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The #1 New York Times bestselling author and producer of the Fox television hit, Bones, returns with a spectacular new Tempe Brennan novel. There are 206 bones in the human body. Forensic anthropologists know them intimately, can read in them stories of brief or long lives and use them to reconstruct every kind of violent end. 206 Bones opens with Tempe regaining conscio The #1 New York Times bestselling author and producer of the Fox television hit, Bones, returns with a spectacular new Tempe Brennan novel. There are 206 bones in the human body. Forensic anthropologists know them intimately, can read in them stories of brief or long lives and use them to reconstruct every kind of violent end. 206 Bones opens with Tempe regaining consciousness and discovering that she is in some kind of very small, very dark, very cold enclosed space. She is bound, hands to feet. Who wants Tempe dead, or at least out of the way, and why? Tempe begins slowly to reconstruct... Tempe and Lieutenant Ryan had accompanied the recently discovered remains of a missing heiress from Montreal to the Chicago morgue. Suddenly, Tempe was accused of mishandling the autopsy -- and the case. Someone made an incriminating phone call. Within hours, the one man with information about the call was dead. Back in Montreal, the corpse of a second elderly woman was found in the woods, and then a third. Seamlessly weaving between Tempe's present-tense terror as she's held captive and her memory of the cases of these murdered women, Reichs conveys the incredible devastation that would occur if a forensic colleague sabotaged work in the lab. The chemistry between Tempe and Ryan intensifies as this complex, riveting tale unfolds. Reichs is writing at the top of her game.


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The #1 New York Times bestselling author and producer of the Fox television hit, Bones, returns with a spectacular new Tempe Brennan novel. There are 206 bones in the human body. Forensic anthropologists know them intimately, can read in them stories of brief or long lives and use them to reconstruct every kind of violent end. 206 Bones opens with Tempe regaining conscio The #1 New York Times bestselling author and producer of the Fox television hit, Bones, returns with a spectacular new Tempe Brennan novel. There are 206 bones in the human body. Forensic anthropologists know them intimately, can read in them stories of brief or long lives and use them to reconstruct every kind of violent end. 206 Bones opens with Tempe regaining consciousness and discovering that she is in some kind of very small, very dark, very cold enclosed space. She is bound, hands to feet. Who wants Tempe dead, or at least out of the way, and why? Tempe begins slowly to reconstruct... Tempe and Lieutenant Ryan had accompanied the recently discovered remains of a missing heiress from Montreal to the Chicago morgue. Suddenly, Tempe was accused of mishandling the autopsy -- and the case. Someone made an incriminating phone call. Within hours, the one man with information about the call was dead. Back in Montreal, the corpse of a second elderly woman was found in the woods, and then a third. Seamlessly weaving between Tempe's present-tense terror as she's held captive and her memory of the cases of these murdered women, Reichs conveys the incredible devastation that would occur if a forensic colleague sabotaged work in the lab. The chemistry between Tempe and Ryan intensifies as this complex, riveting tale unfolds. Reichs is writing at the top of her game.

30 review for 206 Bones

  1. 4 out of 5

    Petra

    I am a huge fan of the TV show Bones. I have never read a book by Kathy Reichs. I don't think I'll read more. This book has a very grumpy Temperance Brennan. There's something quite dislikable about her throughout. She's angry, she complains, she hardly has anything nice to say. There were various mysteries but the "real time" one was easy to figure out but anyone, except Temperance and Ryan. The murder mysteries were convoluted and, frankly, boring. The writing was poor. Winds skulked down stre I am a huge fan of the TV show Bones. I have never read a book by Kathy Reichs. I don't think I'll read more. This book has a very grumpy Temperance Brennan. There's something quite dislikable about her throughout. She's angry, she complains, she hardly has anything nice to say. There were various mysteries but the "real time" one was easy to figure out but anyone, except Temperance and Ryan. The murder mysteries were convoluted and, frankly, boring. The writing was poor. Winds skulked down streets, for example. Sigh..... I listened to the audio. There wasn't anything wrong with the narration. This just wasn't an interesting story and didn't have interesting characters.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Elisabeth Pound

    I am the type of reader who hooks into a series that is already established and reads each book in order, one after the other - I started the Temperance Brennan novels a few months back, and have read each book in succession. Maybe I have read too many in too short a period of time, but the formula is wearing thin, and Tempe is becoming annoyingly arrogant. This book especially focuses on board certification, and while I'm sure Ms. Reichs can attest to its importance, I found the repeated messag I am the type of reader who hooks into a series that is already established and reads each book in order, one after the other - I started the Temperance Brennan novels a few months back, and have read each book in succession. Maybe I have read too many in too short a period of time, but the formula is wearing thin, and Tempe is becoming annoyingly arrogant. This book especially focuses on board certification, and while I'm sure Ms. Reichs can attest to its importance, I found the repeated message to be irritating - I rolled my eyes in a way that would put "Katy" to shame *many* times. Besides, the plotline indicates that the mistakes were made by a not only uncertified person, but a criminal - grossly untrained, working under an assumed name ... doesn't go very far to lend credence to her overall point. Am I the only one who wonders how scarred Tempe's face must be by now? She is always falling, scraping, breaking, and being clonked about the head. The girl should put on a helmet with a facemask before she goes outside. Maybe Ms. Reichs should have Tempe rescue someone else for a change - solve the forensic puzzle and have it lead her to the clues needed to rescue someone else, rather than having the truth come to her in a brain addled rush all at once.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Nadine Jones

