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Anne Frank: The Anne Frank House Authorized Graphic Biography

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Drawing on the unique historical sites, archives, expertise, and unquestioned authority of the Anne Frank House in Amsterdam, New York Times bestselling authors Sid Jacobson and Ernie Colón have created the first authorized and exhaustive graphic biography of Anne Frank. Their account is complete, covering the lives of Anne's parents, Edith and Otto; Anne's first years in Drawing on the unique historical sites, archives, expertise, and unquestioned authority of the Anne Frank House in Amsterdam, New York Times bestselling authors Sid Jacobson and Ernie Colón have created the first authorized and exhaustive graphic biography of Anne Frank. Their account is complete, covering the lives of Anne's parents, Edith and Otto; Anne's first years in Frankfurt; the rise of Nazism; the Franks' immigration to Amsterdam; war and occupation; Anne's years in the Secret Annex; betrayal and arrest; her deportation and tragic death in Bergen-Belsen; the survival of Anne's father; and his recovery and publication of her astounding diary.


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Drawing on the unique historical sites, archives, expertise, and unquestioned authority of the Anne Frank House in Amsterdam, New York Times bestselling authors Sid Jacobson and Ernie Colón have created the first authorized and exhaustive graphic biography of Anne Frank. Their account is complete, covering the lives of Anne's parents, Edith and Otto; Anne's first years in Drawing on the unique historical sites, archives, expertise, and unquestioned authority of the Anne Frank House in Amsterdam, New York Times bestselling authors Sid Jacobson and Ernie Colón have created the first authorized and exhaustive graphic biography of Anne Frank. Their account is complete, covering the lives of Anne's parents, Edith and Otto; Anne's first years in Frankfurt; the rise of Nazism; the Franks' immigration to Amsterdam; war and occupation; Anne's years in the Secret Annex; betrayal and arrest; her deportation and tragic death in Bergen-Belsen; the survival of Anne's father; and his recovery and publication of her astounding diary.

30 review for Anne Frank: The Anne Frank House Authorized Graphic Biography

  1. 4 out of 5

    Negin

    We visited Amsterdam for a few days over the summer and made it a point to visit the Anne Frank House. It was one of the highlights of our entire trip and we were moved beyond words. Here’s a picture that we took while standing in line (we were lucky enough to be one of the first in line). I had no idea that there was an Anne Frank biographical novel until we went to the bookshop. All the English copies were out of stock, so we waited till we got back home to place an order. This book is accurat We visited Amsterdam for a few days over the summer and made it a point to visit the Anne Frank House. It was one of the highlights of our entire trip and we were moved beyond words. Here’s a picture that we took while standing in line (we were lucky enough to be one of the first in line). I had no idea that there was an Anne Frank biographical novel until we went to the bookshop. All the English copies were out of stock, so we waited till we got back home to place an order. This book is accurate, well-organized, and chock-full of detailed information. I would highly recommend it combined with another Holocaust graphic novel, another favorite of mine, “Maus”. I honestly wish that both were required reading for all secondary-school students, although I recommend both books for all ages. Both are an absolute pleasure to read, despite the awful and horrific subject matter.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    I didn't expect to learn anything new, or even to be touched very deeply by this book (being that I know the subject matter so thoroughly -- having read the diary many times, and otherwise immersed myself in background material for the last 42 years). I was wrong. Somehow, the drawings of the familiar photographs renewed their emotional impact for me. Somehow, the drawings of the photographs of Nazi criminals, and the other instances of historical information and context, made it much more perso I didn't expect to learn anything new, or even to be touched very deeply by this book (being that I know the subject matter so thoroughly -- having read the diary many times, and otherwise immersed myself in background material for the last 42 years). I was wrong. Somehow, the drawings of the familiar photographs renewed their emotional impact for me. Somehow, the drawings of the photographs of Nazi criminals, and the other instances of historical information and context, made it much more personal and real. There are images that will definitely stick with me -- the two sisters, Anne & Margot, about ages 2 and 5, in their white singlets with innocent eyes gazing up at their beloved father. In the drawing, the carelessly drooping strap has been restored to Anne's shoulder. So poignant and heart-wrenching--that these adjustments and fixes may be made to images, but that the life itself was so brutally crushed out of two little girls (and countless others). The image of Anne affixing her photos of "film stars" to the wall in her tiny room, palm emphatically flat to the surface, exerting her will. The book pointed out that the Secret Annex was barely 700 square feet in total, housing 8 people. Anne's room, shared with Mr. Dussel, and Anne's parents' room, shared with Margot, were each 6' wide. Reading those facts caused my blood to freeze -- imagine the sense of being trapped in these tiny spaces with so many others! A very worthwhile read and I probably will need to own this book, someday.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    This graphic biography chronicles the life of the Nazi movement (beginning with Germany in WWI) and its rise to power, and the life of Anne Frank (beginning with her parent's courtship) and her development from carefree girlhood to pensive adolescent, culminating with the Armistice and Anne's death at Auschwitz, just a few weeks before the end of WWII. Each chapter contains at least one "snapshot:" a 1/3 to full page that, like a sidebar, imparts some background information, like a family tree w This graphic biography chronicles the life of the Nazi movement (beginning with Germany in WWI) and its rise to power, and the life of Anne Frank (beginning with her parent's courtship) and her development from carefree girlhood to pensive adolescent, culminating with the Armistice and Anne's death at Auschwitz, just a few weeks before the end of WWII. Each chapter contains at least one "snapshot:" a 1/3 to full page that, like a sidebar, imparts some background information, like a family tree with portraits drawn from photographs, a map that shows the territories in control of each of the combatants, and a page on concentration camps. The snapshots break up the narrative of Anne's life and the progression of the Nazi movement. The text is well-supported with facts and primary source material, such as interviews with concentration camp survivors, and of course, excerpts from Anne's diary itself. The creators occasionally put undocumented thoughts into the character's heads, and I was left wondering how they KNEW that's what the person was thinking at the time. The layout is very orderly, a classic 2 panel by 3 panel formation. Style varies slightly from page to page, employing the classic left to right Z formation for reading. A few split screen style illustrations show what various characters are doing, within the same timeframe. One especially clever panel on pg. 104 uses the spread of an airplane's wings to transition a scene. Perspectives vary, making use of techniques such as silhouette, closeups, angles, and aerials, only the text breaks out of the neat boxes, and there are plenty of opportunities--chaotic moments--for such deviation. Chapter headings have unique full page illustrations with interesting angles. The artist employs traditional devices such as a lightning bolt shaped speech bubble for speech coming from a radio, and puffy cloud like speech bubbles to indicate thoughts instead of spoken words. The somber hues of the artwork - especially the gray and beige of the concentration camps - are effective at setting mood, while the browns and golds lend an old-fashioned and historical feel. Many illustrations are beautifully rendered reproductions from actual photographs: of the building at 263 Prinsegracht, of emaciated prisoners in the camps, of Otto Frank. Several, rendered in grayscale, pack a real punch, forcing the reader to stop and contemplate the significance of the action captured. Anne's palette shifts from pink, purple and white as a young girl to more sober maroons, browns and blues as a teen. The soft, hazy style of the illustrations on page 74 of rooms in the annex (devoid of their inhabitants) has a nostalgic, nearly ghostly feel; the same technique, employed in sepia on pg 139, is nothing short of haunting. The chronology at the end of the book juxtaposes two timelines: Anne's family (in black ink) and WWII (in red ink). Sources are credited on the final page, with only one suggestion for further explanation (the museum website). I think this well-intentioned book would be a much more satisfying read if it had stronger art/editorial direction; it suffers from a textbook-like tone in too many places for the reader to become lost in the very powerful story of Anne's life. In spite of the objective tone, the images in chapter 9, "Discovery" are absolutely heartwrenching. Chapter 10, The Story Lives On, chronicles the one surviving member of the eight who hid in the annex, and how Anne's diary not only went on to see the light of day, but was made into a play and a film, translated into over 70 languages, and achieved her dream of someday becoming a writer. I feel strongly that delivery is too lecturey in tone, and unfortunately diminishes the appeal of this book. In spite of the popularity of Anne's story, the tragic appeal, the message about peace, harmony and acceptance. It's not a balanced enough piece to warrant 5 stars. It has too much of a souvenir feel, like the book was commissioned to sell in the gift shop at the Anne Frank House to teach people about Anne's life.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kricket

