action, where he excels. But instead, the bulk of the stories in this collection are told through teeth-grindingling awful blocks of expository dialogue. Don't waste your time, re-read Lovecraft if you hunger for Mythos stories. His remain the best and most readable. I wanted to like this book. I enjoy a lot of classic pulp writers. But Howard's dialogue is unnaturally wooden and in general horrible. This would be forgivable if, like his Conan stories, most of the narrative was action, where he excels. But instead, the bulk of the stories in this collection are told through teeth-grindingling awful blocks of expository dialogue. Don't waste your time, re-read Lovecraft if you hunger for Mythos stories. His remain the best and most readable.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    A great book. Robert E. Howard was a contemporary, and friend, of H. P. Lovercraft and this is a collection of REH's stories which featured elements of Lovecraft's Cthulhu Mythos. Some of them are the equal of Lovecraft's work and, I have to admit, the prose is generally more accessible than HPL's. A great book. Robert E. Howard was a contemporary, and friend, of H. P. Lovercraft and this is a collection of REH's stories which featured elements of Lovecraft's Cthulhu Mythos. Some of them are the equal of Lovecraft's work and, I have to admit, the prose is generally more accessible than HPL's.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Baker

    A great selection of Cthulhu mythos tales. Howard breathes life into these stories better than Lovecraft ever did - believable, understandable conversations, detailed with enough vagueness to allow your imagination to fill in the blanks. The Black Toad is my favorite of these tales, and haunts me for months every time I read it.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Redsteve

    Cthulhu Mythos*, written by the author of Conan. 'Nuff Said? * Loosely. About half the stories have little or nothing to do with Cthulhu Cannon and there's a lot more two-fisted adventuring than Lovecraft ever dreamed of. Cthulhu Mythos*, written by the author of Conan. 'Nuff Said? * Loosely. About half the stories have little or nothing to do with Cthulhu Cannon and there's a lot more two-fisted adventuring than Lovecraft ever dreamed of.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Gary

    I really like Howards influence on the mythos.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Cornelius

    Fuck this. Anything Cthulhu not written by Lovecraft is shit. Fuck Robert E. Howard and fuck August Derleth.

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