    Kathy Reichs used to be my favorite author, and I don't know if she's gotten into a rut, or if I'm just no longer enamored with her style, but either way, this book didn't do it for me. It was too self-aware, too precious, too bogged down in details. I used to enjoy the technical/medical details that Reichs includes, but this time I found myself skimming entire paragraphs. I was also annoyed w/ the excessively complicated plot line - as in past books, many seemingly unrelated deaths turn out to Kathy Reichs used to be my favorite author, and I don't know if she's gotten into a rut, or if I'm just no longer enamored with her style, but either way, this book didn't do it for me. It was too self-aware, too precious, too bogged down in details. I used to enjoy the technical/medical details that Reichs includes, but this time I found myself skimming entire paragraphs. I was also annoyed w/ the excessively complicated plot line - as in past books, many seemingly unrelated deaths turn out to have a connection - it's clever, but confusing. I start to forget which case is which. I've also become tired of the protagonist finding herself in harm's way, kidnapped, beaten, left for dead - at least in this book, it was accidental, she was not knowingly doing something risky when she was abducted. (However, I found it HIGHLY annoying that the book starts with the good doctor already trapped, and then backtracks to the story as she remembers.) In the end, the criminals and the motive were believable, which was nice.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Alaina

    Pretty good audio. 206 Bones is just another book in the Temperance Brennan series where she finds herself in trouble. It's pretty consistent so I just knew before diving in that something crazy was going to happen. Just like in the TV show, Bones, Tempe is kidnapped. She's in danger and doesn't really know where she is until the end of the book. Of course, she's betrayed by someone that was working with - which a good twist. I liked this book because I wasn't really dealing with Ryan being a dum Pretty good audio. 206 Bones is just another book in the Temperance Brennan series where she finds herself in trouble. It's pretty consistent so I just knew before diving in that something crazy was going to happen. Just like in the TV show, Bones, Tempe is kidnapped. She's in danger and doesn't really know where she is until the end of the book. Of course, she's betrayed by someone that was working with - which a good twist. I liked this book because I wasn't really dealing with Ryan being a dumb guy. Or their relationship going through something stupid. I mean, he still was a jerk in some ways when he was drinking.. but people usually are. The case that Tempe was working on was pretty interesting but I will admit.. I did, at one point, lose interest. Not because I was bored with the book.. but I just kind of ended up daydreaming about something else lol. Or my dog would just be annoying and want my love. Overall, I enjoyed the audio and I can't wait to dive into the next one. I'm hoping that Brennan will change her ways and not be so easily to catch.. but eh, I'm not that hopeful either.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    At 20 pages in, I was already annoyed by the author's habit of taking paragraphs of description, slapping quotation marks around it, and calling it dialogue. And yet, I carried on to the bitter end. Which I saw coming a mile away. This isn't one of Tempe's greatest hits. The crimes are unremarkable (for the genre, anyway) and the twists are... less than twisty. Plus the Brennan-Ryan romance is back in its tedious "will they (again) or won't they (again)" mode. My biggest beef is that Reichs is cle At 20 pages in, I was already annoyed by the author's habit of taking paragraphs of description, slapping quotation marks around it, and calling it dialogue. And yet, I carried on to the bitter end. Which I saw coming a mile away. This isn't one of Tempe's greatest hits. The crimes are unremarkable (for the genre, anyway) and the twists are... less than twisty. Plus the Brennan-Ryan romance is back in its tedious "will they (again) or won't they (again)" mode. My biggest beef is that Reichs is clearly using the novel as a megaphone with which to complain about uncertified experts practicing forensics. And while I agree that I'd much rather have a board certified forensic anthropologist examining my dry & dessicated corpse, I really don't need Reichs to take a sledgehammer and beat that opinion into my skull.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Brooke

    With her 12th Bones book, Kathy Reichs decided to mix it up a little bit. Instead of saving Tempe's inevitable abduction for the very end, she opens the book with it and then takes us back to the beginning of the case so we could see how Tempe ended up in peril. Nice try, Reichs, but the real way to mix it up would be to stop having your heroine get kidnapped at all. Its ridiculousness is right up there with how many times Chloe and Lois have each been knocked out on Smallville. I'd make a drinki With her 12th Bones book, Kathy Reichs decided to mix it up a little bit. Instead of saving Tempe's inevitable abduction for the very end, she opens the book with it and then takes us back to the beginning of the case so we could see how Tempe ended up in peril. Nice try, Reichs, but the real way to mix it up would be to stop having your heroine get kidnapped at all. Its ridiculousness is right up there with how many times Chloe and Lois have each been knocked out on Smallville. I'd make a drinking game out of it, except I don't want people dying of alcohol poisoning. And that really sums up my feelings about this series at this point. It takes a really skilled writer to keep things fresh after a dozen books. Jim Butcher has that skill (Jim Butcher has mad skills). Kathy Reichs, not so much. Sometimes she spins a really intriguing mystery, and sometimes she just spins. It's been a few books since I felt really invested in the homicide Tempe and Detective Ryan investigated. I'm hoping it's just a matter of personal taste rather than Reichs burning out.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Why read: Love the series What impressed me: Three dead women, seemingly unconnected, plus Tempe trapped means a whole lot of mystery going on. The details were easy to follow, the solutions always a surprise. And while I've always been a fan of Ryan, all of his scenes with Tempe's former in-laws were hilarious and made me love him even more. What disappointed me: The back and forth between the past investigations and Tempe being trapped annoyed me. I think it was supposed to heighten the tension, Why read: Love the series What impressed me: Three dead women, seemingly unconnected, plus Tempe trapped means a whole lot of mystery going on. The details were easy to follow, the solutions always a surprise. And while I've always been a fan of Ryan, all of his scenes with Tempe's former in-laws were hilarious and made me love him even more. What disappointed me: The back and forth between the past investigations and Tempe being trapped annoyed me. I think it was supposed to heighten the tension, but it seemed like Tempe just flailing around and passing out every couple of chapters. Recommended: I definitely wouldn't suggest 206 Bones as your first Temperance Brennan book, but series fans shouldn't miss it. Continue series: Yes. Sticking with Tempe to the end.