    (in case you haven't noticed) i have a thing for graphic novels relating to world war 2. this particular title is a mixed bag- good: color artwork, feast for the eyes the additional perspective of what was happening during the war as anne wrote. she mentions some things in her diary but wasn't aware of everything (she couldn't be). additional info about what happened to the residents of the secret annex after they were arrested bad: the dialogue. oh god. the authors try to summarize events and personal (in case you haven't noticed) i have a thing for graphic novels relating to world war 2. this particular title is a mixed bag- good: color artwork, feast for the eyes the additional perspective of what was happening during the war as anne wrote. she mentions some things in her diary but wasn't aware of everything (she couldn't be). additional info about what happened to the residents of the secret annex after they were arrested bad: the dialogue. oh god. the authors try to summarize events and personalities by having the characters say trite ridiculous things to each other or themselves. some of the artwork is better than others. of course by the end i was in tears, especially reading this excerpt from otto frank's letters: "I hope Anne's book will have an effect on the rest of your life so that, insofar as it is possible in your own circumstances, you will work for unity and peace.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Cecile Msays

    This book was the graphic interpretation of Anne Frank's life in a Nazi-occupied Amsterdam. It was very insightful as it gave a complete biography of her life, her parents lives, and the continuation of her diary after she died. Having read her actual diary translated in English, I thought this book was a great way to really understand what Anne was going through. The pictures added to the emotions connected to the story as a visual representation of the strife Anne was going through. This book This book was the graphic interpretation of Anne Frank's life in a Nazi-occupied Amsterdam. It was very insightful as it gave a complete biography of her life, her parents lives, and the continuation of her diary after she died. Having read her actual diary translated in English, I thought this book was a great way to really understand what Anne was going through. The pictures added to the emotions connected to the story as a visual representation of the strife Anne was going through. This book also gave a third-person perspective on Anne's life, so the reader was able to focus on not just her experience in the Annex, but the other seven members as well. This book kept me engaged and overall I really enjoyed it. I especially like how the authors went into detail about Anne's diary being publish, as obviously the diary wouldn't cover that. Overall I really loved this book, it was insightful and full of emotion!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Athira (Reading on a Rainy Day)

    Anne Frank is no stranger to us. We all know about how she hid with her family and four others in a secret annex in Netherlands during the infamous Holocaust, for two years. Whether or not we have actually read or loved her diary, none of us would deny that she went through a harrowing experience - just as million other Jews, victimized simply because of their faith. But in so many ways, Anne has become a symbol of that period chiefly because she was just fifteen when she died (murdered is what Anne Frank is no stranger to us. We all know about how she hid with her family and four others in a secret annex in Netherlands during the infamous Holocaust, for two years. Whether or not we have actually read or loved her diary, none of us would deny that she went through a harrowing experience - just as million other Jews, victimized simply because of their faith. But in so many ways, Anne has become a symbol of that period chiefly because she was just fifteen when she died (murdered is what I like to say, even if it was disease that eventually claimed her), and also because she recorded her stay in the annex in her diary, which has already been read by millions. That said, when I first read and loved Anne Frank's Diary two years back, the most common sentiment I heard expressed among those who didn't rate it highly was that the book felt too "immature". In other words, it read like any fifteen year old's diary - with all the typical squabbles, complaints, teenage infatuations/crushes/desires and worldly wisdoms. It seemed anticlimactic or too flat considering all the hype around it. I know many who tried to read it as any diary and eventually gave up. Most people loved it though, and what particularly struck me about the diary was that it was the manifestation of the dreams and desires of a girl (like any other girl), who never got to experience them, because of a man-made tragedy. From that perspective, this graphic nonfiction is a really excellent accompaniment to the diary. Many have attested that when reading Anne's diary, it is really crucial to be in Anne's position - trapped for two years in an annex with just a single bathroom and not much privacy; a young girl at the cusp of those years when she is discovering herself, every single day - the age at which any girl or boy wants to experiment with a lot of things, including love and all the desires it invokes. Add another family to that annex, a family you now had to live with for two years, or rather for an unknown amount of time. In Anne's diary, the events following their capture are chronicled in the Afterword section of the edition I read - who died and how, who survived. This book actually shows the events. Pictures can have a more powerful effect on the reader, and it did so in this case. Did you know that Anne and her sister died just weeks before rescue arrived at their camp? If she had been rescued, her diary might never have seen the light of day. But at least the world would not have missed having such a remarkable woman in its midst. I felt that this book was really well-done. I read in an interview (whose link I can't find now) that the drawings of the characters, their attires and even the layouts of the annex strongly resemble the original characters and their hideout. Towards the end of the book when everyone is captured, they all look so different from their original selves - malnutrition, disease and fatigue eating out their muscle and body mass quickly. That's something I can never get used to - all those horrific images of the camps and their inmates. How could humans be so callous? I knew before I started, thanks to Ash, that this book is not a duplicate of Anne's diary. Instead, it covers a significant period before and after Anne starts writing her diary. That's really helpful because it puts Anne's diary in context much better than the diary itself does. Suddenly, the events seem much more harrowing, more scary, vivid and dangerous than how Anne says it. And after reading this graphic book, when I recollect some of the entries from Anne's diary, I see them in a much different light.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kellee Moye

    I've been sitting here for a while and I just don't know where to begin. This is a precious book and it is hard to put into words how important it is and how well done it is. I am thoroughly impressed. It will be a great introduction to Anne Frank for many and will hopefully lead them to want to learn more about her and the injustices that happened during WWII. A misconception I had was that I thought it was a graphic novel of Anne Frank's diary. It isn't. It is included, but this is a biography I've been sitting here for a while and I just don't know where to begin. This is a precious book and it is hard to put into words how important it is and how well done it is. I am thoroughly impressed. It will be a great introduction to Anne Frank for many and will hopefully lead them to want to learn more about her and the injustices that happened during WWII. A misconception I had was that I thought it was a graphic novel of Anne Frank's diary. It isn't. It is included, but this is a biography of Anne. It starts with her parents and continues all the way until the death of her father. It showcases Anne's life pre-hiding, during hiding, in the concentration camps and as her father makes sure that her legacy lives on. And it is done with primary sources woven in including Anne' diary, letters and interviews. The book even includes photographs of Anne and her family in the back along with a timeline of the Franks and WWII. Also throughout the biography, the authors periodically pause to give the reader a snapshot of a certain aspect of WWII that pertains to the story. It helps readers who may not have the prior knowledge of the war and Nazi power. Snatch of text: Book Trailer at http://youtu.be/yLSvdEUA2wI

  8. 4 out of 5

    Claudia

    When I first read the DIARY, I desperately wanted to be Anne's friend. When I read it again, in Amsterdam, after only walking past the Annex, I wanted desperately to be her English teacher. She lived a full life within those confining walls, and she left a treasure for the world. This graphic biography gives us background of the family and its place in the world, and adds enough current events for us to see the two tracks of the story which would collide. The story is far more than just the DIARY When I first read the DIARY, I desperately wanted to be Anne's friend. When I read it again, in Amsterdam, after only walking past the Annex, I wanted desperately to be her English teacher. She lived a full life within those confining walls, and she left a treasure for the world. This graphic biography gives us background of the family and its place in the world, and adds enough current events for us to see the two tracks of the story which would collide. The story is far more than just the DIARY, as it follows the families after their capture, and even gives us a suspect for the betrayal. How ironic that Peter and Anne and Margo died so close to the liberation of the camps. We lost her, and all the potential she promised. But we have her DIARY which still inspires us all.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Olivia

