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Grunge Is Dead weaves together the definitive story of the Seattle music scene through a series of interviews with the people who were there. Taking the form of an “oral” history, this books contains over 130 interviews, along with essential background information from acclaimed music writer Greg Prato. The early ’90s grunge movement may have last only a few years, but it Grunge Is Dead weaves together the definitive story of the Seattle music scene through a series of interviews with the people who were there. Taking the form of an “oral” history, this books contains over 130 interviews, along with essential background information from acclaimed music writer Greg Prato. The early ’90s grunge movement may have last only a few years, but it spawned some of the greatest rock music of all time: Pearl Jam, Nirvana, Alice in Chains, and Soundgarden. This book contains the first-ever interview in which Pearl Jam’s Eddie Vedder was willing to discuss the group’s history in great detail; Alice in Chains’ band members and Layne Staley’s mom on Staley’s drug addiction and death; insights into the Riot Grrrl movement and oft-overlooked but highly influential Seattle bands like Mother Love Bone/Andy Wood, the Melvins, Screaming Trees, and Mudhoney; and much more. Grunge Is Dead digs deeper than the average grunge history, starting in the early '60s, and explaining the chain of events that gave way to the grunge movement. The end result is a book that includes a wealth of previously untold stories and insight for the longtime fan, as well as its renowned story for the newcomer. Grunge Is Dead collects the whole truth of grunge music in one comprehensive volume.


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Grunge Is Dead weaves together the definitive story of the Seattle music scene through a series of interviews with the people who were there. Taking the form of an “oral” history, this books contains over 130 interviews, along with essential background information from acclaimed music writer Greg Prato. The early ’90s grunge movement may have last only a few years, but it Grunge Is Dead weaves together the definitive story of the Seattle music scene through a series of interviews with the people who were there. Taking the form of an “oral” history, this books contains over 130 interviews, along with essential background information from acclaimed music writer Greg Prato. The early ’90s grunge movement may have last only a few years, but it spawned some of the greatest rock music of all time: Pearl Jam, Nirvana, Alice in Chains, and Soundgarden. This book contains the first-ever interview in which Pearl Jam’s Eddie Vedder was willing to discuss the group’s history in great detail; Alice in Chains’ band members and Layne Staley’s mom on Staley’s drug addiction and death; insights into the Riot Grrrl movement and oft-overlooked but highly influential Seattle bands like Mother Love Bone/Andy Wood, the Melvins, Screaming Trees, and Mudhoney; and much more. Grunge Is Dead digs deeper than the average grunge history, starting in the early '60s, and explaining the chain of events that gave way to the grunge movement. The end result is a book that includes a wealth of previously untold stories and insight for the longtime fan, as well as its renowned story for the newcomer. Grunge Is Dead collects the whole truth of grunge music in one comprehensive volume.

30 review for Grunge Is Dead: The Oral History of Seattle Rock Music

  1. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

    Three things I learned: 1. The drummer from Alice in Chains recorded "Facelift" with a broken hand. 2. Eddie Vedder got paid $80 to teach Matt Dillon how to play guitar for the movie "Singles." 3. The font for Nirvana's logo resulted from the graphic designer of "Bleach" just using whatever was already loaded on the computerized type-setter because she didn't want to put forth any effort since Sub Pop already owed her a bunch of money. I love oral biographies, especially about bands ("Fool the World Three things I learned: 1. The drummer from Alice in Chains recorded "Facelift" with a broken hand. 2. Eddie Vedder got paid $80 to teach Matt Dillon how to play guitar for the movie "Singles." 3. The font for Nirvana's logo resulted from the graphic designer of "Bleach" just using whatever was already loaded on the computerized type-setter because she didn't want to put forth any effort since Sub Pop already owed her a bunch of money. I love oral biographies, especially about bands ("Fool the World" about the Pixies is another great example). This has interviews with Eddie Vedder--who never does interviews, Kim Thayil from Soundgarden, Mark Arm from Mudhoney, and Layne Staley's mother (pretty intense), as well as a hundred other people involved in the time/place in various ways. See also: "Route 666: On the Road to Nirvana" and "Our Band Could be Your Life: Scenes from the American Indie Underground 1981-1991."

