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'What if I were to tell you that a psychopathic arsonist might also be the person most likely to save you from a burning building?' *This book is about a special kind of persuasion: 'flipnosis'. It has an incubation period of just seconds, and can instantly disarm even the most discerning mind. This is the kind of high-wire psychological espionage which, in the right hands, 'What if I were to tell you that a psychopathic arsonist might also be the person most likely to save you from a burning building?' *This book is about a special kind of persuasion: 'flipnosis'. It has an incubation period of just seconds, and can instantly disarm even the most discerning mind. This is the kind of high-wire psychological espionage which, in the right hands, can dismantle any conflict- but which in the wrong hands can kill. Flipnosis is black-belt mind control. It doesn't just turn the tables, it kicks them over. *From the malign but fascinating powers of psychopaths, serial killers and con men to the political genius of Winston Churchill - via the grandmasters of martial arts, Buddhist monks, magicians, advertisers, salesmen, CEOs and frogs that mug each other - Kevin Dutton's brilliantly original and revelatory book explores what cutting-edge science can teach us about the techniques of persuasion. *Fascinating, provocative, and ultimately inspiring, Flipnosis reveals, for the first time, the psychological DNA of instant influence - and how each of us can learn to be that little bit more persuasive.


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'What if I were to tell you that a psychopathic arsonist might also be the person most likely to save you from a burning building?' *This book is about a special kind of persuasion: 'flipnosis'. It has an incubation period of just seconds, and can instantly disarm even the most discerning mind. This is the kind of high-wire psychological espionage which, in the right hands, 'What if I were to tell you that a psychopathic arsonist might also be the person most likely to save you from a burning building?' *This book is about a special kind of persuasion: 'flipnosis'. It has an incubation period of just seconds, and can instantly disarm even the most discerning mind. This is the kind of high-wire psychological espionage which, in the right hands, can dismantle any conflict- but which in the wrong hands can kill. Flipnosis is black-belt mind control. It doesn't just turn the tables, it kicks them over. *From the malign but fascinating powers of psychopaths, serial killers and con men to the political genius of Winston Churchill - via the grandmasters of martial arts, Buddhist monks, magicians, advertisers, salesmen, CEOs and frogs that mug each other - Kevin Dutton's brilliantly original and revelatory book explores what cutting-edge science can teach us about the techniques of persuasion. *Fascinating, provocative, and ultimately inspiring, Flipnosis reveals, for the first time, the psychological DNA of instant influence - and how each of us can learn to be that little bit more persuasive.

30 review for Flipnosis: The Art of Split-Second Persuasion

  1. 4 out of 5

    Matthew ayer

    Would not go out of the way to recommend this book to any of my friends. The back cover over sold the book big time. Going into I thought he would provide a lot of theory on how persuasion works and how one can practice this theory. Instead, the book just went through a lot of case studies of persuasion. Most of them were unrelated to each other. Some of them were fairly interesting while others were dry. Reminded me of a Malcolm Gladwell wanna be. There were some instances in which the author t Would not go out of the way to recommend this book to any of my friends. The back cover over sold the book big time. Going into I thought he would provide a lot of theory on how persuasion works and how one can practice this theory. Instead, the book just went through a lot of case studies of persuasion. Most of them were unrelated to each other. Some of them were fairly interesting while others were dry. Reminded me of a Malcolm Gladwell wanna be. There were some instances in which the author talks about masters of persuasion, but only briefly. He only gave a few examples of their persuasion and offered almost no information on how they persuaded people. It seems like anyone who looks at the cover of this book wants to read it. That alone is the best example of persuasion I encountered reading the book.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Zack Zefferini

