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He hails from an unimaginable era: the 31st century. Fleeing through the timestream from the pursuing team of futuristic defenders known as the Guardians of the Galaxy, Korvac the Machine Man has established a secret presence on present-day Earth in the self-created persona of the mysterious Michael. Through such an unassuming guise, Korvac contemplates the elements of a u He hails from an unimaginable era: the 31st century. Fleeing through the timestream from the pursuing team of futuristic defenders known as the Guardians of the Galaxy, Korvac the Machine Man has established a secret presence on present-day Earth in the self-created persona of the mysterious Michael. Through such an unassuming guise, Korvac contemplates the elements of a universe he thirsts to command. Yet despite the subtlety of Michael's machinations, the world's greatest super-team - the mighty Avengers - catches wind of his cosmos-conquering scheme, thus drawing the two titanic forces into inevitable conflict.


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He hails from an unimaginable era: the 31st century. Fleeing through the timestream from the pursuing team of futuristic defenders known as the Guardians of the Galaxy, Korvac the Machine Man has established a secret presence on present-day Earth in the self-created persona of the mysterious Michael. Through such an unassuming guise, Korvac contemplates the elements of a u He hails from an unimaginable era: the 31st century. Fleeing through the timestream from the pursuing team of futuristic defenders known as the Guardians of the Galaxy, Korvac the Machine Man has established a secret presence on present-day Earth in the self-created persona of the mysterious Michael. Through such an unassuming guise, Korvac contemplates the elements of a universe he thirsts to command. Yet despite the subtlety of Michael's machinations, the world's greatest super-team - the mighty Avengers - catches wind of his cosmos-conquering scheme, thus drawing the two titanic forces into inevitable conflict.

30 review for Avengers: The Korvac Saga

  1. 4 out of 5

    Brian Poole

    As Avengers hurtled toward the ‘80s, it proved that it still had one big epic in the tank. Avengers members (past and present) and various allies started disappearing mysteriously, popping away in front of their friends. A confrontation with the cosmic “Elder” The Collector brought the Avengers to the brink of discovering the extremely powerful Michael, once a villain from the future known as Korvac. Michael killed the Collector before he could expose him, precipitating a final showdown that lef As Avengers hurtled toward the ‘80s, it proved that it still had one big epic in the tank. Avengers members (past and present) and various allies started disappearing mysteriously, popping away in front of their friends. A confrontation with the cosmic “Elder” The Collector brought the Avengers to the brink of discovering the extremely powerful Michael, once a villain from the future known as Korvac. Michael killed the Collector before he could expose him, precipitating a final showdown that left most of the heroes near death. This was a massive saga with universe-shattering stakes. The fractured core team had to find a way to reunify, just as a massive infusion of former members and allies descended on their doorstep. Michael’s motivations were rather complex and he was presented as far from the typical comic book villain. He would have a profound impact on Moondragon, especially, propelling her down some dark roads in the years to come. Several characters made progress dealing with their respective personal issues. Ms. Marvel made her first appearances in the book (though it would still be some time before she’d join as an official member). This arc also included the introduction of Wasp’s career as a fashion designer and explored some crucial terrain in the complicated Captain America/Iron Man partnership that would echo down the years in stories such as Civil War or Jonathan Hickman’s recent run on the title. On a sartorial note, this arc marked the debut of Wonder Man’s infamous leisure suit look. Readers were also introduced to NSA liaison Peter Henry Gyrich, who revoked the team’s special privileges due to security concerns, making their operations difficult at a crucial moment. Seeing the team commandeer a city bus to transport them to the climactic showdown was a wonderfully bizarre detail. A small army of writers and artists worked on this saga. That it holds together so well is an accomplishment of strong editing. Avengers: The Korvac Saga is one of the most famous Avengers arcs and a must read for fans. A version of this review originally appeared on www.thunderalleybcp.com

