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The First Discworld Novels: The Colour of Magic and the Light Fantastic

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Together in one volume, here are the first two Discworld novels, featuring Rincewind the wizard and his Luggage, Twoflower and innocent tourist and Cohen the Barbarian, the world's oldest and greatest hero. And not to mention Death, who's not so bad once you get to know him. Together in one volume, here are the first two Discworld novels, featuring Rincewind the wizard and his Luggage, Twoflower and innocent tourist and Cohen the Barbarian, the world's oldest and greatest hero. And not to mention Death, who's not so bad once you get to know him.


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Together in one volume, here are the first two Discworld novels, featuring Rincewind the wizard and his Luggage, Twoflower and innocent tourist and Cohen the Barbarian, the world's oldest and greatest hero. And not to mention Death, who's not so bad once you get to know him. Together in one volume, here are the first two Discworld novels, featuring Rincewind the wizard and his Luggage, Twoflower and innocent tourist and Cohen the Barbarian, the world's oldest and greatest hero. And not to mention Death, who's not so bad once you get to know him.

30 review for The First Discworld Novels: The Colour of Magic and the Light Fantastic

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    I’m reviewing these two books together, because despite being two books, they are two halves to a single story. The story of the first tourist on the Discworld, or alternately, the story of how the Discworld was nearly destroyed, or alternately the story of Rincewind and the Octavo, or even a story concerning how nice it is to have a hero around when you need one. In the beginning of this two-part tale, we are first introduced to Terry Pratchett’s Discworld – an entire world in the shape of a dis I’m reviewing these two books together, because despite being two books, they are two halves to a single story. The story of the first tourist on the Discworld, or alternately, the story of how the Discworld was nearly destroyed, or alternately the story of Rincewind and the Octavo, or even a story concerning how nice it is to have a hero around when you need one. In the beginning of this two-part tale, we are first introduced to Terry Pratchett’s Discworld – an entire world in the shape of a disc, set on the back of four enormous elephants, riding on the shell of gigantic turtle flying through space. On the Discworld, magic is commonplace, the gods play dice games, and you really can fall off the edge of the earth. The future of Discworld will be forever altered upon the meeting of two unique individuals. First, there is Twoflower, the very first tourist on the Discworld. He is blissfully unaware of danger and dangerously full of imagination. He’s loaded to the gills with pure gold and has a luggage trunk that will follow him anywhere and protect him from anything. Or at least try. The second individual is Rincewind, a failed wizard who has been expelled from the Unseen University of Magic for being completely incompetent in the ways of magic. In fact, Rincewind has only ever been able to retain one spell – that of one of the great eight spells of the Octavo. Rumor has it all the other spells are so frightened of this one spell, they refuse to stay in Rincewind’s mind. Rincewind is charged with keeping Twoflower safe and making him happy. This seems like it’d be an easy job, but considering their personalities are fantastically opposite from each other, Twoflower has quite the knack for irritating Rincewind. Between the two of them, they discover dragons, trolls, meet several gods, stop pagan sacrifices, arrange romances for heroes, visit Death’s house for a game of bridge, and fall off the edge of the Disc. We’re introduced to hundreds of violently alive characters, all of whom add a great depth (and often a high sense of hilarity) to the story and the Discworld itself. Having never read any of Terry Pratchett’s works, I felt I should probably start at the beginning. “The Colour of Magic” was the very first book written about the Discworld which has now become so famous among sci-fi and fantasy readers. I feel I should say I’m forever indebted to my husband for introducing Pratchett and me. He has all the talent of a fantastically famous writer (he is one) and all the humor and randomness of Douglas Adams. There’s not so much that the story is lost, as in some of Adams’ works, but there’s quite enough to keep me giggling long into the night as I try and squeeze in just a little bit more reading. If you’re not a fan of either fantasy or sci-fi, but enjoy books with a social statement to make in a parable-like manner, these books would be a great place to start as an introduction to a phantasmagorically phenomenal series.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Naomi Schmidt