    If you're interested in reading this book as a how-to guide on persuasion, it may fall short of your expectations. However the book reads more like a series of case-studies into persuasion from the biological level up to the social level. Hence the mixed feelings and reviews of this book. It sells itself as a how-to manual but only gives the principles and to act on these one will have to go to work and exercise their own creativity. The actual act of 'flipnosis' seems far easier to recognize th If you're interested in reading this book as a how-to guide on persuasion, it may fall short of your expectations. However the book reads more like a series of case-studies into persuasion from the biological level up to the social level. Hence the mixed feelings and reviews of this book. It sells itself as a how-to manual but only gives the principles and to act on these one will have to go to work and exercise their own creativity. The actual act of 'flipnosis' seems far easier to recognize than it is to execute, and as to whether the possibility of reaching a level of charming persuasion or conman like expertise is open for all, remains an open ended question. Despite this Dr. Dutton delivers and exciting tour through the labyrinth of the human mind with regard to persuasion, specifically the kinds of tactics employed by con men, lawyers, and ultimately psychopaths. Also his writing style is incredibly glamorous for a university research fellow (read: Good literary skills). The book's main theme boils down to the s.p.i.c.e formula, which is very interesting and seems to really make up some of the cleanest and most effective persuasion out there (once you're aware of what it is, you'll recognize it more in day-to-day life). Bottom line: If you like studying the human mind and psychology, you will most likely find the book a thoroughly enjoyable read as it over delivers here. If you want the book to teach you how to employ this kind of persuasion, you will not necessarily find it to be full of techniques. These you will have to develop and practice yourself, based on the principles (which are sound). As a psychology book it gets four stars. As a how to manual it gets three.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Nura Yusof

    The title of the book is misleading. Nowhere in the book does it teach on how to employ split-second persuasion in our dealings with people. It is peppered with amusing anecdotes and the prerequisite textbook description of what's going on in the brain (the boring part). Dutton writes an amusing read but the only triumph of this book is that through its cover and title, it used split-second persuasion to get me to buy this book.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Neeraj Sachdeva

    Complete review available here The book starts of slowly, impresses you and captivates your attention. Surprisingly, the only time I wanted to put the book down is when I was on the last page. There are a couple of segments within this book which made me go ‘Huh?’ as they did not make much sense on the first read (I did not have time for second helpings). Overall, the explanations, examples and scenarios are sublime, which makes a generally heavy psychology text easy to read. I am very keen on per Complete review available here The book starts of slowly, impresses you and captivates your attention. Surprisingly, the only time I wanted to put the book down is when I was on the last page. There are a couple of segments within this book which made me go ‘Huh?’ as they did not make much sense on the first read (I did not have time for second helpings). Overall, the explanations, examples and scenarios are sublime, which makes a generally heavy psychology text easy to read. I am very keen on persuasion and persuasion-related topics since I want to see how people work. If I could go back and do psychology instead of a Masters in Engineering, I definitely would! However, since I can’t, I have to read dumbed-down versions of Freud and Nietzsche. This book wasn’t stupid, it was just simple to read. So you should definitely purchase it. If you can’t just borrow my copy! I was expecting a ‘cheat sheet’ from this book, but there was none. I was surprised. This book fails to deliver how one can learn to persuade better. The problem with books such as these is, there is so much text and information, but nothing in a form which can be used soon after one is done reading. I would definitely read the book again, but I would probe deeper to see how I can persuade people (clicks fingers together) There are some tests at the end of the book to help you categorize yourself (or someone else) in one or the other type, but I am surprised the author has not linked to any other detailed tests. Briggs-Meyer test is always an interesting one. Either way, knowing your (and others’) personality type is really useful in navigating better. We all want to. Read this book, it might not change your life, but it will give you a reason to smile.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Franziska

    It's ok, but did not inspire me. It was more like reading an interesting collection of different facts but without getting the conclusion.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Raz Pirata

    “How many times a day do you think someone is trying to persuade you? What to do. What to buy. Where to go. How to get there… estimates hover around the 400 mark.” You know that game where someone says, “if you had just one wish… and it can’t be more wishes, what would you wish for?” Well, after reading Keven Dutton’s Split Second Persuasion - The Ancient Art and New Science of Changing Minds, I might want to change my wish from being able to pull endless hundred-dollar bills out of my pocket to “How many times a day do you think someone is trying to persuade you? What to do. What to buy. Where to go. How to get there… estimates hover around the 400 mark.” You know that game where someone says, “if you had just one wish… and it can’t be more wishes, what would you wish for?” Well, after reading Keven Dutton’s Split Second Persuasion - The Ancient Art and New Science of Changing Minds, I might want to change my wish from being able to pull endless hundred-dollar bills out of my pocket to being a ‘flipnotist’. Dutton’s foray into the art of instant persuasion has revealed that there are a particular collection of nuanced skills that can turn almost anyone and any situation around, on its head, or in the favor of the master persuader (or flipnotist). “In the vast majority of cases, influence is wrought with talking.” This intriguing tale of influence wanders through the fields of psychology and neuroscience and introduces the reader to some very charming individuals. People who you don’t really want to meet for fear of them fleecing you for your wallet and collection of passwords without the least bit of resistance. The genuine concern here is that these characters of extraordinary ability are amongst us. Standing beside us on subways, sitting next to us in theaters, and leading public policy. “It is largely because of persuasion that we have a ‘society’ at all… persuasion is what keeps us alive. Often, quite literally.” Split Second Persuasion reveals that there is a particular set of ‘black belt’ level mind controllers and it shares the elements that make up their extraordinary skill set. The book provides countless entertaining, and somewhat concerning, tales of ‘flipnosis’ in action. But what Split Second Persuasion does not do is tell you how to become a master persuader. If you are looking for a manual of mind control, keep looking. The Ancient Art and New Science of Changing Minds is an entertaining and informative read that will not teach you specifically how to use these deadly persuasive powers to get others to pull endless hundred dollar bills out of their pocket and give them to you. But it will make you believe it is possible. Overall Score 3 / 5 In a Sentence: There are people who are as good at persuasion as Jordan is at hoops, meet them and keep your hand on your wallet.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Paul Denis