  2. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    This volume collects a ten-issue epic from 1977, from issues of Avengers and a Thor Annual. Korvac was a slave of the alien Badoon until he used their own technology to break free. Gathering power along the way, he travels from the 30th century to our time, intending to remake the world, bringing him into conflict with both the Avengers and the Guardians of the Galaxy. I never really liked Jim Shooter's writing much, even as a kid, and he handles most of this story arc (and seems to direct the res This volume collects a ten-issue epic from 1977, from issues of Avengers and a Thor Annual. Korvac was a slave of the alien Badoon until he used their own technology to break free. Gathering power along the way, he travels from the 30th century to our time, intending to remake the world, bringing him into conflict with both the Avengers and the Guardians of the Galaxy. I never really liked Jim Shooter's writing much, even as a kid, and he handles most of this story arc (and seems to direct the rest, as there isn't a noticeable difference among the other writers who contribute.) There are too many attempts to be funny that just come off as embarrassing, too much petty, annoying bickering amongst the teammates and too many broad, hand-wavy explanations for everything. Korvac's origin is a particularly egregious example; he escapes from Thor and the Guardians and just happens to teleport right to Galactus' world-ship. There he plugs himself in and woohoo instant near-omnipotence. Honestly, I don't expect real, hard science from this but at least make something up that sounds plausible. There is an odd sequence where the Avengers, needing to get somewhere but having their jet flight privileges revoked, take a bus--despite the fact that about half of them can fly under their own power. Ultron makes a less-than-stellar showing around the middle of the volume, hiding out in a convent (!) We find that the Avengers have been "immunized" to his primary means of attack. How does that work, exactly? The Scarlet Witch's involvement in this battle was referenced when Ultron returned a couple years later, but this really dumb plot device is never heard from again. Nor is the deus-ex-machina way in which Thor finally defeats the robot. And what on Earth is Nighthawk doing in here? He shows up at a fashion show, something he admits he wouldn't normally do, for no apparent reason. I like a lot of 1970s Marvel, but the Avengers wouldn't reach greatness until about a half a year later.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Johnny Andrews

    A complicated epic involving the most complex of characters, Korvac or later, Michael. It starts with Thor teaming with the original Guardians of the Galaxy to take on this mad machine man who is tormented and yearning for power (like they all do) then it moves to an awkward time within the Avengers, fighting and disloyalty is high, some government official basically comes in and shuts them down leaving them with lacklustre means, even Nick Fury abandons them as the Avengers lose all their prior A complicated epic involving the most complex of characters, Korvac or later, Michael. It starts with Thor teaming with the original Guardians of the Galaxy to take on this mad machine man who is tormented and yearning for power (like they all do) then it moves to an awkward time within the Avengers, fighting and disloyalty is high, some government official basically comes in and shuts them down leaving them with lacklustre means, even Nick Fury abandons them as the Avengers lose all their priority clearance. Stressful times ahead so how do they cope when past and present Avengers keep disappearing and who is Michael. Without giving too much away the Korvac Saga leads up to what you expect a huge battle but are the Avengers really the bad guys at the end of the day. I totally felt for Michael but then he wanted to rule the world even if he wanted to save it make it better, the likes of Hitler said similar doings and we know how that ended, so was the Avengers right to not allow him to go ahead as planned. One will never know.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Patrickderaaff

    As a youngster I marveled at the scope of this story, but I was unable to find all the back issues that were translated into Dutch in second hand comic book shops. You can imagine how pleased I am now to own the whole story in one tpb! The pencils by George Perez are great, the style of the other artists is not my thing. The unfolding mystery of Michael/The Enemy/Korvac still holds up after all these decades, love the story pacing as well. It's nice to see the Thor Annual with the Guardians of t As a youngster I marveled at the scope of this story, but I was unable to find all the back issues that were translated into Dutch in second hand comic book shops. You can imagine how pleased I am now to own the whole story in one tpb! The pencils by George Perez are great, the style of the other artists is not my thing. The unfolding mystery of Michael/The Enemy/Korvac still holds up after all these decades, love the story pacing as well. It's nice to see the Thor Annual with the Guardians of the Galaxy included, even though the storytelling style there is totally over the top. Good fun really (regardless of some obvious flaws) and a great addition to my collection (finally!).

