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This volume aims to reflect the enduring popularity of archaeology - a subject which appeals as a pastime, career, and academic discipline, encompasses the whole globe, and surveys 2.5 million years. From deserts to jungles, from deep caves to mountain tops, from pebble tools to satellite photographs, from excavation to abstract theory, archaeology interacts with nearly ev This volume aims to reflect the enduring popularity of archaeology - a subject which appeals as a pastime, career, and academic discipline, encompasses the whole globe, and surveys 2.5 million years. From deserts to jungles, from deep caves to mountain tops, from pebble tools to satellite photographs, from excavation to abstract theory, archaeology interacts with nearly every other discipline in its attempts to reconstruct the past.


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This volume aims to reflect the enduring popularity of archaeology - a subject which appeals as a pastime, career, and academic discipline, encompasses the whole globe, and surveys 2.5 million years. From deserts to jungles, from deep caves to mountain tops, from pebble tools to satellite photographs, from excavation to abstract theory, archaeology interacts with nearly ev This volume aims to reflect the enduring popularity of archaeology - a subject which appeals as a pastime, career, and academic discipline, encompasses the whole globe, and surveys 2.5 million years. From deserts to jungles, from deep caves to mountain tops, from pebble tools to satellite photographs, from excavation to abstract theory, archaeology interacts with nearly every other discipline in its attempts to reconstruct the past.

30 review for Archaeology: A Very Short Introduction

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    Archaeology: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions #10), Paul G. Bahn, Bill Tidy (Illustrator) This entertaining Very Short Introduction reflects the enduring popularity of archaeology-a subject which appeals as a pastime, career, and academic discipline, encompasses the whole globe, and surveys 2.5 million years. From deserts to jungles, from deep caves to mountain tops, from pebble tools to satellite photographs, from excavation to abstract theory, archaeology interacts with nearl Archaeology: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions #10), Paul G. Bahn, Bill Tidy (Illustrator) This entertaining Very Short Introduction reflects the enduring popularity of archaeology-a subject which appeals as a pastime, career, and academic discipline, encompasses the whole globe, and surveys 2.5 million years. From deserts to jungles, from deep caves to mountain tops, from pebble tools to satellite photographs, from excavation to abstract theory, archaeology interacts with nearly every other discipline in its attempts to reconstruct the past. تاریخ نخستین خوانش: ماه می سال 2016میلادی عنوان: باستان شناسی؛ نویسنده: پل جی بان؛ مترجم: کامیار عبدی؛ تهران، ماهی، 1394؛ در 165ص؛ مصور؛ نمایه، کتابنامه از ص 159، تا ص160، شابک9789642091089، موضوع: باستانشناسی از نویسندگان بریتانیا - سده 21م کتاب به این منظور نگاشته شده که با عرضه‌ ی پاره‌ ای از مقدمات باستان‌ شناسی، کنجکاوی خوانشگران را برانگیزد، تا به انبوه نوشته‌ های مربوط به باستان‌ شناسی، نگاهی ژرفتر بیندازند، کمی پژوهش، یا کار میدانی بکنند، و به دانش‌ آموزان و دانشجویان یاری میکند، تصمیم بگیرند دوره‌ ای را در زمینه‌ ی باستان‌ شناسی بگذرانند تاریخ بهنگام رسانی 03/04/1400هجری خورشیدی؛ ا. شربیانی