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ed Wagemann

    There was a chapter at the end of the book that asked people how Grunge will be remembered. Some folks said it changed music, it changed the industry, etc. Maybe. The only thing that I can see that it did was it helped the corporate powers-that-be to have another pigeonhole which to exploit. Musically, as Jack Endino said, Grunge was basically 70s hard rock with a bit of punk attitude. And personally I agree. I dont feel that there is anything special about the Seattle scene or Grunge when compa There was a chapter at the end of the book that asked people how Grunge will be remembered. Some folks said it changed music, it changed the industry, etc. Maybe. The only thing that I can see that it did was it helped the corporate powers-that-be to have another pigeonhole which to exploit. Musically, as Jack Endino said, Grunge was basically 70s hard rock with a bit of punk attitude. And personally I agree. I dont feel that there is anything special about the Seattle scene or Grunge when compared to other scenes or movements in late 20th century western civilization. I don't see where Grunge accomplished anything meaningful. Still, I enjoy a regular share of the music, and I dress--even 20 years later--basically in a Grunge style, a style I have been dressing in basically since I was first able to pick my own clothes--probablly around 9 years old when I wore a pair of gray sweat pants and a flannel shirt to school every day... Why Everything You Think You Know About Punk Is Completely Wrong: http://generation-add.blogspot.com/20...

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jimmy Leitsch

    Loved the content. Disliked the layout. The entire book is done in interviews, but with no context given by the author. I loved what each person was talking about, but had difficulty remembering who was who. There's a list of descriptions in the back, but constantly flipping in the back got annoying, especially if the description for someone was "concert goer." Again, I loved the content and learned a lot, but I wish Prato would create a new edition that was not an oral history. Loved the content. Disliked the layout. The entire book is done in interviews, but with no context given by the author. I loved what each person was talking about, but had difficulty remembering who was who. There's a list of descriptions in the back, but constantly flipping in the back got annoying, especially if the description for someone was "concert goer." Again, I loved the content and learned a lot, but I wish Prato would create a new edition that was not an oral history.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Greta

    Woah, this book spent 6 years in my to-read list and I'm so glad I finally picked it up. A very enjoyable read, however, reading the last 100 pages is quite a bummer. Now I have to spend some time listening to Nirvana 24/7 as in good old teenage-angsty days until everything gets back to normal. Woah, this book spent 6 years in my to-read list and I'm so glad I finally picked it up. A very enjoyable read, however, reading the last 100 pages is quite a bummer. Now I have to spend some time listening to Nirvana 24/7 as in good old teenage-angsty days until everything gets back to normal.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    If you have any interest in the History of Seattle music then this is the book for you. Although I found it pretty depressing at times because of all the talk of drug addiction, the lives lost to it & the talent wasted, the facts & the music kept me very interested. Great read

  6. 5 out of 5

    Christine

    This book was interesting. I've never read a book entirely of interviews before. And not necessarily ordered interviews. The beginning was kind of boring, lots about bands I've never heard of from the 50-70s. But it was interesting to consider the influences of some of my favorite music. Then you get into why you are reading the book. To understand the development of the "grunge" era of music. And you quickly learn to hate the following things... 1. MTV 2. Heroin 3. The music industry 4. Heroin 5. Her This book was interesting. I've never read a book entirely of interviews before. And not necessarily ordered interviews. The beginning was kind of boring, lots about bands I've never heard of from the 50-70s. But it was interesting to consider the influences of some of my favorite music. Then you get into why you are reading the book. To understand the development of the "grunge" era of music. And you quickly learn to hate the following things... 1. MTV 2. Heroin 3. The music industry 4. Heroin 5. Heroin 6. MTV The book is kind of a fun read until people start dying. Then it's heartbreaking. All of these incredibly talented people who die entirely too young. I've started really hating the homogenized society we are becoming and this book really didn't help that. But it is a good read if you are interested in the era.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Nerita