    Every book or story about Anne Frank manages to break my heart. Every single one. Not only that, they diminish my faith in humanity. Reading about what people had to go through changes a perspective entirely. These aren’t dates in a book, they’re men, women, and children that had to go through this. This book has given me a bigger background into what happened before and after the war. Anne Frank’s diary and the play did an amazing job at describing what went on in the annex, but I learned so mu Every book or story about Anne Frank manages to break my heart. Every single one. Not only that, they diminish my faith in humanity. Reading about what people had to go through changes a perspective entirely. These aren’t dates in a book, they’re men, women, and children that had to go through this. This book has given me a bigger background into what happened before and after the war. Anne Frank’s diary and the play did an amazing job at describing what went on in the annex, but I learned so much from this graphic novel. Things that I had wondered about before, as well as many things I hadn’t.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Madison

    I just finished reading The Anne Frank graphic novel. Earlier this year I read a novel about Anne Frank written by Miep Gies, which was an employee of Otto Frank, Anne’s father. I really enjoyed this graphic, more than the first one that I read. I felt like this story is very important and it was enjoyable to see it in a different aspect. Having the pictures there it engages you in the book. Although I enjoyed reading the novel by Miep Gies I liked this graphic novel better because it focused mo I just finished reading The Anne Frank graphic novel. Earlier this year I read a novel about Anne Frank written by Miep Gies, which was an employee of Otto Frank, Anne’s father. I really enjoyed this graphic, more than the first one that I read. I felt like this story is very important and it was enjoyable to see it in a different aspect. Having the pictures there it engages you in the book. Although I enjoyed reading the novel by Miep Gies I liked this graphic novel better because it focused more on Anne. In the other novel I felt that by the end I really did not get to know who Anne was or any of the insight in hiding because Miep only came up once a day and that was to bring food. This graphic was more focused on the family members and really showed all of their personalities and what happened during hiding. There were many different things I learned in this book that was not in the novel. I did not know that Anne and her mother did not get along very well, or that Anne and Peter dated and he was her first kiss. In this graphic we also got to see what happened to them while they were in the concentration camps, where as in the novel we see what Mieps life is like after the Franks were taken away. Both books are great and both show a different side to the same story. I recommend this book to anyone that has ever read a book about Anne Frank and I think that this graphic novel and the novel written by Miep Gies compliment each other very well. The illustrations were also very well done.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Josh O'conner

    I never would have thought that I would encounter the "The Diary of Anne Frank" in comic book format. For a book rooted in such a horrific period in time, the topic seems almost off limits to a graphic novel, but I must admit that I was thoroughly impressed with the level of tact and skill that Sid Jacobson and Ernie Colon employed in "Anne Frank: The Anne Frank House Authorized Graphic Biography". Their version of the story provide a new level of depth and emotion by providing snapshots of how I never would have thought that I would encounter the "The Diary of Anne Frank" in comic book format. For a book rooted in such a horrific period in time, the topic seems almost off limits to a graphic novel, but I must admit that I was thoroughly impressed with the level of tact and skill that Sid Jacobson and Ernie Colon employed in "Anne Frank: The Anne Frank House Authorized Graphic Biography". Their version of the story provide a new level of depth and emotion by providing snapshots of how the story unfolded (they also supplement Anne's story with historical pretext that shows the rise of the Nazi party and the events that led to Anne's residence in the annex). Jacobson and Colon provide a masterfully illustrated version of the story that allows readers to experience Anne's plight from a different angle. The dialog is also easy to follow allowing for ample character development and allowing the story to unfold at a natural pace. While a graphic novel is perhaps not an appropriate substitute for the actual diary, it allows readers to grasp Anne's story at a younger age and provides a hook to pull them into the realities of the Nazi Party. I would recommend this book to anyone looking to expose younger readers to "The Diary of Anne Frank" or even to older readers looking to spark their interest on the topic.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Michèle

    Graphic books tend to give me headaches (especially manga), but this one did read smoothly. A good summary of what happened to the Frank family before the war, when they went into hiding, their capture and imprisonment, and how Anne's Diary was published after the war.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    This was required reading this year for the book club. Right. A graphic novel. I fully expected to hate the entire experience, but found this particular book packed full of interesting facts that I either never knew, or had entirely forgotten. I also appreciated the fact that I could read the 148 pages in only two lunch hours. Yes, I suppose I cheated just a little.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Colin

    A very direct account of the story of Anne Frank, with historical asides that would I think be very useful for anyone learning about the subject, say for a school project. There's another graphic novel that I've seen people reading which goes off into the realms of fantasy (dream sequences from the diary and so on) but this one is a much more conventional retelling of the story.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Bookworm Emmy

