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Hellblazer: Rise and Fall

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At 12 years old, John Constantine and his friends try and fail to summon something. Truth be told, they have no idea what they re doing on the riverbed on the outskirts of town. They re just messing with what they ve been told not to mess with, and that s enough for John. Witness the adolescence of John Constantine, a rebellious and clueless kid who unwittingly unleashes a At 12 years old, John Constantine and his friends try and fail to summon something. Truth be told, they have no idea what they re doing on the riverbed on the outskirts of town. They re just messing with what they ve been told not to mess with, and that s enough for John. Witness the adolescence of John Constantine, a rebellious and clueless kid who unwittingly unleashes a demon. A demon who haunts a nation 30 years later by selling the irredeemable one percent on a scam to get into heaven, one that causes evil men with angel wings to fall from the sky. Will John stop this demon from obtaining more empires and ruining the world as we know it? Will he be happy to let a few more rich bastards fall first, like a vindictive Robin Hood? Or will sacrifices need to be made?


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At 12 years old, John Constantine and his friends try and fail to summon something. Truth be told, they have no idea what they re doing on the riverbed on the outskirts of town. They re just messing with what they ve been told not to mess with, and that s enough for John. Witness the adolescence of John Constantine, a rebellious and clueless kid who unwittingly unleashes a At 12 years old, John Constantine and his friends try and fail to summon something. Truth be told, they have no idea what they re doing on the riverbed on the outskirts of town. They re just messing with what they ve been told not to mess with, and that s enough for John. Witness the adolescence of John Constantine, a rebellious and clueless kid who unwittingly unleashes a demon. A demon who haunts a nation 30 years later by selling the irredeemable one percent on a scam to get into heaven, one that causes evil men with angel wings to fall from the sky. Will John stop this demon from obtaining more empires and ruining the world as we know it? Will he be happy to let a few more rich bastards fall first, like a vindictive Robin Hood? Or will sacrifices need to be made?

30 review for Hellblazer: Rise and Fall

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    Members of the wealthy elite are turning up dead in unusual circumstances: nekkid, impaled, and wearing angel wings. Coincidentally the beat for all these deaths is Liverpool, John Constantine’s hometown, and, with the help of a childhood friend we’ve never seen before (and prolly won’t see again) and Lucifer Morningstar, the Hellblazer is on the case to find out wha happen, like. I was quite looking forward to this one because the Hellblazer cameo in DCeased was by far the standout part of that Members of the wealthy elite are turning up dead in unusual circumstances: nekkid, impaled, and wearing angel wings. Coincidentally the beat for all these deaths is Liverpool, John Constantine’s hometown, and, with the help of a childhood friend we’ve never seen before (and prolly won’t see again) and Lucifer Morningstar, the Hellblazer is on the case to find out wha happen, like. I was quite looking forward to this one because the Hellblazer cameo in DCeased was by far the standout part of that otherwise crappy book. It was really funny and it seemed like Tom Taylor had a good handle on the character. Unfortunately, Hellblazer: Rise and Fall isn’t nearly as fun and is another unmemorable outing for Constantine. The story is no great shakes. We’re told almost immediately who’s behind it all so there’s no mystery or tension there, and the reason behind the nekkid angel deaths is tossed off with an unremarkable meh towards the end. Most of the book then is John and contrived old bestie Aisha going through the usual police procedural motions with the occasional bit of magic thrown in. There’s the creepy kid cliche, and the resolution is too neat (the villain’s a challenge until he doesn’t need to be!) and overly sentimental for Hellblazer. Which isn’t to say the whole book is a bust: Darick Robertson’s art is great (lots of body horror and explicit gore means this comic isn’t best suited for the littles ones) and, as cliche as the character was, the creepy kid did look proper creepy at times. The Devil is a fun character and I enjoyed most of the scenes he was in, and “cockwomble” is a terrific insult. Still, I wasn’t taken with this one and found myself unengaged with the dull goings-on for the most part. Despite the talent involved, Hellblazer: Rise and Fall is a slight, unremarkable and almost instantly-forgettable story.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Paul E. Morph