    My goodness, that Terry Pratchett has a gift for twisting language in a way that makes one's insides tickle irresistibly. The characters are amazingly well drawn, the plotlines are thoroughly engaging, and there is nothing like laughing your head off while your spouse looks up enviously from the papers he's grading. In these first 2 Discworld books, the society of Ankh-Morpork is introduced to reflected-sound-of-underground spirits, Death fails, multiple times, to collect a not-quite-wizard, the My goodness, that Terry Pratchett has a gift for twisting language in a way that makes one's insides tickle irresistibly. The characters are amazingly well drawn, the plotlines are thoroughly engaging, and there is nothing like laughing your head off while your spouse looks up enviously from the papers he's grading. In these first 2 Discworld books, the society of Ankh-Morpork is introduced to reflected-sound-of-underground spirits, Death fails, multiple times, to collect a not-quite-wizard, the Discworld's first tourist finds the most decrepit structures "quaint" and "charming," and a sapient pearwood trunk repeatedly saves the day (and disposes of the body). Ingenious. One comment on this particular edition: it's terrible. It seems that they scanned the text of a previous edition, and it didn't all get scanned correctly. It did not negatively affect my considerable enjoyment of the book, but, if you have a choice, get a different edition.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Rik

    Took me a while to get into it, but as I became accustomed to the style I began to enjoy the bizarre humour. The story takes second place to the funny aspects, but is still intriguing enough to keep the pages turning.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    An odd world, with odd characters, and an odd sense of humour, though oddly this all works. For instance, in this world, the logic we know has been thrown out the window, and is considered illogical, like harnessing the power of lightning, aka electricity. In some ways Rincewind is more like us, and is therefore an apt narrator for us to follow, as he represents the viewer, and questions things like the viewer would. Rincewind's attempts to figure out words are funny, and technically incorrect, An odd world, with odd characters, and an odd sense of humour, though oddly this all works. For instance, in this world, the logic we know has been thrown out the window, and is considered illogical, like harnessing the power of lightning, aka electricity. In some ways Rincewind is more like us, and is therefore an apt narrator for us to follow, as he represents the viewer, and questions things like the viewer would. Rincewind's attempts to figure out words are funny, and technically incorrect, and yet are blunt realities of what they describe. This author is unbelievably good at stringing together random coincidences, in most books they would be frowned upon, but considering the nature of this odd world, they turn out humourous.

  5. 5 out of 5

    D.L. Morrese

    I bought this combined hardcover edition to replace my worn paperbacks. The stories, of course, are wonderful. This is Pratchett, after all. Rereading these earliest Discworld books after having read all the others reminds us of how the setting and characters evolved from their beginnings as comparatively simple comic fantasy. They ended up being much more than that. My one issue with this edition is the editing. It appears as though the text was digitized by an optical character reader, and no o I bought this combined hardcover edition to replace my worn paperbacks. The stories, of course, are wonderful. This is Pratchett, after all. Rereading these earliest Discworld books after having read all the others reminds us of how the setting and characters evolved from their beginnings as comparatively simple comic fantasy. They ended up being much more than that. My one issue with this edition is the editing. It appears as though the text was digitized by an optical character reader, and no one verified the accuracy of the outcome. There are several errors. Commas turned into periods, letters were misread, (in one the letter 'm' was turned into 'in', for example). This is very shoddy and, I felt, an insult to the story and to the memory of the author. Bad job, Colin Smythe Limited. It's not like the copy I bought is a first edition. It's at least the fourth reprint. You've had time to fix this stuff.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Prachi Pati

    Absolutely loved it! I haven't laughed so much reading a book since Douglas Adam's Hitchhiker's guide to the Universe! My gosh, I cant believe these books have been around and there are 41 of them to devour and laugh to, for so long! These books are nearly my age! hahah What characters and what analogies! Some of the dialogues between death and fate were so simple, and yet so funny. I can't write a review for this, because its just not possible to get into Terry Pratchett's brain! I wish I had hal Absolutely loved it! I haven't laughed so much reading a book since Douglas Adam's Hitchhiker's guide to the Universe! My gosh, I cant believe these books have been around and there are 41 of them to devour and laugh to, for so long! These books are nearly my age! hahah What characters and what analogies! Some of the dialogues between death and fate were so simple, and yet so funny. I can't write a review for this, because its just not possible to get into Terry Pratchett's brain! I wish I had half of his imagination :D

  7. 5 out of 5

    May Freighter

    A fantastic read with an adventure that will make you laugh out loud in a room full of people from time to time. I have no idea how the author managed to come up with such fantastic characters and interesting world. It’s definitely inspiring. The characters were all so different and well executed. Still am in love with the idea of an imp inside the camera, drawing all the photographs. Ahah. Wonderful story.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sonya Christine

