hits counter The Halfling's Gem - Ebook PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Halfling's Gem

Availability: Ready to download

Regis has fallen into the hands of the assassin Artmis Entreri, who is taking him to Calimport to deliver him into the clutches of the vile Pasha Pook. But Drizzt and Wulfgar are close on their heels, determined to save Regis from his own folly as much as from his powerful enemies.


Compare

Regis has fallen into the hands of the assassin Artmis Entreri, who is taking him to Calimport to deliver him into the clutches of the vile Pasha Pook. But Drizzt and Wulfgar are close on their heels, determined to save Regis from his own folly as much as from his powerful enemies.

30 review for The Halfling's Gem

  1. 5 out of 5

    Melissa ♥ Dog/Wolf Lover ♥ Martin

    I can't even begin to explain how much I love these books and characters ❤️ My wonderful Wulfgar ❤️ The sharp tounged and awesome Bruenor Battleaxe ❤️ The lovely and bad to the bone Cattie-Brie ❤️ I didn't add Regis but I love him too. 😊 These friends do everything for each other, even die if they have to and I never want to see that day come 😫 The ending was so sweet. Wulfgar and Cattie-Brie. Bruenor ruling over his home again. And we shall see with Drittz, he's never sits long and he has his own tho I can't even begin to explain how much I love these books and characters ❤️ My wonderful Wulfgar ❤️ The sharp tounged and awesome Bruenor Battleaxe ❤️ The lovely and bad to the bone Cattie-Brie ❤️ I didn't add Regis but I love him too. 😊 These friends do everything for each other, even die if they have to and I never want to see that day come 😫 The ending was so sweet. Wulfgar and Cattie-Brie. Bruenor ruling over his home again. And we shall see with Drittz, he's never sits long and he has his own thoughts and worries of the world. And Guenhwyvar is by his side once again ❤️ I want to leave it with a funny little excerpt. Bruenor and Cattie-Brie are riding a fiery chariot through the sky to quickly get to their friends and help. The silver dragon rolled over onto its back lazily, riding the morning winds with its legs-all four- crossed over it and its sleepy eyes half closed. The good dragon loved its morning glide, leaving the bustle of the world far below and catching the sun's untainted rays above the cloud level But the dragon's marvelous orbs popped open wide when it saw the fiery streak rushing at it from the east. Thinking the flames to be the forerunning fires of an evil red dragon, the silver swooped around into a high cloud and poised to ambush the thing. But the fury left the dragon's eyes when it recognized the strange craft, a fiery chariot, with just the helm of the driver, a one-horned contraption, sticking above the front of the carriage and a young human woman standing behind, her auburn locks flying back over her shoulders. Its huge mouth agape, the silver dragon watched as the chariot sped past. Few things piqued the curiosity of this ancient creature, who had lived so very many years, but it seriously considered following this unlikely scene. A cool breeze wafted in then and washed all other thoughts from the silver dragon's mind. "Peoples," it muttered, rolling again onto its back and shaking its head in disbelief. Happy Reading! Mel ❤️ MY BLOG: Melissa Martin's Reading List AMAZON: REVIEW

  2. 5 out of 5

    Markus

    A 300-page chase with some solid parts and a lot of not so solid parts. Drizzt's journey continues, and the original trilogy, the Icewind Dale trilogy, ends. This one was definitely worth reading for its influential position in fantasy and published D&D literature, but it was definitely very weak overall, and reads like exactly what it is: a fantasy fan's first attempt at publishing some adventures himself. The contrast is huge to the Dark Elf trilogy, written later but taking place earlier in the A 300-page chase with some solid parts and a lot of not so solid parts. Drizzt's journey continues, and the original trilogy, the Icewind Dale trilogy, ends. This one was definitely worth reading for its influential position in fantasy and published D&D literature, but it was definitely very weak overall, and reads like exactly what it is: a fantasy fan's first attempt at publishing some adventures himself. The contrast is huge to the Dark Elf trilogy, written later but taking place earlier in the chronology, in which Salvatore has already grown his skills. I will definitely keep following the series and am excited to follow these characters around the world, especially now that I've gotten the low point out of the way.

  3. 5 out of 5

    GrilledCheeseSamurai (Scott)

    I had forgotten how many truly epic moments occur in this book and, as I was re-reading it, I completely understood why younger me was so taken by this series. Terry Brooks, Tolkien, R.A. Salvatore, Tad Williams, Weis & Hickman, Raymond Feist...these authors were the cornerstone of my reading as a kid and are responsible for why I am so in love with the fantasy genre to this day. The Halfling's Gem is, without a doubt, my favorite out of the Icewind trilogy. It's rapid-fire awesomeness from start I had forgotten how many truly epic moments occur in this book and, as I was re-reading it, I completely understood why younger me was so taken by this series. Terry Brooks, Tolkien, R.A. Salvatore, Tad Williams, Weis & Hickman, Raymond Feist...these authors were the cornerstone of my reading as a kid and are responsible for why I am so in love with the fantasy genre to this day. The Halfling's Gem is, without a doubt, my favorite out of the Icewind trilogy. It's rapid-fire awesomeness from start to finish.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Dani