    Incredible book on the persuasiveness within human neuroscience. The title has been chosen a bit poorly as it sets your expectations wrong. However, if you can read past that and are looking to understand how the human brain works from a persuasion perspective, you will love this book. I'd rather place this book in the same shelve as "Think Fast, Think Slow" by Daniel Kahnemen than your average negotiation/persuasion topic.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Mangoo

    An enjoyable, if a bit unfocused and not optimally organized, review of recent and classic findings on persuasion techniques, particularly on those inducing instantaneous change in one's view and feelings. The text is filled with anecdotes and stories about persuasion masters who could solve situations and change one's mind by subtle inputs. Dutton's text is thus yet another one on the topic, which is rather establised now yet preserves all its unnerving and disillusioning charm. Personally, mos An enjoyable, if a bit unfocused and not optimally organized, review of recent and classic findings on persuasion techniques, particularly on those inducing instantaneous change in one's view and feelings. The text is filled with anecdotes and stories about persuasion masters who could solve situations and change one's mind by subtle inputs. Dutton's text is thus yet another one on the topic, which is rather establised now yet preserves all its unnerving and disillusioning charm. Personally, most of the interest in this field is the knowledge that the human brain is entwined into a dense web of intrinsic behaviors and schemata which normally can bypass rational logic and this underlie all our actions. This may lead directly to issues on free will of Schopenauerian taste. Key stimuli activate fixed action patterns beyond the grasp and the comprehension of the victim. Dutton presents the stuff in ascending order of power, and arrives at a concise formula (SPICE = simplicity, perceived self-interest, incongruity, confidence, empathy) that links all most effective persuasion techniques. Not what you say, but HOW you say it is (most) important. What is interesting is then the presentation of psycopaths as natural-born persuaders, and the ideas on the limits of persuasions (the mirror man, cognitive dissonance, change in behavior biases) as supported by recent fMRI and clinical studies. Gnoseologically, I believe one cannot make it without being at least aware of the brain's pressure points, and how context, peer and environment pressure, modality of approach, sentiments and emotions affects our instantaneous view of the world. This applies in general, but Dutton's book, while updated and well supported by studies, lacks some focus (e.g., some basic ideas such as framing, anchoring, and so on are introduced along without sufficient emphasis, as compared to e.g. Taleb's texts). Still, an interesting read.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    I was not persuaded to keep reading.

  10. 4 out of 5

    John Fredrickson

    As other reviewers have stated, I too bought the cover of a book whose internals are different than appeared advertised. I expected a text that discussed psychological predispositions and cognitive faults, and how these can be manipulated in positive and negative ways by advertisers, con-men, therapists and the like. To a certain extent, the book does deal with these, but it also spends quite a bit of energy going into biological brain function, showing which parts of the brain fire under differ As other reviewers have stated, I too bought the cover of a book whose internals are different than appeared advertised. I expected a text that discussed psychological predispositions and cognitive faults, and how these can be manipulated in positive and negative ways by advertisers, con-men, therapists and the like. To a certain extent, the book does deal with these, but it also spends quite a bit of energy going into biological brain function, showing which parts of the brain fire under different conditions. This material got old quickly. The book does have a lot of interesting material inside, as the author has interviewed with linguists, therapists, con-men, and psychopaths. The stories that are told are definitely very intriguing, and could have been organized into a much better book.