    Did not like the formatting at all, but it was good

  16. 5 out of 5

    Vivooi25

    Literary Analysis on the Graphic Novel Anne Frank November 2020 The dominance of Nazism in Europe was both emotionally and, unfortunately, quite literally equivalent to that of a burning pit of fire for numerous citizens, specifically the Jews. One such Jewish citizen was the bright, jovial adolescent by the name of Anne Frank, whom life placed under a circumstance of great magnitude, forcing her to withdraw herself from society and remain concealed within a secret annex for more than two years. E Literary Analysis on the Graphic Novel Anne Frank November 2020 The dominance of Nazism in Europe was both emotionally and, unfortunately, quite literally equivalent to that of a burning pit of fire for numerous citizens, specifically the Jews. One such Jewish citizen was the bright, jovial adolescent by the name of Anne Frank, whom life placed under a circumstance of great magnitude, forcing her to withdraw herself from society and remain concealed within a secret annex for more than two years. Emotions of fear and terror were the basis of a typical day under Nazi rule, but rather surprisingly, hope managed to sprout out of the tainted spiritual soils and became the reason many opted to continue battling for their lives. The authors of Anne Frank intend to illustrate these prevalent emotions of hope and despair within communities under Nazi rule by consistently incorporating both positive and tragic events that occurred in Anne’s life, openly emphasizing on Anne’s optimistic temperament by the recurrent usage of juxtaposition, and utilizing starkly contrasting tones in narration. Throughout the book, both tragic and positive moments in Anne’s life were presented. By presenting two contrasting types of events, the authors were able to showcase both contrasting feelings of despair (contributed by the tragic events) and hope (contributed by the more positive events) experienced by the characters. Characters who were part of the positive moments all had a feeling of joy and happiness, with all their worries vanishing into thin air. Early scenes from Anne’s childhood include joyous family times, mischievous tricks played alongside her friends, and acts of stubbornness which reputed her as a bright, cute little girl. For instance, page 51 showcased the lively times Anne and Hanneli had in her father’s office, toying with the appliances and pouring water out of windows intending to frighten innocent pedestrians down below. On page 57, the authors wrote, “The Jewish school, however, worked well for the two girls [Anne and Margot]. Teachers worked closely with the children, creating a sense of community. Those who survived the Holocaust would remember this later as a happy time.” This showed how the discriminated Jews managed to turn an originally depressing situation (the fact that they were being discriminated) into a happy time worth remembering for the rest of their lives. During times such as these (moments when Jews were happily going about their lives), the people must have been thinking how life wasn’t solely comprised of death and violence, and how people were capable of being happy too. This led them to feeling hopeful, hopeful that they could constantly feel such a grand emotion in the future once the Nazis were out of rule. On the contrary, characters a part of the negative moments showed the emotion of despair. One such negative moment was a burglary of the warehouse on April 9 to April 10. There was one instance where the Gestapo had come so frightfully close to discovering the eight hiders by reaching the front of the bookcase which concealed the entrance to the annex. In the graphic novel, on page 108, the hiders are pictured as being very anxious, with Anne thinking, “Oh no, they are at the bookcase… We are lost…” In her actual diary, Anne mentioned, “No one breathed audibly now, footsteps on our staircase, then a rattling of the swinging cupboard. This moment is indescribable. “Now we are lost!” I said, and could see us all being taken away by the Gestapo that very night.” (Frank 201). Everyone in the annex was fearing for their lives that night. The sense of despair was, no doubt, so intense that it was almost palpable. Therefore, by incorporating positive and negative moments, both despair and hope can be read about throughout the whole entire story through separate circumstances. Perhaps the idea of hope and despair within the same circumstance is more evident under the juxtaposition of Anne’s optimistic temperament against a dreary, solemn background of racial discrimination, regular outbursts of violence and unhappiness derived from others. Anne Frank was a gregarious, charismatic, obstinate, and bright young girl who was deeply consumed by natural curiosity (Anne Frank House). Even though haunted by the traumatic events happening around her, she still maintained her distinctive positive nature throughout. The family members had quite starkly different reactions when they finally physically faced their stressful situation of being in hiding. Anne can be witnessed turning the worst aspects of the Secret Annex into the most intriguing ones, which emphasizes her positive personality. For example, on page 78, it was described how the daily morning silence would be pierced with the punctual ringing of cacophonous bells every fifteen minutes. Seeing as the onomatopoeia used was featured in black and red, capitalized text with a rather bold font, quite likely the bells did not produce a pleasant sound. Anne’s mother, Edith, can be seen greatly uncomfortable with the noise, exclaiming, “I can’t stand it!”, while Anne’s father, Otto, can be seen reluctantly accepting this new addition to their daily schedules by sighing, “We’ll have to get used to it.” Meanwhile, in the exact same panel, Anne’s reaction was, “I love it. It’s like a faithful friend,” which was a great contrast to her parents’ reactions. Instead of complaining about what a nuisance the bells made, she viewed them as positive aspects of the Annex. While in the Secret Annex, Edith was often portrayed as having a rather challenging time adjusting to her new life. Her constant heated disagreements with Anne contributed to her “depression”. In the graphic novel, Anne had mentioned how she was optimistic, “unlike her mother”. Miep Gies, one of the figures in the story who helped conceal the Franks, claimed “Although the others were counting the days until the Allies came, making games of what they would do when it was all over, Mrs Frank confessed that she was deeply ashamed of the fact that she felt the end would never come” (Gies and Gold 130). On the contrary, Anne managed to maintain her positive attitude by using her outspoken nature to efficiently resolve conflicts which threatened to diminish her exuberance. Anne and Edith’s conflicting personalities always made them seem juxtaposed from each other every time they were placed together in the same room or within the same scene. In this sense, Anne represents hope while her mother represents despair. Even while being deported to Auschwitz, Anne still openly showcased her innate curiosity and appreciation for all things on Earth. On page 119, Anne’s family is depicted as being deported to concentration camps by means of train, still adequately dressed with comfortable attire. Presumably, the atmosphere within the train cars was solemn and tense as each individual contemplated his/her past life and future. While in the car, Anne was thinking, “Summer… it’s all so beautiful,” with Otto Frank recalling how Anne was entranced by the scenery to the extent that she remained at the window for the majority of their journey. The fact that Anne was still capable of appreciating the beauty of summer while being sent to her death evidently demonstrates the emotion of hope within the dreary situation. Anne’s positive attitude showed how there could be hope and joy present even under stressful circumstances. It is not only the events concerning the characters that showcase the feelings of hope and despair, but also the authors’ tone of writing. The stark contrast between the authors’ tone of voice for different sections also highlights the emotions of hope and despair by using a more serious tone for darker events while using a more appreciative tone when discussing happy times. A more carefree tone was used to describe one of Anne’s displays of childish mischief. Her housekeeper Kati discovered Anne on the balcony, drenched from the downpour. The ensuing dialogue on page 18, goes as follows: “[Kate:] Anne! What are you doing there? It’s raining! You’ve got to come inside! [Anne:] Tell me a story! [Kate:] I’ll tell you one inside. [Anne:] No! Here! Here! [Kate:] Come with me now! [Anne:] I want a story! [Kate:] Not even a short one, young lady!” Although Kati did use the phrase “young lady” which is often used when one is upset with someone else, and Anne may seem to be upset just based on the dialogue, the illustrations depicted the two of them with grins on their faces, which proves that this scene is a rather comical and lighthearted scene. During lighthearted scenes such as these, Anne and her family possibly had high hopes for a successful and secure future. The usage of the darker tone can be visibly seen on page 123, which described the brutal and inhumane conditions at Auschwitz concentration camp. Sentences describing how the prisoners slept in “large, empty stables”, how the prisoners were fed with “small portions” of food and forced to do hard labor, how the prisoners would “stand for hours in all kinds of weather while being counted”, how those too ill or weak to work were murdered in the gas chambers, and how the “crematoria, where the corpses of the murdered prisoners were burned, could be seen working day and night” all used a morbid, dark, and grisly tone. This is predicted as the conditions at all the concentration camps were of the utmost appalling quality; therefore, the authors should recognize this fact using a darker tone. The dark tone emphasizes the feeling of despair felt by the characters who were unfortunate enough to be imprisoned in such a circumstance. Darker colors are also utilized to represent the dread and unhappiness those in the concentration camps felt. I believe that the overall book itself is quite a quite worthwhile read, as the realistic and natural illustrations really contribute to the quality of the story, allowing the reader to effectively visualize the events. Most importantly, I really enjoyed how the authors utilized the story of Anne Frank to present two different messages; one message was about Anne’s character development, while the other message was about the two prevalent emotions of hope and despair which were discussed in this analysis. I agree with the idea about how hope and despair were prevalent emotions felt by the people under Nazi rule, based on the past readings (both nonfictional and fictional) that I have previously read. Anne Frank’s diary enabled the world a unique experience to delve within the view of an innocent, young teenager whose insightful entries effectively portrayed the brutality of discrimination during World War II while simultaneously showing her journey of maturity. Anne’s straightforward and outspoken nature granted her with the gift of writing unequivocally, voicing her opinions, suggestions, and words of frustration with the sheer clarity and honesty that can only be sought out from a brilliant, truthful teenage author. Nothing was ever sugar-coated; Anne wrote down all her emotions and thoughts without ever considering its appropriateness. The naiveness, mixed character, and quick mind of a teenager made her work shine brighter than any other nonfiction text regarding World War II and the Holocaust because people could emotionally grasp and connect with many of the hardships (both internal and external) she faced. I do reckon that Anne Frank and her diary are being substantially honored and respected, as her diary has been translated into over 70 languages and is a source of inspiration for many (Anne Frank House). In conclusion, this story not only captures the events occurring in the life of Anne Frank, but also presents a deeper message which encapsulates the contrasting emotions of hope and despair felt during the dark years of World War II. The authors of Anne Frank intended to illustrate the hope and despair felt in several ways. The authors consistently incorporated both positive and tragic events that occurred in Anne’s life, such as her early fond childhood memories and the burglary of the annex’s warehouse. Anne’s optimistic temperament was also openly emphasized by the recurrent usage of juxtaposition. Anne’s bright personality contrasted with the background of dreary and dark events and emotions. Lastly, the authors utilized starkly contrasting tones in narration using a lighter tone for positive events and a negative tone for darker events. Anne Frank is an inspirational figure whose frank thoughts during World War II and the Holocaust revolutionized the way many view those dark times, and who should be recognized and read about not only to respect the bravery and motivation of such a talented girl, but to also receive a firsthand, honest view on the endangered lives of the Jews. References Anne Frank House. www.annefrank.org/en/. Accessed 25 November 2006. Frank, Anne. The Diary of a Young Girl. Bantam Books, 1994 Gies, Miep, and Allison Gold. Anne Frank Remembered: The Story of the Woman Who Helped to Hide the Frank Family. Simon & Schuster, 1987. Jacobson, Sid, and Ernie Colón. Anne Frank. Hill and Wang, 2010.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Maxwell Banghart

