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Black Nature is the first anthology to focus on nature writing by African American poets, a genre that until now has not commonly been counted as one in which African American poets have participated.Black poets have a long tradition of incorporating treatments of the natural world into their work, but it is often read as political, historical, or protest poetry—anything b Black Nature is the first anthology to focus on nature writing by African American poets, a genre that until now has not commonly been counted as one in which African American poets have participated.Black poets have a long tradition of incorporating treatments of the natural world into their work, but it is often read as political, historical, or protest poetry—anything but nature poetry. This is particularly true when the definition of what constitutes nature writing is limited to work about the pastoral or the wild. Camille T. Dungy has selected 180 poems from 93 poets that provide unique perspectives on American social and literary history to broaden our concept of nature poetry and African American poetics. This collection features major writers such as Phillis Wheatley, Rita Dove, Yusef Komunyakaa, Gwendolyn Brooks, Sterling Brown, Robert Hayden, Wanda Coleman, Natasha Trethewey, and Melvin B. Tolson as well as newer talents such as Douglas Kearney, Major Jackson, and Janice Harrington. Included are poets writing out of slavery, Reconstruction, the Harlem Renaissance, the Black Arts Movement, and late twentieth- and early twenty-first-century African American poetic movements. Black Nature brings to the fore a neglected and vital means of considering poetry by African Americans and nature-related poetry as a whole. A Friends Fund Publication.


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Black Nature is the first anthology to focus on nature writing by African American poets, a genre that until now has not commonly been counted as one in which African American poets have participated.Black poets have a long tradition of incorporating treatments of the natural world into their work, but it is often read as political, historical, or protest poetry—anything b Black Nature is the first anthology to focus on nature writing by African American poets, a genre that until now has not commonly been counted as one in which African American poets have participated.Black poets have a long tradition of incorporating treatments of the natural world into their work, but it is often read as political, historical, or protest poetry—anything but nature poetry. This is particularly true when the definition of what constitutes nature writing is limited to work about the pastoral or the wild. Camille T. Dungy has selected 180 poems from 93 poets that provide unique perspectives on American social and literary history to broaden our concept of nature poetry and African American poetics. This collection features major writers such as Phillis Wheatley, Rita Dove, Yusef Komunyakaa, Gwendolyn Brooks, Sterling Brown, Robert Hayden, Wanda Coleman, Natasha Trethewey, and Melvin B. Tolson as well as newer talents such as Douglas Kearney, Major Jackson, and Janice Harrington. Included are poets writing out of slavery, Reconstruction, the Harlem Renaissance, the Black Arts Movement, and late twentieth- and early twenty-first-century African American poetic movements. Black Nature brings to the fore a neglected and vital means of considering poetry by African Americans and nature-related poetry as a whole. A Friends Fund Publication.

30 review for Black Nature: Four Centuries of African American Nature Poetry

  1. 4 out of 5

    Leslie Reese

    Love this book of poetry!💚💚 400 years of nature poetry by black poets organized NOT chronologically but in 10 "cycles" with titles such as "Nature, Be With Us," "Dirt On Our Hands," and "What The Land Remembers." 93 poets. 180 poems. Too many favorites to list, but here is an excerpt from Kendra Hamilton's "Southern Living:" Let us say the names together: heart-leaf, barrenwort, rose campion, fairies thimbles. Feel the meditative music of the names: Goat’s rue, lady-by-the-gate, queen-of-the-mea Love this book of poetry!💚💚 400 years of nature poetry by black poets organized NOT chronologically but in 10 "cycles" with titles such as "Nature, Be With Us," "Dirt On Our Hands," and "What The Land Remembers." 93 poets. 180 poems. Too many favorites to list, but here is an excerpt from Kendra Hamilton's "Southern Living:" Let us say the names together: heart-leaf, barrenwort, rose campion, fairies thimbles. Feel the meditative music of the names: Goat’s rue, lady-by-the-gate, queen-of-the-meadow. To love a garden is to be in love with words: with potteries and racemes, corymbs hispid, and corms. To love a garden is to be in love with possibility: for it can never, almost by definition, ever be complete. To love a garden is to be in love with contradiction: ravished by order yet ever open to the wild. But more than all these, to love a garden is to find your one true lover: for a garden can’t survive its maker, will die with the one who loved it, with only a sudden spray of roses in June amid a derelict tangle of wood sorrel and sumac to tell an eye that can read the land that either of you was ever there.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Erica