  11. 4 out of 5

    R K

    DNF around 60% It wasn't a bad book nor was it misinformed. I truly believe that Dutton worked hard and has a powerful thesis for this book it's just that I've come to the realization that, well, I'm getting tired of reading books about psychology. At least super big books. They go into unnecessarily deep detail on experimentation so it ends up feeling like I'm reading someone's research paper. I'm not giving up reading books on psychology because it fascinates me but I think psychology flows bet DNF around 60% It wasn't a bad book nor was it misinformed. I truly believe that Dutton worked hard and has a powerful thesis for this book it's just that I've come to the realization that, well, I'm getting tired of reading books about psychology. At least super big books. They go into unnecessarily deep detail on experimentation so it ends up feeling like I'm reading someone's research paper. I'm not giving up reading books on psychology because it fascinates me but I think psychology flows better vocally instead of in written form. Fiction though, is a great place to show psychology

  12. 4 out of 5

    Rhys Powell

    Incredibly interesting, in-depth dive into how the mind works when it comes to makes us think and do what we do. Not only that, it is presented in a very easy to read and funny way that makes the learning and understand an actual pleasure. It was amazing to learn how our minds can be changed and how some people are naturally able to work with that, to get the best from us or to mislead us. This book is some 6 years old and it I am already hunting down more information to get the outcome of some of Incredibly interesting, in-depth dive into how the mind works when it comes to makes us think and do what we do. Not only that, it is presented in a very easy to read and funny way that makes the learning and understand an actual pleasure. It was amazing to learn how our minds can be changed and how some people are naturally able to work with that, to get the best from us or to mislead us. This book is some 6 years old and it I am already hunting down more information to get the outcome of some of the studies that are in the last chapter of the book

  13. 5 out of 5

    Toma Nicolae

    I don't think the ratings under four stars do this book justice. I'm sure there's a lot to appreciate in the work of someone who dealt with psychopaths all his adult life. Maybe some don't want to admit to being one. But like he says: some people (like bomb disposal technicians) just need that cold heart and clear head when dealing with high stakes situations; having something in common with psychopaths doesn't make one a criminal.👍

  14. 4 out of 5

    Robert Bogue

    You’ve only got an instant, and you’ve got to make the sale. Whether it’s literally selling to someone or selling the big idea – or even your potential as a romantic suitor – Split-Second Persuasion: The Ancient Art and Science of Changing Minds is designed to help give you the tools you need to make it happen. Read more You’ve only got an instant, and you’ve got to make the sale. Whether it’s literally selling to someone or selling the big idea – or even your potential as a romantic suitor – Split-Second Persuasion: The Ancient Art and Science of Changing Minds is designed to help give you the tools you need to make it happen. Read more

  15. 4 out of 5

    Cherie White

    This book is the holy grail if you want to learn how to persuade! I am always hungry for books like these and I could not put the book down! It teaches so many techniques...techniques that most all of us use but are completely unaware that we use them every day! This book made me very conscious of how the expert persuaders "do it" and no doubt will allow me to be a better persuader in the future!

  16. 4 out of 5

    J. King

    This book was good. Kevin is a good story teller and keeps you engaged. It is a bit deep and sometimes hard to follow the concepts presented. It is also more theory than application so understand that before jumping in.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Paul Birch

    Part read, almost halfway through and couldn't stick it out.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Gsc

    In parts hugely interesting. But a very variable book. Hence the 2 stars.

  19. 5 out of 5

    John Morris

    I enjoyed this book. Some great tips on influencing people which I would never have previously considered. Written in an engaging and easy to digest way.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ian Fitzpatrick

    Not about persuading people in a split second, but a lot of eye opening bits of info you may not see in everyday life otherwise.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Odobasa

    The title is the biggest clickbait ever. Many funny anecdotes, you can enjoy it, but the main topic is barely treated. :)