    Not one of Pratchett's best, but it certainly has its moments of embarrassment (which always occur when someone reads Pratchett in public transportation and suddenly bursts out laughing like hell) plus the incredible duo Rincewind-Twoflower and the Luggage. Not one of Pratchett's best, but it certainly has its moments of embarrassment (which always occur when someone reads Pratchett in public transportation and suddenly bursts out laughing like hell) plus the incredible duo Rincewind-Twoflower and the Luggage.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Terrington

    I again find myself wishing that Goodreads offered me a half-star option. In the instance of this story I will grant it the higher of the options between three and four but I would prefer to diagnose it with a three and a half. It was great, it was okay, it was weak, it was strong. It ebbed and flowed still holding onto Terry Pratchett's unique tone. Like Douglas Adams this tone is a blend of random detail and wit, utilizing deus ex machina elements at times for the sake of comedy. On the whole i I again find myself wishing that Goodreads offered me a half-star option. In the instance of this story I will grant it the higher of the options between three and four but I would prefer to diagnose it with a three and a half. It was great, it was okay, it was weak, it was strong. It ebbed and flowed still holding onto Terry Pratchett's unique tone. Like Douglas Adams this tone is a blend of random detail and wit, utilizing deus ex machina elements at times for the sake of comedy. On the whole it was an enjoyable fantasy and those who like a clever-enough plot that serves the humor of the writer should enjoy this. And what is it in short? A tale of a wizard who tries to escape death and the naive tourist in a dangerous land who he leads around. Only problem is there's a spell stuck in his head... If that sounds interesting enough read it. I can't adequately describe the book in my review suffice to say it was enjoyable.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Phil Davies

    About 16 years ago past me picked up Mort by Terry Pratchet. I didn't like it and since then I've avoided all the discworld novels. I hate past me and wish I could go back and shake him to explain why I could have read these books earlier. I love long book series and I can't wait to dive in to this wonderful series About 16 years ago past me picked up Mort by Terry Pratchet. I didn't like it and since then I've avoided all the discworld novels. I hate past me and wish I could go back and shake him to explain why I could have read these books earlier. I love long book series and I can't wait to dive in to this wonderful series

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sean Rich

    great book everyone should read

  12. 4 out of 5

    Smaug the Unmerciful Editor

    This lived up to it's title as a really strange book. An apparently random magic system, weird names, strange happenings and science, and dash of babe-obsessed wizards for good measure. There wasn't really a cohesive story either---I assume people just read it for the ride. I stopped because I got mightily uncomfortable at the mention of a spell that summoned "nude virgins." Like, what the heck?! And I had such high hopes for this book, too . . . This lived up to it's title as a really strange book. An apparently random magic system, weird names, strange happenings and science, and dash of babe-obsessed wizards for good measure. There wasn't really a cohesive story either---I assume people just read it for the ride. I stopped because I got mightily uncomfortable at the mention of a spell that summoned "nude virgins." Like, what the heck?! And I had such high hopes for this book, too . . .

  13. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    I'd heard a lot about these books. The Disc World series is huge and even has a few movies to its name. I decided it had to be good right? Well, to be honest, I was very disappointed in this book. It wasn't near what I expected from all the hype that accompanied Pratchett's books. The Colour of Magic is the first book in the series, although I've heard that they can mostly be read as stand-alones. Which is probably a good thing since I believe there are over thirty novels in the series. This one I'd heard a lot about these books. The Disc World series is huge and even has a few movies to its name. I decided it had to be good right? Well, to be honest, I was very disappointed in this book. It wasn't near what I expected from all the hype that accompanied Pratchett's books. The Colour of Magic is the first book in the series, although I've heard that they can mostly be read as stand-alones. Which is probably a good thing since I believe there are over thirty novels in the series. This one involved two main characters of Rincewood the incompetent wizard and Twoflower, a bumbling tourist. They encounter a myriad of characters along the way, including Death. Coerced into keeping Twoflower safe, Rincewood encounters all sorts of hazards and people trying to kill them. Especially since Death himself is interested in Rincewood. They travel and meet dragons, edge-worlders (Discworld is of course a disc, balanced on the backs of four elephants who in turn stand on a turtle), trolls, and other strange beasts, most of whom are not very friendly. Rincewood and Twoflower are not very exciting characters. They don't have a lot of development and their conversations are not very intriguing. Rincewood especially I just found annoying. There is only so far you can make someone inept and he didn't really seem to have any redeeming qualities. Just a lot of luck. Twoflower is little better, but at least he has some interesting background compared to Rincewood. The writing was very jumpy. So many characters and and places were introduced in the beginning that I never got them sorted out in my head before having to move on to the next thing in the plot. The story also jumped around a lot. I'd no sooner get to one point in the novel then it seemed that they were already on a new adventure without resolving the last. I just wasn't a big fan of the way it flowed. There were a few funny moments, but it wasn't enough to make up for the majority of the book. I do hope these books get better. I'm going to try a few more because there's got to be a reason the series is so popular. I have heard that the writing and plots get better so I am somewhat excited to read more. Here's hoping that I can leap into Discworld with further novels. The Colour of Magic Copyright 1983 210 pages + extras Review by M. Reynard 2010