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jon Arnold

    In retrospect this is one of the foundation stones that pointed the way to the future of modern comics. It’s clearly influenced by Claremont’s X-Men storylines, with a lot of soap operatic conflicts going on (a leader filled with self-doubt, Captain America taking a quite out-of-character Wolverine role of undermining him), panels here and there setting up later storylines so nothing ever quite feels tidily resolved, and epic battles stretching from the 31st century to New York’s Forest Hill Gar In retrospect this is one of the foundation stones that pointed the way to the future of modern comics. It’s clearly influenced by Claremont’s X-Men storylines, with a lot of soap operatic conflicts going on (a leader filled with self-doubt, Captain America taking a quite out-of-character Wolverine role of undermining him), panels here and there setting up later storylines so nothing ever quite feels tidily resolved, and epic battles stretching from the 31st century to New York’s Forest Hill Gardens neighbourhood. It’s clearly a primitive form of the ongoing narrative which dominates modern comics – whilst the story builds to the last three issues here, the Korvac storyline itself doesn’t properly kick in until the last three issues or so. What saves it though, and marks it out from the majority of what’s followed is the enormous sense of fun behind it all. In the economically testing 70s the government interference and cuts storylines were very much on the nose (and read so again to a modern British reader like me). It culminates in the splendidly absurd way the Avengers eventually reach Korvac’s lair, a splendidly comic conceit that adds to the absurdity of the climax’s setting. And of course there are the requisite punch-ups, although Jim Shooter has the wit to undermine this in the climactic battle (it’s far better executed here than when he reused it for Secret Wars). This is ridiculous, epic and yet has room to ponder moral questions. What also raises it above the usual superhero fare is the essentially tragic nature of the villain. Korvac is clearly one of the Avengers’ most powerful foes and even a combination of the world’s mightiest heroes wouldn’t match him. The answer is therefore rooted in character, lending a tragic air to proceedings. We’re not simply admiring the heroes and jeering the bad guys, instead we’re left with characters on both sides as flawed and complex as the medium would allow. Of course, being forty years old a lot of the attitudes on display are out of date, as happens to all art over time. But this is a reminder of how inventive Marvel of the 70s was and how fortunate I was to be brought up on them. Tremendous fun.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Tone

    What it must have been like to read that final fight scene at the time. There really had never been someone who walked over the Avengers like that before.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Buddy Scalera

    I have mixed feelings on this one. I read this as a kid and remembered it fondly. Reading it now felt like a lot of work. Comics of that era had a lot of long exposition designed to make every issue clear to new readers. That slows down the narrative a lot when you're reading it in a collected edition. The art is great. The core story is good, bordering on very good. This is an "important" Avengers run, but maybe not the finest. It's just a dense read, especially if you read modern comics. You wo I have mixed feelings on this one. I read this as a kid and remembered it fondly. Reading it now felt like a lot of work. Comics of that era had a lot of long exposition designed to make every issue clear to new readers. That slows down the narrative a lot when you're reading it in a collected edition. The art is great. The core story is good, bordering on very good. This is an "important" Avengers run, but maybe not the finest. It's just a dense read, especially if you read modern comics. You won't breeze through this collection. It's worth reading, if you're just getting into the Avengers or Guardians of the Galaxy titles. It touches on big events that are referenced in other Marvel titles, particularly Bronze Age books.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sonja S.