  2. 4 out of 5

    Nicky

    This was okay, but honestly? If you're interested in archaeology, watch out for the "Archaeology's Dirty Little Secrets" course to run again on Coursera. It covers a lot of the same issues, but in more depth, with more examples, and obviously with the chance to interact with a lot more people/opinions (even if you just watch the videos). The assignments help you focus on and get to grips with the techniques and discussions. This book is... much more basic. It's very informal, often very personal This was okay, but honestly? If you're interested in archaeology, watch out for the "Archaeology's Dirty Little Secrets" course to run again on Coursera. It covers a lot of the same issues, but in more depth, with more examples, and obviously with the chance to interact with a lot more people/opinions (even if you just watch the videos). The assignments help you focus on and get to grips with the techniques and discussions. This book is... much more basic. It's very informal, often very personal to the author (as where he sneers at theories he doesn't agree with, or makes snide comments about other people working in the field). There are some useful bits, and it's certainly an easy (and very brief) read, but mostly I think you'd be better investing a bit more time in this, via Coursera or via other, better books. One section that rather riled me was the whole bit about "feminist archaeology", mostly using those scare quotes. Bahn falls into pretty much every pitfall in talking about feminism, claiming for example that the history of men is now going to be ignored, and comparing women to slaves who will want to be masters. Right. Thanks, dude.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sulaf Farhat

    A concise book on a very interesting subject, written, apparently, by a disgruntled teenager!! I was really interested in the subject of the book, but didn't really care for the writing style. It did arouse my curiosity though, and I think I'd love to read further on archaeology in the future. A concise book on a very interesting subject, written, apparently, by a disgruntled teenager!! I was really interested in the subject of the book, but didn't really care for the writing style. It did arouse my curiosity though, and I think I'd love to read further on archaeology in the future.

  4. 4 out of 5

    S

    Not the same quality as most of this series-- unattractively curmudgeonly.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Cathy DuPont

    While this was interesting, not sure I would depend on it if I dug as an amateur. But as a starter on the subject, it was ok.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Robin

    It's frightfully smashing that Bertie Wooster has written this very short introduction to archaeology. What-ho! This is a weird book. I do NOT recommend that anyone read it as a first introduction to archaeology. The tone is flip and silly. The author spends the first chapter saying there's too much being published in archaeology today, so much so that it is not even worth the space on library shelves. Then he says there aren't enough archaeologists to do the analysis. He ends the chapter by pooh- It's frightfully smashing that Bertie Wooster has written this very short introduction to archaeology. What-ho! This is a weird book. I do NOT recommend that anyone read it as a first introduction to archaeology. The tone is flip and silly. The author spends the first chapter saying there's too much being published in archaeology today, so much so that it is not even worth the space on library shelves. Then he says there aren't enough archaeologists to do the analysis. He ends the chapter by pooh-poohing the very premises on which the discipline is based. (In the next chapter, he basically says no archaeologists are smart enough to understand the science behind any archaeological dating techniques.) Tell, me, why did Bahn choose to write this book? Apparently, he's written a lot of books on archaeology but, he doesn't seem to respect it as a field of study. He focuses on archaeology's failings and, of all things, on the inbred politics of 1960s academe. Why would anyone need to know that stuff in an introductory volume? If I were new to archaeology, I would want to know the principles on which it's based, field and lab practices, a few major contributions that archaeology has made to our understanding of humanity's past, and what archaeologists are working towards now. I would not want cheesy political cartoons and his bizarrely outdated whining about feminism.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Liz De Coster

    This introduction was probably too short. The tone of the book was very informal, often gossipy, which I found detracted from the information being explained. Some ideas were left unexplained (e.g., the Terracotta Army was referenced twice but never described) while entire sections were devoted entirely to professional navel-gazing. I would have appreciated more information on archaeology in the sense of historical information, rather than details of the professional.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Joy

    I don't normally review books but I couldn't not say anything about this one. I read this book for a class and have to assumed that the professor himself did not read it before assigning it. My edition is a second edition that was published 8 years ago and I cannot fathom how it managed to make it to a second print when it contains blatant sexism, racism and a host of other biases. Paul Bahn clearly needs to read his own chapter on recognizing the inherent biases found in scholarly research. I don't normally review books but I couldn't not say anything about this one. I read this book for a class and have to assumed that the professor himself did not read it before assigning it. My edition is a second edition that was published 8 years ago and I cannot fathom how it managed to make it to a second print when it contains blatant sexism, racism and a host of other biases. Paul Bahn clearly needs to read his own chapter on recognizing the inherent biases found in scholarly research.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Maxwell Forton