    Probably the worst one in the series so far. I actually didn't enjoy this one in the least. Here's what this book reminded me of: I work a job where I scan a document into the computer as a picture then convert that picture into text using a "smart read" program. This program often messes up: interchanging I's, 1's and l's. It also mistakes O's and 0's and changes other things like t's to i's and ect. It even goes so far as to turn D's into I) or d's into cl. My job is to read through and correct Probably the worst one in the series so far. I actually didn't enjoy this one in the least. Here's what this book reminded me of: I work a job where I scan a document into the computer as a picture then convert that picture into text using a "smart read" program. This program often messes up: interchanging I's, 1's and l's. It also mistakes O's and 0's and changes other things like t's to i's and ect. It even goes so far as to turn D's into I) or d's into cl. My job is to read through and correct these errors. A job which I don't need to bring home and do to a published book that should have gone through this editing process. A lot of the time I found myself editing the book more than enjoying it. Guenhwyvar once again keeps changing sex throughout the book and the names of most main characters are places are spelled wrong like the indications above, eg: Drizzi. I dislike all of the characters at this point and I wonder if Salvatore really knows how to create interpersonal conflict or realistic relationships between the characters. It's like most of these things happen behind the scenes and are brought out to parade before the reader as though Salvatore is saying "See they're in love." Then he reaches his maximum ability at writing emotionally and switches to another battle scene. Nothing was believable. There was no romance in previous books between Drizzt and Catti-brie but here it is as though we are expected to believe it could've happened. The romance between Catti-brie and Wulfgar also comes out of nowhere. Of course we saw it coming but there was no build up. No sweet moments. No little fights. Nothing. Just a passionate kiss here and there and the worry they have for each other. Another relationship that's touched on but never explored is the one between Drizzt and Alustriel. It's high school writing at best in my opinion, I would expect much more from someone who changed their major so they could write for a living. The characters are too overpowered. Catti-brie is never before mentioned having the ability to shoot a bow and arrow with unerring accuracy. Legolas, I mean Catti-brie, literally picks up a bow and suddenly is the world's greatest archer. Drizzt cannot be beat and Wulfgar has unending stores of "adrenalin" that get him through anything no matter how tired he is. The dwarf is stronger than an ox and apparently has no trouble leaping through the air to bash people in the face whereby they immediately die or pass out. Character Development: Or lack there of. Or how can a character develop when there's nothing there? Flat. All of them. They were increasingly hypocritical, judgmental, and self-righteous. Bruenor says that the dwarves deal with Theives by cutting off their hands and that is it a fitting punishment because he so loathes them. And yet there is little Regis. Drizzt's morals seem only to apply when he isn't in battle and nothing seems to deter him from killing everything in sight when much more peaceful solutions can be reached. Wulfgar seems like he is nothing but a roaring, killing god. Nothing can stop him and he has no personality. It seems his role in the story is for action filler. And the biggest one of all. . . That's right, oh yes, it's: Catti-brie. The woman screams hypocrite every move she makes. She's gets her own paragraph for this one: In one battle scene Catti-brie and Bruenor rush to the aid of Drizzt and Wulfgar while they battle pirates. Since Pirates are human Catti-brie refuses to kill them and instead takes a different approach, not killing them directly but making sure they can't hurt her friends. Then in the next fight scene she's involved in Catti-brie picks off bandits with her little bow like she's shooting cans in the backyard. She doesn't care. She has no lament about killing these humans or how she hates to murder them so she finds another way. No nothing like that. Without a single thought about how much she hates killing people she shoots them down. Made even worse by a line later in the book stated by Bruenor: "But it was Catti-brie, his beautiful daughter, who truly abhorred killing with all of her heart,". Yes and she really, truly shows it too. The characters also never have to make any tough decisions that will effect one of the outcomes in the book. Bruenor, as king, should have to stay with his incoming troops and help with battle plans to reclaim his home. It's the sacrifice of a king, putting the needs of the many against the needs of ... Regis. In my opinion he really doesn't deserve to be a king since he can't be there when needed. He can't put the personal away and act as a leader. I expect a lot more from an author and series people are saying is the best in the fantasy world. It seems his only concern is how awesome his characters have to be and how they must be able to defeat everything. How they can do whatever they want no matter what people think or believe (stealing a mask from an innocent ghost) as long as it justifies their actions to Salvatore so he can keep them happily killing. Anything to move that darn plot along. Anything to keep his precioussssssss Drizzt alive.

  5. 5 out of 5

    David - proud Gleeman in Branwen's adventuring party

    I'll write a full review when I have the time, but for now, here's... DAVE'S FINAL JUDGMENT - THE DEFENSE - Salvatore once again proves that he's one of the best at describing action sequences - Lightning quick pace and non-stop action ensures Salvatore has many opportunities to prove the above claim - While Drizzt may be the star of the show, Bruenor, Wulfgar, Regis, and especially Cattie-Brie are all given their moments to shine - Features more originality than the previous books of The Ice I'll write a full review when I have the time, but for now, here's... DAVE'S FINAL JUDGMENT - THE DEFENSE - Salvatore once again proves that he's one of the best at describing action sequences - Lightning quick pace and non-stop action ensures Salvatore has many opportunities to prove the above claim - While Drizzt may be the star of the show, Bruenor, Wulfgar, Regis, and especially Cattie-Brie are all given their moments to shine - Features more originality than the previous books of The Icewind Dale Trilogy - Artemis constantly reminds us why he's one of the most popular villains in the Forgotten Realms THE PROSECUTION - While many interesting things happen, the overall story is disappointingly shallow and amounts to little more than a 300-page chase sequence THE VERDICT This book has much in common with a really good action movie. It doesn't reinvent the genre or challenge you cerebrally. Rather, it simply takes you on a wild ride and ensures you're enjoying it every step of the way!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Devin

    I feel like this didnt age well and i hate how the characters that "died" were never really dead. It also was too drawn out. I feel like this didnt age well and i hate how the characters that "died" were never really dead. It also was too drawn out.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Brad