    I really enjoyed this tale of demonic possession and sins of the past. It actually made me wonder why, when I like this character so much, I haven’t read more Hellblazer stuff. I’m going to have to do something about that. I’m not a huge fan of Darick Robertson’s artwork but he does a solid job on this one, with only one panel where Constantine had the wrong number of fingers. Story: 5 stars Artwork: 3 stars Overall: 4 stars P.S. Many thanks to whichever Goodreads librarian corrected the error in the I really enjoyed this tale of demonic possession and sins of the past. It actually made me wonder why, when I like this character so much, I haven’t read more Hellblazer stuff. I’m going to have to do something about that. I’m not a huge fan of Darick Robertson’s artwork but he does a solid job on this one, with only one panel where Constantine had the wrong number of fingers. Story: 5 stars Artwork: 3 stars Overall: 4 stars P.S. Many thanks to whichever Goodreads librarian corrected the error in the title of this book’s GR entry! My next book: From the Green Helmet & Other Poems & Michael Robartes & The Dancer

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lashaan Balasingam (Bookidote)

    You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. Guilt has a way to gnaw at your consciousness in a frustratingly distressing manner. If left to proliferate throughout your mind without any prudent solutions, it can destroy lives and send individuals down a dark road. For John Constantine, there’s no context for an upbringing more devastating than his own when his very existence is a burden for his father. Growing up, his rebellious self leads him to find refuge in the occult yet such a playgr You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. Guilt has a way to gnaw at your consciousness in a frustratingly distressing manner. If left to proliferate throughout your mind without any prudent solutions, it can destroy lives and send individuals down a dark road. For John Constantine, there’s no context for an upbringing more devastating than his own when his very existence is a burden for his father. Growing up, his rebellious self leads him to find refuge in the occult yet such a playground in heaven and hell opens up a world of terrifying possibilities that could only promise misery and regret if he doesn’t thread carefully. But who ever thought John Constantine would ever play by the rules? Collecting all three issues of the DC Black Label miniseries, writer Tom Taylor (Injustice, DCeased) and artist Darick Robertson (The Boys) form an exciting new creative team to explore a careless and cynical hero’s journey of redemption. What is Hellblazer: Rise and Fall about? On one fateful night, a billionaire falls from the sky, skewered on a church spire, with angel wings attached to his body. Detective Aisha Bukhari doesn’t have much of a lead on this case, especially when they’re unable to identify the animal from which those feathers are from. It’s when occult investigator John Constantine, a childhood acquaintance, knocks on her door and unveils to her the link of this mystery to a tragedy they were all part of as children, that everything starts to make sense. This tragedy that marked John Constantine’s first foray into mystic art, but also the first death on his hands, has now come to haunt them all once again. Working together, accepting all conspicuous help that comes along the way, they race against time to stop a demon from wreaking havoc and plummeting their world into an unforgiving calamity. In an effort to showcase John Constantine in all of his glory, from his out-of-the-blue ability to counter and defend himself against occult and mystical creatures to his weakness for personal vices, mostly revolving around his drug consumption (alcohol and cigarettes) or his homosexuality, writer Tom Taylor sacrifices creative and engaging narrative elements, that could have made this murder mystery much more memorable, for a shallow exploration of a hero’s complex personality. The story’s intrigue also mostly resides in the denouement of the mystery, quickly putting aside the whodunnit to focus on the how-do-we-undo-it and making the story much less memorable as the source of evil and everyone’s problem is revealed quite early. While the adventure in itself is engaging, paced with some great horror moments to capture the insanity of many of the situations that take place, it remains unrewarding due to its simplicity. If you’re familiar with artist Darick Robertson’s artwork from The Boys, you won’t be surprised by this graphic novel’s artistic vision. Taking advantage of the prestige format of the graphic novel, the panel structure never sticks to a predetermined number of squares or arrangement. Whether it’s larger rectangles, panels that superpose themselves on one another, or splash pages, the artwork offers more breathable room to play with, to expose the character’s emotions or to display the flagrantly gory moments that implicate more blood than humans are ever supposed to encounter in their lives. The excellent colouring also help establish a darker atmosphere for the story that unfolds, mostly taking place at night, perfect to highlight the characters with vivid colours by soaking them in a lot of blood or lighting them up on fire. If anything, it’s through the artwork that the story finds any footing to justify its relevance. Hellblazer: Rise and Fall is a trivial adventure where a ghost, a magician, and the devil look to stop a demon’s evil endeavor before countless humans plummet to their death. Yours truly, Lashaan | Blogger and Book Reviewer Official blog: https://bookidote.com/

  4. 5 out of 5

    Blindzider

    It's good. Has all the hallmarks of previously read, favorite Constantine stories, but that's also the problem. For the most part, it's kinda boiler plate. Something John did in the past comes back to haunt him and he has to make it right. One bit that I hadn't really seen was some character building dealing with his dad. Otherwise, it's a tad generic. Robertson's art is satisfactory. Worth reading, but not as tremendous as some of Taylor's other work. It's good. Has all the hallmarks of previously read, favorite Constantine stories, but that's also the problem. For the most part, it's kinda boiler plate. Something John did in the past comes back to haunt him and he has to make it right. One bit that I hadn't really seen was some character building dealing with his dad. Otherwise, it's a tad generic. Robertson's art is satisfactory. Worth reading, but not as tremendous as some of Taylor's other work.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Richard Howlett

    Meh. This was fine, maybe even good, but I hoped for better than that. If I could give half points then this would probably be a 3.5.

