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Concurrent Programming in Java(tm): Design Principles and Pattern

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In this second edition, you will find thoroughly updated coverage of the Javao 2 platform and new or expanded coverage of: * Memory model * Cancellation * Portable parallel programming * Utility classes for concurrency control The Java platform provides a broad and powerful set of APIs, tools, and technologies. One of its most powerful capabilities is the built-in support In this second edition, you will find thoroughly updated coverage of the Javao 2 platform and new or expanded coverage of: * Memory model * Cancellation * Portable parallel programming * Utility classes for concurrency control The Java platform provides a broad and powerful set of APIs, tools, and technologies. One of its most powerful capabilities is the built-in support for threads. This makes concurrent programming an attractive yet challenging option for programmers using the Java programming language. This book shows readers how to use the Java platforms threading model more precisely by helping them to understand the patterns and tradeoffs associated with concurrent programming. You will learn how to initiate, control, and coordinate concurrent activities using the class java.lang.Thread, the keywords synchronized and volatile, and the methods wait, notify, and notifyAll. In addition, you will find detailed coverage of all aspects of concurrent programming, including such topics as confinement and synchronization, deadlocks and conflicts, state-dependent action control, asynchronous message passing and control flow, coordinated interaction, and structuring web-based and compu


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In this second edition, you will find thoroughly updated coverage of the Javao 2 platform and new or expanded coverage of: * Memory model * Cancellation * Portable parallel programming * Utility classes for concurrency control The Java platform provides a broad and powerful set of APIs, tools, and technologies. One of its most powerful capabilities is the built-in support In this second edition, you will find thoroughly updated coverage of the Javao 2 platform and new or expanded coverage of: * Memory model * Cancellation * Portable parallel programming * Utility classes for concurrency control The Java platform provides a broad and powerful set of APIs, tools, and technologies. One of its most powerful capabilities is the built-in support for threads. This makes concurrent programming an attractive yet challenging option for programmers using the Java programming language. This book shows readers how to use the Java platforms threading model more precisely by helping them to understand the patterns and tradeoffs associated with concurrent programming. You will learn how to initiate, control, and coordinate concurrent activities using the class java.lang.Thread, the keywords synchronized and volatile, and the methods wait, notify, and notifyAll. In addition, you will find detailed coverage of all aspects of concurrent programming, including such topics as confinement and synchronization, deadlocks and conflicts, state-dependent action control, asynchronous message passing and control flow, coordinated interaction, and structuring web-based and compu

30 review for Concurrent Programming in Java(tm): Design Principles and Pattern

  1. 5 out of 5

    Dan Boeriu

    Humble pie for the Java developer. It doesn't get better. Humble pie for the Java developer. It doesn't get better.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Chad Rhyner

    In this book, it covers a lot of different concurrent programming constructs. Some of these constructs are commonly known for Computer Scientists (things such as Binary/Counting Semaphores, fork/join, acquire/release constructs, latches.). Going into this book, I thought this would be more of a review of some of my Computer Science studies. I was pleasantly surprised to learn new terms and techniques to handle concurrency issues that I never would have thought of without reading this book. These In this book, it covers a lot of different concurrent programming constructs. Some of these constructs are commonly known for Computer Scientists (things such as Binary/Counting Semaphores, fork/join, acquire/release constructs, latches.). Going into this book, I thought this would be more of a review of some of my Computer Science studies. I was pleasantly surprised to learn new terms and techniques to handle concurrency issues that I never would have thought of without reading this book. These examples all pleasantly surprised me, such as "Oh yea, I guess that would be useful to do in a situation like when you want to make sure that all systems in a distributed system are shut off." One thing it was also nice to read is the trade-offs between using solution x versus solution y. In the real world (and in Computer Science, in general), there are constant tradeoffs. The age old example is "use more memory for the algo -or- wait more time for the algo to complete" is a common paradigm that software engineers need to make on a day-to-day basis. It is nice to hear from experience some of the trade-offs that need to be considered when using a technique described in the book. I would have given this book a 5-star rating if it was not for one thing that continually irked me. As you are reading along, instead of referencing a concept in the book that may have already been mentioned or is going to be mentioned...it always referenced the Section Numbers. It was annoying and tedious to read. A sentence might be like this: "While technique is used extensively, if you are looking for more flexibility in the framework that you use, refer to Section 2.3.2.3." Instead of giving me some pedantic section number, why don't you just say the section name? Say something like "or you could use techniques described in the Guarded Methods section to achieve the same results is a less complicated way.". The section numbers instead of the section names bugged me enough to remove 1 star from the review. I was thinking about removing 2 stars, but I think that was probably a bit too drastic.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Borys