    For the first time in six books, I can see why people like R.A. Salvatore's Dark Elf series. I still don't like them myself, but The Halfling's Gem isn't completely without merit. I see that the series' greatest appeal must come from the obligatory and breathless battle sequences -- and those can be kind of entertaining. The Halfling's Gem contains the best of the series so far (taken in chronological order). From Rogues Circle to the Sewers of Calimport to Tarterus to victory, Salvatore rolls an For the first time in six books, I can see why people like R.A. Salvatore's Dark Elf series. I still don't like them myself, but The Halfling's Gem isn't completely without merit. I see that the series' greatest appeal must come from the obligatory and breathless battle sequences -- and those can be kind of entertaining. The Halfling's Gem contains the best of the series so far (taken in chronological order). From Rogues Circle to the Sewers of Calimport to Tarterus to victory, Salvatore rolls an utterly ridiculous ball of bloodshed, mayhem, and so-called honour. If it sounds like I am unimpressed by Salvatore's display it because I AM unimpressed by his display, but that can't change the fact that it is still, on some juvenile, simplistic, good vs. evil level, fun to read. Unfortunately, the book is not just an asinine battle that spans 100 pages. If it were only the battle I would like it better. No, Salvatore wastes 200 pages leading us to the battle with more of his usual, ham-fisted attempts at creating depth of character and meaning. Once again, we are reminded of the dangers of "judging a book by its cover." And this time Salvatore finally uses those very words. Meanwhile, Drizzt himself kills "evil" beings, or steals indiscriminately from "evil" beings (in this case a Banshee who provides safety to an entire village of "good" farmers), without ever taking the time to get to know the depth of their souls, nor the reasons for their badness. Nope. He just knows they're evil and that's enough. Or then there is Breunor and his disgust with thieves, and his thoughts about the chest in Mithral Hall that is reserved for the hands of thieves, all the while ignoring the fact that Regis, the halfling he has slaughtered countless victims to "save," is a master thief. Breunor, apparently, has a different standard for non-evil races or, at least, his friends, because he completely ignores that Regis is willing to become the new guildmaster of thieves. Regis isn't just part of the mob. He makes himself the godfather, and Breunor doesn't blink an eye. These contradictions wouldn't be so bad if the characters actually struggled with them internally. These problems, these obvious lapses of logic, would actually enhance the story if they weren't simply ignored or blithely dismissed. But they are ignored and dismissed without engagement, and that weakens Salvatore's work beyond repair. His work is, at its core, some of the most poorly conceived and insidiously propagandist fantasy drivel I have ever read. Before the huge silly battle began I had decided to not read any more of these books. Six was enough, I thought. But now I don't know. I may need to read them all to fully appreciate how bad Salvatore's series really is. Then again, if I finally saw why people like the series at Book VI, I may actually come to love the series myself when I reach Book XII.

  8. 4 out of 5

    daisy

    More of a 2.5-2.75* I think, but let's just round it up to 3. More of a 2.5-2.75* I think, but let's just round it up to 3.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

    Great ending to this trilogy! I look forward to reading more Drizzt books when I get back home!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Aja: The Narcoleptic Ninja

    This series is such a roller coaster for me. I absolutely loved the last book and then this one just kind of went downhill again. Most of the book was an extended trip going from point a to point b without any real conflict. The only source of tension was whether they’d catch Artemis in time, and even then, the only reason they DID manage to come out on top, was because the primary villain, Pasha Pook, an evil criminal mastermind leading an entire guild of thieves, is surprisingly dumb… And afte This series is such a roller coaster for me. I absolutely loved the last book and then this one just kind of went downhill again. Most of the book was an extended trip going from point a to point b without any real conflict. The only source of tension was whether they’d catch Artemis in time, and even then, the only reason they DID manage to come out on top, was because the primary villain, Pasha Pook, an evil criminal mastermind leading an entire guild of thieves, is surprisingly dumb… And after Streams of Silver, I could feel the tension mounting for a face-off between Drizzt and Artemis and I was so looking forward to it, but even THAT was completely lackluster. First, Cattie-Brie has an intervention with Drizzt and tells him that he’s bigger than Artemis and should let go of this stupid rivalry. It would have been a great moment, but Drizzt just kind of immediately gives in. He didn’t have an internal struggle to come to terms with it and get over the rivalry, it was all just instantly fixed by the magical Cattie-Brie. So now, if and when they do face off, the outcome doesn’t really matter to Drizzt. And that’s exactly what happened. Artemis and Drizzt face off, but all that tension is just gone. We all know Drizzt is going to come out on top somehow, because he’s the protagonist and this isn’t the end of the series. But now, he just doesn’t even care about Artemis on top of it. There’s no good versus evil mentality, no rush knowing that Drizzt is fighting everything he could have been, everything he stopped himself from becoming, because who cares? Even if he loses it doesn’t matter to him anymore. So he starts to come out on top and Artemis finds a clever way to get away- oh, nope sorry. He ran away shrieking like a girl. WHAT!?