    It was a good book. It was not only the diary but also her life before and Ottos life after.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Cristina

    Text Summary Beginning with the marriage of Anne Frank’s parents, Edith and Otto Frank, and ending with Otto Frank’s survival and publication of his daughter’s diary, Sid Jacobson and Ernie Colon depict the life of Anne Frank, the horrific events of the Holocaust, and the legacy that Anne Frank and her family leave behind. As a child, Anne Frank was a charming, smiley, free-spirited girl whose laugh had the ability to bring “sunshine” to those around her. As she grew older, Anne Frank’s passion f Text Summary Beginning with the marriage of Anne Frank’s parents, Edith and Otto Frank, and ending with Otto Frank’s survival and publication of his daughter’s diary, Sid Jacobson and Ernie Colon depict the life of Anne Frank, the horrific events of the Holocaust, and the legacy that Anne Frank and her family leave behind. As a child, Anne Frank was a charming, smiley, free-spirited girl whose laugh had the ability to bring “sunshine” to those around her. As she grew older, Anne Frank’s passion for life and learning stayed strong even through the difficult economic times brought on by the Depression. Later, the threats that Nazi Germany brought to the Frank family forced them to move to Amsterdam. It was here and on her thirteenth birthday that Anne Frank received her favorite present: a diary. When Margot Frank, Anne’s older sister, received a call-up notice to report for a “work camp” in Germany, the very next day the Frank family went into hiding. It was in her hiding that Anne Frank shared her thoughts and fears of the war, her hopes of peace, and her dreams of one day becoming a famous writer. Anne Frank had no idea that the writings in her diary would one day reach and inspire people all over the world. Literary Merits Jacobson and Colon weave a rich narrative with historical details in this graphic biography. The reader can appreciate the care and time that the authors put into not only creating the graphic novel, but also in researching events of the war and Holocaust, and gathering information on the Frank family through the help of many individuals at the Anne Frank House in Amsterdam. The impact of this careful research can be observed through the detailed maps, visuals, and statistics represented in each of the historical “snapshots” that are woven through the text. In the midst of reading the Frank family storyline, these helpful “snapshots” provide the reader with a perspective of the larger historical events taking place in Nazi Germany. By inviting the reader to examine the Holocaust through both broad and narrow lenses, the authors give the reader an opportunity to gain a deeper and more holistic understanding of this tragedy. Classroom Recommendations This text can appeal to both teenagers (13 and up) as well as an adult audience. High school students learning about the complexities of Nazi Germany and the Holocaust may find this graphic biography to be a helpful supplemental text. English and History classrooms may find the best use of this text. In an English classroom, I can see this text being paired with some excerpts from Anne Frank’s diary. Students may analyze and discuss themes of empathy, family and community relationships, discrimination, hatred, violence, etc... the list goes on. Students can also analyze Anne Frank’s writing and apply some of her techniques in their own, possibly through writing a memoir. Jacobson and Colon’s graphic biography includes several quotes from Frank’s diary, portraying her writing abilities: “I feel like a songbird whose wings have been ripped off, hurling itself against the bars of its dark cage” (102).

  19. 4 out of 5

    Mattsa25

    At the age of thirteen, Anne Frank entered the annex, a bright-eyed girl. The next time she stepped foot outside, two years later, she was a new person. In Anne Frank: The Anne Frank House Authorized Graphic Biography, the well-known life of Anne Frank takes on a new perspective. As Anne changes from a lively, fanciful child to a perceptive young adult, so do her thoughts and actions, and attitudes towards the people around her. Through showing these changes, the author tells readers that one gr At the age of thirteen, Anne Frank entered the annex, a bright-eyed girl. The next time she stepped foot outside, two years later, she was a new person. In Anne Frank: The Anne Frank House Authorized Graphic Biography, the well-known life of Anne Frank takes on a new perspective. As Anne changes from a lively, fanciful child to a perceptive young adult, so do her thoughts and actions, and attitudes towards the people around her. Through showing these changes, the author tells readers that one grows and matures through facing both internal and external challenges. In this graphic biography depicting Anne Frank’s life, readers are able to witness her grow and mature from a small child to a young adult, especially through her thoughts and actions. In the beginning, Anne was, as anyone would expect, a happy child, mischievous and carefree in her ways. Often surrounded by friends, Anne played pranks, giggled over boys, and had long conversations with them. But after going into hiding, Anne began to experience the difficulties of adolescence, lapsing into disagreements with her family, depression, and fits of anger and frustration. This quote, shown in the graphic novel and taken from an entry in Anne’s diary written four months after entering the annex, encapsulates how Anne felt about her mother and sister at the time: “I love them, but only because they're Mother and Margot. I don't give a darn about them as people. As far as I'm concerned, they can go jump in a lake.” After this point, however, Anne’s thoughts and actions shifted. Having emerged from adolescence clearer-minded and in better possession of herself, she began to figure out her true self. “One side contains my [exuberant cheerfulness, flippancy, and appreciation of the lighter side of things.]... This side of me is usually lying in wait to ambush the other one, which is much purer, deeper, and finer.” This quote, taken from Anne’s last diary entry, is placed on the last page of the sections portraying Anne’s life in the annex. In comparison to the untroubled Anne of childhood or the moody Anne of adolescence, this new Anne is the epitome of young adulthood–hopeful, introspective, and still in the process of growth. At the same time Anne herself was changing, the ways in which she viewed those around her was changing too. One person that truly changed in Anne’s eyes was Peter van Pels. He was the son of the van Pels family who was in hiding with the Franks, and went from “a shy, awkward boy whose company won't amount to much” to someone Anne looked forward to seeing “morning, noon, and night”. It was in early 1944, their final year in the annex, that Anne and Peter’s relationship truly began to change. Through Anne’s deepened relationship with him, readers are able to see how Anne’s perspective of everyone transformed. Where she had once found Peter annoying, she now found him endearing. And where she had once fought with her mother, she now realized that those clashes were the cause of being stuck in the annex. The graphic novel also utilizes what Anne wrote in her diary to show this, often choosing quotes that are wholly different from other quotes later on. An example is this quote, one of the first that appears when describing Anne’s disagreements with her mother: “[Mother’s] the one whose tactless comments and cruel jokes about matters I don’t think are funny have made me insensitive to any sign of love on her part.” And then, when Anne finally began getting along with her mother again, this quote is used: “It's true, [Mother] didn't understand me, but I didn't understand her either.” From these two quotes, it’s easy to see that as Anne matured, so did the ways she dealt with people, and the ways she thought of them. As shown by the ways in which Anne changed, it’s clear that one of the main challenges she faced in the annex was the internal pressure of adolescence. A secondary, but just as important, challenge she also faced was the external pressure of World War II and the Holocaust. For many of us, adolescence is hard to deal with. But Anne was forced to undergo these struggles even as the warplanes of World War II flew overhead. Under constant fear of being caught or killed, Anne’s emotions were likely amplified due to the knowledge that her life could end at any moment. Despite the stronger impacts of her emotions, Anne experienced all the typical struggles of teen life. She fought with her family, fell in love with a boy for the wrong reasons, and believed no one understood her. These internal conflicts, combined with the second main challenge of World War II and the Holocaust, shaped Anne into a maturer version of the girl that first walked into the annex in 1942. The combined effect of these two different struggles is demonstrated in the panel below, where Anne can be seen writing in her diary about her relationship with her mother. [pg.99. panels 1-2; image not available] These panels (which is where one of the aforementioned quotes appear) show how Anne was influenced by both internal and external struggles. Fighting with her mother was a byproduct of adolescence, and after a long period of frustration and bitterness, Anne realized that the root of many of their clashes was being stuck in the annex, with no space to truly air out any strong feelings. From this example, one can see how deeply the inner struggles of adolescence and the outer tribulations of the Holocaust and the ongoing war affected Anne’s life and how she came to be the person she was. I believe that the authors presented the changes Anne went through during her adolescence and the trials of World War II and the Holocaust well, especially in the way they allowed the changes to be shown gradually and subtly throughout the story. That said, an area I struggled with in the graphic novel was the imbalance between a biography and a story. Some parts are told with facts and statistics from an objective point of view, making it very biography-like, especially when not focusing on characters besides Anne. But some parts are told quite dramatically–almost too dramatically–in the exaggerated way many stories tend to be told. Between the huge chunks of text describing statistics of the war and the sometimes cheesy dialogue, the graphic novel can be hard to read at times. Part of that may just be that the story of Anne Frank is not best suited to a graphic novel, though I think this graphic novel is a good read for a younger audience, specifically in the way the authors display Anne’s constant optimism and perseverance even through the challenges she faced. From this graphic novel, it feels like Anne’s legacy is not just her diary nor her tragic death, but the way she dealt with and grew from what was happening around her, even when it made her life nearly unbearable. In Anne Frank: The Anne Frank House Authorized Graphic Biography, readers are able to witness Anne’s growth through both internal and external struggles as she transitions from a young, daydreaming child to a young adult with dreams for the future, as seen through the changes in her thoughts and actions and her attitude towards those around her. The graphic novel, though hard to read at times, tells the story of Anne Frank, a girl who kept on going even when everything around her told her to stop–the story of someone who remained hopeful even in times of despair.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Anonymous