  22. 5 out of 5

    Onyx

    I started reading this after I read The Wisdom of Psychopaths by the same author, even though I bought it almost a year ago...so I didn't get to this book right away. It was a little chewy to get through, but when I looked the author up on YouTube, I found he's more entertaining on video. Something of how he expresses himself gets lost in print. (In other words, he's better to watch than he is to read.) If you're looking for a book on how to persuade, you'll probably find this won't tell you as I started reading this after I read The Wisdom of Psychopaths by the same author, even though I bought it almost a year ago...so I didn't get to this book right away. It was a little chewy to get through, but when I looked the author up on YouTube, I found he's more entertaining on video. Something of how he expresses himself gets lost in print. (In other words, he's better to watch than he is to read.) If you're looking for a book on how to persuade, you'll probably find this won't tell you as much on how to do it as much as on how it can be done. Among the stories of those who persuade for fun and profit, there are lot of references to the science and psychology of persuasion that tends to get in the way of the subject. Spoiler alert: Seriously, you don't even have to buy the book. All you really need to know is written on its front inside jacket. The author seems to have a sense of Irish-sounding humor (it's gotta be...I don't find British humor funny), and there are little vignettes throughout the book that are enjoyable to read. But even though I wasn't really out to discover how to charm the wits out of someone when I bought this, I found myself lost in the descriptions on how the brain works and who's got what university degree. I would have appreciated it if he would have just streamlined his subject a little bit more. Not everyone cares to know the names of brain parts, let alone has gotten a post-doctorate in psychology or psychiatry. Otherwise, if you can look past the technical jargon that tends to pepper the book, it's not bad. What I did get out of the book is that, if a person knows how to persuade you, what can keep another person from persuading them back? And what about how psychology can be so manipulative in and of itself...Aren't there supposed to be laws against some of those experiments?....And what would happen when two con artists meet each other in a bar? (That would be a nice beginning for a joke....)

  23. 4 out of 5

    Faith Wood

    Eye contact and good looks appear to be a key ingredient of influence, reports Kevin Dutton, author of Split-Second Persuasion. Does this mean that in order to be more influential, I need to invest in plastic surgery if I wasn’t blessed with good looks? Perhaps not! After all, beauty is in the eye of the beholder right?! The truth is we make split second decisions about others based on the way our core group of associates sees them. This is why some cultures think beauty is reflected in a robust Eye contact and good looks appear to be a key ingredient of influence, reports Kevin Dutton, author of Split-Second Persuasion. Does this mean that in order to be more influential, I need to invest in plastic surgery if I wasn’t blessed with good looks? Perhaps not! After all, beauty is in the eye of the beholder right?! The truth is we make split second decisions about others based on the way our core group of associates sees them. This is why some cultures think beauty is reflected in a robust curvy body parts while others prefer a more angular and chiseled appearance. In other words, the community you hang around with the most has greater persuasive ability over your thought processes than you might think. Another great example of the power of group influence at work is how a normally sane and logical person can be persuaded to participate in a riot as a result of group frenzy. Before consciousness enters onto the scene, we are all capable of innate influence and persuasiveness. Consider how persuasive an infant is in getting their needs met by crying. Once our analytical minds become involved though, all bets are off. Facts and data analysis are rarely influential. When the pressure is on, and the stakes are high, the brain literally “cowers behind the heart”. This need to engage the heart is known to some of the most influential people who walk among us; advertisers, hostage negotiators, conmen and psychopaths. Much like an Illusionist, their real skill comes from creating distraction, undermining your expectations and taking your emotions hostage. Speed of delivery matters in this process. Second-guessing prevents speed of delivery which is why conmen are often better influencers than most. They just go for it and leave the emotional guilt behind as they pursue their goals and objectives. Influencing is a critical skill that we should all aspire to master. After all, if you are not influencing others than they quite likely are influencing you. This is not necessarily a bad thing, but we all feel better when we are aware that we are following and not because we are simply emotionally hooked. However, how often do you think you have a choice in these matters? According to Kevin Dutton, influence is not only a survival concept for society, it is what creates society. Persuasion is a social concept. Without it, we would be unable to recognize a threat, date, propagate or even navigate our way through heavy traffic. So what makes some of us view this vital skill as dangerous or black belt mind control? In this book, Kevin Dutton combines stories and anecdotes of real world persuasion in action. What I loved about this book was the way in which the author merged real world examples with the latest research in brain studies and neuroscience to illustrate how prevalent persuasion is in our environment. Kevin Dutton emphasizes that the techniques of persuasion, and of being convinced to change one's mind even in the face of factual evidence, are universal. Since people truly make decisions in an instant and most of these are based on our own beliefs (or that of our group), education and experiences, this book will prove invaluable as a resource and reference to the real-world application of influence and persuasion.