    This book reminded me a little bit of Everybody Loves Our Town: An Oral History of Grunge. Oral history of Seattle music scene was interesting to read and find out more information about the music that I'm a fan of. This book reminded me a little bit of Everybody Loves Our Town: An Oral History of Grunge. Oral history of Seattle music scene was interesting to read and find out more information about the music that I'm a fan of.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jeremiah

    While I came of age int he Grunge era I was never a fan of its biggest stars. (eg. Nirvana, Pearl Jam, Soundgarden). Mudhoney was the one exception, but they were never superstars on a national level like those other groups i mentioned. All that said, this is a fascinating oral-history style book. I am a big fan of this type of history because there is far less editorial interference in the narrative. It is also a way to get people to have a conversation about events without them being in the sa While I came of age int he Grunge era I was never a fan of its biggest stars. (eg. Nirvana, Pearl Jam, Soundgarden). Mudhoney was the one exception, but they were never superstars on a national level like those other groups i mentioned. All that said, this is a fascinating oral-history style book. I am a big fan of this type of history because there is far less editorial interference in the narrative. It is also a way to get people to have a conversation about events without them being in the same room. I appreciate that the book spends considerable time setting up the peak of the Seattle scene by delving into the late 70s, early 80s, and what all set the stage for what is to come. The book also spends a lot of time in the aftermath. So many people didn't make it. Some people were not interviewed, or perhaps turned down the author. We never get Courtney Love or Dave Grohl's commentary, for example, except when they are being paraphrased by others. I finished the book three days ago and don't recall seeing their names at the beginning of quotes, but I could be wrong. The one danger with books like these is that there are so many names that it's easy to lose track. Some of the names I knew exactly who they were as their thread weaved from the 80s to the late 90s, but some of them I had to look up. Luckily there was an index.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    The deal with this book is you’re just going to read snippets of interviews. For the whole book. Besides a contextual sentence or two to frame each chapter, the author just organizes all the dozens of interviews into small chunks where stuff about a certain person or event are next to each other. Now mind you these are (shall we say) “colorful” people who have questionable views on life but you get the real picture warts and all. This is how music books should be written and I found it pretty en The deal with this book is you’re just going to read snippets of interviews. For the whole book. Besides a contextual sentence or two to frame each chapter, the author just organizes all the dozens of interviews into small chunks where stuff about a certain person or event are next to each other. Now mind you these are (shall we say) “colorful” people who have questionable views on life but you get the real picture warts and all. This is how music books should be written and I found it pretty entertaining as well as variously frightening, off-putting, hilarious and exhilarating.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Nicola Batecola

    Similar to Yarm's "Everybody loves our town" (and, in fact, sometimes the interviews used are the same), this is a good, comprehensive account of the Seattle scene. It does have Layne's mom on it, and it covers most of what's interesting. However, Yarm's book has a better flow to it and feels easier even though it's longer. If you're super interested, get both books - they do overlap, but it's worth it. Nice work by Prato, it's a fine oral history, worth a read. Similar to Yarm's "Everybody loves our town" (and, in fact, sometimes the interviews used are the same), this is a good, comprehensive account of the Seattle scene. It does have Layne's mom on it, and it covers most of what's interesting. However, Yarm's book has a better flow to it and feels easier even though it's longer. If you're super interested, get both books - they do overlap, but it's worth it. Nice work by Prato, it's a fine oral history, worth a read.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Donna Carpenter

    I'll always read books on grunge. Even if they are oral histories, which is a terrible, lazy format, especially when the topic switches from one band to another without any segue or obvious I'll always read books on grunge. Even if they are oral histories, which is a terrible, lazy format, especially when the topic switches from one band to another without any segue or obvious

  12. 4 out of 5

    Austin Montgomery

    Content was great and helped contextualize the music I grew up listening too. The format was too jumpy and discombobulated though. My love for Soundgarden and Pearl Jam increased!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Richard Haynes

    What happened was formed before the big 4. Good history lesson about the bands that were before the big acts of grunge. Time to go back and listen to these trailblazers.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Eric

    Great read, very informative, delves deeper than just the BIG grunge bands.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Derek

    An attempt at recreating the oral history magic of Please Kill Me but comes across a bit cloying and chummy. More of a love letter than an analysis of the Seattle scene.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Maya Lee