    My inner MARVEL nerd is screaming with joy. I loved this so so much and I can't believe I didn't invest myself in the comics earlier, because it turns out I'm not exclusively a movie fan after all. I loved all the cameos and crossovers that weren't incorporated in the movie franchise yet. I wish Nat had more lines in this one, but we Nat stans are sadly used to that by now (and impatiently waiting for the much deserved solo movie). The villain was quite well-crafted and enjoyable as well as the My inner MARVEL nerd is screaming with joy. I loved this so so much and I can't believe I didn't invest myself in the comics earlier, because it turns out I'm not exclusively a movie fan after all. I loved all the cameos and crossovers that weren't incorporated in the movie franchise yet. I wish Nat had more lines in this one, but we Nat stans are sadly used to that by now (and impatiently waiting for the much deserved solo movie). The villain was quite well-crafted and enjoyable as well as the older characters I didn't have a chance to get to know before, like the original Guardians. Last but not least, the illustrations were absolutely amazing. All in all, I had a blast reading this and it definitely made my day.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Keith Jones

    It was better than I was expecting from a mainstream 70s comic book, and the bad guy turning out to be just a guy wearing Bermuda shorts, living in the suburb, must have been cheeky and original at the time. He was still downright all powerful and all. He basically loses because of ennui, I guess. Also the good guys having to take public transit to get to the bad guy because their super jet had been grounded must have been edgy and camp, I suppose. Now, I mostly just notice the intense sexism. W It was better than I was expecting from a mainstream 70s comic book, and the bad guy turning out to be just a guy wearing Bermuda shorts, living in the suburb, must have been cheeky and original at the time. He was still downright all powerful and all. He basically loses because of ennui, I guess. Also the good guys having to take public transit to get to the bad guy because their super jet had been grounded must have been edgy and camp, I suppose. Now, I mostly just notice the intense sexism. Wow, is The Korvac Saga ever sexist.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sebastian Song

    The writing and art invokes a sense of nostalgia. More importantly, it signifies the things to come! As in the mega crossovers to plague Marvel year after year. With great ambiguities and artistic conveniences carelessly woven into the Marvel universe.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Alain DeWitt

    One of my favorite stories from when I first started reading comic books in the late '70s. It has not aged very well.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Snyder

    The Korvac Saga! An epic Marvel tale, told when epic tales didn't need to be a miniseries crossing over 42 on-going titles to get the whole story, which doesn't make any sense. No way! It begins in a Thor annual, guest starring the Original Guardians of the Galaxy, and gains momentum as it sails through the regular issues of Earth's Mightiest Heroes, The Avengers! (Guest starring the Original Captain Marvel and the Original Ms. Marvel! Now, I ask you, "What more could you possibly ask for?" Just d The Korvac Saga! An epic Marvel tale, told when epic tales didn't need to be a miniseries crossing over 42 on-going titles to get the whole story, which doesn't make any sense. No way! It begins in a Thor annual, guest starring the Original Guardians of the Galaxy, and gains momentum as it sails through the regular issues of Earth's Mightiest Heroes, The Avengers! (Guest starring the Original Captain Marvel and the Original Ms. Marvel! Now, I ask you, "What more could you possibly ask for?" Just don't sit there! Go and read it! Enjoy!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Josh

    The dialogue is cringe-worthily chauvinistic when it comes to women, and treats every non-superhero as merely cardboard comedy relief, or caricatures. The one exception might be Moondragon. The only thing that kept me reading was "Michael's" humorous casual wear, shorts and all. Maybe he was showing off his quads once he got a new body? Who knows.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Joshua

    A classic Avengers story with an immeasurably powerful villain who is ultimately done in by the forces of good (and a little deus ex machina). There's some interesting characterization here and there, but not a great amount of depth overall. The biggest problem was the big bad's massive change in appearance, power, and personality (with little explanation). The best part was the ambiguous ending.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    Overall this was enjoyable. I liked how it incorporated so many different heroes, but, being from the 70's, it was still really sexist and cheesy.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jared