  11. 5 out of 5

    Luke Scull

    The ruthless assassin Artemis Entreri has kidnapped the halfling Regis and is taking him to Calimport to deliver him to his erstwhile master, Pasha Pook - kingpin of Calimshan's criminal underworld. Fortunately for Regis, his friends Drizzt the drow elf and Wulfgar the barbarian are hot on their heels. Meanwhile, another friend thought lost struggles to survive a perilous situation. It is a case of out of frying pan and into the fire for the Companions of the Hall as they make their way to spraw The ruthless assassin Artemis Entreri has kidnapped the halfling Regis and is taking him to Calimport to deliver him to his erstwhile master, Pasha Pook - kingpin of Calimshan's criminal underworld. Fortunately for Regis, his friends Drizzt the drow elf and Wulfgar the barbarian are hot on their heels. Meanwhile, another friend thought lost struggles to survive a perilous situation. It is a case of out of frying pan and into the fire for the Companions of the Hall as they make their way to sprawling Calimport, the largest city in the Realms deep in the heart of the desert nation of Calimshan. Regis, or Rumblebelly to his friends - or at least his friend, the dwarf Bruenor - has a lot to answer for. Not content with a life as the Pasha's most prized thief, he made the foolish error of stealing his master's most valued possession, a ruby Pendant of Beguiling able to charm any creature within sight of the gem. Taken at face value, one could argue he deserves whatever dire fate Pasha Pook has in store for him. Look a little deeper, however, and... well, he still kind of deserves the fate the Pasha has in store for him. I mean, Bruenor himself has a chest in Mithral Hall in which the severed hands of thieves are kept. Hmm. Muddy morals aside, honour demands that Drizzt and Wulfgar rescue their friend from the clutches of the wicked Artemis Entreri. What follows is a somewhat abbreviated journey south, aided by some rather convenient magic and punctuated by scenes that range from memorable to rather silly. Firstly, the memorable: the tavern scene in which Wulfgar chooses restraint in talking down the hilariously-named Bungo shows some nice character growth. The scenes between Pook and his minions are frequently amusing and, as with Salvatore's earlier efforts, paint villains with greater nuance than some of his contemporaries. There is an exciting sea battle between the heroes and a small pirate fleet that rewards Drizzt with a heart-warming moment of acceptance as his race-altering mask slips and the crew choose to embrace him despite his heritage. The showdown between Drizzt and Entreri, when it eventually happens, is a blood-pumping confrontation that will have readers on the edge of their seats. As always, Salvatore writes combat with an energy and level of detail that highlights every thrust, slash, parry and wound dealt. As mentioned, though, the justness of our heroes' cause is less sure in this novel. For all Drizzt's introspection regarding respect and honour, he allows his hunger to prove himself better than Entreri to occasionally cloud his thoughts. For his part, Entreri massacres an entire ship's crew in perhaps his most villainous act of his career. There's a certain twisted logic behind his doing so - but it feels gratuitous and jars with what we know of his character. The novel's biggest misstep is the journey into Tarterus, an Outer Plane crawling with native fiends known as demodands. Here the action crosses over into the absurd, with the heroes surviving hordes of fiends (mostly) unscathed and constantly making million-to-one odds seem a sure thing. Drizzt's obvious attraction to Catti-Brie becomes a tad uncomfortable given she and Wulfgar are clearly an item - there's a stolen kiss from an unconscious Cattie-Brie that is certainly eyebrow-raising - and Drizzt claims highest-level hero privilege to shunt both Bruenor and Wulfgar to the side and become the star of the show in decidedly dickish fashion near the end. There's the feeling that here was where R.A. Salvatore decided a certain drow elf was absolutely the main event and plotted accordingly. (Of course, the Dark Elf Trilogy remains the jewel in the crown of the roughly 400 subsequent Realms novels, so in that he was absolutely correct!) One thing that grated that I must mention is the dialect used for some of the characters, particularly the Calishite Sali Dalib, whose broken English (or Common) is embarrassingly denoted using "de" instead of "the," among other abominations. Maybe it read better in 1990 - but, as with the stolen kiss, it makes for slightly uncomfortable reading in 2019. All in all, The Halfling's Gem is the weakest of the original Icewind Dale Trilogy. It lacks the rough charm of the first novel and the charming character growth of the second. Nonetheless, it presents a memorable cast of secondary villains and henchmen which it delights in knocking down, and features an iconic showdown between two iconic characters. An uneven plot and some questionable character choices don't detract too much from the book serving as a satisfying conclusion to a story that brought to life some of the most prominent locales and colourful characters in the Forgotten Realms. For that achievement, the Icewind Dale Trilogy was crucial to the runaway success of the setting.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Allen M Werner

    Once again the intrepid, unusual friends of R.A. Salvatore's imagination ride out on another exciting adventure, leaving the familiar world of Icewind Dale behind for the Sword Coast, from Waterdeep to Baulder's Gate, to Calimport to save the lovable but thieving halfling, Regis. Regis was taken away by the assassin Artemis Entereri in the last book for a debt owed to a powerful guildmaster, Pasha Pook. There are host of battles, as always, sea battles, spider creatures, wererats, demodand's from Once again the intrepid, unusual friends of R.A. Salvatore's imagination ride out on another exciting adventure, leaving the familiar world of Icewind Dale behind for the Sword Coast, from Waterdeep to Baulder's Gate, to Calimport to save the lovable but thieving halfling, Regis. Regis was taken away by the assassin Artemis Entereri in the last book for a debt owed to a powerful guildmaster, Pasha Pook. There are host of battles, as always, sea battles, spider creatures, wererats, demodand's from another astral plane. Drizzt leads the way but can't do it alone. His friends, Wulfgar, Catti-brie and the still breathing king of Mithral Hall, Bruenor, are instrumental on every step of the journey. Being a fan of R.A. Salvatore's work, especially the drow elf Drizzt, I felt this edition lived up to all the intrigue and adventure of the other volumes. Highly recommended.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea

    This, the third in the Icewind Dale trilogy, is better than the previous two entries, mostly for the change in scenery. Characters, major and minor, are still characterized with a heavy handedness to be found in bad fanfic, characters act outside their "good alignments," and this book manages to bring a little racial fun into play with the profoundly idiotic character Salib whatever his name is. Also, I am sick of the way Bruenor talks! I had to reread sentences a few times to figure out what th This, the third in the Icewind Dale trilogy, is better than the previous two entries, mostly for the change in scenery. Characters, major and minor, are still characterized with a heavy handedness to be found in bad fanfic, characters act outside their "good alignments," and this book manages to bring a little racial fun into play with the profoundly idiotic character Salib whatever his name is. Also, I am sick of the way Bruenor talks! I had to reread sentences a few times to figure out what the hell he was saying. However, there are redeeming points. There is some humor, finally, though I am not sure if it's intentional.Drizzt shows some depth beyond being badass, and it was interesting to see Cattie-Brie touch on the source of his tension and hound-like obsession with Artemis. She reminds the reader of what "good" means (in a D&D sense) when she asks if Drizzt wants to kill him to protect the innocent, or simply to prove himself. Drizzt himself isn't sure. On the other hand, this message would have been much, much more effective if Cattie-Brie didn't slaughter swathes of humans all the damn time. Each character demonstrates hypocrisy in this way. The supposedly good Drizzt and Wulfgar gleefully sack the treasure trove of a harmless ghost, Bruenor hates all thieves, except Regis, and Cattie-Brie, who suddenly becomes the world's best archer, hates killing but does it anyway. I shall persevere onwards towards Passage To Dawn....

  14. 5 out of 5

    Earl Grey Tea

    I think I've reached the end of my adventure in D&D literature (outside of the instruction manuals). As some of my D&D buddies would describe R.A. Salvatore's work, it's just fan fiction, nothing great, but nothing particularly terrible either. After getting through six of these books, I would have to say my vocabulary concerning the Forgotten Realms has increased somewhat and I've been able to follow some of our adventures a little bit better since I have some more familiarity with the setting a I think I've reached the end of my adventure in D&D literature (outside of the instruction manuals). As some of my D&D buddies would describe R.A. Salvatore's work, it's just fan fiction, nothing great, but nothing particularly terrible either. After getting through six of these books, I would have to say my vocabulary concerning the Forgotten Realms has increased somewhat and I've been able to follow some of our adventures a little bit better since I have some more familiarity with the setting and context. However, the stories are nothing spectacular to read. It just feels like the main characters are going through the motions of their adventure in a sparsely painted backdrop. R.A. Salvatore's stories don't feel like they are placed in a vibrant society or backdrop. Instead, I get the impression that all the characters that Drizzt and friends interact with are hastily assembled actors. Reading the first six (of thirty-three) Drizzt book was an experience and gives me a bit more insight into the world of D&D and a connection with some of the other people in D&D groups. However, there is a giant world of literature and history books out there drawing my attention instead. If I was still in Middle School and avidly rolling a D20, I think my continuation into the saga of Drizzt would be a much different story.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Wanda

    I will never be a super-fan of this series, but I can still certainly appreciate its appeal. I will try very hard not to complain about character names—many of them, I find completely ridiculous and sometimes even distracting. I mean, who wants an imaginary Halfling in their head who looks like Regis Philbin with furry feet? There’s plenty of good action in this installment, several lost-and-found characters, plus incredible imaginary beasts. Positive from my point of view is Cattie-Brie getting I will never be a super-fan of this series, but I can still certainly appreciate its appeal. I will try very hard not to complain about character names—many of them, I find completely ridiculous and sometimes even distracting. I mean, who wants an imaginary Halfling in their head who looks like Regis Philbin with furry feet? There’s plenty of good action in this installment, several lost-and-found characters, plus incredible imaginary beasts. Positive from my point of view is Cattie-Brie getting a bit more page-time (although I still get hungry for cheese when I read about her). Essentially one long chase scene, this book isn’t too complex. This is good, as there are commas sprinkled throughout the novel, like iron filings in a contaminated loaf of bread, making sentences very unclear. This requires the reader to back up and to try again to wrest the sense from them, not just once or twice, but repeatedly. The obvious “be who you are and don’t mind other people’s opinions” message of Drizzt is a positive one for the age group that this series seems to be aimed at, namely the high school/young adult crowd. Book 253 in my Science Fiction and Fantasy Reading Project.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Zachlopez

    now, I've a weak spot in my heart for fantasy novels. I know that they don't have to be masterful works of modern literature. I know what they do and totally digg it. This book ( and the entire drizzt series/ stories) is one of the worst books I've read since "bridge to teribithia 3". The characters are horribly cliched...even in a cliched world. They have almost no flaws save for their brooding, whining 'woe as me' thought process. Reading ( later skipping) excerpts of a protagonists diary that now, I've a weak spot in my heart for fantasy novels. I know that they don't have to be masterful works of modern literature. I know what they do and totally digg it. This book ( and the entire drizzt series/ stories) is one of the worst books I've read since "bridge to teribithia 3". The characters are horribly cliched...even in a cliched world. They have almost no flaws save for their brooding, whining 'woe as me' thought process. Reading ( later skipping) excerpts of a protagonists diary that are self serving, pretentious as a 15 year old's blog is horrendously painful. It's hard to get attached for anyone in the book, when you know that they will always be ok. Not just surviving, but defeating the trite bad guys in a fashion that makes even the most nerdy of us roll our eyes.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    What stands in the final tome of the Icewind Dale trilogy, is the lengths and strengths the main characters endure to help and avenge their loved ones. A mother lifting a wagon to save her baby would not be out of a place in this book. The action scenes and the escalating tension are top-notch. Because the book is one action scene after another, it's hard to stop, after you start. From sea to desert to urban environment to Hell itself, and back from the dead! The companions tackle everything and e What stands in the final tome of the Icewind Dale trilogy, is the lengths and strengths the main characters endure to help and avenge their loved ones. A mother lifting a wagon to save her baby would not be out of a place in this book. The action scenes and the escalating tension are top-notch. Because the book is one action scene after another, it's hard to stop, after you start. From sea to desert to urban environment to Hell itself, and back from the dead! The companions tackle everything and everyone to save Regis. Entreri continues to impersonate the ultimate cool bad guy. A perfect yang mirror for Drizzt. Faerûn keeps getting richer and richer as these books develop.