  6. 5 out of 5

    TJ

    This was my first Constantine comic, and I absolutely loved it! This book really said “be gay, f*ck capitalism,” and I said “yes, thank you.” Tom Taylor doesn’t disappoint! 5/5 stars and a new favorite graphic novel.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Frédéric

    Meh. Not the worst Hellblazer ever by far but it goes both ways. 2,5* really but I don’t feel li’e bumping it up. Constantine’s spirit is there on the whole but the Taylor fails to give him the subtle touch of cynism that makes the damned scouser so great. The ending is somehow way too "nice" to be an honest Hellblazer book. Some lines are typical (and fun) though. I didn’t like the class war aspect much too. Fitting but boy, is it heavy handed! I was kinda surprised to see John’s dad since I th Meh. Not the worst Hellblazer ever by far but it goes both ways. 2,5* really but I don’t feel li’e bumping it up. Constantine’s spirit is there on the whole but the Taylor fails to give him the subtle touch of cynism that makes the damned scouser so great. The ending is somehow way too "nice" to be an honest Hellblazer book. Some lines are typical (and fun) though. I didn’t like the class war aspect much too. Fitting but boy, is it heavy handed! I was kinda surprised to see John’s dad since I thought he’d been killed by the Family man 30 years ago.I’m kind of stuck with the original character I started to follow in 1990 or 91 and forgot this was in a bloody rebooted universe. I’m afraid no new version have stood its ground against the original up til now... Art is unimpressive from beginning to end with the exception of a few really creepy shots of Billy. So... True fans of the original series might feel a tad disappointed but there’s enough substance not to throw awy the book. New readers will discover a somewhat watered down version of Constantine’s universe but pleasant enough. Toldja. Goes both ways.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ronald

    Just your run of the mill Constantine story. Bad things have happened in Constantine's past, he fells bad, tries to help. Things happen. The art is kind of bad, but like really life like unless the image is focusing on Mr Hellblazer. The devils look amazing though. I don't know why this was a black label comic they have done worse in the regular Justice League Dark. It was also super expensive for physical copies as well as a weird giant sized paper that would not fit in my comic boxes or on a b Just your run of the mill Constantine story. Bad things have happened in Constantine's past, he fells bad, tries to help. Things happen. The art is kind of bad, but like really life like unless the image is focusing on Mr Hellblazer. The devils look amazing though. I don't know why this was a black label comic they have done worse in the regular Justice League Dark. It was also super expensive for physical copies as well as a weird giant sized paper that would not fit in my comic boxes or on a book shelf.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Reinhardt

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Im not going to slam the writing or the plot but I will say this - a bit of a let down. If I remember correctly, John’s dad was killed by the Family Man in #29 and then is literally shown in Hell and then all of a sudden he’s in his living room where Lucifer gives him a quick earfull about being nicer to John. And then there’s Lucifer. He and John detest eachother, why would he go to John for help and then try to get him in the sack? Im not sure if we’re meant to disregard #1-300 of the original Im not going to slam the writing or the plot but I will say this - a bit of a let down. If I remember correctly, John’s dad was killed by the Family Man in #29 and then is literally shown in Hell and then all of a sudden he’s in his living room where Lucifer gives him a quick earfull about being nicer to John. And then there’s Lucifer. He and John detest eachother, why would he go to John for help and then try to get him in the sack? Im not sure if we’re meant to disregard #1-300 of the original run for this to make sense, but, thats not particularly great.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Bruso

    The illustrations are breathtaking, another winning story. I devoured this graphic novel. I loved reading about Constantine's male love interest. It was real. I hope a second book is in the works. The illustrations are breathtaking, another winning story. I devoured this graphic novel. I loved reading about Constantine's male love interest. It was real. I hope a second book is in the works.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Travis