    Anne Frank, the Jewish girl known to have been hiding in an annex during the time of the Holocaust, describes her life in a diary still being preserved in a museum today, and the adolescence she never got to experience normally. Since her diary has experienced exposure, a series of biographies have been published to spread the tale of Anne Frank. One of which is the book being analyzed today. “Anne Frank: The Anne Frank House Authorized Graphic Biography” by Sid Jacobson and Ernie Colon wants th Anne Frank, the Jewish girl known to have been hiding in an annex during the time of the Holocaust, describes her life in a diary still being preserved in a museum today, and the adolescence she never got to experience normally. Since her diary has experienced exposure, a series of biographies have been published to spread the tale of Anne Frank. One of which is the book being analyzed today. “Anne Frank: The Anne Frank House Authorized Graphic Biography” by Sid Jacobson and Ernie Colon wants the readers to learn about the life of Anne Frank, as well as convey the message of non-discrimination, that all humans should have the rights to live in freedom, and that nobody should be discriminated against because of their race, religion, or any other aspect of their identities. This is the message the authors try to convey to the reader, because throughout the book the narration, although mostly objective, is biased against the Nazis. The authors do this by including very specific details about the rights the Nazis had taken away from Jewish people, as well as including specific details about the events Anne and her family had to witness and experience. The author could be doing this to trigger emotions within the reader, to further convey the message of non-discrimination, and that the results of discrimination are never good. One such example can be seen on page 129, (image evidence in document outline) when the author includes information about the disease that Margot had contracted in the concentration camps, Typhus, (very specific information) as well as the detail that Anne had to throw away all her clothes because of lice, and on the same page they also chose to show the tragic reunion of Anne and her old classmate in the concentration camp. (These details were not written and told in the diary or really related to the diary, however, the author still managed to retrieve this information and included it in the biography.) Another reason I think that the message the author is trying to convey is non-discrimination is that during the plot before the climax happened the author often used juxtaposition to emphasize the loss of the lives that Anne and her family are about to lose, by occasionally showing the lives of the other Jewish people after getting caught and put in concentration camps. One such usage of juxtaposition can be seen on page 18 and 19, the authors show Anne having fun in the rain with the housekeeper, while right next to these panels is a snapshot of the German economic crisis, while the illustration in the panel shows Nazi soldiers handing out flyers to passersby, as well as the Nazi symbol on random objects. This shows that the Nazis are trying to progress in power through popularity, while Anne is creating happy memories as a child. These snapshots continue to be added in the graphic novel, one such snapshot can be seen on page 81, the page shows Anne and her family hiding in the annex, somewhere even they call ‘paradise’ while a snapshot below shows the events the other Jewish people (that have been caught in hiding) are experiencing in concentration camps foreshadowing the life Anne and her family are about to lose due to discrimination. The final reason I think that the author is trying to convey the message of non-discrimination is that the author uses pathos (emotions), very occasionally emotionally affecting the reader, to emphasize the point that discrimination never leads to good results in the real world. The authors do this multiple times in the novel, especially towards the end when Otto Frank finds out about the fate of his family after being separated in the concentration camps. Reviews on Goodreads also mention how unexpectedly touched they were by the graphic novel. (review screenshots in outline) One mentions how emotionally touched they were by Otto’s quote mentioned near the end of the novel “I hope Anne’s book will have an effect on the rest of your life so that, insofar as it is possible in your own circumstances, you will work for unity and peace.” (p. 139) Another review mentions how the illustrations and dialogue help connect the emotions of the story to the graphic novel. This is true, because the illustrations and dialogue in chapter 10: The Story Lives On contains very emotional illustrations and dialogue, to emphasize the emotions Otto was feeling after knowing that none of his family members survived the concentration camps. The emotions sadness and acceptance are often emphasized in the illustrations, and the dialogue often includes emotional quotes from Otto. Some pages that show the effect of the emotional illustrations are p. 134, after Otto finds out the news of Anne’s death. On this page Otto is illustrated to seem very miserable, and it is clear that the death of his family had struck him hard emotionally. Another use of pathos can be seen on p. 136, when the author illustrates the excitement of Otto when a company agrees to publish Anne’s diary. “Finally! Uitgeverij Contact wants to publish Anne’s diary…” (exclamation mark demonstrates his excitement) The author also shows the frustration of Otto when he finds out that no records could allow him to find out who had betrayed the family. The same usage of pathos can also be seen in p. 137 on the bottom panel, when the author illustrates the image of Anne in Otto’s embrace while Otto is smiling brightly, when the author describes the success of the diary after being published. One last use of pathos is on p. 140 and p. 141, when the author mentions the death of Otto, when he was 91 years old. The author also chooses to include a very emotional quote from Otto, showing that Otto is aware of his old age, yet is still very passionate about spreading awareness for discrimination through the diary of his daughter. The quote says: “I am now nearly 90 and my powers are slowly waning, but the duty Anne left me continues to give me new strength--to fight for reconciliation and human rights throughout the world.” On the next page, (p.141) the author shows the passion people are to take over for Otto to spread awareness for discrimination, even after his death and after the diary had blown up in fame. If the true intention/message of the biography is to promote non-discrimination, then I agree with this message, because even after a long fight for social justice discrimination is still an ongoing occurrence in the real world, and could be ceased if more awareness would be spread and more people were to understand the severity and consequences of discrimination. Without using the message from the biography itself, the legacy of Anne Frank also serves as evidence that all the events she and her family had experienced were consequences of discrimination from the Nazis. Her legacy helps spread awareness for discrimination, and the many consequences that come with it. In conclusion, by including details about the torments of the Nazis, using juxtaposition to foreshadow the events Anne and her family are about to experience, and by using pathos to touch the reader, it is clear that the message the author is trying to convey is non-discrimination, that all humans should have equal rights and freedom, without facing discrimination for their religion, race, gender, or any aspects of their unique identities.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sierra Villalobos