  8. 5 out of 5

    fleurette

    This is my first book in this series. Of course, I had watched the TV show before, but I was also quite aware that there are significant differences between the show and the books. Still, I didn't expect them to be that big. As already mentioned, I have not read the previous books in this series. Sometimes it was a problem, sometimes it wasn't. The author tries to explain the situations in Brennen's private life and does a pretty good job, but sometimes I just didn't care what was going on in her This is my first book in this series. Of course, I had watched the TV show before, but I was also quite aware that there are significant differences between the show and the books. Still, I didn't expect them to be that big. As already mentioned, I have not read the previous books in this series. Sometimes it was a problem, sometimes it wasn't. The author tries to explain the situations in Brennen's private life and does a pretty good job, but sometimes I just didn't care what was going on in her love life, for example, because I wasn't attached to these characters. It was also a bit difficult for me to follow the plot from time to time. Sometimes one chapter talked about the murder of one victim, and the next one about another, and I was a bit confused, not knowing exactly which person it was about. I had a problem distinguishing between them. It may also be related to the fact that the main plot about the murders of old men is not that interesting. It's okay, but it's not something I will remember. Even now, having finished reading this book only a week ago, I have absolutely no memory of what it was about and hardly remember who the killer was. At first, I thought more space would be devoted to Laszlo's murder. I guess I expected that this would be something Brennan would be working on. Meanwhile, the answer to the question of what happened to Laszlo is tucked somewhere between other things and, in fact, of little importance. It's a shame as it was a really good start to the book. The part about the accusations against Tempe of malpractice is very interesting, but the person responsible for all this is a one I suspected from the very beginning. I was a little frustrated that Brennan didn't see what was happening as it is pretty obvious to the reader. Although I was also surprised by everyone involved in this case, there were more of them than I expected. I also think that this thread could have been used somehow more interestingly or more closely related to the rest of this story. As I mentioned, even though I knew the show was very different from the books, I was still surprised by the extent of these differences. I guess I was most surprised that the story is set in Canada, and to be honest, I don't know really why. But I also think that's really good for this book as it added a nice aspect to this story. Besides, I guess I just missed the characters I know from the show and the dynamics of the relationship between them. This is not a bad book but it is not a story I will remember. I will probably try to read some other books in this series. I also think that I should start with the earlier ones, it will be easier for me to become attached to the characters and understand what is going on.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Wanda

    Blech! I think Reichs may be losing it. I have been a past fan of hers for many years and have read everything she wrote but I think she may be resting on her laurels. Temperence Brennan has turned into a misanthropic curmudgeon who is pretty unlikeable. This story was disjointed with subplots plopped in willy nilly. Unrealistically Tempe stays with Pete's extended family -- her ex in laws with whom she has a wonderful relationship. How realistic is that? Could be, but unlikely. She goes on and Blech! I think Reichs may be losing it. I have been a past fan of hers for many years and have read everything she wrote but I think she may be resting on her laurels. Temperence Brennan has turned into a misanthropic curmudgeon who is pretty unlikeable. This story was disjointed with subplots plopped in willy nilly. Unrealistically Tempe stays with Pete's extended family -- her ex in laws with whom she has a wonderful relationship. How realistic is that? Could be, but unlikely. She goes on and on about the Latvian community in Chicago in one subplot with Ryan insinuating himself into the family. How realistic is that? I don't think so. It was not well edited -- e.g. Temperance has her window blown out in her apartment but we really never find out whether it was a shot or a rock when the cops come. She just calls the cops and Ryan finds out and she puts plywood over it. And??? Then we learn at the very end who and what happened. To make matters worse IT WAS PREACHY. Hey, I hate that there are incompetent people in my profession too. But to go on and on about board certification is ENUF already. The most likeable character in this series with the most staying power has proved to be Birdie at this point.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Was up all night read because of the rain storm we had so I was able to finish it.just like the rest of the ones of this series its a must read.if you haven't read the series yet then you need to. Was up all night read because of the rain storm we had so I was able to finish it.just like the rest of the ones of this series its a must read.if you haven't read the series yet then you need to.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Alex Black

