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1928. Loos was an acclaimed American screenwriter, playwright and author. Loos is perhaps best known for her short novel Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, a satirical view of a dumb blonde showgirl from Arkansas out to get a rich husband. It was an overnight bestseller. She wrote a sequel titled But Gentlemen Marry Brunettes, which was also successful. These Jazz Age classics are 1928. Loos was an acclaimed American screenwriter, playwright and author. Loos is perhaps best known for her short novel Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, a satirical view of a dumb blonde showgirl from Arkansas out to get a rich husband. It was an overnight bestseller. She wrote a sequel titled But Gentlemen Marry Brunettes, which was also successful. These Jazz Age classics are written as the diaries of a flapper who travels to Europe, meets everyone and returns to the United States to marry a millionaire. A fun read.


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1928. Loos was an acclaimed American screenwriter, playwright and author. Loos is perhaps best known for her short novel Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, a satirical view of a dumb blonde showgirl from Arkansas out to get a rich husband. It was an overnight bestseller. She wrote a sequel titled But Gentlemen Marry Brunettes, which was also successful. These Jazz Age classics are 1928. Loos was an acclaimed American screenwriter, playwright and author. Loos is perhaps best known for her short novel Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, a satirical view of a dumb blonde showgirl from Arkansas out to get a rich husband. It was an overnight bestseller. She wrote a sequel titled But Gentlemen Marry Brunettes, which was also successful. These Jazz Age classics are written as the diaries of a flapper who travels to Europe, meets everyone and returns to the United States to marry a millionaire. A fun read.

30 review for But Gentlemen Marry Brunettes: The Illuminating Diary of a Professional Lady

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sharon Barrow Wilfong

    But Gentlemen Marry Brunettes is the follow up to Gentlemen Prefer Blondes. Both are tongue in cheek satire on the expected inter relationship between men and women as portrayed in Hollywood movies. Rich man falls in love with poor, sweet, innocent girl from nowhere. Except though Loos' women may be innocent, they're not stupid. Men seem to helplessly fall in love, or at least have wolfish objectives, yet the women somehow come out on top. Often this seems to be due to dumb luck, more than anythi But Gentlemen Marry Brunettes is the follow up to Gentlemen Prefer Blondes. Both are tongue in cheek satire on the expected inter relationship between men and women as portrayed in Hollywood movies. Rich man falls in love with poor, sweet, innocent girl from nowhere. Except though Loos' women may be innocent, they're not stupid. Men seem to helplessly fall in love, or at least have wolfish objectives, yet the women somehow come out on top. Often this seems to be due to dumb luck, more than anything. In this book, Lorelei is still writing in her diary, but this time instead of writing about herself and her love life, she writes about her friend Dorothy, whom we met in the first book as a sidekick of Lorelei's. We learn Dorothy grew up in a carnival, but was "rescued" by a sheriff who had "noble intentions" to make her an honest woman. It turns out the sheriff is not able to carry out his heroic plan due to a blonde secretary that apparently has enough information on him to keep him away from Dorothy. So Dorothy ends up eventually in New York where she joins Zigfeld Follies and is discovered by a rich man who wants to marry her, however, his mother does not think she is quite their kind. All sorts of shenanigans follow, a la Buster Keaton and Dorothy ends up marrying a sax player who ends up being a lout, so the rich guy pays for her to travel to Paris to get a divorce, only the mother pays for a lawyer to make it so Dorothy has no grounds for divorce. It's all very silly, but written with such fluid grace and wit that it is easy to zoom through the whole book, rather like riding a toboggan down a snowy hill. I don't know if I'll read more of Loos. The two books I've read were all fun and games, however, I think I'm satiated with her brand of social satire. But who knows?