    SO powerful and so important. I have stickies all over this book now.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Campbell

    This book is so important, for so many reasons. I’ve been reading a poem two or three times each week with my daughter, who is thirteen and who often does not want to consider the harder realities of what it means to be a black female in the U.S. and in the world. Dungy’s curation of this collection encourages my daughter and me (her white ally) to view nature (and these writers’ experience of it) through a complex lens of pure celebration, joy, heartache, and pain. Here, nature can be comfort, This book is so important, for so many reasons. I’ve been reading a poem two or three times each week with my daughter, who is thirteen and who often does not want to consider the harder realities of what it means to be a black female in the U.S. and in the world. Dungy’s curation of this collection encourages my daughter and me (her white ally) to view nature (and these writers’ experience of it) through a complex lens of pure celebration, joy, heartache, and pain. Here, nature can be comfort, it can be painful reminder, and it can be inspiration, often all at once. In a country that still expresses surprise to see black faces in natural spaces, this collection of poetry is utterly essential.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jon

    An amazing collection of nature poetry by black poets, the earliest (as far as I can tell) being in heroic couplets by 18th century poet Phillis Wheatley. There is a brilliant introduction by the editor, outlining how black experience of nature, and thus black poetry about it, differs from the experiences and poetry of white Europeans and Americans. She then divides black approaches into 10 different groups, thus providing 10 short anthologies of similarly inspired poems. A truly eye-opening ant An amazing collection of nature poetry by black poets, the earliest (as far as I can tell) being in heroic couplets by 18th century poet Phillis Wheatley. There is a brilliant introduction by the editor, outlining how black experience of nature, and thus black poetry about it, differs from the experiences and poetry of white Europeans and Americans. She then divides black approaches into 10 different groups, thus providing 10 short anthologies of similarly inspired poems. A truly eye-opening anthology, especially for someone like me, who was unaware of the majority of the poets collected here. The book comes with all the necessary apparatus: biographies of the poets, indexes of poets and titles, and separate brief introductions to each section.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Aliiraba

    pick it up everyday. my most worn book.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Diann Blakely

