hits counter Star Science Fiction Stories No. 2 - Ebook PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Star Science Fiction Stories No. 2

Availability: Ready to download

Contents Disappearing Act • short story by Alfred Bester It's a Good Life • short story by Jerome Bixby The Clinic • (1953) • short story by Theodore Sturgeon The Happiest Creature • [Quarantine] • short story by Jack Williamson The Odor of Thought • short story by Robert Sheckley F Y I • short story by James Blish Critical Factor • short story by Hal Clement The Remorseful • shor Contents Disappearing Act • short story by Alfred Bester It's a Good Life • short story by Jerome Bixby The Clinic • (1953) • short story by Theodore Sturgeon The Happiest Creature • [Quarantine] • short story by Jack Williamson The Odor of Thought • short story by Robert Sheckley F Y I • short story by James Blish Critical Factor • short story by Hal Clement The Remorseful • short story by C.M. Kornbluth A Pound of Cure • short story by Lester del Rey Friend of the Family • short story by Richard Wilson Hormones • short story by Fletcher Pratt Conquest • short story by Anthony Boucher The Purple Fields • short story by Robert Crane The Congruent People • short story by Algis Budrys Introduction (Star Science Fiction Stories No. 2) • essay by Frederik Pohl


Compare

Contents Disappearing Act • short story by Alfred Bester It's a Good Life • short story by Jerome Bixby The Clinic • (1953) • short story by Theodore Sturgeon The Happiest Creature • [Quarantine] • short story by Jack Williamson The Odor of Thought • short story by Robert Sheckley F Y I • short story by James Blish Critical Factor • short story by Hal Clement The Remorseful • shor Contents Disappearing Act • short story by Alfred Bester It's a Good Life • short story by Jerome Bixby The Clinic • (1953) • short story by Theodore Sturgeon The Happiest Creature • [Quarantine] • short story by Jack Williamson The Odor of Thought • short story by Robert Sheckley F Y I • short story by James Blish Critical Factor • short story by Hal Clement The Remorseful • short story by C.M. Kornbluth A Pound of Cure • short story by Lester del Rey Friend of the Family • short story by Richard Wilson Hormones • short story by Fletcher Pratt Conquest • short story by Anthony Boucher The Purple Fields • short story by Robert Crane The Congruent People • short story by Algis Budrys Introduction (Star Science Fiction Stories No. 2) • essay by Frederik Pohl

30 review for Star Science Fiction Stories No. 2

  1. 5 out of 5

    Martin

    A young boy with mind powers has the whole village living in fear of him If Anthony could hear your thoughts he might want to help you - in unexpected ways. If he did not like you then you would turn into something most unpleasant! Bill Soames pumped the pedals, he was wishing deep down that he could pump twice as fast, to get away from Anthony all the faster, and away from Aunt Amy, who sometimes just forgot how careful you had to be. And he shouldn’t have thought that. Because Anthony caught it. A young boy with mind powers has the whole village living in fear of him If Anthony could hear your thoughts he might want to help you - in unexpected ways. If he did not like you then you would turn into something most unpleasant! Bill Soames pumped the pedals, he was wishing deep down that he could pump twice as fast, to get away from Anthony all the faster, and away from Aunt Amy, who sometimes just forgot how careful you had to be. And he shouldn’t have thought that. Because Anthony caught it. He caught the desire to get away from the Fremont house as if it was something bad, and his purple gaze blinked and he snapped a small, sulky thought after Bill Soames – just a small one, because he was in a good mood today, and besides, he liked Bill Soames, or at least didn’t dislike him, at least today. Bill Soames wanted to go away – so, petulantly, Anthony helped him. Pedaling with superhuman speed – or rather, appearing to, because in reality the bicycle was pedaling him – Bill Soames vanished down the road in a cloud of dust, his thin, terrified wail drifting back across the heat. It's a good life Everybody in Peaksville always said ‘Oh, fine,’ or ‘Good,’ or ‘Say, that’s swell,’ when almost everything happened or was mentioned – even unhappy things like accidents or even deaths. They’d always say ‘Good,’ because if they didn’t try to cover up how they really felt, Anthony might overhear with his mind, and then nobody knew what might happen. Like the time Mrs. Kent’s husband, Sam, had come walking back from the graveyard because Anthony liked Mrs. Kent and had heard her mourning. This story finishes but it has no end. Find out by reading it. Enjoy!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    Oh GOODY!.....True Horror.....AND it's a 1953 Classic! You can actually feel the fear of the characters as you listen to the voices in this creepy-good short audio.Little Anthony rules the town so mind your P's and Q's.....NO bad thoughts....NO complaining....and NO singing.....Just be GOOD! Come to a birthday party and watch some Anthony television.....Peaksville no longer has electricity, but.....it's gonna be GOOD!PLEASE.....only pleasantries allowed....or you're history! ---------------- Oh GOODY!.....True Horror.....AND it's a 1953 Classic! You can actually feel the fear of the characters as you listen to the voices in this creepy-good short audio.Little Anthony rules the town so mind your P's and Q's.....NO bad thoughts....NO complaining....and NO singing.....Just be GOOD! Come to a birthday party and watch some Anthony television.....Peaksville no longer has electricity, but.....it's gonna be GOOD!PLEASE.....only pleasantries allowed....or you're history! ---------------- The November 3, 1961 Twilight Zone episode (had to watch) is very atmospherically creepy as well as our little monster (older here) worries fear into those who cross his path transforming people, animals, objects and weather to satisfy his every heart's desire. BUT MY VERY FAVORITE ZONE (if anyone is interested) is the one about a hitchhiker with CCR's song The Midnight Special. Still gives me a fright!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Paul Bryant