    This was an entertaining John Constantine story. It captured a lot of what makes the character great: flippant with demons, nonchalant about danger, troubled past, and English magic. Take it for what it is and you should enjoy it if you like Constantine. It's sort of like a British Law & Order: Demons, sans the courtroom scenes. I also enjoy hearing Matt Ryan's voice in my head now as I read Constantine comics. One thing I enjoyed in this short series over the older run on the original Hellblazer This was an entertaining John Constantine story. It captured a lot of what makes the character great: flippant with demons, nonchalant about danger, troubled past, and English magic. Take it for what it is and you should enjoy it if you like Constantine. It's sort of like a British Law & Order: Demons, sans the courtroom scenes. I also enjoy hearing Matt Ryan's voice in my head now as I read Constantine comics. One thing I enjoyed in this short series over the older run on the original Hellblazer is that I always felt like I was missing some key elements of the story in those issues because I had to read them out of order. Characters clearly had relationships and pasts that I had no knowledge of. Now, that's the nature of picking up a series in the middle, but comics like Sandman and Transmetropolitan do a better job keeping the reader up to date. Rise and Fall is a one and done story, so you don't have to be familiar with the totality of Constantine's history to enjoy this one. The artwork from Robertson is great, as usual. I'm not sure it needed the large format given to these Black Label comics but it doesn't hurt. There were some instances where it felt like wasted space, though. This could easily have fit in a standard size comic book. The message of the story involves class warfare. It's not out of character for Constantine but it does feel a little of this moment in time and might not age as well as more classic themes. The message also isn't clearly presented until the third issue, a problem also in Batman: Damned. It would help these series to put a little bit more of their heft in the front, although that can be harder to do without spoiling some story elements, I suppose. Still, the entire story here was entertaining and didn't meander like Batman: Damned.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Neil Carey

    I suppose I can overlook gaffes like English cops having guns or a panel with John Constantine making an abracadabra hand gesture with six fingers; we all make mistakes. My bone of contention, if anything, would be more how exactly the influence of a seminal 300-issue British horror series shot through with white-knuckle gems like Jamie Delano/Kev Walker's The Family Man, Garth Ennis/Steve Dillon's Rake At The Gates Of Hell, or M.R. Carey/Leonardo Manco's Reasons To Be Cheerful could lead to... w I suppose I can overlook gaffes like English cops having guns or a panel with John Constantine making an abracadabra hand gesture with six fingers; we all make mistakes. My bone of contention, if anything, would be more how exactly the influence of a seminal 300-issue British horror series shot through with white-knuckle gems like Jamie Delano/Kev Walker's The Family Man, Garth Ennis/Steve Dillon's Rake At The Gates Of Hell, or M.R. Carey/Leonardo Manco's Reasons To Be Cheerful could lead to... well, something like this. By which I mean: A Hellblazer tale that goes in the straightest possible line, offers rather benign comment on the world we've made, and then goes right down with no real resistance. This was like a bog-standard Hollywood thriller that's forgotten practically the instant the credits finish, or even something from DC's old Comics Code Authority-approved horror comics (I seriously half-think that, with minor alterations here & there, this probably could have ran in one of those dusty old things). Taylor is a DC writer who's made his bones in their superhero books, and-- sorry not sorry-- you probably can't count on such a talent pool to do much justice to John Constantine, as he's not from their traditions/styles. There's no redemption story for him, for one thing (and not because of the old Marvel/Stan Lee "illusion of change" load of balls; more that such a concern is beside the point in Hellblazer tales). And the Big Two superhero story's zero-tolerance policy on characters being heroic/cool/morally-right in the end is similarly moot when dealing with Constantine (John's moral victories are less a good man triumphing over evil and more a man solving a problem the only way he can; he's also been allowed a vulnerability that the "complex" superheroes will never know). Put another way... I suppose Taylor & similar scribes do an alright enough job of getting that Constantine is the guy Roger Daltry sang about in Behind Blue Eyes; they just forget or ignore that he's *also* very much the guy Kirsty MacColl-- and Tracey Ullman-- sang about in They Don't Know. Hellblazer-- when it's at its best-- is only partly a series about the misfortunes that befall us; the rest of it is about the misfortunes that people are very much capable on inflicting on others, knowingly or otherwise. And as long as DC writers want to write about the former bit and to hell with the latter bit, they're just better off with Dr. Fate.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Duncan

