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The State and Social Transformation in Tunisia and Libya, 1830-1980

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The book traces growing state intervention in the rural areas of Tunisia and Libya in the middle 1800s and the diverging development of the two countries during the period of European rule. State formation accelerated in Tunisia under the French with the result that, with independence, interest-based policy brokerage became the principal form of political organization. For The book traces growing state intervention in the rural areas of Tunisia and Libya in the middle 1800s and the diverging development of the two countries during the period of European rule. State formation accelerated in Tunisia under the French with the result that, with independence, interest-based policy brokerage became the principal form of political organization. For Libya, where the Italians dismantled the pre-colonial administration, independence brought with it the revival of kinship as the basis for politics. Originally published in 1986. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These paperback editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.


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The book traces growing state intervention in the rural areas of Tunisia and Libya in the middle 1800s and the diverging development of the two countries during the period of European rule. State formation accelerated in Tunisia under the French with the result that, with independence, interest-based policy brokerage became the principal form of political organization. For The book traces growing state intervention in the rural areas of Tunisia and Libya in the middle 1800s and the diverging development of the two countries during the period of European rule. State formation accelerated in Tunisia under the French with the result that, with independence, interest-based policy brokerage became the principal form of political organization. For Libya, where the Italians dismantled the pre-colonial administration, independence brought with it the revival of kinship as the basis for politics. Originally published in 1986. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These paperback editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

32 review for The State and Social Transformation in Tunisia and Libya, 1830-1980

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ekul

    This really is a provocative book, so please don't let my average rating scare readers away from taking a look at it. In short, Lisa Anderson argues that the divergent trajectory of Tunisia and Libya can be traced back to the colonial period. At the outset of the colonial period, both states were rather similar. Tunisia and Libya (or Tripolitania) were both semi-autonomous provinces of the Ottoman Empire, they were heavily agricultural, they are generally homogeneous ethnically and religiously, This really is a provocative book, so please don't let my average rating scare readers away from taking a look at it. In short, Lisa Anderson argues that the divergent trajectory of Tunisia and Libya can be traced back to the colonial period. At the outset of the colonial period, both states were rather similar. Tunisia and Libya (or Tripolitania) were both semi-autonomous provinces of the Ottoman Empire, they were heavily agricultural, they are generally homogeneous ethnically and religiously, and much of their societies were indeed tribal. However, Anderson argues that the French establishment of a protectorate in Tunisia did a great deal to maintain political and bureaucratic institutions, whereas Italian colonization of Libya destroyed pre-colonial political structures in their totality. By continuing old political models, the French and--later--Tunisia's post-independence government, were able to foster a level of political pluralism and the formation of a civil society. Post-independence Libya, in contrast, saw individuals take power who earned their legitimacy on behalf of political power or patronage from Italian (and later, to a lesser degree, American and British) colonizers. This placed Libya in a position where political power was tenuous and without the necessary bureaucarcy to properly manage a country. Interestingly, Anderson argues that the main separation between "Third World" states (Libya and Tunisia in this case, but also more broadly) and European states is that European state formation was rooted in internal negotiations in social structures dating back to the Early Modern period, whereas state formation in the Third World actually restructured the societies within (take Kenya, for example, where colonial and post-independence political structures fundamentally redefined the concept of the "tribe," essentially crystallizing it). One major qualm I have with Anderson's book is her laser-focus on Libya and Tunisia alone. I agree with her arguments comparing the two, but they do not answer why Tunisia and Morocco (both French protectorates) took such different trajectories. Was it because Morocco had (and has) a much larger Amazigh population? Perhaps it has to do with the stronger independence of Morocco in the pre-colonial period? Does Moroccan geography, with the prominence of both the Atlantic and the Atlas Mounains, play a major role in its trajectory? Much ink has been spilled on Algeria, but thinking about Tunisia, Libya, and Morocco together may offer much more than a simple analysis of Tunisia and Libya on their own.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Cisco Dilg

  3. 4 out of 5

    Tori

  4. 4 out of 5

    Nick Garcia-Mason

  5. 4 out of 5

    Rime

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kyle Anderson

  7. 4 out of 5

    Adam

  8. 5 out of 5

    Roxanne

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ufuk

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jaybird Rex

  11. 5 out of 5

    James

  12. 5 out of 5

    Graham

  13. 4 out of 5

    Milood Ashur

  14. 5 out of 5

    Matt Connolly

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ian

  16. 4 out of 5

    Mohamed Nwegi

  17. 5 out of 5

    Peter Blake

  18. 4 out of 5

    Emine Deniz

  19. 5 out of 5

    Noah Bond

  20. 4 out of 5

    Syaeful Amry

  21. 4 out of 5

    Rifat Islam

  22. 4 out of 5

    G

  23. 5 out of 5

    Michael Fiumano

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sean

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mariam

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sinan ├ľner

  27. 5 out of 5

    EBRAHIM

  28. 5 out of 5

    PKN3 GoodReads

  29. 5 out of 5

    Mohamed Omar

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lizzie

  31. 5 out of 5

    Dunia

  32. 4 out of 5

    Hejer Bell

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