    This is my first introduction to the Temperance Brennan books, and I think this was a particularly bad place to start. However, it also left me with no desire to ever read Kathy Reichs again so this will probably be my only experience with these books. But my thoughts are definitely going to be skewed by this being my first book in the series, despite it being book 12. First, it was incredibly confusing. Most procedural cop thriller series can be read out of order just fine. Authors generally do This is my first introduction to the Temperance Brennan books, and I think this was a particularly bad place to start. However, it also left me with no desire to ever read Kathy Reichs again so this will probably be my only experience with these books. But my thoughts are definitely going to be skewed by this being my first book in the series, despite it being book 12. First, it was incredibly confusing. Most procedural cop thriller series can be read out of order just fine. Authors generally do a quick summary at the beginning of the major players, family situations, romances, etc in case you're starting here. This book had that a little, but not right at the beginning and it only gave background information on Brennan and Ryan, the two main players. I had no idea who the other people in the lab were, and it was incredibly relevant to this story in particular. By the end of the book, there were at least a half dozen people who I knew by name alone and couldn't give you any additional information. And they weren't meant to be minor characters, I don't think. And then the plot. It took me until about halfway through the book to realize what the plot was. It was a mystery within the lab itself instead of a specific case (there were in fact several different cases involved). I think that made this a particularly bad place to start in the series since it wasn't a typical case, although of course I can't speak for what the other books are like. The cases involved were pretty basic and Brennan didn't actually do much work in solving any of them. The main lab mystery took over her story, but it was so obvious. Like painfully obvious. One character was bad. Everyone hated them. They were continuously annoying and mean. They were described as evil. Plot twist, they were the villain. What a shock. I also really couldn't stand the writing style. She included so much unnecessary information, either in pages of narration or paragraphs and paragraphs of dialogue. The worst was on page 99 when I seriously considered dnfing the book (and probably should have). Brennan says the town name reminds her of Mohawks, monks, and monastery cheese. Then proceeds to go on about those topics for two and a half pages despite it literally having no relevance to the story. It happened all the time. Random information on Chicago Transit Authority, the entire backstory of Brennan's exhusband's extended family, long explanations of technical forensics information that was pretty hard to follow as someone who knows nothing. When she included stuff like the cheeks being wide and that indicating a certain race, that was cool. When she wrote three long paragraphs about how the sternum was formed, not so much. I started skimming about a hundred pages in because it was intolerable. There was also just so much unnecessary stuff, even when it wasn't in paragraphs of random information. When Ryan was driving, it would say what streets he turned on. There were long pages about Brennan getting food poisoning even though it contributed nothing to the story. At one point she randomly went to North Carolina to hang out with her daughter and the whole thing was vaguely described in summary. I was honestly just kind of lost. I didn't understand why she was including so much extraneous stuff. Brennan was super annoying. I understand why they changed her character in the tv show. I could hardly stand her narration in the book when I was quickly skimming. She would whine and whine about how she'd go home to an empty house and how Ryan (her on again, off again, on again, off again, on again, ad infinitum boyfriend) didn't care about her anymore, but then people would ask her to hang out or offer her rides and she'd refuse and insult them. At one point she asked Ryan to hang out and he said he couldn't because he was picking up his daughter in the morning, who he was estranged from and had a heroin addiction. He didn't want to risk being late. Brennan said she understood, and then in narration went on about how she didn't understand and felt abandoned by him. That is one of the most understandable rejections I've ever seen. And those are just two examples, but that was what she was like for the entire book. The ending was the trope where after it's all over, Brennan and Ryan sit down and explain what happened to each other/the reader, which was really annoying. I much prefer seeing the drama play out than being told about it after the fact. Just in general, it seemed like most of this book was pretty big on telling over showing. And I wanted to add that yes, I watched the Bones tv show and enjoyed it. This book was very different in terms of characters and story (Booth is Andrew Ryan in the book and they're from Canada, Brennan has an exhusband and an adult daughter, and there are a million other differences). But the differences didn't bother me because I didn't expect them to be at all similar. This isn't a one star review because I was expecting it to be like Bones the show. This was a one star because I found it thoroughly unpleasant. Honestly, I was just so confused for this whole book. Confused and bored. I'm not too picky with cop thrillers most of the time. I don't care if they're amazing. I just want them to be entertaining for a couple of hours. This was negative entertainment, if that's possible. Perhaps other books in the series are better, but I won't be finding out. This was a weird one because it was laboratory mystery instead of specific case mystery, but even then, the overall writing style and characters were just unpleasant. I wouldn't say don't pick up this series if you're looking to give it a try, but definitely don't start with this book.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Arnis

    https://poseidons99.wordpress.com/201... https://poseidons99.wordpress.com/201...

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jocelyn

    Seriously... How many times is she going to get knocked on the head?

  14. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    I love me some David Boreanaz. Way before there was Team Edward, there was Angel, the tortured vampire with a soul from Buffy the Vampire Slayer. What does David Boreanaz have to do with a Kathy Reichs novel, you ask? Nothing-except that he now plays a characters on Bones, a television show VERY loosely based on Kathy Reichs character Temperance Brennan. I give you this background on DB as an explanation for my love of said show, despite the fact that the only things that the show and Kathy Reic I love me some David Boreanaz. Way before there was Team Edward, there was Angel, the tortured vampire with a soul from Buffy the Vampire Slayer. What does David Boreanaz have to do with a Kathy Reichs novel, you ask? Nothing-except that he now plays a characters on Bones, a television show VERY loosely based on Kathy Reichs character Temperance Brennan. I give you this background on DB as an explanation for my love of said show, despite the fact that the only things that the show and Kathy Reich's actual books have in common is the name of the main character and her profession. If you want the REAL Temperance Brennan, you have to read the books. Like her latest book, 206 Bones. There's a lot going on in this one, even though it is one of her shorter books. There is a sabotage plot, a serial murderer, and a 40 year old missing person's case. The best part-Andrew Ryan, the hot Quebecois police officer, is back. He's done with the mother of the child he just found about about, and he is ready to get back to business with Tempe. Question is, is she ready for him? (I for one am rooting for them to get back together-hot guys that speak French are quite a catch!) As usual, the story is fast paced, and there is lots of really interesting forensic anthropological goodness. The title of the book, of course, refers to the number of bones in the human body. One thing of interest for Chicago-dwellers is that the setting for the first part of the book is Elmhurst. Tempe, who's originally from Illinois, comes back to visit her former in-laws, and while here she gets sucked into a missing persons case. I so enjoyed reading that part of the book-the body is found at the Thornton Quarry, just below the bridge that take Interstates 294 and 80 over the large hole in the ground where my daughter thought the Flintstones lived when she was little. This is, oh, about five minutes from my house. I drive over that bridge so often it doesn't even trigger my bridge phobia. Every step of their time in Chicago was recognizable to me...I love it when an author takes the time to get the details right. I have to admit, I've felt let down by the last couple Reichs books. It seemed like she was phoning it in, and I thought that maybe concentrating on the show was taking away from her writing. But this book gives me hope that we are going to get out of the doldrums and get back to the fascinating exploration of forensic anthropology that is a Temperance Brennan novel.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kristina

