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The Vampyre, The Werewolf and Other Gothic Tales of Horror

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In this 19th-century medley of the macabre, seven blood-chilling tales feature a cast of demons, doppelgangers, werewolves, and other beastly creatures, sure to haunt your dreams. The lead story, "The Vampyre," has influenced generations of fantasy fiction writers. One of the first tales ever written in the romantic vampire genre, it was the result of a friendly In this 19th-century medley of the macabre, seven blood-chilling tales feature a cast of demons, doppelgangers, werewolves, and other beastly creatures, sure to haunt your dreams. The lead story, "The Vampyre," has influenced generations of fantasy fiction writers. One of the first tales ever written in the romantic vampire genre, it was the result of a friendly writing competition that also yielded Mary Shelley's classic, Frankenstein. The story begins as a gentleman traveling in Greece falls in love with a local beauty. When she warns him about vampires, he scoffs at her fears — until he's caught in the forest one night and finds someone at his throat. This fiendishly good collection continues with Clemence Housman's "The Werewolf," in which a white-robed maiden with a thirst for blood encounters twin brothers — and executes a diabolical plan. In Edward Bulwer-Lytton's "Monos and Daimonos," a reclusive young man goes to great lengths to rid himself of the odd character pursuing him...with horrifying results. Plus, there are four more equally thrilling tales, including the anonymous stories, "The Curse" and "The Victim." Must-have reading for college students and fans of the supernatural.


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In this 19th-century medley of the macabre, seven blood-chilling tales feature a cast of demons, doppelgangers, werewolves, and other beastly creatures, sure to haunt your dreams. The lead story, "The Vampyre," has influenced generations of fantasy fiction writers. One of the first tales ever written in the romantic vampire genre, it was the result of a friendly In this 19th-century medley of the macabre, seven blood-chilling tales feature a cast of demons, doppelgangers, werewolves, and other beastly creatures, sure to haunt your dreams. The lead story, "The Vampyre," has influenced generations of fantasy fiction writers. One of the first tales ever written in the romantic vampire genre, it was the result of a friendly writing competition that also yielded Mary Shelley's classic, Frankenstein. The story begins as a gentleman traveling in Greece falls in love with a local beauty. When she warns him about vampires, he scoffs at her fears — until he's caught in the forest one night and finds someone at his throat. This fiendishly good collection continues with Clemence Housman's "The Werewolf," in which a white-robed maiden with a thirst for blood encounters twin brothers — and executes a diabolical plan. In Edward Bulwer-Lytton's "Monos and Daimonos," a reclusive young man goes to great lengths to rid himself of the odd character pursuing him...with horrifying results. Plus, there are four more equally thrilling tales, including the anonymous stories, "The Curse" and "The Victim." Must-have reading for college students and fans of the supernatural.

30 review for The Vampyre, The Werewolf and Other Gothic Tales of Horror

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    This selection of 19th century gothic horror tales includes one of the original vampire stories, supposedly written during the same "competition" that produced Mary Shelley's Frankenstein. Alas, the John Polidori story cannot hold a candle to Bram Stoker's Dracula. Fortunately, the book also contains an excellent tale by A E Housman's sister Clemence entitled "The Werewolf," which has some nice touches. The Vampyre, The Werewolf and Other Gothic Tales of Horror is filled out with some other This selection of 19th century gothic horror tales includes one of the original vampire stories, supposedly written during the same "competition" that produced Mary Shelley's Frankenstein. Alas, the John Polidori story cannot hold a candle to Bram Stoker's Dracula. Fortunately, the book also contains an excellent tale by A E Housman's sister Clemence entitled "The Werewolf," which has some nice touches. The Vampyre, The Werewolf and Other Gothic Tales of Horror is filled out with some other interesting short tales, including "Monos and Daimonos" by Edward Bulwer-Lytton and some moderately interesting anonymous tales. This book is primarily of interest to those who are interested in the literary antecedents of the horror tales and movies to come over the next century and a half. All the stories are well selected for their eeriness, with "The Werewolf" being the best of the lot.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sharon

    This is a collection of seven short stories, The Vampyre being the more prominent. I had heard about it by watching Mysteries at the Museum. Polidari was one of the "contestants" who wrote a short horror story competing against the Shellys and Lord Byron. Of course Mary Shelly won with her story of Frankenstein, but Polidari's Vampyre is said to be what inspired Bram Stoker's Dracula. The remaining Gothic horror tales are also from basically the same era (mid- to late 1800s) represent the times This is a collection of seven short stories, The Vampyre being the more prominent. I had heard about it by watching Mysteries at the Museum. Polidari was one of the "contestants" who wrote a short horror story competing against the Shellys and Lord Byron. Of course Mary Shelly won with her story of Frankenstein, but Polidari's Vampyre is said to be what inspired Bram Stoker's Dracula. The remaining Gothic horror tales are also from basically the same era (mid- to late 1800s) represent the times steeped in superstition and terror. The language, for me was at times difficult to follow as some were translations. However, the last line of the last story, The Astrologer's Prediction, or Maniac's Fate, by Anonymous, seemed very prophetic today: "Surely this is a spot where guilt may thrive in safety, or bigotry weave a spell to enthrall her votaries."