    Good overall introduction to archaeology for students, but the edition we used is definitely outdated in its chapters concerning gender and the rights of indigenous peoples. The author equates Feminist Theory with being just the opposite side of the same sexist coin as male centric archaeology. This false equivocation fails to grasp the need for specialized research into historically oppressed groups of people. Hopefully the newer additions have corrected this misjudgment.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ketiana Osias

    3.25-3.5 A good book on introducing you to the field of archaeology. It was a short and informative read but the author likes to make little snide comments, which I honestly didn’t care for.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Laurel Bradshaw

    I love the subject of archaeology, and have often thought I probably should have been an archaeologist. But this book was a bit disappointing really. I would have preferred less of the flip comments about the theories and politics of the field, and the dangers of feminism, and more about the field itself, such as "a day in the life of an archaeologist", an overview of important discoveries, and famous archaeologists. I did like some of the discussion on the problems of dealing with indigenous po I love the subject of archaeology, and have often thought I probably should have been an archaeologist. But this book was a bit disappointing really. I would have preferred less of the flip comments about the theories and politics of the field, and the dangers of feminism, and more about the field itself, such as "a day in the life of an archaeologist", an overview of important discoveries, and famous archaeologists. I did like some of the discussion on the problems of dealing with indigenous populations, and on the biases of archaeologists and the problems of interpretation. Just a bit TOO short overall. Book description: This entertaining introduction reflects the enduring popularity of archaeology--a subject which appeals as a pastime, career, and academic discipline, encompasses the whole globe, and spans some 2.5 million years. From deserts to jungles, from deep caves to mountain tops, from pebble tools to satellite photographs, from excavation to abstract theory, archaeology interacts with nearly every other discipline in its attempts to reconstruct the past. Series info: See Classics: A Very Short Introduction

  12. 4 out of 5

    Bonni

    This is honestly the greatest text book I have ever been required to buy! If I had known about these little books earlier, I would, most definitely, have read a lot more by now! Paul Bahn is so fantastically hilarious and still incredibly informative in just 115 pages! I found myself smiling ridiculously at this book so many times, people must have thought I had hidden love letters in it. Not to mention how much he teaches you in this book! I learned about so many things I hadn't even considered This is honestly the greatest text book I have ever been required to buy! If I had known about these little books earlier, I would, most definitely, have read a lot more by now! Paul Bahn is so fantastically hilarious and still incredibly informative in just 115 pages! I found myself smiling ridiculously at this book so many times, people must have thought I had hidden love letters in it. Not to mention how much he teaches you in this book! I learned about so many things I hadn't even considered before. If you are at all into archaeology, this is 100% the book you HAVE to read!

  13. 4 out of 5

    M. Ashraf

    It is an O.K but I don't think it offers anything new. I thought it would focus more on ancient Egypt but it didn't and it kept jumping to different parts of the world and eras. It is very short and you can feel the writer's passion through the lines but I felt it all over the place, the cartoons are good though :p history is not a catalogue but a version of events. Archaeology is a perpetual search, never really a finding; it is an eternal journey, with no true arrival. Everything is tentat It is an O.K but I don't think it offers anything new. I thought it would focus more on ancient Egypt but it didn't and it kept jumping to different parts of the world and eras. It is very short and you can feel the writer's passion through the lines but I felt it all over the place, the cartoons are good though :p history is not a catalogue but a version of events. Archaeology is a perpetual search, never really a finding; it is an eternal journey, with no true arrival. Everything is tentative, nothing is final.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Yasmin