  14. 5 out of 5

    Susanne

    A friend first told me about these books one day in the University library. (I should have been forewarned, she's one of my craziest friends.) She quoted the line from Feet of Clay, "We can rebuild him, we have the pottery." OK, you need to know about Golems and the Bionic Man TV series to get the joke, but I laughed so much I almost choked (while trying to be quiet, with students glaring at us indignantly.) That's typical Pratchett. Not all of it (even not a lot of it) is laugh-out-loud funny, A friend first told me about these books one day in the University library. (I should have been forewarned, she's one of my craziest friends.) She quoted the line from Feet of Clay, "We can rebuild him, we have the pottery." OK, you need to know about Golems and the Bionic Man TV series to get the joke, but I laughed so much I almost choked (while trying to be quiet, with students glaring at us indignantly.) That's typical Pratchett. Not all of it (even not a lot of it) is laugh-out-loud funny, but a lot of it is very clever - subtle digs at "Roundworld" pretentions, particularly management-speak and religion. And there are big laughs - there's a long philosophical discussion in the middle of Small Gods which almost caused me a permanent injury. Anyway, on Helen's advice I began at the beginning, with these two absurd tales featuring Discworld's (any world's) most incompetent but loveable wizard, Rincewind. I went on to know and love (from a safe distance) the formidable Granny Weatherwax, the ruthlessly effective Patrician, Vetinari, and the unexpectedly effective City Guard, some of whose members are convinced (on the evidence of narrativium... No, don't have time to explain that) that a million-to-one chance must always succeed, so the best way to achieve success is to stand on one leg facing the wrong way... Well, you get the picture.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Sampson

    When I previously left The Colour of Magic unrated, I was still trying to work out how I felt about the series—about the satirical style, which was new to me at the time, and about the confused worldviews of the characters. With this reading I've come to appreciate Rincewind as a person, as a character who embodies many of the traits of what it means to be human. He and the eternally optimistic and idealistic Twoflower make an excellent pair. I did enjoy the book, for all its moral muddle, and Ri When I previously left The Colour of Magic unrated, I was still trying to work out how I felt about the series—about the satirical style, which was new to me at the time, and about the confused worldviews of the characters. With this reading I've come to appreciate Rincewind as a person, as a character who embodies many of the traits of what it means to be human. He and the eternally optimistic and idealistic Twoflower make an excellent pair. I did enjoy the book, for all its moral muddle, and Rincewind's character growth by the end—however slight—was inspiring. Inspiring? Ha. Rincewind is not a character to inspire anyone. But I was pleased with his growth anyhow. I don't really like the magic. Talk of occult and demons leaves a bad aftertaste in my mouth, as with Eragon, which I've also been reading recently. But I'm learning to respect Pratchett for presenting a compelling moral worldview through The Colour of Magic and The Light Fantastic, even if it doesn't match the truth of our own world. I'll probably pick up another Discworld book in the future. They make for interesting reading, if not a compelling truth.