  24. 4 out of 5

    KarnagesMistress

    "five major axes of persuasion: 1. Simplicity 2. Perceived self-interest 3. Incongruity 4. Confidence 5. Empathy Or SPICE for short." p. 161 Examples: (1) simplicity: round numbers, information essential to the communication of the message, rhyming phrases; (2) perceived self-interest: the limited-edition Oasis refund checks, the Wolf's Dilemma game, the seminary students who didn't stop for the hurt man; (3) incongruity: the card trick, the Stroop test, the "rich" and "poor" beggar team; (4) confide "five major axes of persuasion: 1. Simplicity 2. Perceived self-interest 3. Incongruity 4. Confidence 5. Empathy Or SPICE for short." p. 161 Examples: (1) simplicity: round numbers, information essential to the communication of the message, rhyming phrases; (2) perceived self-interest: the limited-edition Oasis refund checks, the Wolf's Dilemma game, the seminary students who didn't stop for the hurt man; (3) incongruity: the card trick, the Stroop test, the "rich" and "poor" beggar team; (4) confidence: pretty self-explanitory; (5) empathy: set yourself up to be like the person you're trying to convince (e.g. the smokers on the Underground, shared birthday, get in-jokes and references, shared unusual name spellings) pp. 162-94 _____ What can stop us from being persuadable? Cognitive dissonance. pp. 237-40 _____ How do we re-wire the brain? cognitive bias modification (CBM): "'It's not persuasion in the strictest sense of the word, . . . because in CBM the individual is a willing participant in the belief change process, and the contingencies of the procedure are subliminal. But as an indicator of what changes in the brain when we change our minds, it's certainly a start.'" Elaine Fox, professor of psychology at the University of Essex see pp. 245-9 _____ For the 2015 Watauga County Public Library Reading Challenge: A nonfiction book; A popular author's first book; a book by an author you love that you haven't read yet

  25. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    Psychopaths, Politicians, & the Pygmalion Effect. Initially the book seemed a little cavalier and lightweight, but it actually got into some meaty discussion about cognitive dissonance, disruption & the Stroop effect and other games our brains play on us. We are hard wired to make decisions in a certain way. What's more, it's all emotional. The interesting thing is how some of us instinctively know how to very quickly, and often with a single sentence, manipulate others into making a 180 degree Psychopaths, Politicians, & the Pygmalion Effect. Initially the book seemed a little cavalier and lightweight, but it actually got into some meaty discussion about cognitive dissonance, disruption & the Stroop effect and other games our brains play on us. We are hard wired to make decisions in a certain way. What's more, it's all emotional. The interesting thing is how some of us instinctively know how to very quickly, and often with a single sentence, manipulate others into making a 180 degree change. Dutton provides two handy acronyms that attempt to formulaize these persuasive techniques: the 3As - ATTENTION (empathetic), APPROACH (good delivery), AFFILIATION (social group identity). And SPICE: Simplicity, Perceived Self-Interest, Incongruity, Confidence, and Empathy. From Winston Churchill to hostage negotiators, and from your Saturday night date to the mall salesman, we are influenced not so much by the content of the argument which appeals to our rational mind, as by the structure of the argument which appeals to us emotionally.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Madeleine

    So, I saw this at the library (i.e., "libary") and thought this would be an excellent jump into the world of pop psychology. My first pop psychology book! "Self," I says to myself, "self, my mind control powers could really use a boost." Three chapters in and I realized I was getting nowhere. What did I learn from the first three chapters? Here is how you become a more persuasive person: 1) be a baby in any species on Earth. 2) be beautiful, with a symmetrical face and 3) be confident in what yo So, I saw this at the library (i.e., "libary") and thought this would be an excellent jump into the world of pop psychology. My first pop psychology book! "Self," I says to myself, "self, my mind control powers could really use a boost." Three chapters in and I realized I was getting nowhere. What did I learn from the first three chapters? Here is how you become a more persuasive person: 1) be a baby in any species on Earth. 2) be beautiful, with a symmetrical face and 3) be confident in what you are saying, even if it is pure lies. So, instead of providing actual helpful or even vaguely interesting insights into the human mind, Kevin Dutton just lists random fact after random fact on how different species of animals interact with each other to get what they need to survive. There wasn't any unifying idea, or even theme, though the entire book seemed to be wrapped in a heavy layer of 50's-era sexist jokes? Not even funny ones? So, in conclusion, don't read this book. There, did I persuade you?