  18. 5 out of 5

    DemetraP

    I don't like Regis. He's a thief and lazy. I don't like Regis. He's a thief and lazy.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Adam Whitehead

    The Companions of the Hall have successfully located Mithril Hall, the ancestral home of Bruenor Battlehammer and his clansmen. Unfortunately, the quest was completed only at great cost: Bruenor was lost in combat with the shadow dragon Shimmergloom and the halfling Regis was captured by the assassin Artemis Entreri. Entreri is now taking his prisoner back to the great southern metropolis of Calimport, leaving Drizzt Do'Urden and Wulfgar with no choice but to pursue them, whilst Catti-brie organ The Companions of the Hall have successfully located Mithril Hall, the ancestral home of Bruenor Battlehammer and his clansmen. Unfortunately, the quest was completed only at great cost: Bruenor was lost in combat with the shadow dragon Shimmergloom and the halfling Regis was captured by the assassin Artemis Entreri. Entreri is now taking his prisoner back to the great southern metropolis of Calimport, leaving Drizzt Do'Urden and Wulfgar with no choice but to pursue them, whilst Catti-brie organises the armies coming together to retake Mithril Hall. The pursuit is long and dangerous, and Drizzt must decide whether the recovery of his friend is true motivation, or the knowledge that Entreri is the first warrior to have ever matched him blade to blade, and how eagerly he seeks a rematch. The Halfling's Gem (1990) wraps up R.A. Salvatore's first fantasy series, The Icewind Dale Trilogy. The Crystal Shard had introduced the world to the dark elven ranger Drizzt Do'Urden and his companions and Streams of Silver had given them an epic, Tolkienesque quest to undertake. This concluding book sees them divided and hot on the heels of one of their kidnapped fellows, a scenario ripe for pulp fantasy adventure, and that's what we get. Drizzt and company visit the grand cities of Waterdeep, Baldur's Gate, Memnon and Calimport; engage in all manner of hijinks on the high seas; and are then pitched into battle with a shadowy thieves' guild and its allies, a mixture of wizards, giants and wererats. It's mostly splendid fun. By this third book, Salvatore has become a reasonable writer of straightforward action adventure and delivers an entertaining book in that mode. It does feel like he has larger aspirations to write an engaging travelogue of the Sword Coast (the west coast of the main Forgotten Realms continent of Faerun and the focus for many of the works in the setting), and in that respect falters; 320 pages isn't really enough time to do that and both Waterdeep and Baldur's Gate get decidedly short shrift in this book. Calimport is more fully fleshed out, but it's questionable to what extent Salvatore consulted the source material: the city's distinction of being divided into many dozen drudachs or subdistricts, each walled off from its neighbours, is not mentioned at all. As a result the unique character and flavour of Calimport is lost (Salvatore is also smarter than to rely on Arabian stereotypes for the city or Calimshan as a whole, although one hapless Memnon merchant does start leaning in that direction). Characterisation remains reasonable and Salvatore explores some interesting ideas, such as Drizzt using a magical mask to pass as a surface elf and avoid the racist appraisals of his character stemming from his skin colour alone, and facing a crisis of identity as a result. Drizzt also has to face his motives for dealing with Entreri, and whether these stem from a desire for revenge, a desire for a rematch with a worthy foe or a genuine desire to save his friend Regis. Wulfgar also gets a fish-out-of-water storyline as he finds himself trying to survive in civilised surrounds for prolonged periods for the first time, and we meet a few more characters who will become important in future volumes of the wider Legend of Drizzt series, such as Captain Deudermont and the crew of the Sea Sprite. On the minus side, there isn't much. This very much remains an action-focused, fast food meal of a fantasy novel and is enjoyable on that level, but those looking for a deeper, richer experience best look elsewhere. Otherwise, The Halfling's Gem (***½) wraps up this trilogy reasonably well. From this book readers can go back to experience Drizzt's backstory in The Dark Elf Trilogy or press on to find out what happens to the Companions of the Hall and Mithril Hall next in the Legacy of the Drow Quartet (I'd strongly recommend the former).