    I rarely, rarely give five stars to books that are not considered canonical or by living authors, but BLACK NATURE (ed. Camille T. Dungy, (UGA Press), IS already canonical, and even more spectacular than its predecessor, THE RINGING EAR: BLACK POETS LEAN SOUTH (ed. Nikky Finney, Cave Canem / UGA Press). The latter anthology was almost predictable, since most blacks and African-Americans have their roots in the South; but who would have thought to base an entire volume of poems of work that range I rarely, rarely give five stars to books that are not considered canonical or by living authors, but BLACK NATURE (ed. Camille T. Dungy, (UGA Press), IS already canonical, and even more spectacular than its predecessor, THE RINGING EAR: BLACK POETS LEAN SOUTH (ed. Nikky Finney, Cave Canem / UGA Press). The latter anthology was almost predictable, since most blacks and African-Americans have their roots in the South; but who would have thought to base an entire volume of poems of work that ranges from the Hopkinsian ecstatic--Kendra Hamilton, who gardens in a baptism of sweat and revels in her Spanish-moss-like hair in the mockingly titled “Southern Living,” which appears also in her 2006 début volume, THE GODDESS OF GUMBO (WordTech)--to the fear of Robert Johnson, as the rising sun began to sink down and so did he. Others I originally alerted readers "to watch for" in the Finney volume who reappear here are Honorée Fanonne Jeffers, a 2010 NEA winner; Thomas Sayers Ellis, now nationally praised for SKIN, INC. (Graywolf); Harryette Mullen (RECYCLOPEDIA, Graywolf, 2006); and Hamilton, author as well of "The Search for the Perfect Sidecar" in a 2009 issue of CALLALOO, and now at work on a new manuscript MIRROURS OF THE WORLD: POEMS INSPIRED BY THE LIFE OF BELLE DA COSTA GREENE.) Dungy herself, who has enjoyed the mentorship of Al Young, first came to my attention through the "rogue snnets" of WHAT TO EAT, WHAT TO DRINK, WHAT TO LEAVE FOR POISON (Red Hen) has gone on to publish two other splendid individual collections, SUCK ON THE MARROW (also Red Hen, winner of the Northern California Book Award, the American Book Award, as well as a NAACP Image Award nominee), and now the just-released SMITH BLUE (Southern Illinois Press and winner of the Crab Orchard Series in Poetry Prize). Furthermore, Dungy, assistant editor for GATHERING GROUND, the first Cave Canem anthology, had her second book, SUCK ON THE MARROW, selected for the American Book Award, and her newest collection, SMITH BLUE, has finally arrived. That soaring eagle on the cover, grasped my heart in its talons--to change metaphoric strands--which I read the epigraphs and the first poem, all of which are concerned with the difficulty of maintaining balance between private emotion that struggles to express itself through our sullen craft and art and the horrors dished out to us daily--forgive, please, the change of metaphors once again--by "the world, the world, the world," to quote a "cousin on the light side," the late Lynda Hull. (Please see my review of THE ONLY WORLD here.) There are many anthologies about nature poetry, of course, but Dungy’s stands out so shiningly that is has been endorsed by two giants of the genre in modern times, Allison Hawthorne Deming: "What excites about this anthology is that it is not only the richest and most comprehensive collections by black poets I have read, it is the richest and most comprehensive collection of poems about nature I have read. I believe the book should be widely read, taught, and talked about." and John Elder: "BLACK NATURE is the most exciting anthology of poetry I’ve read in years. This collection will quickly become essential reading for poets and scholars, as well as for courses on American poetry and the literature of nature." The praise is well-deserved: we’ve never had an assembly of poems that represents the conflict between a world traditionally represented, especially in the British and Irish canon, as benign, benevolent, and maternal and one that history has soaked in sweat, blood, tears, and terror. And Dungy is well aware this is a cross-racial, but not necessarily cross-gender, predicament. Compare Plath, American but of German and Austrian origin, cringing as horizons surround her as though she were a witch ready for burning and Whitman, cradling hands full of grass and ecstatic in wonder. He claims he has no more fear of death than of being born: surely he needed to be held out a window and have “Ode to the Confederate Dead” recited to him, though perhaps “My Life--Had Stood--A Loaded Gun,” by the stone-American (so to speak) Dickinson would have gotten his attention. As I write in Part Four of a recent essay, “Down--But Not Out--In Mississippi and Elsewhere,” Dungy and I have shared an email giggle or three “about teaching what she calls some of Frost’s ‘totally gendered’ poems, such as ‘Acquainted with the Night’ or ‘Stopping By Woods On a Snowy Evening.’ Over the course of a decade in which I taught Plath-like overachieving eighteen-year-old women these poems in alternation, I’d habitually ask them to ponder whether or not a woman might have been its author. Though the immediate, shouted-out answer, varied slightly in choices of words, the essence was always the same: ‘No! Our mothers told us we would be raped and chopped into small pieces if we went out walking in the wood by ourselves at night.’ (Again, see Plath’s ‘Wuthering Heights.’) “Tintern Abbey” cf. “Mont Blanc.” The Wordsworthian tradition itself is complicated when these two great works are set side by side. Seamus Heaney, who edited the Ecco Essentials volume on the former poet, also of rapturous Hopkins, for example, praises Plath for her relational view of nature in early poems such as “Black Rook in Rainy Weather” and “Mussel Hunter at Rock Harbor” but condemns her for poems he describes as negational. How can we account for perhaps the sole mis-step in Heaney’s canon as critic? First, of course, there’s his friendship with Ted Hughes, to whom he has dedicated at least one poem. More important, however, is that Wordsworthian vision in which nature is eternally kind, open, and ripe for harvest, if needing masculine protection. Heaney even perceives the Anglophone language--half Anglo-Saxon (“harsh” and “consonantal”), half Latinate (“tripping,” “lilting,” “assonantal,” meaning softer, more permeable vowels) in similar terms; but while I don’t know Gaelic except through poets‘ readings, I’d characterize its sounds as Lynda Hull did Polish: an “elaborate hush and murmur.” But there’s a problem Heaney doesn’t discuss, at least to my knowledge. While Gaelic has remained protected in designated areas, most in the Gaeltecht, or West Country, and thus untouched, three sets of invaders brought with them as many languages. The Vikings, then the Anglo-Saxons themselves, then the Norman French. I’m no linguist. I’m a poet, thus I read with wide-open ears. But I think Dungy’s anthology has a thematic shown in its individual poems, both of which can be seen as a microcosm of Heaney’s argument for dueling elements in language, but here reflected in the differing relationship African-Americans and Blacks have had with nature itself.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    Worth reading cover to cover