    Best book I have read this year. I am in love with the grunge era. I was raised by the music by someone who participated in it. So reading this book was eye opening. Not only did I love how it was a walk through history, but I loved the little bits of fun facts thrown in. For example, I did not know that Kurt Cobain auditoned for Soundgarden just merely a few years before Nirvana was created. The drummer for Alice In Chains recored the entire Facelift album with a broken hand. I also love the la Best book I have read this year. I am in love with the grunge era. I was raised by the music by someone who participated in it. So reading this book was eye opening. Not only did I love how it was a walk through history, but I loved the little bits of fun facts thrown in. For example, I did not know that Kurt Cobain auditoned for Soundgarden just merely a few years before Nirvana was created. The drummer for Alice In Chains recored the entire Facelift album with a broken hand. I also love the layout of the history; how it's separated by decade. It makes it so you can see the true roots of where grunge music came from. Some of my favorite musicians were interview for this book, one example being Jerry Cantrell. The idea that grunge is dead is actually a popular debate right now-- And I think it is. Grunge is an idea and a mindset. It's a people. The style was based off of people not having money to buy fancy clothing so they invented a new style that people called "grunge" (because they thought it was gross like the stuff in the sink that was called grunge). So now, in this time, people are spending money to look/be grunge, when you can never truly achieve that. The grunge movement was anti-capatalism so by spending money to look a certain way you are going against the movement. (I know this is not directly related to the book but I have done outside research to form this opinion.) The one thing I disliked about this book was that it was kinda hard to follow sometimes because it was laid out like an interview and sometimes you did not know who was talking (about who). However, if you love grunge/rock music, or just want a history of music and the 90s, I really reccomend you read this book.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Josh Beedy

    Overall, I really enjoyed this book. I'm not a huge fan of grunge music specifically (or any other subgenres of rock discussed in the book, honestly) but I really like reading about music scenes regardless. It's super cool to see the way that these scenes built up and grew, and the way that the book portrays everything, through the quotes of those who actually experienced this "grunge movement," is really powerful. I'd never read or even heard of any books comprised entirely of quotes before rea Overall, I really enjoyed this book. I'm not a huge fan of grunge music specifically (or any other subgenres of rock discussed in the book, honestly) but I really like reading about music scenes regardless. It's super cool to see the way that these scenes built up and grew, and the way that the book portrays everything, through the quotes of those who actually experienced this "grunge movement," is really powerful. I'd never read or even heard of any books comprised entirely of quotes before reading Grunge is Dead--I honestly thought the book was a podcast that had been transcribed, and honestly it might as well have been. Everything being told through personal stories makes it feel like you're having a chat with whoever is being quoted. The stories told feel so personal, and a lot of them were, in fact, very personal. Looking through other reviews it seems like some of the people interviewed in this book aren't normally keen to do so. Honestly, it just makes it feel even more personal. That's my favorite thing about the book, the way that the personality of everyone interviewed can shine through their quotes. I definetely don't consider the "quote-book" thing to be perfect, though, because there's often some parts that the quotes make confusing. The thing I noticed the most is that often the quote-based nature of the book made it hard for the author to include proper transitions. On occasion, the topic of the quotes would fade into the next topic over a series of two or three vaguer quotes, but often I found that the topic would change suddenly. One second the interviewee was talking about Soundgarden, and then the next interviewee would be talking about Alice in Chains. Couple this with the fact that many of these bands are new, or at least unfamiliar to me, and this got quite confusing at times. I would assume that this would be less of a problem for someone more well-versed than I at this type of music in general (again, I'm not super big into grunge, metal, or really any of the genres discussed--I just like to read about music). Even though it was a bit confusing from time to time, I've thoroughly enjoyed Grunge is Dead. I think the book's meant for someone who has an interest in Seattle music already, like many of the other reviewers, but I learned a ton from this book about stuff that I don't think I would've ever learned otherwise. I agree with the other reviewers that the book had some really cool interviews, even if I wasn't familiar with those being interviewed beforehand. I'd honestly recommend it to anyone who loves reading about music. It might be a bit hard to read for some, and you might end up looking people up online, but I think for people who like reading about music, it is a very interesting book.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Doungjai