    Despite the book being published in 1996 it is horribly dated. Bahn has used this little book not to explore a "stimulating way in to a subject (as per the back cover) but to air out his prejudices, biases, sexism and racism. He calls the "angry young men" that came up with "New Archaeology" as patronising when his whole tone throughout the book has been incredibly patronising towards the reader. He seems to be writing as if speaking to children and mocking their intelligence. The book has achie Despite the book being published in 1996 it is horribly dated. Bahn has used this little book not to explore a "stimulating way in to a subject (as per the back cover) but to air out his prejudices, biases, sexism and racism. He calls the "angry young men" that came up with "New Archaeology" as patronising when his whole tone throughout the book has been incredibly patronising towards the reader. He seems to be writing as if speaking to children and mocking their intelligence. The book has achieved the belief in me that all archaeologists are overgrown men-children sanctified in white able bodied male privilege. He roundly mocks women (then) trying to get into the field, saying "sexism rubs both ways"--it doesn't. He generously declares Indigenous peoples asking for consultation as "reasonable", but when they ask for their history back he more or less calls it extreme! He claims relations between Indigenous peoples and archaeologists are improved--as far as I know "demands" (as he calls it) for cultural heritage from museums is still on going. He seems to think archaeologists "helped" Indigenous peoples "put their cultures back together". That alone requires serious unpacking, it was only ever for archaeologists to have "live" exhibits in museums as under the guise of philanthropists in the 19th century, but he wouldn't mention that! Nor why Indigenous peoples "needed help" putting their cultures back together. He refuses to name names about perceived "problematic" archaeologists citing "they know who they are" and complaining they bitch and stab each other--and yet has no issue doing the same thing to these "angry young men", "feminist archaeologists", but leaves out the "young Turks"--whatever that means. Usually the Very Short Introductions are enjoyable and interesting, however, this was not. I'm even sorry Barry Cunliffe praised the book--I have liked Cunliffe's books in the past. I don't know how I went on with this...I haven't.

  15. 4 out of 5

    B.

    This book was awesome! Now, first, please keep in mind that I say this because I am a fan of the Very Short Introduction series, and second, because I've been fascinated by archaeology as a kid. However, those aren't the only reasons I enjoyed this book. First, Paul Bahn is an incredible resource in his own right. I would absolutely love to go on one of the archeological tours he offers, but I live in the wrong country for that. Second, the conversational tone makes for easy reading, and Bahn's This book was awesome! Now, first, please keep in mind that I say this because I am a fan of the Very Short Introduction series, and second, because I've been fascinated by archaeology as a kid. However, those aren't the only reasons I enjoyed this book. First, Paul Bahn is an incredible resource in his own right. I would absolutely love to go on one of the archeological tours he offers, but I live in the wrong country for that. Second, the conversational tone makes for easy reading, and Bahn's concise list of additional references provides the perfect starting place for anyone interested in learning more about archaeology. Life happened, kids happened, and I haven't been able to stay as current in the field as I would have liked to over the past decade, but Bahn's book was a great re-introduction to the subject, building off of preexisting knowledge, while at the same time providing enough information for anyone unfamiliar with the subject to be able to get a running start. The purpose of these books is not to provide you with all of the information, but to provide you with bits and pieces on the subject so that you can continue your learning outside of the text in the areas that you find interesting, and I think Bahn pulls that off beautifully. This book is all about the profession, and not about specific sites, so if that's what you're looking for, you're looking in the wrong place. However, Bahn does have books about specific sites in specific time periods, so you may want to check out the rest of his body of work if that's what you're looking for. As for me? Well, thanks to this book, I found out there was an updated version of Bahn's textbook, so I've got that on order, along with several other books mentioned throughout the work :)

  16. 4 out of 5

    zachary

    One should never be satisfied with an existing scenario - true scientists constantly question and return to their earlier conclusions, to check them again. Don't rest on your laurels, because laurels rapidly wither and die. An insightful but short summary not just of archaeology itself but its methods and theories, its different fields and subjects as well as its history and its social and political aspects and impacts. In ten chapters, Bahn goes over everything from the origins and development One should never be satisfied with an existing scenario - true scientists constantly question and return to their earlier conclusions, to check them again. Don't rest on your laurels, because laurels rapidly wither and die. An insightful but short summary not just of archaeology itself but its methods and theories, its different fields and subjects as well as its history and its social and political aspects and impacts. In ten chapters, Bahn goes over everything from the origins and development of archaeology, the different theories and methods that make up the archaeology field as well as aspects such as minorities and relation to the public and society. To be quite honest, my highlighter was hard at work during my read. Bahn has managed to put together not only an educational but often humorous introduction to archaeology. Granted, I'm currently on my second year as an Archaeology major, but I did think it was successful in the task of being a short, summarised introduction while also not being simple, or one-sided. Then again, Bahn knows what he's doing by now. I know the books in the series are written by different authors and are bound to be very different, this one really did make me excited to read more of them; and feeling like they're definitely both fun and educational.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Amy Mckee