  8. 5 out of 5

    Nick Walsh

    Literature anthologies tend to snoozily suck the sap outta poetry's booze. Not this one. Editor Camille T. Dungy has her genius powers turned on when selecting/arranging these 250 years of African American nature poems. One reason this book pulses and doesn't flatline is Dungy didn't chronologically order it. Brilliant decision! The poems instead are organized into 10 sections, each one introduced by a short prose piece by a featured poet. So you're not crawling from way back when slowly, ever so Literature anthologies tend to snoozily suck the sap outta poetry's booze. Not this one. Editor Camille T. Dungy has her genius powers turned on when selecting/arranging these 250 years of African American nature poems. One reason this book pulses and doesn't flatline is Dungy didn't chronologically order it. Brilliant decision! The poems instead are organized into 10 sections, each one introduced by a short prose piece by a featured poet. So you're not crawling from way back when slowly, ever so slowly, to now. (Yawn.) You're immersed in Black ecopoetic visions, a simultaneity of them zigzagging all over time. And why not have Phillis Wheatley of 1770 followed by Nikki Giovanni of 1970? If they're singing concordantly let's hear them together on stage. The poets featured are from all over the map. I was introduced to so many writers. Yeah, I'm ignorant, just more aware of it. Book 1 opens with Ed Roberson then Lucille Clifton, just two of the phenomenal writers I came to love through this book. There's 93 poets featured, 180 poems, so you see many more than once, and a handful 4-5 times. GE Patterson, June Jordan, Yusef Komunyakaa, Robert Hayden, Gerald Barrax, Sr., Camille T. Dungy, Major Jackson, Alice Walker, Natasha Trethewey, Phillis Wheatley and Amaud Jamaul Johnson are some of the poets I loved in here, their painfilled at times sublime nature. I was raised, you proly too, on white nature. Dickinson, Whitman, Frost, Bishop, Sandburg, Creeley, Ginsburg; and yes, not only is Black nature poetry as manifold as white, it's essential. It can not be fairly summarized as one type, just as white can't. But there's no doubt these poets bring painfully aware metaphor to a forest of trees, for example, which white poets are conditioned not to see. It's awful and beautiful to realize the toothless gaping holes in your limited experience, right? That's why we need others. We need those nothing like ourselves to see true. Many of these poems feel more seated, more soiled in the blood soaked American earth, than the idyllic pastorals of white lyres wowing tower maidens. Beautiful book. I'm grateful to see nature from Black views as well as white. We overlap. In many ways we Americans are so the same. And then because evil ignorance and racism drilled into our marrow from birth to death to our children's children's birth and death we are not the same. A tree is not one tree. A forest not the same forest. A flower is not the same flower for 2 poets born opposite side of America's racial divide.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Rayna

    Reading this book is like opening a jewel box. Every piece of prose and poetry is deep, emotional and powerful. The arrangement of the poems in cycles, and the introductions to each cycle, help the reader to enter more fully into the images depicted. Once you've read this book, you will look at nature with a greater appreciation of its beauty, and with a greater appreciation of African Americans' experience of the natural world. It's a work of brilliance.

  10. 4 out of 5

    F. Rzicznek

    A great anthology that pretty much redefines the idea of the North American "nature" poem. Dungy has brought together a wide range of voices and styles and I'm really taken with how the book is arranged into ten "cycles" that focus on smaller themes and patterns within the overall framework. Each cycle starts with a short essay and the result is ten mini-anthologies of roughly chapbook-length packed between two covers.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Shanae

    An excellent collection of nature poems written by African Americans. Dungy's anthology is not what I expected from the title...I actually expected a collection of poems about the nature of blackness, not uncommon subject matter for much of the literature written by and about African Americans. I merely rented this text for school, but I just purchased it from Amazon.com. I'm very grateful for Dungy's contribution to Black literature, we desperately needed it.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Margaret