    Sorry for spamming everyone with non-reviews of old science fiction anthologies today - in each case I un-ticked the "add to my update feed" box but GR still added them all to my update feed. Grrr. Sorry for spamming everyone with non-reviews of old science fiction anthologies today - in each case I un-ticked the "add to my update feed" box but GR still added them all to my update feed. Grrr.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Skylar Phelps

    Creeptastic! It’s even better than the Twilight Zone episode. I liked it almost as much as I liked Harrison Bergeron, which is one of my all time favorite shorts in a similar genre and that’s really saying something. It left me with a similar strange feeling in the end. 5 Stars!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Craig

    Frederik Pohl's series of Star anthologies were the first such to present original stories in book form, and remain one of the best examples of the form. The contributors to this second volume were Alfred Bester, Jerome Bixby, Anthony Boucher, A.J. Budrys, Hal Clement, Robert Crane (the only author who wasn't a big "name" in the field), Lester del Rey, C.M. Kornbluth, Fletcher Pratt, Robert Sheckley, Theodore Sturgeon, Jack Williamson, and Richard Wilson. The stand-out story is Jerome Bixby's It Frederik Pohl's series of Star anthologies were the first such to present original stories in book form, and remain one of the best examples of the form. The contributors to this second volume were Alfred Bester, Jerome Bixby, Anthony Boucher, A.J. Budrys, Hal Clement, Robert Crane (the only author who wasn't a big "name" in the field), Lester del Rey, C.M. Kornbluth, Fletcher Pratt, Robert Sheckley, Theodore Sturgeon, Jack Williamson, and Richard Wilson. The stand-out story is Jerome Bixby's It's a -Good- Life, basis for the famous T.Z. show, but there's not a bad one in the bunch.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tim Pendry

    One of my favourite 'demon child' horror stories. 'It's a Good Life' (1953) gives us a picture of what it might be like to have someone with no moral compass and limited intellect who could read your thoughts and was capable of thinking into being or destroying or transforming anything he wished. This is a finely wrought tale of human fear that might or might not have something to do with the way we might be oppressed by a social and political order which might be able to read our thoughts and ha One of my favourite 'demon child' horror stories. 'It's a Good Life' (1953) gives us a picture of what it might be like to have someone with no moral compass and limited intellect who could read your thoughts and was capable of thinking into being or destroying or transforming anything he wished. This is a finely wrought tale of human fear that might or might not have something to do with the way we might be oppressed by a social and political order which might be able to read our thoughts and have powers that we cannot match. This tale brings such abstract thoughts down to earth with ordinary people trapped in a community struggling to survive because this entity, born of them, has made it so, not so much from malice (though there is malice in this child) as ignorance. Their own thoughts become dangerous. Bixby was to be a TV scriptwriter with 'Star Trek' and 'Twilight Zone' episodes to his credit. The dialogue and characterisation is accordingly well above the average for science fiction stories of the 1950s.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Frozenwaffle

    ...and it was GOOD!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mckinley Inglis

    Good. Very Good. The Goodest.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Sammis

    Anthony is younger in the original. The cornfield is more explicit. http://pussreboots.pair.com/blog/2017... Anthony is younger in the original. The cornfield is more explicit. http://pussreboots.pair.com/blog/2017...

