hits counter Gender and Jim Crow: Women and the Politics of White Supremacy in North Carolina, 1896-1920 - Ebook PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Gender and Jim Crow: Women and the Politics of White Supremacy in North Carolina, 1896-1920

Availability: Ready to download

Glenda Gilmore recovers the rich nuances of southern political history by placing black women at its center. She explores the pivotal and interconnected roles played by gender and race in North Carolina politics from the period immediately preceding the disfranchisement of black men in 1900 to the time black and white women gained the vote in 1920. Gender and Jim Crow argu Glenda Gilmore recovers the rich nuances of southern political history by placing black women at its center. She explores the pivotal and interconnected roles played by gender and race in North Carolina politics from the period immediately preceding the disfranchisement of black men in 1900 to the time black and white women gained the vote in 1920. Gender and Jim Crow argues that the ideology of white supremacy embodied in the Jim Crow laws of the turn of the century profoundly reordered society and that within this environment, black women crafted an enduring tradition of political activism. According to Gilmore, a generation of educated African American women emerged in the 1890s to become, in effect, diplomats to the white community after the disfranchisement of their husbands, brothers, and fathers. Using the lives of African American women to tell the larger story, Gilmore chronicles black women's political strategies, their feminism, and their efforts to forge political ties with white women. Her analysis highlights the active role played by women of both races in the political process and in the emergence of southern progressivism. In addition, Gilmore illuminates the manipulation of concepts of gender by white supremacists and shows how this rhetoric changed once women, black and white, gained the vote.


Compare

Glenda Gilmore recovers the rich nuances of southern political history by placing black women at its center. She explores the pivotal and interconnected roles played by gender and race in North Carolina politics from the period immediately preceding the disfranchisement of black men in 1900 to the time black and white women gained the vote in 1920. Gender and Jim Crow argu Glenda Gilmore recovers the rich nuances of southern political history by placing black women at its center. She explores the pivotal and interconnected roles played by gender and race in North Carolina politics from the period immediately preceding the disfranchisement of black men in 1900 to the time black and white women gained the vote in 1920. Gender and Jim Crow argues that the ideology of white supremacy embodied in the Jim Crow laws of the turn of the century profoundly reordered society and that within this environment, black women crafted an enduring tradition of political activism. According to Gilmore, a generation of educated African American women emerged in the 1890s to become, in effect, diplomats to the white community after the disfranchisement of their husbands, brothers, and fathers. Using the lives of African American women to tell the larger story, Gilmore chronicles black women's political strategies, their feminism, and their efforts to forge political ties with white women. Her analysis highlights the active role played by women of both races in the political process and in the emergence of southern progressivism. In addition, Gilmore illuminates the manipulation of concepts of gender by white supremacists and shows how this rhetoric changed once women, black and white, gained the vote.

30 review for Gender and Jim Crow: Women and the Politics of White Supremacy in North Carolina, 1896-1920

  1. 5 out of 5

    Martha

    Sneakily great. What starts out looking like a depressingly judgement-free examination of respectability politics among southern blacks around the turn of the century slowly morphs into a truly thrilling look behind the curtain of our conventional understanding of racial politics during that time. Gilmore regularly confronts and then undermines mainstream history by looking more closely at sources -- and mining others that mainstream historians have dismissed -- to reveal a vibrant, often inspir Sneakily great. What starts out looking like a depressingly judgement-free examination of respectability politics among southern blacks around the turn of the century slowly morphs into a truly thrilling look behind the curtain of our conventional understanding of racial politics during that time. Gilmore regularly confronts and then undermines mainstream history by looking more closely at sources -- and mining others that mainstream historians have dismissed -- to reveal a vibrant, often inspired group of black women pushing boundaries and creating pockets of power for themselves during a time when we're taught they had none. A very impressive work of history.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Valerie

    I would say that this book is a must-read for anyone interested in women's history and/or African American history. Gilmore expertly interprets her sources, and she weaves together an incredible narrative in the process. I would say that this book is a must-read for anyone interested in women's history and/or African American history. Gilmore expertly interprets her sources, and she weaves together an incredible narrative in the process.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Dave