    This book was... weird. Obviously took me way longer to read than it should but I moved into uni and was ill so haven’t had much chance to sit and read. Although Bahn had some interesting ideas and philosophies as well as being pretty good at giving a VERY brief outline on lots of topics he was too political and casual. His tone through the first half of the book was one of someone who hated archaeology and regretted getting into it, he is repetitively rude to fellow archaeologists and continues This book was... weird. Obviously took me way longer to read than it should but I moved into uni and was ill so haven’t had much chance to sit and read. Although Bahn had some interesting ideas and philosophies as well as being pretty good at giving a VERY brief outline on lots of topics he was too political and casual. His tone through the first half of the book was one of someone who hated archaeology and regretted getting into it, he is repetitively rude to fellow archaeologists and continues to undermine them throughout the book. The second part gets particularly bad when he starts talking about politics, especially when talking about gender in archaeology. His opinions of feminism are outdated and problematic and his bizarre ranting on the subject was unnecessary and seemed shoehorned in for not reason apart from his own (and I’m using a word he seemed to favour a lot) ‘naval-gazing’.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Delaney

    this man spends the first 80% of the book repeatedly talking about how the prejudices of individual archaeologists are the downfall of the field and undoubtedly influence their interpretations of the past, and then in chapter 8 turns around and discounts all feminist archaeology or even just the study of gender in ancient times because it’s too focused on women and says that a ~more balanced archaeology is the way forward??? it’s literally one subfield in a discipline that has marginalized women this man spends the first 80% of the book repeatedly talking about how the prejudices of individual archaeologists are the downfall of the field and undoubtedly influence their interpretations of the past, and then in chapter 8 turns around and discounts all feminist archaeology or even just the study of gender in ancient times because it’s too focused on women and says that a ~more balanced archaeology is the way forward??? it’s literally one subfield in a discipline that has marginalized women for hundreds of years?????? what the hell!!!!!!! very mad that this is required reading for an introductory archaeology class i am taking with a white male professor. my first class isn’t for a few weeks but i HOPE we look at this critically. this is probably more of a 2 star book because i DID find the first 80% informative and interesting but i would like to bump down the average rating on here if possible.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Brian Turner

    A very readable book written in a very entertaining manner that gives a great general overview of archaeology without laboring over the history of archaeology (cf, antiquarians) like most archaeology books do. It also does a great job of briefly covering key modern movements such as New Archaeology and Processual Archaeology without getting bogged down in details, as well as criticisms of colonialism. A little over-sensitive when it comes to feminist approaches, methinks, but otherwise a good to A very readable book written in a very entertaining manner that gives a great general overview of archaeology without laboring over the history of archaeology (cf, antiquarians) like most archaeology books do. It also does a great job of briefly covering key modern movements such as New Archaeology and Processual Archaeology without getting bogged down in details, as well as criticisms of colonialism. A little over-sensitive when it comes to feminist approaches, methinks, but otherwise a good tour of key pointers. One negative is that there's not much on practical archaeology, but it does a good job of covering the most recent trends, especially non-invasive approaches. There's a great sense of humor underlying much of the writing, so I'm looking forward to reading more from Paul Bahn.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Brad Paige