  10. 4 out of 5

    Elie

    Indescribably beautiful... creepy and smart. My heart is sill beating in horror. But .... it’s a good life. Wow

  11. 5 out of 5

    Dimos Kifokeris

    Brixby was one of those 20th century science fiction authors that managed, apart from being awarded, discussed and widely cited, to remain underground. Often being read by a more cult reading fanbase and earning the title of having a somewhat pulp-like style, Brixby was and still is a case of "yes, I've read this and this and that but I cannot actually remember the author". His stories, especially his short novels, are legendary, but he is largely obscured. Crucial to this could be his relativel Brixby was one of those 20th century science fiction authors that managed, apart from being awarded, discussed and widely cited, to remain underground. Often being read by a more cult reading fanbase and earning the title of having a somewhat pulp-like style, Brixby was and still is a case of "yes, I've read this and this and that but I cannot actually remember the author". His stories, especially his short novels, are legendary, but he is largely obscured. Crucial to this could be his relatively small output. It's a good life is maybe Brixby's most well-known piece of work. The blending of urban horror elements with the contemporary setting, which can only generously be considered as relevant to science fiction notions, actually works marvelously. The fear of being helpless against someone with horrific paraphysical powers and absolutely no hint and moral code as to how to use them (in this case, a mentally unstable child who may or may not be wholly human), not because they are necessarily evil, but because they simply lack the capacity to do so, is displayed here in its most acute form. Such a theme, widely inquired in literature, movies and games, reaches here one of its literary peaks. The influence of It's a good life to mid-20th century horror/science fiction is depicted, among others, to its several (both successful and not) adaptations to other means, such as a string of episodes in the classic, hugely successful in its time, fiction series The Twilight Zone by Rod Serling. Its short length hinders extensive characterological unfoldings, but that was never the case with it. The story is wonderfully calibrated relatively to its purpose. However, its old-fashioned suburban style (also typical of more well-known stories, like Finney's The body snatchers) may be distasteful for readers new to the blending of horror and science fiction of that era. Maybe it should be better that more contemporary classics, like Matheson's I am legend, will be read priorily.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Chris Capps

    It's good that Jerome Bixby wrote this story. Stories like this are great. It should be fairly obvious, but I was introduced to this story as the classic episode from the Twilight Zone starring Bill Mumy as a scary child with godlike powers. It's been a while since I watched that episode (or the sequel in the Twilight Zone reboot series), but I have to say there are some questions I had about the Good Life universe that are answered, and others that are delightfully not. This is one of those stori It's good that Jerome Bixby wrote this story. Stories like this are great. It should be fairly obvious, but I was introduced to this story as the classic episode from the Twilight Zone starring Bill Mumy as a scary child with godlike powers. It's been a while since I watched that episode (or the sequel in the Twilight Zone reboot series), but I have to say there are some questions I had about the Good Life universe that are answered, and others that are delightfully not. This is one of those stories that doesn't outright tell you a lot of the stuff that's going on, instead leaving your imagination to fill in the gaps - and it's pretty effective. This story was included in the Science Fiction Hall of Fame Volume 1 in 1970, and it's clear why. In addition to being a creepy story, few stories at the time could really capture the stifling paranoia and obsession with image that was pervasive when it was written. Seriously, folks. This is a good one whether you've seen the Twilight Zone episode or not.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Tedward

    It's a good short-story. The story is set in a rural Ohio village so the setting and characters felt real to me. It was adapted into one of the stand out episodes of The Twilight Zone tv show and the movie. I haven't seen the movie version but from what I can tell the tv show was closer to the tone and plot of Bixby's story. Joe Dante and Richard Matheson made the ending a bit lighter for the movie. I'd recommend both the original story and Rod Serling's adaptation. Both can be enjoyed in sittin It's a good short-story. The story is set in a rural Ohio village so the setting and characters felt real to me. It was adapted into one of the stand out episodes of The Twilight Zone tv show and the movie. I haven't seen the movie version but from what I can tell the tv show was closer to the tone and plot of Bixby's story. Joe Dante and Richard Matheson made the ending a bit lighter for the movie. I'd recommend both the original story and Rod Serling's adaptation. Both can be enjoyed in sitting but are different in style. Bixby took a less is more approach to telling this story, in the tv version you get to see more of Anthony's creations.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jerrod

    It's a good story. The suspense throughout the story gives just the right amount of tension ("just before what had happened to Peaksville had happened"). Enough is revealed to keep the reader satisfied but not enough to bore the reader with meaningless detail. Tangential thoughts related to the story: this story shows trade is good and specialization (and, relatedly, innovation) is certainly limited by the extent of the market. This story also shows the importance of local knowledge and how one It's a good story. The suspense throughout the story gives just the right amount of tension ("just before what had happened to Peaksville had happened"). Enough is revealed to keep the reader satisfied but not enough to bore the reader with meaningless detail. Tangential thoughts related to the story: this story shows trade is good and specialization (and, relatedly, innovation) is certainly limited by the extent of the market. This story also shows the importance of local knowledge and how one can do bad by trying to do good. Be careful of those who want to make you happy.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Laur-Marian Mertea