    I've been reading Kathy R. since the very first Temperence Brennan book and either her plots and writing have gotten shittier over the years or I've gotten more critical. Probably a combination of both. This is absolutely the last Kathy Reichs book I will ever read. She's just horrible. I'm immediately irritated because Tempe is being held in an underground tomb and she is described as being hogtied. Now, I know what that means, but I googled it just in case because Tempe is then described as mo I've been reading Kathy R. since the very first Temperence Brennan book and either her plots and writing have gotten shittier over the years or I've gotten more critical. Probably a combination of both. This is absolutely the last Kathy Reichs book I will ever read. She's just horrible. I'm immediately irritated because Tempe is being held in an underground tomb and she is described as being hogtied. Now, I know what that means, but I googled it just in case because Tempe is then described as moving around and beating against the walls in a way she never could do if she were, indeed, hogtied. It's lack of details like that that piss me off. She has been writing these books for a long time--she should be better at it, not worse. Plus, her writing style is annoying and jumpy and I hate it. I will admit right here to not giving a damn about how she got stuck in the tomb (hogtied or not) and skipped right to the end. And the anatomy details are exhausting. It's too much. I just need to know enough to figure out what's going on--if I wanted to know that much detail about the body's skeleton, I'd go be a premed student somewhere. Kathy Reichs has, like many serial crime authors, gone from okay to absolutely unreadable. I no longer can read Patricia Cornwall either. If you want to read good detective/mystery/thrillers, read Karin Slaughter. So far, she is the best I've read of that genre.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Wonda

    4.5! I am a bit bias to this series since this television is one of my favorites of all time! Even with all the differences this is still a solid read! If you enjoy very technical novels, with a highlight of drama! I admit I have quite a hard time reading these novels within a few days of watching the show...I favor tv Brennan! I love the tie-in these novels have with the show...Ryan calling Tempe buttercup...Bones' password in the television show...very sneaky! 4.5! I am a bit bias to this series since this television is one of my favorites of all time! Even with all the differences this is still a solid read! If you enjoy very technical novels, with a highlight of drama! I admit I have quite a hard time reading these novels within a few days of watching the show...I favor tv Brennan! I love the tie-in these novels have with the show...Ryan calling Tempe buttercup...Bones' password in the television show...very sneaky!

  17. 5 out of 5

    J L's Bibliomania

    206 Bones is book 12 of 18 in the long running series by Kathy Reichs starring forensic anthropologist Temperance Brennan. 206 Bones continues to follow the "procedurals" formula and, I don't think it's too much of a spoiler to say that like many of the other books in the series, our protagonist ends up abducted, escaped/rescued, and in the hospital before the end of the story. But she, with the assist from side-kick cop (and ex-lover) Andrew Ryan do eventually put the clues together and catch t 206 Bones is book 12 of 18 in the long running series by Kathy Reichs starring forensic anthropologist Temperance Brennan. 206 Bones continues to follow the "procedurals" formula and, I don't think it's too much of a spoiler to say that like many of the other books in the series, our protagonist ends up abducted, escaped/rescued, and in the hospital before the end of the story. But she, with the assist from side-kick cop (and ex-lover) Andrew Ryan do eventually put the clues together and catch the murders. While not exactly bad, 206 Bones is not nearly as exciting as the earlier books in the series. I'm not quite ready to give up on Tempe, but I don't recommend starting this series with 206 Bones.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Nicola Mansfield

    Reason for Reading: I read every new Kathy Reichs book. Comments: Tempe wakes up to realize that she is tied up and trapped within a small brick structure within complete darkness. Chapters alternate between her present situation and some relative distant past and a case she's been working where the skeletal remains of an elderly woman are recovered and linked to 2 other violent deaths of elderly women and 1 current missing persons case that fits the same descriptors. Tempe is also experiencing Reason for Reading: I read every new Kathy Reichs book. Comments: Tempe wakes up to realize that she is tied up and trapped within a small brick structure within complete darkness. Chapters alternate between her present situation and some relative distant past and a case she's been working where the skeletal remains of an elderly woman are recovered and linked to 2 other violent deaths of elderly women and 1 current missing persons case that fits the same descriptors. Tempe is also experiencing difficulties at work in the Quebec office with a new staff member added to the crew and each other person in a gloomy mood; then she receives a nasty note and confirms someone has tried to discredit her recently. Tempe works this second personal case to get the guy who's after her reputation behind the scenes while working on the 'grannies' case. This was a great entry in the series. I spent my holiday Monday basically doing nothing but reading the book and read it in a day. (Well I read a bit the night before in bed, too) A very exciting, compelling read. The elderly woman case was a good one and different but I did find that the book lacked Reichs' usual flare for the gruesome details. I absolutely loved the switching back to a trapped Tempe, her memory is all hazy and she can't remember the immediate past, so the reader also has no idea how she ended up this way. These bits where she mentally tries to survive and talk herself into physically surviving and trying to escape were really my favourite parts of the book. While the mystery centres around the main case of the elderly women there are also a few side stories and mysteries going on as well. And while the main case proves to be a solid mystery, one of the other mysteries that ran the whole book was rather transparent and very easy to figure out from the beginning. I was quite surprised with that. Reichs usually holds up very solid mysteries. I wish she had advanced Brennan's personal life a little further in this book but instead she kept the Tempe/Ryan relationship pretty much business only and briefly let us see into where her thoughts were with anything further, we are fully aware of where Ryan stands on the issue. The book does end on a note that lets the reader know which direction the relationship will certainly go in the next book, though. On a final note, fans will devour this one and not be disappointed. It's a solid, all-nighter read and will keep us waiting for the next book.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Fiona