    Well, it took me a very long time to finish this one :) A couple of months or so. Style of the book is very academic, and I had to re-read some passages many times (also I've got to mention that it is somewhat hard to read this book while riding the subway :) I never had any problem with cross references, as other reviewer mentions. And I don't think it's not worth a read because it's too old and outdated, I think it's as useful as ever. It explains some basic stuff, it elaborates on Java memory Well, it took me a very long time to finish this one :) A couple of months or so. Style of the book is very academic, and I had to re-read some passages many times (also I've got to mention that it is somewhat hard to read this book while riding the subway :) I never had any problem with cross references, as other reviewer mentions. And I don't think it's not worth a read because it's too old and outdated, I think it's as useful as ever. It explains some basic stuff, it elaborates on Java memory model, on monitors, on how wait and notify really work internally, and also covers large number of design patterns and paradigms (and therefore it will be relevant as long as those patterns are used in practice). So, my final word is: very useful book to read if you really want to understand how to write good and live and safe concurrent programs. P.S. I first heard about this book while reading this review: http://steve-yegge.blogspot.com/2008/...

  4. 4 out of 5

    Martin Chalupa

    A very good overview of concurrent programming in Java. I was worried that the book might be now obsolete, but most topics are covered in timeless manner. The book goes over basic concurrency constructs in Java such as synchronized, wait, notify. Then it uses them to show useful design pattern. And those pattern are generalised into higher level concurrency utilities. I like that everything is clearly explained. The author provide details which leads to certain design decision. What is useful in A very good overview of concurrent programming in Java. I was worried that the book might be now obsolete, but most topics are covered in timeless manner. The book goes over basic concurrency constructs in Java such as synchronized, wait, notify. Then it uses them to show useful design pattern. And those pattern are generalised into higher level concurrency utilities. I like that everything is clearly explained. The author provide details which leads to certain design decision. What is useful in what context.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Otis Chandler

    If you deal with any concurrency issues in Java this is a must - as is anything by Doug Lea

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jack.liu

    Concurrent Programming in Java(TM): Design Principles and Patterns (3rd Edition)

  7. 5 out of 5

    Christophe Addinquy

    Ma note de lecture complète en français ici Ma note de lecture complète en français ici

  8. 5 out of 5

    Amiruddin Nagri

    One of my favorite topics, and the legendary book every developer should read

  9. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Strangely seems to assume you already know all the relevant issues with concurrent programming.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lucas

  11. 4 out of 5

    James

  12. 5 out of 5

    Lieb

  13. 5 out of 5

    Ronald Perrella

  14. 5 out of 5

    compiledwrong

  15. 5 out of 5

    Dorian Leary

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sav Mihai

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ron

  18. 5 out of 5

    Todd

  19. 4 out of 5

    Lydie

  20. 4 out of 5

    Arnon Moscona

  21. 5 out of 5

    Duarte Nunes

  22. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Edward

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ynw

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jim D'Ambrosia

  25. 4 out of 5

    Tyson

  26. 4 out of 5

    Matt

  27. 4 out of 5

    Christoffer Lernö

  28. 4 out of 5

    Tharsu

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ben Sommerville

  30. 4 out of 5

    John

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