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kate Woods Walker

    Once past an awkwardly-written opening anecdote about two men in a bar, the author takes us on a rather pleasant spin through the subject of persuasion. And not just garden-variety coercion, nope. Split-second, instantaneous, almost magical persuasion. In Kevin Dutton's Split Second Persuasion: The Ancient Art and New Science of Changing Minds, we get a heaping helping of sociological and psychological research, a few pertinent illustrations to contemplate, some tempting tests with which to gau Once past an awkwardly-written opening anecdote about two men in a bar, the author takes us on a rather pleasant spin through the subject of persuasion. And not just garden-variety coercion, nope. Split-second, instantaneous, almost magical persuasion. In Kevin Dutton's Split Second Persuasion: The Ancient Art and New Science of Changing Minds, we get a heaping helping of sociological and psychological research, a few pertinent illustrations to contemplate, some tempting tests with which to gauge our own talents, a rather lengthly detour into the dark arts of the psychopath and finally, a peek at the next wave of brain research. With experiments in the area of neuroplasticity and the neurological roots of morality on the horizon, and with the hope that conscious evolution is something humanity can really, eventually, do, Dutton leaves the reader a little bit better informed--as well as armed with a spicy mnemonic to assist in persuading others to do his/her bidding.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Patterson

    If you want to find out why someone has more charm than you do, read Flipnosis. If you want to explore charisma and the ability to persuade read on. Find out what SPICE means. Do you have it? Can you acquire it? Well, you'd have to undergo some serious reconstructive surgery for some of this to work but there are some ideas for you to work on. Find out about foetal attraction. Who are the persuasion grandmasters? Dutton gives some interesting examples and some interesting arguments, even pulling Je If you want to find out why someone has more charm than you do, read Flipnosis. If you want to explore charisma and the ability to persuade read on. Find out what SPICE means. Do you have it? Can you acquire it? Well, you'd have to undergo some serious reconstructive surgery for some of this to work but there are some ideas for you to work on. Find out about foetal attraction. Who are the persuasion grandmasters? Dutton gives some interesting examples and some interesting arguments, even pulling Jesus Christ, a flipnotist of note, into one or two of them. The scary part is that it makes sense. Next time you just can't resist that certain someone; have a good look at the shape of their face. Kevin Dutton is an expert on the science of social influence, and his ideas show how much he has observed. Flipnosis, although not as well-written as it could have been, really made me think.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Julian Haigh

    Working in sales, I've found this to be valuable in applying to how I connect with people over the phone. Much of being successful in life is keeping your eyes open to the possibility all around us and taking advantage of opportunity openings. Mastering the tactic of message incongruity can overcome the traditional (and mundane) boundaries we place around ourselves and seeks to connect with an audience not just as a lecture, but as an in-group member with mirror habits and interests. Obama's ref Working in sales, I've found this to be valuable in applying to how I connect with people over the phone. Much of being successful in life is keeping your eyes open to the possibility all around us and taking advantage of opportunity openings. Mastering the tactic of message incongruity can overcome the traditional (and mundane) boundaries we place around ourselves and seeks to connect with an audience not just as a lecture, but as an in-group member with mirror habits and interests. Obama's reference to the preacher from Georgia (MLK) is one such method to bring an audience to the 'same' page. Many books have attempted to provide a step-by-step approach to persuasion but most fail. Flipnosis is a fun and easy book to read, is backed up with real science, and valuable analysis. You will understand the psychopath's edge and how you can take these lessons to apply to your hopefully more moral cause.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Dr Kevin Dutton catalogues examples of split-second persuasion or ‘Flipnosis’. Dutton unlocks the secrets of a baby’s face, uncovers dastardly scams and tantalises with analyses of The Psychopath. Flipnosis is an easy read that supplies intriguing anecdotes and entertaining experiments to relay to the amazement of your friends. What Dutton lacks is consistent relevance to his primary theme or the ability to follow through on his allusions to being able to teach the reader to become an expert ‘Fl Dr Kevin Dutton catalogues examples of split-second persuasion or ‘Flipnosis’. Dutton unlocks the secrets of a baby’s face, uncovers dastardly scams and tantalises with analyses of The Psychopath. Flipnosis is an easy read that supplies intriguing anecdotes and entertaining experiments to relay to the amazement of your friends. What Dutton lacks is consistent relevance to his primary theme or the ability to follow through on his allusions to being able to teach the reader to become an expert ‘Flipnotist’. This leaves what is simply a pretty enjoyable regurgitation of other people’s ideas, with a catchy title, but no real purpose. Like my reviews? Go to http://booksbeccabuys.wordpress.com for more.

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