    It's hard to rate a vast collection of poetry, such as this is. It's highly southern, with traces of other parts of the US and almost nothing from elsewhere. The poems, arranged in ten groupings, run the gamut of emotions from horror to hope. I would recommend buying this and reading it slowly, perhaps one poem a day over months, allowing the cadences to open your eyes to the cruelty and beauty of the natural world

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ag

    In this thought provoking collection of poetry, compiled by Camille Dungy - an English professor at Colorado State University and author of several books, are over 180 pieces written by African American poets over the past four centuries. Dungy describes the significance of an anthology of solely black work, “Many black writers simply do not look at their environment from the same perspective as Anglo-Saxon writers who discourse with the natural world … in a great deal of African American poetry In this thought provoking collection of poetry, compiled by Camille Dungy - an English professor at Colorado State University and author of several books, are over 180 pieces written by African American poets over the past four centuries. Dungy describes the significance of an anthology of solely black work, “Many black writers simply do not look at their environment from the same perspective as Anglo-Saxon writers who discourse with the natural world … in a great deal of African American poetry we see poems written from the perspective of the workers of the field” (xxi). Dungy organizes the poems into ten cycles - each cycle a strand of ecopoetics. Throughout the various and intertwining cycles readers are reminded that “we are always part of the natural world, even when we feel most alienated from it” (xxix). One of the benefits to an anthology of poetry is that you can pick it up whenever you feel like it and read one page or 40. I would recommend this book to anyone who is interested in moving beyond nature poetry as just 19th century pastoral scenes and exploring city eclogues, discussions of place and home, and the black perspective of nature that has been obscured for centuries.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Emily Persico

    A really wonderful collection - I guess one struggle I had was how much it jumped through time and place, with no real indication of context of author bio. It felt a bit random at times. But I, like others, have so many doggy-eared pages, poems to revisit in the very near future. And I might even research some of the context on my own.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Shirleynature

    Many of the greatest African American poets are included: Audre Lorde, Langston Hughes, Alice Walker, Claudia Rankine, Alice Dunbar-Nelson, Sherley Anne Williams... Frustratingly missing are J. Drew Lanham and Annette Hope Billings.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Marianne

    I read this like 4 years ago! No idea why I never recorded it here. Anyway it is very satisfying, well organized, and worth immersing oneself in. Some really beautiful poetry I'd never seen anthologized anywhere else.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

    An insightful look into the pastoral poem written from a Black perspective.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ms. Arca

    Amazing. I’m buying my own copy so I can dog ear all the pages and flag all of my favorites... there are so many. A fantastic collection / feat of work!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Giragosian

    One of the most important and well-curated anthologies I have ever read.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Monica

    Magnifique! Superb! Find it! Get it! Take your time... read it! Repeat!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sally Piper

    A rich and diverse collection of nature poems from 93 poets who celebrate and document all aspects of the living world - cultural, aesthetic, seasonal, relational, whether urban and wild.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Irene Cooper

    Rich and wonderful!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jamie

    Deserves a prominent place in the canon of nature writing, and maybe the most preeminent place.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Anne, Unfinished Woman

    Favorites: Marilyn Nelson: "Ruellia Noctiflora" Anne Spencer: "Requiem" Paul Laurence Dunbar: "Sympathy"..."I know why the caged bird sings,..." June Jordan: "Letter to the Local Police"