    an excellent look at the history of the Seattle music scene, with the main focus being the "grunge" sound that exploded in the early nineties. I like how the book was laid out as an oral history; with dozens of people contributing to this book, it did get a bit confusing after a while keeping up with who was who (thank goodness for the five page list of those who participated at the end of the book). the list of those who contributed to this book is a who's who of the Seattle scene, but there ar an excellent look at the history of the Seattle music scene, with the main focus being the "grunge" sound that exploded in the early nineties. I like how the book was laid out as an oral history; with dozens of people contributing to this book, it did get a bit confusing after a while keeping up with who was who (thank goodness for the five page list of those who participated at the end of the book). the list of those who contributed to this book is a who's who of the Seattle scene, but there are a few notable names missing: Chris Cornell of Soundgarden, Stone Gossard and Mike McCready of Pearl Jam, and Dave Grohl of Nirvana for starters. There were chapters devoted to those who left us too soon: Andrew Wood of Malfunkshun/Mother Love Bone, Mia Zapata of The Gits, Stefanie Sargent of 7 Year Bitch, Kurt Cobain of Nirvana, and Layne Staley of Alice in Chains. It was especially heartbreaking to read about Staley's last years. it was fun reading about the bands and their antics during gigs, and it was fascinating to read about the behind the scenes stuff, like how badly Sub Pop Records was run. and for every Pearl Jam and Soundgarden, there were at least a half dozen bands who sadly didn't receive the same amount of recognition that should have (Screaming Trees is the most notable example of this to me. Yes, they did get a big record label deal and a spot on the Singles movie soundtrack, it's always been my opinion that they should have gone farther). highly recommended, especially if you grew up in the early nineties and loved the music that came out of Seattle.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Hannah Jo Parker

    Yes, I'm a sucker for exactly this sort of book, but I still feel like it deserves 5 stars. It's an impressive, extensive look back at grunge and its impact on Seattle (and Seattle's impact on it). People like Mark Arm, Kim Thayil, and Eddie Vedder get a chance to tell the story from their perspective, so it feels authentic. I got out my copy of Sub Pop 200 and listened to it repeatedly while reading this book, so I could connect the songs to the people in the book. I appreciated the chance to r Yes, I'm a sucker for exactly this sort of book, but I still feel like it deserves 5 stars. It's an impressive, extensive look back at grunge and its impact on Seattle (and Seattle's impact on it). People like Mark Arm, Kim Thayil, and Eddie Vedder get a chance to tell the story from their perspective, so it feels authentic. I got out my copy of Sub Pop 200 and listened to it repeatedly while reading this book, so I could connect the songs to the people in the book. I appreciated the chance to reconnect with a time and a scene that were really important to me. I was one of those geeks who immediately read every word of The Rocket each time it came out and had the good fortune to see some of these bands in small Seattle clubs in the late 80s and early 90s. I learned a lot from this book, especially about the grim role heroin played in the scene, which was heartbreaking. But, even though there are a lot of very sad stories, there's a ton of humor, too. Many of the people who were interviewed for this book are very funny (I'd love to go have a beer with Kim Thayil sometime, for example, who seems rather grounded and funny). Some of the participants are bitter, of course, and some are even jerks, but I appreciated the various perspectives.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Lilsue Torrez-hutcherson

    So much more than I thought it would be. I am so happy with this find. It takes you back when this world was such a different place. Many people, friends, newly created recording studios, managers, family, new founded friends, girlfriends, and the musicians themselves created this book with their own intake on how music grew and became. Being a big grunge fan I loved hearing the tales of Alice in chains, Soundgarden, & Mother love bone. Oh the turmoil!!!! I think it was great that this book disp So much more than I thought it would be. I am so happy with this find. It takes you back when this world was such a different place. Many people, friends, newly created recording studios, managers, family, new founded friends, girlfriends, and the musicians themselves created this book with their own intake on how music grew and became. Being a big grunge fan I loved hearing the tales of Alice in chains, Soundgarden, & Mother love bone. Oh the turmoil!!!! I think it was great that this book displayed a sort of tree, that branched of the various members of a band who became members of another band. It was nice to read about (grrl power) women who played a major role, in addition to smaller bands who just didn't get far. Excellent read. I give it the head bang. \m/ <~~Rock on