    A must read. A great, powerful, merciless story. While growing up I remember seeing echoes of this story in many cartoons / TV series / etc. which says a lot about the impact this short story had. 4.75/5 (view spoiler)[In the Episode Johnny Real Good, of the cartoon Johnny Bravo, Johnny babysits Timmy, a nasty, all-powerful, six-year-old brat, who punishes everyone having bad thoughts and tyrannizes his parents. Timmy make Johnny live a nightmare and often teleports him to the nearby cornfield. (f A must read. A great, powerful, merciless story. While growing up I remember seeing echoes of this story in many cartoons / TV series / etc. which says a lot about the impact this short story had. 4.75/5 (view spoiler)[In the Episode Johnny Real Good, of the cartoon Johnny Bravo, Johnny babysits Timmy, a nasty, all-powerful, six-year-old brat, who punishes everyone having bad thoughts and tyrannizes his parents. Timmy make Johnny live a nightmare and often teleports him to the nearby cornfield. (from here.) (hide spoiler)]

  16. 5 out of 5

    Keyreads

    I have to be honest, I have never seen the Twilight Zone episode for this. Yes, I have been living under a rock, thank you very much! Anyways, this was another excellent classic science fiction short story. Now I will watch the Twilight Zone episode...Goodbye!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jerry Jose

    Childhood of an evil, far more powerful Prof. X.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Loren

    Fun weird short story about a child that has too much power over the world around him. The Twilight Zone adaptation stayed fairly true to it, and is worth a watch.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Justin Ulmer

    Well... that was terrifying.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Lewis Szymanski

    Pretty standard fare for 1950s speculative fiction. Notable for being the first printing of It's a Good Life by Jerome Bixby. Not a great story, but famous because of The Twilight Zone episode it was made into. Also has Alfred Bester and Theodore Sturgeon stories that I hadn't read before, or have forgotten them if I have. So those were fun. Nothing else really stood out. Pretty standard fare for 1950s speculative fiction. Notable for being the first printing of It's a Good Life by Jerome Bixby. Not a great story, but famous because of The Twilight Zone episode it was made into. Also has Alfred Bester and Theodore Sturgeon stories that I hadn't read before, or have forgotten them if I have. So those were fun. Nothing else really stood out.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kenneth Flusche

    This book of short stories was written in the year of my birth. I injoyed 4 of the 14 stories. But all the stories will help you think of the prime worries of my youth. WAR or especially world war with the bomb. Overpopulation should we really limit families to 5 children. Read between the lines child mortality, how many of those 5 would reach breeding age. Robots replacing people? and always can we find livable planets around the galaxy.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Read1000books

    Fourteen science fiction short stories from the 1940's and 50's, with the stand outs being Lester del Rey's "A Pound Of Cure" (I loved the surprise ending) and Robert Sheckley's tale of a galactic mailman, "The Odor Of Thought". A number of stories have an Orwellian take, and one ("It's A Good Life") is downright creepy. All in all, a fun read. Fourteen science fiction short stories from the 1940's and 50's, with the stand outs being Lester del Rey's "A Pound Of Cure" (I loved the surprise ending) and Robert Sheckley's tale of a galactic mailman, "The Odor Of Thought". A number of stories have an Orwellian take, and one ("It's A Good Life") is downright creepy. All in all, a fun read.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Charl

    A wonder-full collection. Including the first appearance of Bixby's "It's a Wonderful Life" — still as terrifying as the first time I read it. All excellent, I didn't skip a single one (which is high praise from me!). A couple of them felt just slightly dated, but not enough to make them any less enjoyable. A wonder-full collection. Including the first appearance of Bixby's "It's a Wonderful Life" — still as terrifying as the first time I read it. All excellent, I didn't skip a single one (which is high praise from me!). A couple of them felt just slightly dated, but not enough to make them any less enjoyable.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Malapata

    Relato en el que se basó un episodio de The Twilight Zone, aunque quizás lo recordéis más por uno de los especiales de Halloween de Los Simpsons. En Peaksville todos deben tener cuidado con lo que piensan, no sea que el pequeño Anthony Fremont les escuche y haga algo al respecto.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Catwall

    published in 1953, "It's a Good Life" is one of the short stories and this was made into a Twilight Zone episode. Enjoyed reading the short stories very much, most of them could have been written today and reflect the technology we have today published in 1953, "It's a Good Life" is one of the short stories and this was made into a Twilight Zone episode. Enjoyed reading the short stories very much, most of them could have been written today and reflect the technology we have today

  26. 5 out of 5

    K. Axel

    Another anthology featuring a story by Theodore Sturgeon, and not one of his best. The rest of the stories I dont really remember.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    One of the best short stories I've read in a long time! New-found love for science fiction. One of the best short stories I've read in a long time! New-found love for science fiction.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Quinten

  29. 5 out of 5

    Gary

  30. 4 out of 5

    Letande D'Argon

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.