  16. 4 out of 5

    SheriC (PM)

    My introduction to Discworld, and I loved it. This book combines the first two stories. I read the books separately and in stages, so the reviews are all in different places. My original review of The Colour of Magic here, and the re-read for the Booklikes Discworld Book Club is here. My review for the Light Fantastic, including the audio version, is here. My introduction to Discworld, and I loved it. This book combines the first two stories. I read the books separately and in stages, so the reviews are all in different places. My original review of The Colour of Magic here, and the re-read for the Booklikes Discworld Book Club is here. My review for the Light Fantastic, including the audio version, is here.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Caleb Ervin

    You can call this Cost of Entry into the Discworld if you like, but the nature of the books is that you can grab any you like and will be sucked in just as surely as if you tried to go in order. All but one other book in the series rates a 5 for me. Read them if you like fantasy literature at all, it's just behind Tolkien and Lewis in that regard. You can call this Cost of Entry into the Discworld if you like, but the nature of the books is that you can grab any you like and will be sucked in just as surely as if you tried to go in order. All but one other book in the series rates a 5 for me. Read them if you like fantasy literature at all, it's just behind Tolkien and Lewis in that regard.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Martha Ginny

    This was such a delightfully, silly, entertaining read. I've been meaning to get into Discworld for approximately ten million years and I can't believe it's taken me this long! I'm off now to read all of them! This was such a delightfully, silly, entertaining read. I've been meaning to get into Discworld for approximately ten million years and I can't believe it's taken me this long! I'm off now to read all of them!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Joan

    Re-reading these books. The first couple are good, but not a patch on some of the later ones.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Roman

    I discovered Pratchett's work relatively late in life, but I'm glad I wasn't any later. Pratchett's world building is fantastic, and his word play/sense of fun is better than almost any other fantasy author I've ever read. I'd heard many people say that "The Colour of Magic" was a weak way to get into Discworld, but I thought it was great. For me, it was a perfect way to be introduced to the over-the-top series. I don't remember the last time I'd actually laughed and enjoyed a book the way I had I discovered Pratchett's work relatively late in life, but I'm glad I wasn't any later. Pratchett's world building is fantastic, and his word play/sense of fun is better than almost any other fantasy author I've ever read. I'd heard many people say that "The Colour of Magic" was a weak way to get into Discworld, but I thought it was great. For me, it was a perfect way to be introduced to the over-the-top series. I don't remember the last time I'd actually laughed and enjoyed a book the way I had when reading both "The Colour of Magic" and "The Light Fantastic" (as well as the way I have when reading any other of Pratchett's books). I was excited to pick these books up every time I did so, and finishing them was bittersweet. These will definitely be re-read in the future, and I can't recommend them enough.

  21. 4 out of 5

    JS

    "Colour of Magic" by Terry Prachett is the first book, of Diskworld series. Even thoug, it was one of Prachett's first books, it is the essence of this entire saga. "Colour of Magic" operates with rather ironic humor, based on contrast. Diskworld is a mix of, our reality, and fantasy world, where instead of science, civilizations are based on magic. But this brilliant concept doesn't make the book flawless. In fact, it's far from it, and even though I had a great time reading I can't turn a blind "Colour of Magic" by Terry Prachett is the first book, of Diskworld series. Even thoug, it was one of Prachett's first books, it is the essence of this entire saga. "Colour of Magic" operates with rather ironic humor, based on contrast. Diskworld is a mix of, our reality, and fantasy world, where instead of science, civilizations are based on magic. But this brilliant concept doesn't make the book flawless. In fact, it's far from it, and even though I had a great time reading I can't turn a blind eye over its mistakes. First, and most significant of them, is trying, to show us entire Diskworld in just two hundred pages. It makes this "vast" universe look small. The book is also very chaotic. Scenes of action change every moment and new heroes are introduced, just to be forgotten about on the next page. I find it reall hard not to loose myself in this chaos. I think, that Pratchett also lost himself in it, and while writing jokes and references, he forgot about plot