  21. 4 out of 5

    Darren Hemmings

    A great history of Seattle's music scene from the early 80s through to the late 90's, told by the people who were there. For me what I loved was that it demystified a lot of the hype and BS surrounding the scene both then and now, making all those players in the tale seem that bit more human. Ultimately it got me checking out some albums and even realising others weren't all that, but across the board it charts a period I followed well as a teenager, and reading how it all unfolded for those on A great history of Seattle's music scene from the early 80s through to the late 90's, told by the people who were there. For me what I loved was that it demystified a lot of the hype and BS surrounding the scene both then and now, making all those players in the tale seem that bit more human. Ultimately it got me checking out some albums and even realising others weren't all that, but across the board it charts a period I followed well as a teenager, and reading how it all unfolded for those on the ground there was pretty cool. If you loved grunge back in the day, it's a must-read. Simple as that.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Reznore

    Really great book about Grunge. The only funny thing is ...it's the same concept as "Everybody Loves Our Town", an oral history about grunge. I think in this one there's some Eddie Vedder interview , on "Everybody Loves..." you've got some Courtney Love interview . So one book is slightly more hilarious than the other. It's a interesting read if you want to have a better idea of what happened in Seattle music scene , this one goes from the 60's to the 2000 . Of course there's a big emphasis on the 90 Really great book about Grunge. The only funny thing is ...it's the same concept as "Everybody Loves Our Town", an oral history about grunge. I think in this one there's some Eddie Vedder interview , on "Everybody Loves..." you've got some Courtney Love interview . So one book is slightly more hilarious than the other. It's a interesting read if you want to have a better idea of what happened in Seattle music scene , this one goes from the 60's to the 2000 . Of course there's a big emphasis on the 90's when Grunge happened like some musical gold rush .The whole phenomenon left a few millionaires , a couple of dead bodies , some bitterness and crazy stories behind.

  23. 4 out of 5

    David Marlow

    Hey! I love the grunge scene from Seattle. All the major players and bands and interviews are right here in this book. Greg Prato has included all of the interviews condensed into this book which gives it a real flow bringing forward an interesting read - makes a great reference book!!! For some reason no reference to Chris Cornell and Mark Lanegan but the rest of the guys are here, including Eddie Vedder. The artists who took centre stage from that era are of course - Andrew Wood, Kurt Cobain a Hey! I love the grunge scene from Seattle. All the major players and bands and interviews are right here in this book. Greg Prato has included all of the interviews condensed into this book which gives it a real flow bringing forward an interesting read - makes a great reference book!!! For some reason no reference to Chris Cornell and Mark Lanegan but the rest of the guys are here, including Eddie Vedder. The artists who took centre stage from that era are of course - Andrew Wood, Kurt Cobain and Layne Stale who are no longer here, but the book brings plenty of insight for dedicated grunge fans..

  24. 5 out of 5

    Heidi

    The writing style was not my favorite, and the book got off to slow start, but ultimately I'm glad I read it and enjoyed the last half of the book quite a bit. It was interesting to read the insights from so many key players in the Seattle 80's/early 90's music scene, as well as counterpoints from friends and family who were observers. As another reviewer has noted, the interviews with Layne Staley's mother were pretty intense, as were most of the commentaries about Cobain's last years strugglin The writing style was not my favorite, and the book got off to slow start, but ultimately I'm glad I read it and enjoyed the last half of the book quite a bit. It was interesting to read the insights from so many key players in the Seattle 80's/early 90's music scene, as well as counterpoints from friends and family who were observers. As another reviewer has noted, the interviews with Layne Staley's mother were pretty intense, as were most of the commentaries about Cobain's last years struggling with addiction and depression.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Steven

    Probably more interesting to those outside (or after) the Seattle scene. For those who were there, no real surprises here, other than that some chose to speak their mind. What works well is the oral biography style because you get to hear all the different voices. What is suspect is the arrangement and the obvious subtext of leading questions. Plenty of inside dirt if you are into that. Could definitely turn you on to plenty of other bands if you weren't around back then. Probably more interesting to those outside (or after) the Seattle scene. For those who were there, no real surprises here, other than that some chose to speak their mind. What works well is the oral biography style because you get to hear all the different voices. What is suspect is the arrangement and the obvious subtext of leading questions. Plenty of inside dirt if you are into that. Could definitely turn you on to plenty of other bands if you weren't around back then.