    This book focuses on the state of North Carolina and starts in an era that I was not aware of. In the 1890s, middle class African-Americans were not only able to accumulate wealth and prosper in the cities of North Carolina, they were not only tolerated, but often respected by their white neighbors. While Jim Crow laws were being enacted in the deep south, these northern blacks were free to prosper. After 1896, that began to change as white supremacists gained control of the state government. Whi This book focuses on the state of North Carolina and starts in an era that I was not aware of. In the 1890s, middle class African-Americans were not only able to accumulate wealth and prosper in the cities of North Carolina, they were not only tolerated, but often respected by their white neighbors. While Jim Crow laws were being enacted in the deep south, these northern blacks were free to prosper. After 1896, that began to change as white supremacists gained control of the state government. While black men were robbed of their voting rights the women managed to retain some voice through churches, relationships formed earlier in the women's temperance movement and through some schools. They didn't have an easy time, but they didn't give up so that, by the time women gained the vote in 1920, they were ready to insist on their rights too. It's an amazing story, especially when Gilmore follows individuals through their everyday lives in the struggle. Certainly, Jim Crow laws didn't end in 1920, but the efforts to resist them by the women of North Carolina make for an encouraging story of civil rights efforts long before the 1950s.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Dan

    The Progressive Era from a black female middle-class perspective. Very good scholarship.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Katy Elmore

    While there was some good info in this book, it was so freakin’ pedantic that it made it impossible for me to want to read it. If college has taught me one thing, it’s that after I graduate I will never read another book written by someone who works at Yale.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    uggghhhh.... another read for class... she does employ very descriptive and evocative metaphors, which made the book bearable...

  7. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    fascinating.

  8. 4 out of 5

    F. Beers

    I was fully engaged with the action sequences and drama driven scenes.

  9. 4 out of 5

    David Bates

    Glenda Elizabeth Gilmore’s 1996 study of North Carolina from the last years of the 19th century to the first decades of the 20th examines the interplay of gender, race and class in the establishment of the state’s Jim Crow regime. Following a small cadre of well-educated middle class black families, she argues for the centrality of gender to the political justifications for disfranchisement of black men which ended competitive party politics in the state, and for the key role of black women in a Glenda Elizabeth Gilmore’s 1996 study of North Carolina from the last years of the 19th century to the first decades of the 20th examines the interplay of gender, race and class in the establishment of the state’s Jim Crow regime. Following a small cadre of well-educated middle class black families, she argues for the centrality of gender to the political justifications for disfranchisement of black men which ended competitive party politics in the state, and for the key role of black women in advancing the political aspirations of their community. Into the 1890s North Carolina remained a political battleground, with a “less prosperous white elite than Virginia or South Carolina, a fast-growing, but ferociously struggling, middling group of people of all hues, and some chance for two-party government.” A black supported coalition of Republicans and Populists rested control of the state away from Democrats 1896. In response Democratic Party operatives launched a wave of negative propaganda against black men, focusing on their lack of self-control and the threat that they posed to white women now that they were socially emboldened by political victory. A legacy of Redemption had been the a political philosophy which Gilmore terms the “Best Man” paradigm, in which political participation was merited by a restricted perception of a politician’s personal virtue and gentility. The black middle class had somewhat reconciled itself to this framework, within which they were allowed some participation, and the hope that their upright morals and dedication to education would win respect for their race. Democratic leaders were secure in their ability to maintain control by manipulating standards in ways that excluded many black men – until 1896. The attack on the virtue of black men posed by the exaggerated and often fabricated rape accounts distributed by Democrats at once delegitimized their claims to political equality and enlisted the protective manhood of whites against the coalition government, and the vulnerable sense of women to lobby their men on behalf of the Democracy. “The Populist white man who had valued his farm above his race discovered with a shock that he had opened the gates of hell for some distant white woman. The Democrats’ pressure swelled white men’s egos and honed their indignation.” When Democrats regained power in 1898 the disfranchisement of black men followed, along with anti-black violence. Gilmore writes that “elite whites blamed the violence on poor white men and called for more control over their behavior . . . North Carolina’s impoverished white men traded their economic future for “manhood” only to find themselves forever consigned to the ranks of the good ol’ boys“ Into the space left by middle class black men stepped their wives, mothers and daughters, working within national voluntary reform organizations, and serving as advocates for their communities as the state government gradually expanded its services during the Progressive Era.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Samuel