  3. 4 out of 5

    Lena Tumasyan

    My recollection of this collection is a bit spotty and this is because my own personal schedule interfered with progress. Alas, it is complete and I can say a few words. I picked up this book in the clearance section of Barnes and Noble. Vampire fiction is hot right now, and I've always been a fan of Gothic literature so I was hoping this might indulge my curiosity. Only one of the stores was ones I've heard of before but never read, the Vampyre. The rest were all new. I was hoping for more of a My recollection of this collection is a bit spotty and this is because my own personal schedule interfered with progress. Alas, it is complete and I can say a few words. I picked up this book in the clearance section of Barnes and Noble. Vampire fiction is hot right now, and I've always been a fan of Gothic literature so I was hoping this might indulge my curiosity. Only one of the stores was ones I've heard of before but never read, the Vampyre. The rest were all new. I was hoping for more of a collection of Wylde's party, meaning, Frankensteign, Vampire, Werewolf and others, but it wasn't like that. There were only 2 monster stores "Vampyre" and "Werewolf". There was one doppelganger story "Monos and Diamonos" which I didn't suspect at all and really liked. It was supernatural in nature and rightfully so. But there were two very similar stores "The Curse" and "The Astrological's Prediction", neither or which was really supernatural (at least not to our culture today), but instead were psychological. Only one story had a happy ending, "The Vindictive Monk." So it was a short and diverse collection. I just wish I had a bit more scary stories in there. The writing was a bit hard to read. It's mostly very very long sentences with lots of commas and semicolons, but I managed to get through it. There is nothing that can be done, because that was the style of writing at the time. I gave this collection 4 stars bc it seems to capture this period in literature (mostly 1810's to 1830's and one in 1890's) very well and the stories were interesting. But I wish the stories were more spooky, more ominous, more supernatural, and more, well, GOTHIC. If you really want to dig deeper into Gothic literature, I'd recommend a larger, more thorough, and more diverse collection. This is like a quickie - it gives you a bite but not enough to satisfy.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Mike Steven

    I read this because we have to include more nineteenth century literature at work and I thought I might find a short story that would work well. I was also interested to read 'The Vampyre' which is said to be the first 'romantic' interpretation of the vampire myth, partially inspired by Polidori's friendship with Byron and also allegedly originally conceived for the legendary ghost story competition where Mary Shelley first shared the idea for Frankenstein. There is a good selection of stories I read this because we have to include more nineteenth century literature at work and I thought I might find a short story that would work well. I was also interested to read 'The Vampyre' which is said to be the first 'romantic' interpretation of the vampire myth, partially inspired by Polidori's friendship with Byron and also allegedly originally conceived for the legendary ghost story competition where Mary Shelley first shared the idea for Frankenstein. There is a good selection of stories of differing lengths and, like any compilation of short stories, some are better than others. I actually quite liked the Werewolf one best as The Vampyre does lack pace at the beginning, however, the collection has been selected quite well and there are no truly terrible pieces of writing. If you read it expect a healthy mix of the supernatural, clever twists and plenty of openings that tell you about the family history of the protagonists. It's decent.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Bmj2k

    Enjoyable tales but all pretty obvious, and must have been obvious even when they were written over a century ago. For example, in The Vampyre, the odd man you suspect to be a vampire from his first appearance on page one turns out to be- hold on to your hats!- a vampire on the last page. Nearly every story depends on that type of telegraphed and obvious twist. Putting that aside, these are nicely moody tales.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Amber Marshall

    Most of these weren't much on "horror" for the jaded modern reader, others weren't horror at all. Interesting to see the origins of many of our iconic horror stories but nothing I'd probably read again.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    Only read The Vampyre. It was OK.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Marie

    I love me some gothic stories! These were great. Perfect for a lover of Victorian gothic :-)

  9. 5 out of 5

    John P.

  10. 5 out of 5

    PABlo Bley

  11. 5 out of 5

    Danielle

  12. 5 out of 5

    BooksintheBlood

  13. 5 out of 5

    Diana Rosero Morán

  14. 5 out of 5

    Philip Lenhardt

  15. 5 out of 5

    Erik

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lily

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Watkins

  18. 5 out of 5

    Emmanuel

  19. 5 out of 5

    Zel0phe

  20. 4 out of 5

    Hina Siddiqui

  21. 5 out of 5

    Adriana Olarte

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sam

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kate Cometsevah

  24. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca Gransden

  25. 5 out of 5

    Rita Saade

  26. 5 out of 5

    Joel Kibbe

  27. 4 out of 5

    Nick

  28. 4 out of 5

    CATHY

  29. 4 out of 5

    Rieka

  30. 5 out of 5

    Starrev

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