  25. 4 out of 5

    Bowdoin

    Reader in group - Really, I don't even know where to begin. I'm in awe of this collection. Its ambition and scope doesn't surprise me, since I've known the brilliant whirlwind Camille Dungy for many years, but still, I'm amazed at what she's accomplished here. This is an important book; there's nothing else like it that collects and focuses on the nature writing of African American poets. It's the third anthology that Camille has edited or co-edited, and her experience is evident in how well the Reader in group - Really, I don't even know where to begin. I'm in awe of this collection. Its ambition and scope doesn't surprise me, since I've known the brilliant whirlwind Camille Dungy for many years, but still, I'm amazed at what she's accomplished here. This is an important book; there's nothing else like it that collects and focuses on the nature writing of African American poets. It's the third anthology that Camille has edited or co-edited, and her experience is evident in how well the collection is put together, how the poets and the poems are arranged to speak to one another as well as to the reader. I found many familiar names in "Black Nature”including Bowdoin Writer in Residence Anthony Walton, as well as four other poets who've read at Bowdoin recently, Evie Shockley, Ross Gay, Gregory Pardlo, and Camille herself but it's been exciting for me to discover new poems by those poets, in addition to so many fantastic poets whose work I should probably have already known, and many more that Camille brings to light from past (going back to the 1700s!) and current generations. I spend a lot of time outdoors and a lot of time with poetry, and this mix is especially appealing to me. But more than that, as a white guy from Maine, how I view nature and my experiences in it in my daily life differs in many ways from how the African American poets assembled here experience the natural world in their lives, so it fascinates me to read and learn about those differences, as well as to find shared experiences. Subject matter aside, Camille's also simply picked wonderful poems, so this book is just a great read, whether you meander from the beginning, hop through it, or choose poets, poems, pages randomly. I'm looking forward to continuing my walk through this book this summer; I know I'll keep going back to it for many, many seasons to come. For a much better description of Black Nature than I can put together, there is an to this excellent interview with Camille by Renee Montagne on NPR's All Things Considered.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    Having studied w/ a professor who identified with the ecopoetics community during my undergrad, I didn't know that this entire fucking anthology of poetry was missing, [it came out in 2009, in which I was a sophomore in college] and didn't know that the poets we were reading were mostly all white. While I usually flock to anything identifying with "nature" in poetics, I was relieved and proud to see one of my current graduate professors in this anthology, and have a better understanding of how t Having studied w/ a professor who identified with the ecopoetics community during my undergrad, I didn't know that this entire fucking anthology of poetry was missing, [it came out in 2009, in which I was a sophomore in college] and didn't know that the poets we were reading were mostly all white. While I usually flock to anything identifying with "nature" in poetics, I was relieved and proud to see one of my current graduate professors in this anthology, and have a better understanding of how to go about teaching ecopoetics + black nature. Required reading. I think my favorite part of this anthology is the slow burn Camile T. Dungy creates through a series of cycles-- she states, [from the intro]: "Given the scope and continuity of the selections in BLACK NATURE, rather than organizing the collection in chronological order, I have established 10 cycles that highlight recurrent concerns. The thematic organization of the collection helps readers to reconceptualize the boundaries for environmentally minded writing. While a number of the poems included in the anthology address standard topics of nature writing, others reimagine the boundaries of the genre, all working to remind the readers that we are always part of the natural world, even when we feel most alienated from it." What results is a structure of work that is present and accountable-- identities of nature that weren't available or recognizable to me are now part of the horizon. Definitely also working parts of this into my workshop syllabus** and, am aware that as a white instructor, will have to make it clear to my students that I cannot speak for or over these voices. But to not share them or talk about them in addition to / alternative to present ecopoetics would betray everything that calls me to poetry.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Joe

    The book is intended for students and scholars. I'm neither, but it functions also as a broad anthology of black poets. I've found some new favorites. Nice variety. Spare me the analysis and categories. It's not all nature poetry, not really. Joanne V. Gabbin, welcome to my bookshelf. Yusef Komunyakaa. And Ross Gay, holy moly: Thank You If you find yourself half naked and barefoot in the frosty grass, hearing, again, the earth's great sonorous moan that says you are the air of the now and gone, that The book is intended for students and scholars. I'm neither, but it functions also as a broad anthology of black poets. I've found some new favorites. Nice variety. Spare me the analysis and categories. It's not all nature poetry, not really. Joanne V. Gabbin, welcome to my bookshelf. Yusef Komunyakaa. And Ross Gay, holy moly: Thank You If you find yourself half naked and barefoot in the frosty grass, hearing, again, the earth's great sonorous moan that says you are the air of the now and gone, that says all you love will turn to dust, and will meet you there, do not raise your fist. Do not raise your small voice against it. And do not take cover. Instead, curl your toes into the grass, watch the cloud ascending from your lips. Walk through the garden's dormant splendor. Say only, thank you. Thank you. —Ross Gay

  28. 5 out of 5

    Colorado Review

    Reviewed for Colorado Review by Alexa Mergen Reviewed for Colorado Review by Alexa Mergen

  29. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    So much here to choose from, and so much excellence!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Carmela

    I think this book if amazing!

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