    While there are many interesting things discussed in this book, the main argument is not quite convincing given the evidence provided. In most cases, the central argument is proven by speculative claims interpreting silence or non-existent sources. The chosen African-American family, the Pettey family, is quite exceptional rather than representative. The family's context and connection to the broader African-American community is largely absent. That being said, the historical events surrounding While there are many interesting things discussed in this book, the main argument is not quite convincing given the evidence provided. In most cases, the central argument is proven by speculative claims interpreting silence or non-existent sources. The chosen African-American family, the Pettey family, is quite exceptional rather than representative. The family's context and connection to the broader African-American community is largely absent. That being said, the historical events surrounding the Wilmington Rebellion and the disenfranchising of African-Americans in the South at the turn of the century is very well documented and quite fascinating. There is enough evidence to say that women, especially black women, played more than a passive role in the proceedings but they were not convincingly demonstrated as being at the center of the event. Showing that black women had more of a role in politics from 1870-1900 than they did from 1900-1920 was well articulated. Gender, race, and class are all used as historical frameworks in this monograph--some are more effective than others in this case. The resurgence of white supremacy and the nuanced debates and horrific violence related to miscegenation are well chronicled here. There is a clear tragic tone to the failure of post-Civil War Reconstruction and the regression to near slave-like status of African-Americans in the south. The means and methods of white supremacy to strip away the vote from black individuals were both crafty and successful: truly depressing to see democracy hijacked. (pp. 1-175)

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kristi

    Gilmore examines the interplay between gender and race in the construction of the Jim Crow era. Focusing her study on the period between the disfranchisement of African American males and women's enfranchisement, Gilmore argues that African American women played an operative role in furthering African American politic rights. Subverting socio-economic positions to political ends, African American women transformed the violence of white supremacy toward a non-violent and political factionalism. Gilmore examines the interplay between gender and race in the construction of the Jim Crow era. Focusing her study on the period between the disfranchisement of African American males and women's enfranchisement, Gilmore argues that African American women played an operative role in furthering African American politic rights. Subverting socio-economic positions to political ends, African American women transformed the violence of white supremacy toward a non-violent and political factionalism.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    This book has a lot of facts. Interesting but had the dry and boring stuff too. It's for learning not entertainment. Nicely put together. I wish the text wasn't so jammed together because it felt like my eyes never got a break. This book has a lot of facts. Interesting but had the dry and boring stuff too. It's for learning not entertainment. Nicely put together. I wish the text wasn't so jammed together because it felt like my eyes never got a break.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kye Flannery

    Compelling storytelling, impeccably researched, essential history.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Alane

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Actual rating is probably closer to 3.5.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Whitney Borup

    It's both depressing and hopeful that Jim Crow was not an inevitable result of Reconstruction. It's both depressing and hopeful that Jim Crow was not an inevitable result of Reconstruction.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Amy Hearth

    An academic book with a narrow but important focus.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Walls

    I learned alot about racism during this period, to include the era of the Black Great Men. Excellent read.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Todd Laugen

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ron Stafford

  20. 4 out of 5

    Maggielovesequality

  21. 4 out of 5

    Trieste

  22. 4 out of 5

    Erin

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kameron Hurley

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kristi

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jogen Gohain

  26. 4 out of 5

    Tanisha Dudley

  27. 5 out of 5

    Anish

  28. 5 out of 5

    Erin

  29. 4 out of 5

    Thais Santos-Ammons

  30. 4 out of 5

    Younhi {[*൦*}]

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...