    Better than most of the Avengers stories that came before it, but still not quite good. The Korvac Saga shows signs of interpersonal intrigue, but lacks a real fleshing out of its characters. The most sympathetic personalities in the book are likely the villain and his lover, and neither is prominent enough to raise up what is otherwise too bland a text to easily recommend. Flashes of Iron Man butting heads with Captain America and Woman Man's awkward attempts at romance aren't enough to make up Better than most of the Avengers stories that came before it, but still not quite good. The Korvac Saga shows signs of interpersonal intrigue, but lacks a real fleshing out of its characters. The most sympathetic personalities in the book are likely the villain and his lover, and neither is prominent enough to raise up what is otherwise too bland a text to easily recommend. Flashes of Iron Man butting heads with Captain America and Woman Man's awkward attempts at romance aren't enough to make up for overly broad dialogue and characterizations. This problem is compounded as more and more characters are crammed into the book, eventually moving so many current and former Avengers into the spotlight that it's difficult for any of them to shine. There were a couple of moments that I did really enjoy. The final confrontation is appropriately harrowing, though it just made me wish we'd gotten more of a focus on Michael Korvac in the prior issues. Scarlet Witch (view spoiler)[rending Ultron apart after it had subdued the other Avengers (hide spoiler)] was a great, if brief, scene. There's a lot of potential here, but ultimately I didn't find much of it to have been realized in this volume.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Doctor Alpha

    The Judas Contract: Avengers edition. The Avengers fight an endless horde of unrelated villains until the abysmal last issue, where they end fighting the boring titular character. Overlong, contrived, mysoginist and sexist to the very bone (all the women are awfully mistreated and powerless), ridden of Marvel-type moments trying to hamfistedly show you that Th3Se Ar3 N0RmAl P3Opl3, N0t PoWeRFuL anD InVinCiBle SupErHerO3$11!!111!!! like the constant bitching of the invulnerable and all-powerful W The Judas Contract: Avengers edition. The Avengers fight an endless horde of unrelated villains until the abysmal last issue, where they end fighting the boring titular character. Overlong, contrived, mysoginist and sexist to the very bone (all the women are awfully mistreated and powerless), ridden of Marvel-type moments trying to hamfistedly show you that Th3Se Ar3 N0RmAl P3Opl3, N0t PoWeRFuL anD InVinCiBle SupErHerO3$11!!111!!! like the constant bitching of the invulnerable and all-powerful Wonder Man about him "not being enough manly to be an Avenger" (?) and the Bus scene, it's a chore to read. I'll give one half star more for the interesting Iron Man inner dialogue and the funny borderline Homoerotic relation between him and Captain America, but other than that it's awful. Nights of Wundagore followed this, and it was 2000% better in every possible way. Hell, even the "for historical purposes only" first 4-issues West Coast Avengers solo series was better than this!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ed

    Despite it's historical importance, I just did not like the Korvac Saga. Korvac feels like a less weird (and therefore less interesting) version of the Beyonder. At least the Beyonder didn't know how to poop; Korvac just sits in his suburban home zapping people with his god brain. It's also a very odd arc. Korvac is mostly just a b-plot through most of it. And then in the last two issues the Avengers actually find and fight him. The a-plots for most of these issues are just dull generic super-he Despite it's historical importance, I just did not like the Korvac Saga. Korvac feels like a less weird (and therefore less interesting) version of the Beyonder. At least the Beyonder didn't know how to poop; Korvac just sits in his suburban home zapping people with his god brain. It's also a very odd arc. Korvac is mostly just a b-plot through most of it. And then in the last two issues the Avengers actually find and fight him. The a-plots for most of these issues are just dull generic super-hero stuff. The Avengers battle Ultron or a random Atlantean or chase Jocasta around. The issue I liked the most was 174. It was written by Bill Mantlo rather than Jim Shooter, which is probably why I liked it. It's a fun Hawkeye centric issue and has a really great battle with the Collector. I also love the part in issue 176 where the Avengers have to take a bus to the NYC suburbs. That was great. I did enjoy Thor Annual 6, which is really a prequel to the Korvac Saga. It's pretty basic super-hero stuff but it's fun. Grott the Man-Slayer is a great and funny villain; he should have been the breakout character not the dull Korvac.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Zac