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lisajean

    An unnecessary sequel that doesn't live up to the charm and humor of Gentlemen Prefer Blondes . The book is essentially just a sequence of Dorothy's bon mots related by the clueless Lorelei. An unnecessary sequel that doesn't live up to the charm and humor of Gentlemen Prefer Blondes . The book is essentially just a sequence of Dorothy's bon mots related by the clueless Lorelei.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Moira Fogarty

    I guess my taste in fiction runs to blondes. I preferred Anita's first book, detailing the wild life and saucy times of Lorelei Lee, to this meh sequel written by Lorelei about her less fortunate friend Dorothy. Lorelei is exciting: a shameless scoundrel, she manipulates her way through a harsh world of class barriers and prejudice to come out on top. While not a very sympathetic character, one never really worries about Ms. Lee's future, as she has her priorities straight. She always chooses di I guess my taste in fiction runs to blondes. I preferred Anita's first book, detailing the wild life and saucy times of Lorelei Lee, to this meh sequel written by Lorelei about her less fortunate friend Dorothy. Lorelei is exciting: a shameless scoundrel, she manipulates her way through a harsh world of class barriers and prejudice to come out on top. While not a very sympathetic character, one never really worries about Ms. Lee's future, as she has her priorities straight. She always chooses diamonds, money, moving up in society and cultural enrichment over lesser possessions like virtue, honesty and love. Dorothy seems not to know quite what she wants, which makes her biography less compelling, and unlike Lorelei who faces down angry wives, rampaging mothers and scurrilous investigators, Dorothy's greatest obstacle to happiness seems to be herself. Perhaps I disliked this book because I wish I was more fancy-free and mercenary (although not a straight-up gold digger), like Lorelei. Instead, I was horrified to discover that I share several of Dorothy's most maligned traits. Lorelei demands presents; Dorothy GIVES gifts to men. Clearly, Dorothy is being played for a fool. This book disparages my aspirations towards feminist equality as just damned silly behaviour, according to Anita Loos. Huh. The role of Lorelei was acted by Marilyn Monroe. Dorothy is such a watery, forgettable character that the big screen adaptation of this book in 1955's Gentlemen Marry Brunettes didn't even feature her - the script was completely altered to be about two women, Bonnie & Connie - not a Dorothy in sight. One interesting thing I learned from this book came from a passing mention on p. 12 of 'Texas Guynan' (sic). I didn't recognize the name, so looked her up and discovered she was a famous prohibition-era saloon keeper and the namesake of Guinan on Star Trek. Poor Texas died in Vancouver, BC of amoebic dysentery in 1933, exactly one month before Prohibition was repealed... learn a new thing every day!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Heather Putman

    I have a theory that Anita Loos was a nom de plume for Dorothy Parker, or someone otherwise affiliated with the Algonquin Club of New York. Many of these anecdotes seem to be exaggerated private jokes in and amongst the female literati about less-intellectually driven individuals. If read in this context, the book is sharp.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Emjy

    Aussi délicieux et efficace que le premier !

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    The sequel to Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, But Gentlemen Marry Brunettes focuses on Lorelei’s best friend, Dorothy. Dorothy was a wonderful counterpart to Lorelei in the first book, but she loses something when thrust into the spotlight. The same all-knowing, biting satire pervades this book, but Lorelei’s voice doesn’t click quite as well when telling someone else’s story. Plus, I found the darker events alluded to here harder to overlook than in the first book. It’s still a fun read, but it doesn The sequel to Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, But Gentlemen Marry Brunettes focuses on Lorelei’s best friend, Dorothy. Dorothy was a wonderful counterpart to Lorelei in the first book, but she loses something when thrust into the spotlight. The same all-knowing, biting satire pervades this book, but Lorelei’s voice doesn’t click quite as well when telling someone else’s story. Plus, I found the darker events alluded to here harder to overlook than in the first book. It’s still a fun read, but it doesn’t have the same magic as Gentlemen Prefer Blondes. Recommended.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    Personally, I did not like this book. I found it to irreverent about marriage, sex, and life in general. It was like Wodehouse, without the plot and the humor.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Anita Loos once again captured the charm of Lorelei Lee, but as this story centers around her friend Dorothy, I found the character hard to connect with. The book fell a little short for me.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    The first two chapters were hilarious! It went downhill...

