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The Dark Magazine, Issue 69: February 2021

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Each month The Dark brings you the best in dark fantasy and horror! Selected by award-winning editor Sean Wallace and published by Prime Books, this issue includes four all-new stories: “Laughter Among the Trees” by Suzan Palumbo “The Yoke of the Aspens” by Kay Chronister “One Last Broken Thing” by Aimee Ogden “A Resting Place For Dolls” by Priya Sridhar


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Each month The Dark brings you the best in dark fantasy and horror! Selected by award-winning editor Sean Wallace and published by Prime Books, this issue includes four all-new stories: “Laughter Among the Trees” by Suzan Palumbo “The Yoke of the Aspens” by Kay Chronister “One Last Broken Thing” by Aimee Ogden “A Resting Place For Dolls” by Priya Sridhar

16 review for The Dark Magazine, Issue 69: February 2021

  1. 4 out of 5

    Maija

    This issue didn't really have very memorable stories for me. 2.5 stars “Laughter Among the Trees” by Suzan Palumbo - This one I liked! I don't know why I like camping/someone disappears into the forest stuff. In some ways that's quite a traditional horror story, which I do enjoy, but this one also adds its own thing to it. We follow the protagonist through the immediate events as well as the long years after her sister's disappearance, and how she reacts to it. “The Yoke of the Aspens” by Kay Chro This issue didn't really have very memorable stories for me. 2.5 stars “Laughter Among the Trees” by Suzan Palumbo - This one I liked! I don't know why I like camping/someone disappears into the forest stuff. In some ways that's quite a traditional horror story, which I do enjoy, but this one also adds its own thing to it. We follow the protagonist through the immediate events as well as the long years after her sister's disappearance, and how she reacts to it. “The Yoke of the Aspens” by Kay Chronister - Didn't really feel it. “One Last Broken Thing” by Aimee Ogden -Ok, but I think I've seen/read this metaphor before. “A Resting Place For Dolls” by Priya Sridhar - I didn't quite get this, maybe? Also, it made me uncomfortable that it referenced a real celebrity suicide, even though it was in the context that the protagonist was sad about it.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

    Another issue with three of four stories to read. Those three fit the billing of dark fantasy, and were notably good, with one particularly sticking with me to lead off the issue: “Laughter Among the Trees” by Suzan Palumbo — An immigrant to Canada with her parents from the West Indies, Anarika has mixed feelings about the birth of her sister Sabrina, an immediate citizen of this new land, her only home in contrast to the rest of the family. But, when Sab goes missing on a family camping trip, An Another issue with three of four stories to read. Those three fit the billing of dark fantasy, and were notably good, with one particularly sticking with me to lead off the issue: “Laughter Among the Trees” by Suzan Palumbo — An immigrant to Canada with her parents from the West Indies, Anarika has mixed feelings about the birth of her sister Sabrina, an immediate citizen of this new land, her only home in contrast to the rest of the family. But, when Sab goes missing on a family camping trip, Ana deals with the guilt and the pain of her parents for the years to come. The eerie story combines familiar conventional themes of sibling rivalry and the immigrant experience with elements of classic horror (ghosts) and the monstrosities of colonization in very effective ways. “The Yoke of the Aspens” by Kay Chronister — I do not read you. “One Last Broken Thing” by Aimee Ogden — Liv’s mother has abandoned her and her father, who now live on an unproductive farm where her father shoots any animal that he sees in the fields. At school Liv is mocked and outcast. But as HS graduation approaches, Liv yearns to depart for college, though her father remains set against it. An apt title for a story showing how people can be broken by the past and loss, but also the power of staying true to oneself. “A Resting Place For Dolls” by Priya Sridhar — A baker who is distraught over the suicide of celebrity chef Anthony Bourdain uses a doll-making hobby – and power – inherited from her grandmother to help friends and acquaintances in her life who struggle with depression and stress. An anti-Voodoo doll kind of concept here, in a brief but good short story. The issue also features cover art “Angel Fire East” by Tomislav Tikulin.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin DeHaan

    Especially liked the ending in “Laughter Among the Trees” and visceral writing style in “One Last Broken Thing”.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kevin

  5. 5 out of 5

    Dain Kavars

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ioanna Papadopoulou

  7. 4 out of 5

    Cassie

  8. 5 out of 5

    Erin

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ranya Abdeltif

  10. 4 out of 5

    Danilo

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mark Catalfano

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sara Hollingsworth

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jacob

  14. 5 out of 5

    Clara Madrigano

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lauren Caldwell

  16. 5 out of 5

    Nikita

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