    The first time I read a Kathy Reichs novel, I was about sixteen, and really into my forensic-pathologist-does-crime-fighting-lit. I read it in about two days, decided it was brilliant, swore off Patricia Cornwell and all other substitutes ever again... and promptly forgot about it. Every so often now, I see one, and think yeah, that was great, I must do that again. So anyway, I've done it again. This time around, I was a bit worried that, now I'm a bit older, they'd have lost their brilliance, bu The first time I read a Kathy Reichs novel, I was about sixteen, and really into my forensic-pathologist-does-crime-fighting-lit. I read it in about two days, decided it was brilliant, swore off Patricia Cornwell and all other substitutes ever again... and promptly forgot about it. Every so often now, I see one, and think yeah, that was great, I must do that again. So anyway, I've done it again. This time around, I was a bit worried that, now I'm a bit older, they'd have lost their brilliance, but you know, I really enjoyed it. There are a great couple of main characters, enough jargon to make it sound technical and - best of all! - if there's one thing Reichs can do well, it's make you complicit in the info-dumping. You want to read it. You want to hear about a hundred-odd years of history of the Chicago subway system. You definitely want to hear about the evolution of teeth between the ages of six and adult. If ever such a situation where this information is necessary comes up, you will be the MAN, seriously. Tempe Brennan is an expert; you are also an expert, well done you. And that, for me, is something that in this genre gets a definite thumbs up. Also, this is the sort of book that makes you feel totally bilingual for knowing five words of French. Thank you, Kathy Reichs, I am appropriately flattered. The mystery was interesting and clever, although I did have Bad Guy #1 pegged pretty quickly. I think I must be in a minority among mystery readers, though, because that doesn't bother me: I like having suspicions early on, and then watching the story confirm or contradict that, and the characters try and work it out for themselves. It was engaging. The drip-feed of new information made me feel like I was still guessing most of the way through. Also - and I feel this must be noted - the banter was excellent. I would recommend this for the banter alone. I'd have to agree with some other reviewers, though, that I could have done without the morality tale in the last few pages. (We get it! We got it even before you ended up in hospital! Trust me, it spoke for itself!) But, last five pages aside, this was a bloody good read. Too short, obviously - it wasn't a book in a week by any means. But a bloody good read. Gold star, would puzzle again.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Paula Brandon

    My first book for 2017! How exciting! The book itself - not so much! This one felt as if Reichs was struggling to meet her deadline and her word count. Way too much padding! She pulls a James Patterson and throws in several cases for the price of one. I do not like this! If I did, I'd watch a TV show. My biggest peeve - description! I swear, did we really need that three-page description on the history of her ex-husband's family? Three pages! ABOUT HER EX-HUSBAND'S FAMILY! Good grief. After that My first book for 2017! How exciting! The book itself - not so much! This one felt as if Reichs was struggling to meet her deadline and her word count. Way too much padding! She pulls a James Patterson and throws in several cases for the price of one. I do not like this! If I did, I'd watch a TV show. My biggest peeve - description! I swear, did we really need that three-page description on the history of her ex-husband's family? Three pages! ABOUT HER EX-HUSBAND'S FAMILY! Good grief. After that, it's describing every road she drives down to get somewhere, or the history of every building she sees. I HATE, HATE, HATE this! Grrrrr! IT'S NOT IMPORTANT! Sorry for the yelling. It really grinds my gears. No wonder I read so much category romance; they're shorter and cut all that s*** out! I did want to keep reading to find out how it all ended, but I was largely unimpressed. The extraneous subplots, including the old-as-the-hills-and-just-as-dusty "someone-wants-to-sabotage-my-career" (which has served Patricia Cornwell well over the years) narrative strand pulled my attention to too many directions. All that pointless description - Aarrgghh! The climax was a bit of a fizzler too.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Naomi

    Probably my favorite Tempe Brennan book thus far...It just flowed incredibly smooth and I thought the storyline was the best out of all of them. She is still just a really, really comfortable read for me.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Renee Marski

    A little slow at the start but that feels like the norm for these books. Once you get into it you wont be able to stop. Tempe has been wrongfully accused by someone of messing up on the job. Back in Quebec the new girl is making waves and not good ones. Tempe also has a new assistant that is cold and unfeeling. Changes are happening on staff. Definitely an edge of your seat read!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jammin Jenny

    I liked this installment of the Temperance Brennan series, but I think I would have liked it more if I hadn't read it out of order (did that due to challenges). I like her relationship with Ryan and the fact that he figured out (view spoiler)[ she was missing and had been abducted (hide spoiler)] . I liked this installment of the Temperance Brennan series, but I think I would have liked it more if I hadn't read it out of order (did that due to challenges). I like her relationship with Ryan and the fact that he figured out (view spoiler)[ she was missing and had been abducted (hide spoiler)] .