  22. 5 out of 5

    Rhiannon

    Weird but very enjoyable

  23. 5 out of 5

    Al

    Twoflower was a tourist, the first ever seen on the Discworld. Tourist, Rincewind decided, meant idiot. Somewhere on the frontier between thought and reality exists the Discworld, a parallel time and place which might sound and smell very much like our own, but which looks completely different. It plays by different rules. Certainly it refuses to succumb to the quaint notion that universes are ruled by pure logic and the harmony of numbers. But just because the Disc is different doesn't mean Twoflower was a tourist, the first ever seen on the Discworld. Tourist, Rincewind decided, meant idiot. Somewhere on the frontier between thought and reality exists the Discworld, a parallel time and place which might sound and smell very much like our own, but which looks completely different. It plays by different rules. Certainly it refuses to succumb to the quaint notion that universes are ruled by pure logic and the harmony of numbers. But just because the Disc is different doesn't mean that some things don't stay the same. Its very existence is about to be threatened by a strange new blight: the arrival of the first tourist, upon whose survival rests the peace and prosperity of the land. But if the person charged with maintaining that survival in the face of robbers, mercenaries and, well, Death is a spectacularly inept wizard, a little logic might turn out to be a very good idea..."The Colour of Magic" is the first novel in Terry Pratchett's acclaimed Discworld series, which has become one of the most popular and celebrated sequences in English literature. Review "Ingenious, brilliant, and hilarious."--Washington Post From the Back Cover THE FUNNIEST AND MOST UNORTHODOX FANTASY IN THIS OR ANY OTHER GALAXY The Colour of Magic On a world supported on the back of a giant turtle (sex unknown), a gleeful, explosive, wickedly eccentric expedition sets out. There's an avaricious but inept wizard, a naïve tourist whose luggage moves on hundreds of dear little legs, dragons who only exist if you believe in them, and of course THE EDGE of the planet… The Light Fantastic As it moves towards a seeemingly inevitable collision with a malevolent red star, the Discworld has only one possible saviour. Unfortunately, this happens to be the singularly inept and cowardly wizard called Rincewind, who was last seen falling off the edge of the world... ‘One of the best, and one of the funniest English authors alive’ Independent ‘He is a satirist of enormous talent..Incredibly funny, compulsively readable’ The Times ‘He would be amusing in any form and his spectacular inventiveness makes the Discworld series one of the perennial joys of modern fiction’ Daily Mail

  24. 5 out of 5

    Caio Duayer

    The first time I came across Pratchett was in Good Omens, and yeah, hes the more dominant writer in that book (certainly in the narrative style at least) but only here could I see how imaginative and amazing he really is! The narrative is quick and bounces around perspectives, the action is great, the humour is good too, if a bit repetitive, and just his sheer imagination, is staggering! People say he borrows a lot form Lovecraft, Robert E Howard and so on, but I don't think "Borrowing" is the w The first time I came across Pratchett was in Good Omens, and yeah, hes the more dominant writer in that book (certainly in the narrative style at least) but only here could I see how imaginative and amazing he really is! The narrative is quick and bounces around perspectives, the action is great, the humour is good too, if a bit repetitive, and just his sheer imagination, is staggering! People say he borrows a lot form Lovecraft, Robert E Howard and so on, but I don't think "Borrowing" is the word, they're more like out-right comical parodies, which I really liked! Having said that, the plot drive isn't really there, there are no big life lessons to be learnt and the interactions/dialogue between the characters are not exactly deep, but given the story, the age group that it is aimed that and even the cover! I really don't think its fair to expect that! It delivers in its promise, big time, and I'll be reading more. (though I've heard there is a buck load of these, don't know how much I'll go through. *And yes, like everyone is saying, the comedy is very similar to Douglas Adams stuff, and in my opinion Douglas does it better, the comedy here is a one liner or two, very punchy and quick, which you see in Douglas too, but kind of gets his humour from the situations the characters are in and really drags out the gags(whale and plant pot for example), not really comparable but I'd say I prefer it.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Frankienright

    At first I didn't really enjoy the book as I didn't get the sense of humour and the authors writing. However after page 50 I started to get really into it and I couldn't put the book down. I did find you had to concentrate reading this book. I feel like I might of had to concentrate more as I just started getting to reading again and my reading skills aren't amazing, but I still had fun reading it! At the end of the book I had to double check though that I did understand the storyline and I did! At first I didn't really enjoy the book as I didn't get the sense of humour and the authors writing. However after page 50 I started to get really into it and I couldn't put the book down. I did find you had to concentrate reading this book. I feel like I might of had to concentrate more as I just started getting to reading again and my reading skills aren't amazing, but I still had fun reading it! At the end of the book I had to double check though that I did understand the storyline and I did! I may read the second book but I shall think about it. I read this book as I wanted to read something different and it was. If you want to read something different I would recommend this book! As the authors imagination is amazing. It keeps you on your toes as you want to know what happens. Its about wizards, and involves a magical world, and has a bit of magical history involved! I did enjoy the book in the end!