  10. 5 out of 5

    Basia Korzeniowska

    Good fun once I managed to get over my irritation at the arch bad spelling. Very much of its time, morals and hypocrisy wise.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Galina

    The first book was much better. The story of the brunette even being told by the blond is just another chick-lit, nothing special.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Cindy

    And I preferred to not finish this book. Did not care to invest my time on the ditzy Lorelei.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    Not as good as "Blondes." I, mean, really, really not as good. Not as good as "Blondes." I, mean, really, really not as good.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    Truly amusing and just as silly as the first book, this is the story of Dorothy "Dot" Shaw, as related by her friend Lorelei with all the naive judgements and misspellings you'd expect. Part of the fun for me is that Lorelei doesn't always seem to know exactly what she is talking about so innuendo slides right past her. Dot's story is interesting and involves carnivals, Detention homes, the Follies, domestic abuse, Paris divorces and the mob. And everywhere there are men trying to take advantage Truly amusing and just as silly as the first book, this is the story of Dorothy "Dot" Shaw, as related by her friend Lorelei with all the naive judgements and misspellings you'd expect. Part of the fun for me is that Lorelei doesn't always seem to know exactly what she is talking about so innuendo slides right past her. Dot's story is interesting and involves carnivals, Detention homes, the Follies, domestic abuse, Paris divorces and the mob. And everywhere there are men trying to take advantage of women, and the women who let them - for a price. Whether that price is a Paris vacation, or a wedding ring, someone is going to pay.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    Basically unnecessary follow-up to "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes," this time telling the story of Lorelei's friend Dorothy. The intentional misspellings were even more numerous than in the previous book, to the point of being overdone. The first book provided a look at flapper culture, but this one was just Lorelei droning on about Dorothy, the foolish things she did, and the losers she took up with. Basically unnecessary follow-up to "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes," this time telling the story of Lorelei's friend Dorothy. The intentional misspellings were even more numerous than in the previous book, to the point of being overdone. The first book provided a look at flapper culture, but this one was just Lorelei droning on about Dorothy, the foolish things she did, and the losers she took up with.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Emilie

    A hurler de rires !! Ce petit livre est palpitant et bourré d'un humour désuet, mais qui fait quand même mouche à chaque fois. Une pépite qui mérite d'être (re)découverte pour le talent de conteuse de son auteure, la fabuleuse Anita Loos. A hurler de rires !! Ce petit livre est palpitant et bourré d'un humour désuet, mais qui fait quand même mouche à chaque fois. Une pépite qui mérite d'être (re)découverte pour le talent de conteuse de son auteure, la fabuleuse Anita Loos.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Chrisanne

    Loos commits one of the unpardonables here and makes light of child molesters. Nope, nope and nope.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Bostonlotus

    .... part 2. The crap continued...

  19. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    2.5 stars Not as entertaining as Blondes.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Amy Christine Lesher

    If you've ever watched Gentlemen Prefer Blondes it will be hard to read this book without hearing Marilyn Monroe's breathy voice as the narrator. This book was a delightful little read. Besides getting more of Lorelei Lee's philosophy you will also see very interesting spelling in the book. That was one of the items that stayed with me. There's a line in The Thin Man about the words an illiterate person would misspell and Anita Loos nails the spelling in this novelette. Now to find Gentlemen Pref If you've ever watched Gentlemen Prefer Blondes it will be hard to read this book without hearing Marilyn Monroe's breathy voice as the narrator. This book was a delightful little read. Besides getting more of Lorelei Lee's philosophy you will also see very interesting spelling in the book. That was one of the items that stayed with me. There's a line in The Thin Man about the words an illiterate person would misspell and Anita Loos nails the spelling in this novelette. Now to find Gentlemen Prefer Blondes to see what that book is like!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Enrique Arellano

    Not as perfect or groundbreaking as Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, but Loos' writing still shines with her wit, humor, and charm. I was more so disappointed by how sparse and inconsistent the illustrations were, but overall I would say it is still very much worth a read. Not as perfect or groundbreaking as Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, but Loos' writing still shines with her wit, humor, and charm. I was more so disappointed by how sparse and inconsistent the illustrations were, but overall I would say it is still very much worth a read.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Laurel

    "Because it seems that the Ohio Society is very exclusive, because you have to be born in Ohio. But he got Henry an invitation to join the Pennsylvania Society, which is not so exclusive, because all you have to be born in is Pennsylvania." "Because it seems that the Ohio Society is very exclusive, because you have to be born in Ohio. But he got Henry an invitation to join the Pennsylvania Society, which is not so exclusive, because all you have to be born in is Pennsylvania."

  23. 5 out of 5

    Tim Archer

  24. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne

  25. 5 out of 5

    A

  26. 4 out of 5

    Judith

  27. 5 out of 5

    Javan

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ian

  29. 5 out of 5

    Zoe J

  30. 5 out of 5

    Tracey

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