  24. 4 out of 5

    itchy

    titular sentence: p96: Two hundred and six bones. eh?: p110: Below the words, the author had drawn a smiley face with a downturned mouth. p209: Were Jurmain and Villejoin random, selected because of their age and gender? Luc's grammar: p154: "...Yesterday, I'm doing follow-up with Lu, and the whole interview something's bugging me, like he's looking different than I remember...." I might have mentioned this already but Kathy sure does have a way with words--I should have started a words-learned list. B titular sentence: p96: Two hundred and six bones. eh?: p110: Below the words, the author had drawn a smiley face with a downturned mouth. p209: Were Jurmain and Villejoin random, selected because of their age and gender? Luc's grammar: p154: "...Yesterday, I'm doing follow-up with Lu, and the whole interview something's bugging me, like he's looking different than I remember...." I might have mentioned this already but Kathy sure does have a way with words--I should have started a words-learned list. But the marathon could do with one less book per.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Tammy

    In 206 Bones by Kathy Reichs, Temperance Brennan, is handcuffed and buried in some place underground. She does not remember how she got there, she is injured, and terrified, but attempts to save herself. Then Ms. Reichs shows us the series of events that led up to the abduction. This is a first for me author and so I was not 100% sure of what to expect, because I like the TV series Bones, which I frankly love, but I know that some things don't translate well from book to screen. I think what sur In 206 Bones by Kathy Reichs, Temperance Brennan, is handcuffed and buried in some place underground. She does not remember how she got there, she is injured, and terrified, but attempts to save herself. Then Ms. Reichs shows us the series of events that led up to the abduction. This is a first for me author and so I was not 100% sure of what to expect, because I like the TV series Bones, which I frankly love, but I know that some things don't translate well from book to screen. I think what surprised me the most about this was the one thing that irritated me the most -- the French (language that is). I do not speak the language, do not understand the language, and don't read it. Without the translations I would have been at sea in a heavy fog without knowing where in the heck I was going. I understand that most of the book takes place in Quebec Canada, and that French and English are both spoken there, but I could have really done without so much of the language. For those that may not know whom I'm talking about - Temperance Brennan is a renowned forensic anthropologist who seems to divide her time between labs in Quebec Canada and helping others -- and being with family in North Carolina. Her friend and romantic interest appears to be the good looking Lieutenant/detective Andrew Ryan, who works for the Surete du Quebec, but there is also mention of another gentleman in North Carolina that she seems to care for. The two (Ryan and Tempe) seem to have an on again off again romance that is currently off, although they have remained good friends, and Ryan seems to want to restart the romance. There are several very unusual things going on in this book -- again not being familiar with Ms. Reich's work I'm not sure if this is usual or just the tone of this book. The mysteries, include the deaths of three or four elderly females. As a favor to a friend, Temperance also tries to learn what happened to a young man who disappeared years ago. Temp also has to tolerate a newcomer or two in her lab in Canada, and things there aren't what they seem either. When Temperance talks bones, I listened, due in a large part I'm sure to Ms. Reich herself being such a well known and respected anthropologist. Ms. Reich's talents however do not all lie in just that one field as she also shows the harshness of a Montreal winter, with heavy snows, bad roads and lousy temps, and the fluidity of a well written mystery or would that be mysteries? Another thing that surprised me was that the weather seemed to mirror Temperance's mood/attitude for the most part, again I'm not sure if this is a common occurrence or just the way things went for this book. She is ticked that an ambitious newcomer named Marie-Andréa Briel is challenging her knowledge and apparently succeeding in making her look bad. Otherwise, I kind of enjoyed the book almost as much as I like the TV series. When Temperance spoke I listened, the book has a faint romance going on between Temperance and the detective Ryan, but the book is mainly a mystery, and it was written well enough that someone that doesn't usually read mysteries enjoyed herself. Would I buy the book in hardback, I'm afraid not, in paperback if I didn't have something else to read, maybe? That is the main reason I'm only giving this a 3 star, simply because while I enjoyed the book, it just didn't make me want to run out and find more by this author right away.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Leslie

    Just for fun mystery. I listened to the audio version which was a little harder to follow because of the unfamilar names but I think I understood most of it. Entertaining summer read.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jlaurenmc