    Anne Frank is about a girl (named Anne Frank I might add.) who was a Jew in the time of the Holocaust. The Jews fought for Germany in the First World War, but then Hitler took over and decided that it would make the world a better place if there were no Jews to believe differently than them. Anyway, Anne Frank started out her life with an older sister, named Margot. Anne and her family lived in Germany until 1933 when she left the country with her parents because of the Nazis control over German Anne Frank is about a girl (named Anne Frank I might add.) who was a Jew in the time of the Holocaust. The Jews fought for Germany in the First World War, but then Hitler took over and decided that it would make the world a better place if there were no Jews to believe differently than them. Anyway, Anne Frank started out her life with an older sister, named Margot. Anne and her family lived in Germany until 1933 when she left the country with her parents because of the Nazis control over Germany. They moved to Amsterdam and were trapped by the Nazis control of the Netherlands in the Second World War. The Franks went into hiding with a non- Jewish friend and stayed there for two years. WARNING SPOILER ALERT!!!!!! Eventually they were found and sent to a concentration camp where they were offered little food or water. Anne’s mother died from exhaustion and malnourishment, and Margot and Anne were put on a train because the Russians were coming to rescue the Jews. on the train Margot and Anne died of typhoid fever that spread rapidly through the overcrowded cars and weak people. Otto, Anne’s father, was the only one that survived the camp. SPOILER ENDING Anne Frank is a good book, if you like historical non-fiction. Anne frank picks up some steam toward the end, but the book is not very climactic. Anne frank, the graphic novel, describes just how devastating the concentration and extermination camps were. As her thirteenth birthday present, Anne received a diary, and she wrote in it every day. After she died, her diary became known as the diary of Anne frank, which can still be read, and is a well-known read. Anne frank’s house is still standing, and you can visit it today as a museum. The diary is on display at the house which you can still see. I thought that the book was good, but history isn’t my favorite. In the overall, I’d say it’s a great read and anyone that wants to know more about Anne frank or how she lived; this is a great book for you. it is a great historical graphic novel that really shows the holocaust through the eyes of a Jew and what they faced with their everyday lives.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    I decided to read the graphic novel: Anne Frank as it is good general knowledge although I was aware I am pressured for time so I decided to read a comic version rather than the actual lengthy novel. The category on the bingo board this book completes is : a book related to those we've studied in class in the second half of the year. This was interesting as you have to think how stupid the Nazis were to try and get rid of the jews. Even if they were inferior ( which they weren't ) it wouldn't ha I decided to read the graphic novel: Anne Frank as it is good general knowledge although I was aware I am pressured for time so I decided to read a comic version rather than the actual lengthy novel. The category on the bingo board this book completes is : a book related to those we've studied in class in the second half of the year. This was interesting as you have to think how stupid the Nazis were to try and get rid of the jews. Even if they were inferior ( which they weren't ) it wouldn't have made any difference not having them in Germany ( and most of them had left anyway ) but killing them would ruin their country and start a terrible war. My favourite quote from the book was: " Don't think of me as a 14 year old as all these troubles have made me older. " This is so true, as well as parents being stricter and students working harder in the old days they also had to face problems we could scarcely imagine and hardship we may not have been able to bear. Hiding in a house for years with people you hate and a thick cloud of death hovering around just waiting to consume you, millions being tortured and brutal murders treated as a normal, everyday thing. I learnt a lot of new things about that time period and her life such as: her mother's name was Edith, her father's Otto, Anne was born at 7:30 am June 12th 1929. In January 30th Hitler became chancellor, it soon became a dictatorship so they moved to Amsterdam. Anne received her famous diary on her 13th birthday. She also had a sister named Margot, they both contracted Typhus and died in Bergen- Belsen ( a concentration camp ) in March 1945. An interesting character in the novel was definitely Anne as she had such an advanced mind and was so mature for an young teen and her thoughts, beliefs and stories have inspired so many. She is a great role model for girls everywhere. Also I didn't know of her struggles between her and her mother, her father and Peter and her and her frustrating roommate Mr.Pfeffer ( among the more obvious ones. )

  23. 5 out of 5

    Meltha

    This was in the adult biography section of the library for a variety of reason, not the least of which is the horrifying conclusion of Anne's life, which is discussed in more detail then would probably be appropriate for a child or possibly even a young adult audience under age 14. This is the stuff of very graphic nightmares, and the authors did document it rather than just saying she was killed, as most bios of Frank tend to do. This actually starts prior to the courtship of Otto Frank and Edit This was in the adult biography section of the library for a variety of reason, not the least of which is the horrifying conclusion of Anne's life, which is discussed in more detail then would probably be appropriate for a child or possibly even a young adult audience under age 14. This is the stuff of very graphic nightmares, and the authors did document it rather than just saying she was killed, as most bios of Frank tend to do. This actually starts prior to the courtship of Otto Frank and Edith Hollander and continues to Otto's death at age 91 and his publication of the diary and ultimately unsuccessful search for whomever betrayed the Franks, Van Pels, and Pfeffer. There is a lot of historical background given, often to the side of a page discussing what was happening in the lives of the Franks at the same time. The art was a bit unusual. While parts of it are definitely based on historical or Frank family photos, others set in the annex seemed to make Anne look a bit too old (almost her mother's contemporary), and a rather large number of characters seemed to have crossed eyes. I did feel there were some unresolved sections as well, such as what ultimately happened to the two helpers who were arrested, while other bits of information, which were used to fill in gaps in the Franks' lives, such as their babysitter or Anne's figure skating cousin, felt like they weren't fully incorporated into the overall arc for much the same reason. (Also, please, change the "to" to "too" on the top of page 93, and photographs in the timeline need identifying captions since they're not always placed next to the person or event they are discussing.) It's excellent background, and heart-rending, particularly when the family is split apart, and perhaps oddly the bit that stabbed me in the heart the worst was Anne and Margot's attempt at a St. Nicholas/Christmas/Hanukkah "party" in Bergen-Belsen. This was well done, but again, a few bits needed a little more closure. It does hammer home, not for the first time, just how much the world lost when Anne was murdered.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Charles

    Although some may consider this a glorified comic book, it in fact is a history book with a lot of pictures. The story of Anne Frank is one that should be told and retold in as many ways as possible and to every generation. For it is a story of talent and abilities chewed up and destroyed by the forces of evil manifested by the policy of a modern nation state. Germany under the Nazi rule was determined to carry out the final solution to the Jewish “problem” in Europe by exterminating them. Th Although some may consider this a glorified comic book, it in fact is a history book with a lot of pictures. The story of Anne Frank is one that should be told and retold in as many ways as possible and to every generation. For it is a story of talent and abilities chewed up and destroyed by the forces of evil manifested by the policy of a modern nation state. Germany under the Nazi rule was determined to carry out the final solution to the Jewish “problem” in Europe by exterminating them. The Frank family was originally from Germany, but they moved to the Netherlands when the persecution against the Jews began. When Germany invaded the Netherlands, their persecution of the Dutch Jews was originally rather light. However, in a very efficient manner, the Germans slowly implemented their policy of persecution until it reached the point where it was a life and death matter. The Frank family went into hiding along with some others. Their location was a loft above the business that Otto Frank was a part of. Trusted employees kept their secret, providing them with food and other supplies. It was a tough existence, there was tension between the people, not all of which was due to the stress of possible discovery. Ironically, when the Germans discovered the Frank family, they ignored Anne’s diary and other writings, considering them insignificant. Yet, as has been demonstrated, her diary is one of the most powerful documents to have emerged from World War II. This book is the story of the Frank family and their experiences, not the contents of her diary. Their experiences were those of millions of people, most of their stories died with them, making that of the Frank family even more important. For it must serve as the historical representative of many others. This book is a valuable testament to the many tragedies of families and promise destroyed.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    Having always had an interest in World War II and the Holocaust I was excited when my friend Adam found this graphic novel sitting on a table in Barnes and Noble. During my graphic novel kick I asked Adam if I could borrow it, to which he responded of course! Anne Frank: The Anne Frank House Authorized Graphic Novel tells the story of Anne Frank, a name that has become synonymous with the Holocaust. The book is a mesh of information about Anne’s life and also about what was going on in Europe wi Having always had an interest in World War II and the Holocaust I was excited when my friend Adam found this graphic novel sitting on a table in Barnes and Noble. During my graphic novel kick I asked Adam if I could borrow it, to which he responded of course! Anne Frank: The Anne Frank House Authorized Graphic Novel tells the story of Anne Frank, a name that has become synonymous with the Holocaust. The book is a mesh of information about Anne’s life and also about what was going on in Europe with Hitler and the Nazis. I feel absolutely terrible for saying this, but I was not a fan of this graphic novel. The idea of it was there, but it just wasn’t executed well. The novel intertwines the lives of the Frank’s and the history of the Holocaust together, side by side. Unfortunately the book becomes very choppy because of this storytelling technique. There are parts of the dialogue that are written over multiple boxes, making it difficult to figure out which order to read in. The illustrations of the novel are fantastic. Ernie Colon did a wonderful job with the drawing the difficult subject matter of the concentration camps. His depictions of the camps give a clear picture of their horrendous nature, but are toned down slightly to give younger readers an opportunity to read and view this. I would recommend this graphic novel for those looking for a new way to experience the story of Anne Frank. While the book is a bit disjointed and confusing, Anne Frank’s story is one worth pursuing. Kimberly (Reflections of a Book Addict) http://lifeand100books.wordpress.com/...

