hits counter Help Your Child to Thrive: Making the Best of a Struggling Public Education System - Ebook PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Help Your Child to Thrive: Making the Best of a Struggling Public Education System

Availability: Ready to download

This book makes the case that, if students are to succeed in American public schools, their families must focus on fostering key traits that help a child to thrive despite a peer culture that may generate pressures that work at cross-purposes with the academic curriculum of the school. Parents can prepare their child to succeed in this challenging environment by focusing o This book makes the case that, if students are to succeed in American public schools, their families must focus on fostering key traits that help a child to thrive despite a peer culture that may generate pressures that work at cross-purposes with the academic curriculum of the school. Parents can prepare their child to succeed in this challenging environment by focusing on: • developing confidence; • building a secure sense of belonging within the family; • preparing their child to learn from consequences; • nurturing emotional intelligence; • fostering a sense of agency and self-reliance; • encouraging wise decision-making.


Compare

This book makes the case that, if students are to succeed in American public schools, their families must focus on fostering key traits that help a child to thrive despite a peer culture that may generate pressures that work at cross-purposes with the academic curriculum of the school. Parents can prepare their child to succeed in this challenging environment by focusing o This book makes the case that, if students are to succeed in American public schools, their families must focus on fostering key traits that help a child to thrive despite a peer culture that may generate pressures that work at cross-purposes with the academic curriculum of the school. Parents can prepare their child to succeed in this challenging environment by focusing on: • developing confidence; • building a secure sense of belonging within the family; • preparing their child to learn from consequences; • nurturing emotional intelligence; • fostering a sense of agency and self-reliance; • encouraging wise decision-making.

37 review for Help Your Child to Thrive: Making the Best of a Struggling Public Education System

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kristina Aziz

    I got this book for free through a first reads goodreads giveaway. Frankly, I'm glad I didn't pay for it. This book feels like a homework assignment written by someone who really doesn't get the assignment. I was expecting, from the title, a book about the education system and how parents can empower themselves to help their children thrive. What I got was parenting advice that I already get in my email from parenting websites, pages and pages and PAGES of summarizations from various popular mov I got this book for free through a first reads goodreads giveaway. Frankly, I'm glad I didn't pay for it. This book feels like a homework assignment written by someone who really doesn't get the assignment. I was expecting, from the title, a book about the education system and how parents can empower themselves to help their children thrive. What I got was parenting advice that I already get in my email from parenting websites, pages and pages and PAGES of summarizations from various popular movies and shows, and at the end of every chapter or so, a statement along the lines of "oh yeah, and also you should do this to help your child with school." This book was poorly executed and may be of benefit to those who don't subscribe to parenting emails or know who Harry Potter is, but not really something for me.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Online Eccentric Librarian