  20. 4 out of 5

    Caitlin

    The last book in the Icewind Dale trilogy follows Drizzt and Wulfgar trying to save Regis, who has been kidnapped by Artemis Entreri. A game of cat and mouse, continuing the enmity between Artemis and Drizzt from the previous novel, leading through deserts and other planes. The Halflings Gem was a great ending to the trilogy. The continued rivalry between Drizzt and Artemis really comes to a head in this, and there’s a lot of adventure and action throughout the book. The characters are as deligh The last book in the Icewind Dale trilogy follows Drizzt and Wulfgar trying to save Regis, who has been kidnapped by Artemis Entreri. A game of cat and mouse, continuing the enmity between Artemis and Drizzt from the previous novel, leading through deserts and other planes. The Halflings Gem was a great ending to the trilogy. The continued rivalry between Drizzt and Artemis really comes to a head in this, and there’s a lot of adventure and action throughout the book. The characters are as delightful as always, having come so far throughout the trilogy, the development for their personalities and their relationship as a group really hits its stride. The writing is the most noticeable improvement in The Halflings Gem. The Crystal Shard, while entertaining, didn’t feel like it flowed quite as well as the Legend of Drizzt series, and in The Halflings Gem, Salvatore has really come in to his own voice and writing style, and the book just flowed so smoothly. I say this for every Salvatore book in the series, but the nostalgia of this old school style fantasy is so strong, and so worthwhile. If I haven’t convinced anyone to read this by now, I don’t know what more to say other than they are so fun, so enjoyable, and you’re missing out.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ralph Pulner

    A great adventure. A great balance of humor and action. I think this is the best of the trilogy. -There is a shift, tonally, in RA Salvatore's writing style that I really enjoyed. Better sentence structure, more enhanced and descriptive battle scenes, but not hard to follow. -Getting to see the realms was a pleasure. Waterdeep, Baldur's Gate and Calimsham! -This book was number 12 on the New York Times bestseller list at it's release. I imagine that sealed the deal for RA's writing career and legi A great adventure. A great balance of humor and action. I think this is the best of the trilogy. -There is a shift, tonally, in RA Salvatore's writing style that I really enjoyed. Better sentence structure, more enhanced and descriptive battle scenes, but not hard to follow. -Getting to see the realms was a pleasure. Waterdeep, Baldur's Gate and Calimsham! -This book was number 12 on the New York Times bestseller list at it's release. I imagine that sealed the deal for RA's writing career and legitimized TSR as a book publisher as well.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Bradley Woodall

    Another great book. Can't get enough of these gems Another great book. Can't get enough of these gems

  23. 4 out of 5

    SLIKK519

    This series was great. All the classic DnD inspired fantasy goodness you would expect. Diverse line up of characters with great backstories and growth, rich layered world building, cool varied locales, relatablebsystem of magic, enchanted weapons and armour, aaaand I could go on forever haha.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Tony

    4 unstoppable, invincible characters pursue an assassin over thousands of miles for their halfling thief friend in this fantasy. Filled with tons of narrow escapes and convenient encounters. The Companions of the Hall: Drizzt, the dark elf; Wulfgar, the Barbarian, Bruenor, the Dwarf; and Cattie-Brie, the human adopted daughter of Bruenor, aren't supposedly invincible, but upon reading the book it's quite apparent that they are. It's a fantasy book with superheroes and never fear for their deaths 4 unstoppable, invincible characters pursue an assassin over thousands of miles for their halfling thief friend in this fantasy. Filled with tons of narrow escapes and convenient encounters. The Companions of the Hall: Drizzt, the dark elf; Wulfgar, the Barbarian, Bruenor, the Dwarf; and Cattie-Brie, the human adopted daughter of Bruenor, aren't supposedly invincible, but upon reading the book it's quite apparent that they are. It's a fantasy book with superheroes and never fear for their deaths as they always find a convenient way out. Even Regis, the halfling, is seemingly impervious. They face a bajillion enemies including pirates, wererats, duergar (dark dwarves), a banshee, bandits, demodands (demons of Tarterus), even a seedy merchant and his goblin sidekick, and still live to tell the tale. The big baddie is Pasha Pook, the leader of the thieves guild who capture Regis through his assassin, Artemis Entreri. Even though Regis is admittedly guilty as charged, the friends still feel it necessary to tear apart everyone in their path for their rightfully accused friend. But never is this concept addressed in the novel, we are to take it for granted that the heroes are "good" and the guildmaster is "evil." Many battles don't serve a larger purpose in the tale other than as random encounters for our heroes to vanquish. The deeper layer amid all of the fighting and travelling is Drizzt's struggle with his identity, as he finds an item that allows himself to be disguised and walk among the surface world unmolested. The personal conflict between Drizzt and his archenemy, Artemis Entreri, comes to a head as they face-off again to determine whose values make one a better fighter; the cold, calculating assassin, or the passionate, caring dark elf. The Halfling's Gem is a fanciful romp through the forgotten realms world. It lacks much of the layers of scheming that Salvatore authored in Homeland and even Exile, but The Halfling's Gem was published before those two even though it is the 6th book of the Legend of Drizzt chronologically. I am looking forward to The Legacy as that is where characters from the first two trilogies meet up!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Gregory

    This was the conclusion of the Icewind Dale trilogy and it was a real questing book. Lots of intermediary quests to reach the ultimate quest - saving Regis. The one part of this that I found confusing was the sort of quick conclusion of taking back Bruenor's ancestral home. This final battle was put into an epilogue. There was more story here that I wish were played out but I guess there was a limit by either the publisher or the author on how much tale to tell. All in all, a very fine trilogy. This was the conclusion of the Icewind Dale trilogy and it was a real questing book. Lots of intermediary quests to reach the ultimate quest - saving Regis. The one part of this that I found confusing was the sort of quick conclusion of taking back Bruenor's ancestral home. This final battle was put into an epilogue. There was more story here that I wish were played out but I guess there was a limit by either the publisher or the author on how much tale to tell. All in all, a very fine trilogy.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Greg Strandberg

    I first read this in the summer before 8th grade. I sat outside on my mom's chair in the shade under the trees and read almost all of it in one day. I finished off the rest of it the next day and got into a good habit of completing Salvatore books quickly. This is one of my favorite fantasy series and I like to read it again every few years. Check it out! I first read this in the summer before 8th grade. I sat outside on my mom's chair in the shade under the trees and read almost all of it in one day. I finished off the rest of it the next day and got into a good habit of completing Salvatore books quickly. This is one of my favorite fantasy series and I like to read it again every few years. Check it out!