    A decent and entertaining little introduction to a vast subject that is enlightening for those introduced to the field for the first time and also a good grounding refresher for those students of the discipline, who should occasionally revisit these kinds of syntheses to remind themselves of where they are at. Chapters 5-8 are highlights (especially chapter 8 on gender and minorities in archaeology), although I wish there were more emphasis on the importance of provenience and keeping materials A decent and entertaining little introduction to a vast subject that is enlightening for those introduced to the field for the first time and also a good grounding refresher for those students of the discipline, who should occasionally revisit these kinds of syntheses to remind themselves of where they are at. Chapters 5-8 are highlights (especially chapter 8 on gender and minorities in archaeology), although I wish there were more emphasis on the importance of provenience and keeping materials in situ. Bahn certainly doesn’t hide his biases concerning theory and it becomes apparent that much of his work is outside of the U.S. Overall a worthwhile and fun read that can be completed in an afternoon.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ed

    It seems to me after reading a few VSI's that the style, tone and aim of the books varies hugely between subjects - this is therefore very different to the History VSI I read recently. The style is slightly less formal and though the History VSI was very accessible this felt like it was addressed more so to the layman - not a bad thing. Interesting description of archaeology, but I would have found greater detail into the analysis of archaeology great; as it was the book is a balance struck mayb It seems to me after reading a few VSI's that the style, tone and aim of the books varies hugely between subjects - this is therefore very different to the History VSI I read recently. The style is slightly less formal and though the History VSI was very accessible this felt like it was addressed more so to the layman - not a bad thing. Interesting description of archaeology, but I would have found greater detail into the analysis of archaeology great; as it was the book is a balance struck maybe 35-65 between analysis and description respectively. Engaging and informative for a newcomer, with a bent towards advertising honestly archaeology as a discipline and criticising past practice.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Arundev

    Archaeology is not simple thing like just looking for material used in the past,dating it ,give some description and display it for public. It required lot of tolerance to get into a conclusion for a material used in past. Like an investigator who looks for clues for a particular incidence happened in past,one need to connect every dot with the logic and with intelligence until he get a satisfied result. But it is not the end of the story. Very odd clues are emerges out of nowhere, then, it woul Archaeology is not simple thing like just looking for material used in the past,dating it ,give some description and display it for public. It required lot of tolerance to get into a conclusion for a material used in past. Like an investigator who looks for clues for a particular incidence happened in past,one need to connect every dot with the logic and with intelligence until he get a satisfied result. But it is not the end of the story. Very odd clues are emerges out of nowhere, then, it would need another hard task to connect it to result got previously. If it fails then story begins from the beginning.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Chatgemini

    A very short introduction has a limited purpose - to give an overall idea of a particular subject and to possibly generate interest in it to explore it further. This book By Paul Bahn does it admirably well. He gives a well structured tour of various key fields of archeology and thereafter touches upon the present day relevance, challenges and controversies associated with it. Enjoyed the book thoroughly.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Aron

    This book exemplifies what a “very short introduction“ should be: take a complex and extensive topic & provide a comprehensive, jargon-free and illuminating overview. The author shares his passion for the topic while clearly pointing out the pitfalls & problems the field of archaeology faces. His quirky humor & clear language make reading this book a pleasure. Highly recommended.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Wickie

    I got this book as a present from an admirer. However I did not like it, although I find archaeology REALLY interesting. The auther does not tell the reader a lot about his science, but rather uses the book as a platform to state his opinion on all sorts of things. Which is of course the only right opinion. Maybe it was also meant to be British humour. Who knows...

  26. 5 out of 5

    Diana

    “You can release all kinds of demons lurking inside you when you are allowed to burn down a house, or attack a colleague with a bronze sword, bash hell out of a piece of stone, or smear cowdung over a wall or klin, and call it ‘Science’.”

  27. 4 out of 5

    S A N I A

    Bahn mentions minorities and colonization in archaeology, but still fails to do justice to these more than ever important and relevant subjects. A feminist approach is very much needed and is NOT a threat to the study of men in the past.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Joshua Marney

    A decent introduction to various themes is archaeology brought down by a somewhat flippant tone and a rather unprofessional snideness at fellow archaeologists.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Margarita

    Succinct. More than adequate as an intro.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Katie Seal

    Great read! Would recommend for anyone interested in Archaeology and a bit of History!

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