  26. 4 out of 5

    Emma

    The story of one of the most famous diarists of all time is told for the first time as a graphic novel. Anne Frank was the daughter of Otto and Edith Frank, who were German Jews that moved to Amsterdam after Hitler came to power. Anne Frank received a diary for her thirteenth birthday, which she confided in as if it were her closest friend. Only a month later the Frank family was forced to hide in the secret annex so that they would not be sent to a concentration camp like so many other Jews dur The story of one of the most famous diarists of all time is told for the first time as a graphic novel. Anne Frank was the daughter of Otto and Edith Frank, who were German Jews that moved to Amsterdam after Hitler came to power. Anne Frank received a diary for her thirteenth birthday, which she confided in as if it were her closest friend. Only a month later the Frank family was forced to hide in the secret annex so that they would not be sent to a concentration camp like so many other Jews during the German Occupation in the Nertherlands. In this graphic novel, the story of Anne Frank’s life is told with illustrations and lots of information. Beginning before Anne was born, the book outlines Edith and Otto’s lives and families before they had children. The book relies on information from the diary and from various people in the Frank’s lives. It provides you with you a lot of information concisely and in an interesting way. The illustrations were well done and seemed to be accurate next to photographs I’ve seen. This book provides you with a lot of background information from before and during the diary, as well as after. I took this graphic novel out as a sort of experiment, since I was curious how this story could be told in the form of a graphic novel. It tells Anne Frank’s story from a more historical perspective than you would find in the diary. The ending was especially heart wrenching, since the graphic novel shows what happened to the Franks, specifically Anne and Margot, after being taken to concentration camps, with pictures. The graphic novel format did justice to this heart wrenching true story, and is a great read whether you’ve read the diary of not. 5/5

  27. 5 out of 5

    Maddyjayne

    i decided to read this book because i started reading the novel of this book, but i found it really boring. So i thought the graphic novel would be more interesting to read. it was. i liked this book because it was easy to read and i found it really engaging because i love true stories. this book completes the category on the bingo chart: Graphic novel. i found this category really interesting because i love short stories and i found it really easy to read, which meant i could read it really fas i decided to read this book because i started reading the novel of this book, but i found it really boring. So i thought the graphic novel would be more interesting to read. it was. i liked this book because it was easy to read and i found it really engaging because i love true stories. this book completes the category on the bingo chart: Graphic novel. i found this category really interesting because i love short stories and i found it really easy to read, which meant i could read it really fast. My favourite quote in this book would be: "A JOURNALIST! That's what i want to be." i like this quote because Anne has so much faith in what she wanted to be. which i envy because i still don't know what i want to be. even though she died and did not pursue her dreams. He dad published her diary and made it world wide just to make her proud, knowing that she did achieve her dream to become a writer. Something i learnt from this book would be that you shouldn't take what u have for granted. Because there are people far more less fortunate then you. You should be grateful because your parent will do anything to try to keep you safe and to keep providing you with food and a loving family. A setting that was interesting to me was the Bergen-Belsen Concentration Camp in Germany, was because i think it is horrible the way people treated each other. they had no consideration for how people felt or feel, i wonder how they would feel if it was them.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Nick

    In many ways, this graphic biography was easier to read than Anne Frank's original diary. One reason was that she was still learning her craft as a writer. The other is that, very reasonably, her writings included her biases as a young teen girl. Everything is filtered through those. The book does draw upon Anne Frank's writing, though, and focuses on her desire to become a writer, and how this led to the diary. The graphic biography uses an exterior viewpoint, and can maintain a somewhat more ob In many ways, this graphic biography was easier to read than Anne Frank's original diary. One reason was that she was still learning her craft as a writer. The other is that, very reasonably, her writings included her biases as a young teen girl. Everything is filtered through those. The book does draw upon Anne Frank's writing, though, and focuses on her desire to become a writer, and how this led to the diary. The graphic biography uses an exterior viewpoint, and can maintain a somewhat more objective view of the events, including those not witnessed by Anne herself. This provides a more solid context for the story. I found the artwork to be slightly weaker than the writing, which is the reason I couldn't give it five stars. Really, it deserved about four and a half. The story of how and why the diary survived was interesting as well, and the preservation of the annex where the Franks and their friends were hidden is interesting as well. I think that this will be a valuable addition to the material on Anne Frank and the holocaust in general, for the benefit of readers from middle school through adult. Because of some brutal violence, I would not recommend it for younger readers.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Brooke

    I have read the original Diary of Anne Frank, but "Anne Frank: The Anne Frank House" by Sid Jacobson, gave me a more informative version of her story, that starts before she is even born. This graphic novel, presented Frank's view and factual information about what was going on outside the annex. The graphic novel is factual and stayed true to the story of Anne Frank and her family. The author pulls quotes right from her diary. The information is presented in chronological order, starting from I have read the original Diary of Anne Frank, but "Anne Frank: The Anne Frank House" by Sid Jacobson, gave me a more informative version of her story, that starts before she is even born. This graphic novel, presented Frank's view and factual information about what was going on outside the annex. The graphic novel is factual and stayed true to the story of Anne Frank and her family. The author pulls quotes right from her diary. The information is presented in chronological order, starting from when Otto (Anne's father) met and married Edith (Anne's mother), through Anne's experiences, to the last few years of Otto's life. The information is presented through a comic book style. It is easy to follow, and visually appealing. Anne's legacy needs to be passed down from generation to generation. This graphic novel will help to do so. Perhaps, if you still want your students to read her original diary, this book, "Anne Frank: The Anne Frank House" will help to introduce it. I believe it will help students to get excited to read her words, that will carry on forever.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Aurora

    This graphic novel is the authorized graphic biography of "Anne Frank". In this adaptation, we meet Anne's parents, Otto and Edith. We also meet Anne's sister Margot. Anne and her family struggle to survive as a Jewish family in Germany when the Nazi's take control. Anne and her family flee to Amsterdam. There, Anne tries to live a normal life, but cannot help but worry for other Jews. On her 13th birthday, Anne gets a diary. Soon after this, she tells her family she wants to be a journalist. I r This graphic novel is the authorized graphic biography of "Anne Frank". In this adaptation, we meet Anne's parents, Otto and Edith. We also meet Anne's sister Margot. Anne and her family struggle to survive as a Jewish family in Germany when the Nazi's take control. Anne and her family flee to Amsterdam. There, Anne tries to live a normal life, but cannot help but worry for other Jews. On her 13th birthday, Anne gets a diary. Soon after this, she tells her family she wants to be a journalist. I really liked this graphic novel adaptation. I have never read Anne Frank's original diary, but I liked the art style in this comic. The art has clean lines, and realistic colors. I think this makes Anne's story all the more true to the reader. The colors also convey emotion, such as dark colors and backgrounds for concentration camps. I would recommend this book to anyone who wants to learn about the experiences of Jewish communities during WW2.

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