    Decent early Avengers with a more philosophical villain, though also a deadly one. This saga features some corny 70's stuff, but also great character dynamics, Captain America & Iron Man's power struggle is really fleshed out, Ant Man and Wonder Man go through personal development and realize they're not cut out for the team, plus plenty of character deaths. Decent early Avengers with a more philosophical villain, though also a deadly one. This saga features some corny 70's stuff, but also great character dynamics, Captain America & Iron Man's power struggle is really fleshed out, Ant Man and Wonder Man go through personal development and realize they're not cut out for the team, plus plenty of character deaths.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Wesley

    A classic story, one of my favorites as a kid and I can't say it has aged that well but still key old Marvel. A big hard to look at the old style of coloring and the cramped art. Bonus points for the progressive and somewhat unexpected end.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Frans Kempe

    A story within many storylines. First Thor faces Korvac in the future with the help of Guardians of the galaxy 3000. Then on earth the Avangers and Guardians faces different threats like Ultron, the Collector and Korvac is biding his time. A explosive ending

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

    If you love the Avengers, this is amazing. If you just like comics and want to check out something new or different, this is just OK.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jdetrick

    This isn't quite the classic as its often remembered, and its hampered by ever changing artists, but its fun superheroing, with a huge cast.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Gomezmr

    The comic are definitely original.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ekenedilichukwu Ikegwuani

    There are a couple of really good Avengers stories in here, that makes for a very enjoyable read.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Michael Emond

    You know as much as Jim Shooter is praised as a writer - he writes some pretty stinky stories. This "saga" exposes a lot of the things annoying about 70's comics. Inconsistent characterizations, half finished plot threads that lead nowhere and really weird tales like this. Sometimes I feel Claremont was one of the few writers who knew how to begin AND finish a longer story arc back then. So what's not to like about this "saga"? Well we start with typical Shooter thinking "characters arguing for You know as much as Jim Shooter is praised as a writer - he writes some pretty stinky stories. This "saga" exposes a lot of the things annoying about 70's comics. Inconsistent characterizations, half finished plot threads that lead nowhere and really weird tales like this. Sometimes I feel Claremont was one of the few writers who knew how to begin AND finish a longer story arc back then. So what's not to like about this "saga"? Well we start with typical Shooter thinking "characters arguing for no reason" = characterization. The government is shutting the Avengers down because they left their front door open! Security risk!! Let's piss off the world's greatest heroes and take away their funding and randomly break into their mansion and steal their computers. Captain America is full on hating Iron Man being the leader and is acting like no Captain America I have ever seen. Then, suddenly, he decides Iron Man is a good leader and that idea is dropped. Wonder Man is a coward but also likes hitting on Captain Marvel. Thor is dropping in and out of time. Also, the Collector a god-like being is randomly teleporting heroes into test tubes to save them from the menace he sees coming. I am not giving you much context to this but neither did the actual comic book. And the background to it is the Korvac saga. Korvac who starts off as a major menace who gets god-like powers (in the most convoluted way possible) but in the end "he was just trying to do good". Which does not line up with any of his previous actions at all. He was 100% evil and a villain. I guess we have to take Moondragon's word that yes, him trying to rule the Universe was a good thing. Oh also...love. Korvac gave up and lets the Avengers beat him because the female model he hypnotized to be his wife was his true love (Korvac happened to be attending a fashion show...you know...like all Gods bent on ruling the Universe do)...the model later turns out to also be the Collector's daughter (which seems to be a weird plot twist that makes zero sense and was thought up on the fly). And everyone dies...but then...they don't. Ugh. I mean the idea was interesting...a god-like being comes to Earth and the Avengers are on a search for him, but the interactions - the way the story plays out...there is no inventiveness to the story and the half-baked conclusion makes no sense. Overall - one of those "plot-lines" that history should have forgotten but nostalgia makes people remember it being better than it actually was.