  26. 5 out of 5

    David Musto

    An "American Hardcore" for "grunge". Told entirely through quotes from artists and scenesters, this is probably as close to a comprehensive take on Seattle music as possible. Notable omissions are members of Nirvana, Chris Cornell, and Mark Lanegan but their lack of participation was more than likely their choice. The most entertaining part of the book are the differences in opinion. Mark Arm comes off as combatitve but hilarious, this volume's version of Vic Bondi or Steve Albini. An "American Hardcore" for "grunge". Told entirely through quotes from artists and scenesters, this is probably as close to a comprehensive take on Seattle music as possible. Notable omissions are members of Nirvana, Chris Cornell, and Mark Lanegan but their lack of participation was more than likely their choice. The most entertaining part of the book are the differences in opinion. Mark Arm comes off as combatitve but hilarious, this volume's version of Vic Bondi or Steve Albini.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Pinkgreen

    Grunge history is a recent fascination of mine. Also, Pearl Jam is my favorite band of all time, and I like a lot of those other bands. So this book was heaven for me. And sometimes it was REALLY sad. Reading about Andy wood, Kurt Cobain, and Layne Staley... heartbreaking ! Anyone thinking about doing heroin should read this book first... And then watch Requiem for a dream... And then read this book again.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Michael Lello

    An excellent look at the grunge scene with interviews from all the major surviving players besides Chris Cornell. Kot brings the Seattle scene to life, and shows what it was like beyond the mainstream media's co-op of flannel. The book is written as a serious of quotes with little exposition, which might take some getting used to for some readers, but the interviews, for the most part, are interesting enough to carry the book. An excellent look at the grunge scene with interviews from all the major surviving players besides Chris Cornell. Kot brings the Seattle scene to life, and shows what it was like beyond the mainstream media's co-op of flannel. The book is written as a serious of quotes with little exposition, which might take some getting used to for some readers, but the interviews, for the most part, are interesting enough to carry the book.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Anderson Baldwin

    This book was well thought out. I didn't care so much for the first part and the only reason is that I was never into those bands. When Soundgarden showed up I couldn't put it down. Every listener was effected by these bands but for a guy like me that worshiped them as a teenager, it's a jewel to have the lives of these bands come to life by their own words. The part with Layne Staleys mother Nancy is more than the music. It's about true life. It doesn't get much better. This book was well thought out. I didn't care so much for the first part and the only reason is that I was never into those bands. When Soundgarden showed up I couldn't put it down. Every listener was effected by these bands but for a guy like me that worshiped them as a teenager, it's a jewel to have the lives of these bands come to life by their own words. The part with Layne Staleys mother Nancy is more than the music. It's about true life. It doesn't get much better.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Miloš

    Once I got used to flipping the pages back and forth to see, for the 1000th time, who Susie Tennant (DGC Records employee) or Whiting Tennis (concert goer, painter) were, which wasn't until I was halfway through the book, things got pretty interesting. I wouldn't mind, though, if all the interviews were organized in separate chapters instead of being edited and cut in order to revolve around a specific subject. Still, being a huge Soundgarden fan, I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book. Once I got used to flipping the pages back and forth to see, for the 1000th time, who Susie Tennant (DGC Records employee) or Whiting Tennis (concert goer, painter) were, which wasn't until I was halfway through the book, things got pretty interesting. I wouldn't mind, though, if all the interviews were organized in separate chapters instead of being edited and cut in order to revolve around a specific subject. Still, being a huge Soundgarden fan, I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book.

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