  26. 5 out of 5

    ChroniclesofTania

    I know Terry Pratchett has a hard core following so I thought I'd give one of his books a try after years of considering it and walking past the shelf in the library. I've seen two TV adaptations of his books, including this story, which were amusing. I found the book to be over-engineered and proud of its own wittiness and intelligence. Everything is thrown in - Gods, wizards, trolls, elves, gangs, dragons, heroes, murderers etc. It's actually too much and less would have been more in this insta I know Terry Pratchett has a hard core following so I thought I'd give one of his books a try after years of considering it and walking past the shelf in the library. I've seen two TV adaptations of his books, including this story, which were amusing. I found the book to be over-engineered and proud of its own wittiness and intelligence. Everything is thrown in - Gods, wizards, trolls, elves, gangs, dragons, heroes, murderers etc. It's actually too much and less would have been more in this instance and it would have helped the storyline which is essentially a journey. Instead the protagonists bounce from one peril to another ad nauseam. There's no moral realisation at the end of the journey (book) which you'd expect. Things I liked in the book is the luggage and the camera demon. I got bored frequently in the book and it consequently took me ages to finish the thing. I won't be trying any further of this author's books. It's simply not my cup of tea.

  27. 4 out of 5

    R. Scott VanKirk

    The Colour of Magic and The Light Fantastic are the first two novels of the Diskworld by Terry Pratchett. The Diskworld series is a must read for anyone who likes to laugh while reading great stories about very sympathetic, and sometimes very silly people. Terry Pratchett's wit is very similar to Douglas Adams, but he has written about 50 books. His imagination seems endless, as do his characters. Don't walk away from this series thinking it is only fluff, Pratchett's universe, though often silly, The Colour of Magic and The Light Fantastic are the first two novels of the Diskworld by Terry Pratchett. The Diskworld series is a must read for anyone who likes to laugh while reading great stories about very sympathetic, and sometimes very silly people. Terry Pratchett's wit is very similar to Douglas Adams, but he has written about 50 books. His imagination seems endless, as do his characters. Don't walk away from this series thinking it is only fluff, Pratchett's universe, though often silly, is well thought out, consistent and compelling. Frequently his books take a satirical riff on our own world, but it is never mean or nasty. These books exude joy over the quirks of the world and of human frailty and faults. Go read it. If you don't like it, you don't have to pay me for this review.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Bart

    Most of the times this novel is just really fun, and sometimes it's just plain weird. I also seem to remember that some of Prachett's book that I read were satirizing our world, or at least some parts of the book, but I didn't encounter any of such parts. So that was a minor disappointment. That, and the fact that the book is sometimes just weird, and not funny. But for the most part, this book is really fun and a great read! Most of the times this novel is just really fun, and sometimes it's just plain weird. I also seem to remember that some of Prachett's book that I read were satirizing our world, or at least some parts of the book, but I didn't encounter any of such parts. So that was a minor disappointment. That, and the fact that the book is sometimes just weird, and not funny. But for the most part, this book is really fun and a great read!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    Why oh why have I never read this book before, friends & relatives said "You'll love them, so very funny & clever" well I finally have & yes this book is a riot of satirical magic. Hilarious, fun, clever, amusing & downright bonkers I loved the Colour of Magic and was so sad to finish it I immediately bought Light Fantastic. Rincewind & Twoflower & The Luggage are just the craziest characters ever. Why oh why have I never read this book before, friends & relatives said "You'll love them, so very funny & clever" well I finally have & yes this book is a riot of satirical magic. Hilarious, fun, clever, amusing & downright bonkers I loved the Colour of Magic and was so sad to finish it I immediately bought Light Fantastic. Rincewind & Twoflower & The Luggage are just the craziest characters ever.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Vicki

    When I started to read this book I had in the back of my mind my dad's comments 'they do get better after this and its not the best one to start with' but me being me I needed to start at book 1. It wasn't a bad story (believe me I've read worse) but there were a couple of times when I thought just get on with it. But over I enjoyed the book and I really need to find out where I can get luggage like the one in the book. When I started to read this book I had in the back of my mind my dad's comments 'they do get better after this and its not the best one to start with' but me being me I needed to start at book 1. It wasn't a bad story (believe me I've read worse) but there were a couple of times when I thought just get on with it. But over I enjoyed the book and I really need to find out where I can get luggage like the one in the book.

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