  27. 5 out of 5

    The_Mad_Swede

    This volume collects #167–168, 170–177 and Thor Annual #6, which are written by Jim Shooter, Len Wein, Roger Stern, George Pérez, David Michelinie and Bill Mantlo, and pencilled by George Pérez, Sal Buscema and David Wenzel (with inks by Klaus Janson, Pablo Marcos, Ricardo Villamonte and others). It also includes a four page epilogue written by Mark Gruenwald and drawn by Tom Morgan, though that does not contribute greatly to the story in my humble opinion, as well as a number of pages from the This volume collects #167–168, 170–177 and Thor Annual #6, which are written by Jim Shooter, Len Wein, Roger Stern, George Pérez, David Michelinie and Bill Mantlo, and pencilled by George Pérez, Sal Buscema and David Wenzel (with inks by Klaus Janson, Pablo Marcos, Ricardo Villamonte and others). It also includes a four page epilogue written by Mark Gruenwald and drawn by Tom Morgan, though that does not contribute greatly to the story in my humble opinion, as well as a number of pages from the Official Handbook of the Marvel Universe. It is the epic tale of the future villain Korvac, who after an initial encounter with Thor and the Guardians of the Galaxy in the 31st century escapes through time back to the 20th century, with the Guardians hot on his heels. The story that follows is built up slowly, through a lot of sub-plotting, and there are several side stories told throughout the volume. All in all, featuring a host of different Avengers and villainy from several quarters (including Ultron). A very enjoyable Avengers collection (and arc) from a good era in the comic's history.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Mark Phillips

    Enjoyable enough. It was worth reading for the denouement. My problem with some of the story was yje Avengers being cut of from US governemnet funding and forced to comandeer a bus to get to their destination. It was great comic relief but did not make sense as suffieicnet members of The Avengers would be have been more than capable fo making their own way and pssibly carrying other members of the team. As alway I loved reading Jim Shooter's work but the weakness as with many series in the 70s w Enjoyable enough. It was worth reading for the denouement. My problem with some of the story was yje Avengers being cut of from US governemnet funding and forced to comandeer a bus to get to their destination. It was great comic relief but did not make sense as suffieicnet members of The Avengers would be have been more than capable fo making their own way and pssibly carrying other members of the team. As alway I loved reading Jim Shooter's work but the weakness as with many series in the 70s was the constant shifting of writers and illustraors that was at times jarring has the arc reached its conclusion.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Phillip Berrie

    Probably 3.5 stars but not 4. A convoluted story involving multiple villains. I thought it interesting that the perceived major threat for a large part of the story was a total red herring that, however, led to a final confrontation with the major antagonist, which need not have happened. There's some angsty soul searching at the end of this story which I believe is supposed to be thought provoking. However, it didn't leave me that way, as I hadn't really developed enough of an attachment to the c Probably 3.5 stars but not 4. A convoluted story involving multiple villains. I thought it interesting that the perceived major threat for a large part of the story was a total red herring that, however, led to a final confrontation with the major antagonist, which need not have happened. There's some angsty soul searching at the end of this story which I believe is supposed to be thought provoking. However, it didn't leave me that way, as I hadn't really developed enough of an attachment to the characters involved. Your mileage may differ.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    Collects Thor Annual issue #6 and Avengers (1963) issues #167-168 and #170-177 I've been enjoying these classic Cosmic Marvel events more and more. I've read a bunch of them in the last year, and I can see why this one has stood the test of time. As with all older comic books, the dialogue and story telling can sometimes feel wordy, but I liked the way that this saga was a slow burn. I appreciated the character of Korvac, and his motivations, and I thought that the Avengers had a great line-up du Collects Thor Annual issue #6 and Avengers (1963) issues #167-168 and #170-177 I've been enjoying these classic Cosmic Marvel events more and more. I've read a bunch of them in the last year, and I can see why this one has stood the test of time. As with all older comic books, the dialogue and story telling can sometimes feel wordy, but I liked the way that this saga was a slow burn. I appreciated the character of Korvac, and his motivations, and I thought that the Avengers had a great line-up during this story.

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