    206 Bones is the latest book in the Tempe Brennan mystery series by Kathy Reichs. In the novel, Tempe revisits her old stomping grounds of Chicago, with Canadian detective Andrew Ryan in tow. Ostensibly in town to deliver a local body found in Montreal and to discuss the case with the Chicago coroner's office, the two also end up making a holiday visit to Tempe's ex-husband's family. Tempe is actually invited, as she is every year, but Ryan somehow makes his way into the fold and into the family 206 Bones is the latest book in the Tempe Brennan mystery series by Kathy Reichs. In the novel, Tempe revisits her old stomping grounds of Chicago, with Canadian detective Andrew Ryan in tow. Ostensibly in town to deliver a local body found in Montreal and to discuss the case with the Chicago coroner's office, the two also end up making a holiday visit to Tempe's ex-husband's family. Tempe is actually invited, as she is every year, but Ryan somehow makes his way into the fold and into the family's hearts -- much to Tempe's chagrin. Then the two are pulled back to Montreal with a new twist in the case. I have to admit when I read that they were returning to Montreal rather than continuing their sojourn in Chicago, I was disappointed. Reichs had done well with setting the scene in Chicago, from explanations of the El to the multi-layered streets lining the Chicago River. I felt that the movement back to the oft-visited setting of Montreal was a way of returning to the safety of the known, rather than forging through a new experience. But I soon forgot about my disappointment, as the plot pulled me forward. For the first time in many books, Reichs didn't focus on one specific topic (biker wars, DMORT's body recovery process, etc.), but rather just told a story involving Tempe. And Tempe was truly the star of this novel -- not her relationships (although, of course, there is continuance of the ongoing Ryan romance), not her family members (even though in-laws are present for some) -- just Tempe. Interspersed with the forward action was also a new element to the series: scenes of a missing Tempe. As she struggles to free herself from wrist and ankle constraints, and then to figure out where she is, Reichs throws readers bits and pieces of a captive Tempe. These are mixed into the regular action of the novel, so that in reading the background occurrences, suspense builds for the reader. In 206 Bones, Tempe works on the Chicago case, examines other elderly missing women, seeks answers for a family missing since the 1960s, and deals with divisiveness within the pathology department. Meanwhile, readers attempt to figure out beforehand who has captured Tempe and is holding her within a black, unidentified space. My only gripe with the book is in its final pages. Reichs attempts at that point to bring in a lesson, alluded to in very small ways throughout the book. Tempe and Ryan are discussing recent events, and Tempe goes into a stilted speech about credentials and licensing for forensic anthropologists. A valid point, but one perhaps better left to government hearings or professional conferences. Rather than talking like Tempe, the protagonist's words seemed lifted from a speech script Reichs might have written for herself in a professional setting. Still, two pages of awkward conversation a good book do not ruin. 206 Bones is yet another excellent entry in the Tempe Brennan series. Now I have no books to go until the new novel is released in August!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Oceana2602

    And yet another Tempe Brennan novel. Wait, what was this one about again? Oh, right. Tempe is framed for not having done her job properly. Of course, the set-up involves a bit more than just professional jealousy - murder, mayhem, graves and bones... the usual. Oh, Mrs. Reichs - you know I've read all your Tempe-novels, and I'll continue to do so. But, remember the times when you actually created interesting new characters, and when the relationship between Tempe and Ryan wasn't the only thing tha And yet another Tempe Brennan novel. Wait, what was this one about again? Oh, right. Tempe is framed for not having done her job properly. Of course, the set-up involves a bit more than just professional jealousy - murder, mayhem, graves and bones... the usual. Oh, Mrs. Reichs - you know I've read all your Tempe-novels, and I'll continue to do so. But, remember the times when you actually created interesting new characters, and when the relationship between Tempe and Ryan wasn't the only thing that made the book at least a little interesting? When, as I remember it, the action and suspense and story in the books took up so much space that you'd jump on the Tempe/Ryan bits like a starving person? And then jumped right back into the action and suspense and story? Ah, good times. Long gone, as it seems. Well, Mrs. Reichs, 206 Bones is definitely not your best work. I think it's pretty close to the bottom. But, judging from past experience, I'm sure you can do worse with your next one. Ah, I'll read it anyway. That's what fans are for, right?

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lain

    I love Kathy Reichs, but despite the dramatic beginning (forensic anthropologist Tempe Brennan finds herself trapped, bound hand and foot, in what seems to be a crypt), this book was lacking in warmth and emotion. Reichs hits all the points -- setting up a potentially career-ending threat of mishandling an autopsy -- and there are enemies galore. Ryan and her new beau make appearances, as does daughter Katy and ex Peter (and his extended Latvian clan). But while she might get a "6" from the judge I love Kathy Reichs, but despite the dramatic beginning (forensic anthropologist Tempe Brennan finds herself trapped, bound hand and foot, in what seems to be a crypt), this book was lacking in warmth and emotion. Reichs hits all the points -- setting up a potentially career-ending threat of mishandling an autopsy -- and there are enemies galore. Ryan and her new beau make appearances, as does daughter Katy and ex Peter (and his extended Latvian clan). But while she might get a "6" from the judges for technical performance, her aristic score is floundering. But Tempe as narrator merely reports what she's going through. She seems to be sleepwalking, and as a result, the reader feels like she's reading a newspaper report. I was interested in what was happening, but the pulse-racing that usually accompanies these types of books was notably missing. I felt the same way about her previous book, too. I would suggest Reichs not worry so much on transmittal of facts, and instead work on the emotion, allowing the reader to empathize with her character.

  30. 5 out of 5

    David Campton

    It's been a while since I've read one of Dr. Reich's Tempe Brennan thrillers, and while her books are better by far than the TV version 'Bones', and Patricia Cornwell's increasingly grim Scarpetta novels, I quickly remembered why I stopped reading them. I had identified the key villain one third of the way in (3 pages after their introduction), was tired of the 'romantic' backstory way before that, and finished up frustrated with her moralising about board-certified forensics in the final chapte It's been a while since I've read one of Dr. Reich's Tempe Brennan thrillers, and while her books are better by far than the TV version 'Bones', and Patricia Cornwell's increasingly grim Scarpetta novels, I quickly remembered why I stopped reading them. I had identified the key villain one third of the way in (3 pages after their introduction), was tired of the 'romantic' backstory way before that, and finished up frustrated with her moralising about board-certified forensics in the final chapter's fireside chat. Dr. Brennan may try to distance herself from the romanticisation of forensics in the public eye by references to CSI in its various guises (apparently none of her characters watch 'Bones' - they're discerning at least), but she has contributed to this climate, so that the public expect forensics, in all its forms, to bring the villains to book, yet does not enable juries to distinguish junk science from real. In between all that was a relatively readable piece of pulp fiction: nothing more and nothing less.

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