  27. 4 out of 5

    LiteratureIsLife

    Read this review (and others) at: https://literatureislife.com/2021/02/... The Halfling’s Gem picks up right where Streams of Silver left off. Bruenor lost, Regis and Guenhwyvar kidnapped, and the remaining companions at a loss. Bruenor may be gone, but Regis and Guenhywvar can still be saved as the companions continue forward. Now, nothing in this book is too surprising. It’s still your standard fantasy fare. That being said, now that the group is out of not-Moria, the plot does start to get mor Read this review (and others) at: https://literatureislife.com/2021/02/... The Halfling’s Gem picks up right where Streams of Silver left off. Bruenor lost, Regis and Guenhwyvar kidnapped, and the remaining companions at a loss. Bruenor may be gone, but Regis and Guenhywvar can still be saved as the companions continue forward. Now, nothing in this book is too surprising. It’s still your standard fantasy fare. That being said, now that the group is out of not-Moria, the plot does start to get more original. Like the rest of the Icewind Dale trilogy, there are no real surprises here. It’s fairly easy for readers to guess what will happen next, but the characterization and storytelling still make this book worthwhile. Regis’ old boss, Pasha Pook, serves as the key villain here but not really the main one. Entreri is still around and technically working for Pook, but very much has his own agenda. He leads the companions on a merry chase throughout the Forgotten Realms, dangling Regis as bait to lure Drizzt into the rematch he craves. Despite this series later being coined “The Legend of Drizzt”, things are pretty even among the whole cast here. As I mentioned in my review of The Crystal Shard, Salvatore originally intended Wulfgar to be the main character. People just liked Drizzt better because he’s dark and mysterious but still a good person. The focus does start to lean a bit more towards Drizzt in this book, but the spotlight isn’t on him just yet. That being said, everyone gets character development here. Regis (sorta) learns to be a better person, Wulfgar continues to learn about civilized lands, and love starts to blossom being Catti-brie and Drizzt. Kudos to Catti-brie for still being a warrior woman badass and not just a love interest. Entreri also takes a more central role as Drizzt’s rival and is sure to be a recurring villain in this series. R.A. Salvatore’s writing continues to be incredibly detailed. The action sequences are fast-paced but every important little detail is still there. Instead of just saying “this person swings his sword”, Salvatore describes how they swing their sword, why, and what their opponent does in response. It gives a better sense of the immense skill each character possesses with their weapons. Despite all that, The Halfling’s Gem still feels like a very early story. I wouldn’t go as far as to claim it has Early Installment Weirdness, it’s just…shallow. A standard fantasy adventure in a standard fantasy setting. But considering this series started in 1988 and is still going as of 2020, I assume things pick up a bit later.

  28. 5 out of 5

    AAmell

    A++ I legit did not want to finish this book by page 350. I didn't want it to end. I'm happy that I did finish, but also sad that that amazing adventure is over... I could hardly put this book down. Once again, Salvatore was able to cram 600 pages worth of adventure into 350 pages, and it never felt rushed or forced. The action was back to back... to back! I was on edge until the last page, when I finally was able to breathe easy. Sort of... You know Salvatore, always setting up for the next book A++ I legit did not want to finish this book by page 350. I didn't want it to end. I'm happy that I did finish, but also sad that that amazing adventure is over... I could hardly put this book down. Once again, Salvatore was able to cram 600 pages worth of adventure into 350 pages, and it never felt rushed or forced. The action was back to back... to back! I was on edge until the last page, when I finally was able to breathe easy. Sort of... You know Salvatore, always setting up for the next book. Once again, I'll be buying the next novel shortly. I haven't had a flood of depression from finishing a book like this in a long time. It had its hooks in me that deep, I tell ya. Part of it is because this was the last book in the 3 book series (The Icewind Dale Trilogy). Superb pacing, outstanding plot development, sweat-inducing action... This novel is a must read- but you'll have to read the first 5 books first! I pity those who have not read Drizzt yet. They don't know what they're missing.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Daryl

    This is a fine continuation of the tale. I still like the characters a lot and find their internal lives and emotions more compelling than much of what actually happens in the stories (you can read about the drow wielding his scimitars only so many times without finding it a little tiresome). These are pleasant, quick reads, and I'll likely loop back to the first in the whole series (I started with numbers 4 - 6, which were the first Salvatore wrote). This is a fine continuation of the tale. I still like the characters a lot and find their internal lives and emotions more compelling than much of what actually happens in the stories (you can read about the drow wielding his scimitars only so many times without finding it a little tiresome). These are pleasant, quick reads, and I'll likely loop back to the first in the whole series (I started with numbers 4 - 6, which were the first Salvatore wrote).

  30. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    So now I have read the first 6 books of the Legend of Drizzt. The 4 stars reflects my level of enjoyment. Although I don't think this series is nearly as good as The Liaden Universe by Sharon Lee and Steve Miller or the Stormlight Archive series by Brandon Sanderson, I have found that I have trouble putting the books down. They are great for when I need a light quick read. So now I have read the first 6 books of the Legend of Drizzt. The 4 stars reflects my level of enjoyment. Although I don't think this series is nearly as good as The Liaden Universe by Sharon Lee and Steve Miller or the Stormlight Archive series by Brandon Sanderson, I have found that I have trouble putting the books down. They are great for when I need a light quick read.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...