    More reviews (and no fluff) on the blog http://surrealtalvi.wordpress.com/ Help Your Child To Thrive is a treatise exploring the issues of the public school system in the United States and how it affects children. Problems such as belonging, bullying, and other soft issues are discussed through other writing and pop culture. But a rambling narrative and over reliance on other sources make the book feel more like a college dissertation than a practical ideas book. Author Brouillette pulls all More reviews (and no fluff) on the blog http://surrealtalvi.wordpress.com/ Help Your Child To Thrive is a treatise exploring the issues of the public school system in the United States and how it affects children. Problems such as belonging, bullying, and other soft issues are discussed through other writing and pop culture. But a rambling narrative and over reliance on other sources make the book feel more like a college dissertation than a practical ideas book. Author Brouillette pulls all punches and rarely makes a strong statement or impact. This passivity of writing render too many of the points impotent. Typically, I would list a table of contents here - but the book rambles so incoherently as to make me throw up my hands in frustration and give that up. From a parents' standpoint, it meanders around movies and tv shows as metaphors without focusing on any age group (to me, one of the most important ways this book should have been classified). As such, I didn't find a lot for parents in here. Conversely, since so many points are regurgitated studies or summarizations from other authors, I don't know how useful this is to educators. I kept looking for Brouillette's point or voice and never found anything definitive said by her. Most frustrating was the constant referencing of movies and how their popularity is explained by kids' frustrations with public schools. E.g., Harry Potter was popular because Harry is a modern day Cinderella who has to fight class systems just like in middle school. Star Wars was popular because Annakin had to decide whether to use the Force for good or evil - just like kids have the choice to use facebook and other social media for good or evil. To get to those points, we have to slog through 3-5 pages of plot summarization and then what honestly feel like simplistic deconstructions forced into an illogical mold simply to further a point (i.e., pounding a square peg into a round hole). 15 pages into the Star Wars discussion and I was thinking of chewing off my own hand so my Kindle would drop and go away. Honestly, it became difficult to take the book seriously; though written by a professional, I too often felt this was an academic discussion suitable for junior college students or a student end of semester paper using movies to demonstrate issues in public schools. Nothing ever became concrete, useful, or anything I felt I could take serious outside of theoretical classroom material. It was all so disconnected from reality and academic. I have to wonder if perhaps I was the wrong audience and this is meant for students. Reviewed from an advance reader copy.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    This book is a mess. It doesn't seem to know what it wants to be. Is it a critique of the school system? If it is a critical analysis then it is terribly unsophisticated and simplistic. I have known many kids who have graduated from high school who have had productive, wonderful years and at the same time she doesn't even discuss some of the real challenges facing public schools (privatization) especially in high poverty areas. Finland isn't a great comparison since the population is more homoge This book is a mess. It doesn't seem to know what it wants to be. Is it a critique of the school system? If it is a critical analysis then it is terribly unsophisticated and simplistic. I have known many kids who have graduated from high school who have had productive, wonderful years and at the same time she doesn't even discuss some of the real challenges facing public schools (privatization) especially in high poverty areas. Finland isn't a great comparison since the population is more homogeneous than ours and they worked hard to equalize their educational system (and the chief of schools will say that). Is it a parenting book? While its emphasis on emotional intelligence makes sense you could just read Love and Logic since she quotes so much from there. Is it a a movie guide? It doesn't make its point clearly enough about how this pertains to parenting and schools. Needless to say i can only give this book one star for its effort to bring together some compelling topics. I just wish she had done it in a clearer and more compelling way. Thank you to Netgalley for allowing me to review this book for an honest opinion

  4. 4 out of 5

    Nadine

    Parents will find this very readable and informative with a well broken down Table of Contents and Index to find specific information. End of chapter questions, quizzes with explained answers, and activities may be very helpful. Unlike other education books, this one addresses the social vs academic problem parents, students, and teachers face in this increasingly connected world. Additionally, this book has a multitude of comparisons such as Star Wars, Harry Potter's school, the Kardashian fami Parents will find this very readable and informative with a well broken down Table of Contents and Index to find specific information. End of chapter questions, quizzes with explained answers, and activities may be very helpful. Unlike other education books, this one addresses the social vs academic problem parents, students, and teachers face in this increasingly connected world. Additionally, this book has a multitude of comparisons such as Star Wars, Harry Potter's school, the Kardashian family to emphasize the information. A copy was given to me through the Goodreads First Reads program for review.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Fredrick Danysh

    This work is an examination of the faults of the American educational system which has become a watered down unchallenging, feel good environment. It gives recommendations of the steps that parents can take to improve the learning process for their students. This was a free review copy but is still a good read for parents who want more than a baby sitting service..

  6. 5 out of 5

    Liane Brouillette

  7. 5 out of 5

    Cecilia Dunbar Hernandez

  8. 4 out of 5

    Micah

  9. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Oppedisano

    Easy quick read, useful information.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Liane Brouillette

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly Burge

  12. 4 out of 5

    Frederick Rotzien

  13. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

  14. 4 out of 5

    Becky Everhart

  15. 4 out of 5

    Janna

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jason

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kaite

  18. 5 out of 5

    K.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Craig Dean

  20. 4 out of 5

    Donna Schubert

  21. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

  22. 5 out of 5

    Heather

  23. 5 out of 5

    Brenda Hoffman

  24. 5 out of 5

    Pam

  25. 5 out of 5

    Erica Carver

  26. 5 out of 5

    Belmont Kirch

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sara Prior

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sandra

  29. 5 out of 5

    Dr. Cole Marie Mckinnon

  30. 5 out of 5

    Margarita

  31. 5 out of 5

    Almira

  32. 5 out of 5

    Vicky

  33. 4 out of 5

    Crissy

  34. 5 out of 5

    Katharine Adams

  35. 5 out of 5

    Jen Zidak

  36. 4 out of 5

    Tammy Pooser

  37. 5 out of 5

    Caroline

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.