    Great Darick Robertson art. I'm relatively new to his work & I'm a fan now. I've tried to read the late 80's Constantine and I found it depressing, charmless & nihilistic to a fault. This Tom Taylor/Darick Robertson version has charm because of the art & due a bit to Taylor's story telling. It's dark but not profoundly so. Taylor's definitely a leftie who sees the world as class warfare but he's not the new breed of cultural marxist, as far as I can tell. I read this in the magazine sized single Great Darick Robertson art. I'm relatively new to his work & I'm a fan now. I've tried to read the late 80's Constantine and I found it depressing, charmless & nihilistic to a fault. This Tom Taylor/Darick Robertson version has charm because of the art & due a bit to Taylor's story telling. It's dark but not profoundly so. Taylor's definitely a leftie who sees the world as class warfare but he's not the new breed of cultural marxist, as far as I can tell. I read this in the magazine sized single issue version and enjoyed slowly over the 3-4 months it took to publish. There may be tons of cool extras in the book version but the single issues were pretty cool. Definitely not for kids of course, violence, sex and swearing. Apparently the character, John Constantine, is gay in this version? Was he always? I don't know, don't really care but that seems to becoming a quick comix cliche to change once straight characters into gay characters. I might have to give the late 80's Constantine another look-see to see if maybe I like it more after this recent go-round. Hell, I might even give Transmetropolitan another try! It will be worth it for the Darick Robertson artwork alone I guess.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Trike

    Taylor is a worthy successor for writing John Constantine, whose appearances in the Injustice and DCeased series have been standouts. This tale is lighter than those but still great fun, flowing along effortlessly to a satisfying conclusion. I’m sure there will be people complaining that this isn’t the usual hardcase Constantine, but not every single story has to be utterly grimdark from top to bottom. John is still a right bastard here, even if he does edge closer to the side of the angels on th Taylor is a worthy successor for writing John Constantine, whose appearances in the Injustice and DCeased series have been standouts. This tale is lighter than those but still great fun, flowing along effortlessly to a satisfying conclusion. I’m sure there will be people complaining that this isn’t the usual hardcase Constantine, but not every single story has to be utterly grimdark from top to bottom. John is still a right bastard here, even if he does edge closer to the side of the angels on this outing. Fallen angels, though, as he does the buddy cop thing with Satan himself, but still a lot of goodness. Which I think is fine. The art by Darick Robertson is terrific throughout, telling a straightforward story but still with lots of verve. Which is to be expected of the co-creator of Transmetropolitan and The Boys.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Wombo Combo

    This one was kinda bad. Pretty forgettable story. Nothing really interesting. Art's fine. I just finished reading the recent Spurrier Hellblazer series, and that was brilliant, so to immediately read something as bland as this is just kinda frustrating. It feels like nothing happened and nothing mattered. I hate the fact that Taylor felt the need to make a new Devil character. DC comics already has Lucifer from the Sandman and his own series, who is one of my favorite characters in anything ever This one was kinda bad. Pretty forgettable story. Nothing really interesting. Art's fine. I just finished reading the recent Spurrier Hellblazer series, and that was brilliant, so to immediately read something as bland as this is just kinda frustrating. It feels like nothing happened and nothing mattered. I hate the fact that Taylor felt the need to make a new Devil character. DC comics already has Lucifer from the Sandman and his own series, who is one of my favorite characters in anything every, and they have the First of the Fallen, who's also really entertaining to read about, so it's weird that Taylor would make up a new Devil to fill their roles who is nowhere near as compelling as the previous two. And seriously, tons of great artists have drawn various demons in DC comics over the years, so why do the demons in this have the boring, typical, red skin/horns/forked tail design? Overall, I could've skipped this and not missed out on anything. I really liked the setup, with the shots of John's birth and his time as a kid, so I'm sad that the rest of the story was essentially a boring cop procedural.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jamie Revell

    A perfectly reasonable story, but not one of the classics. John turns out to have made a mistake with dire consequences in his past, and now something's out for revenge, as well as killing a number of rich people along the way. There are definitely some good elements in here, with the relationship between John and his father being notable, in a story that's partly about themes of guilt. And the resolution is a decent one, relying on Constantine taking a different approach than usual, while still A perfectly reasonable story, but not one of the classics. John turns out to have made a mistake with dire consequences in his past, and now something's out for revenge, as well as killing a number of rich people along the way. There are definitely some good elements in here, with the relationship between John and his father being notable, in a story that's partly about themes of guilt. And the resolution is a decent one, relying on Constantine taking a different approach than usual, while still being entirely consistent with his character. But the ending is rather drawn out and surprisingly upbeat, and while there's plenty of gore (and swearing) it's less dark than one might expect. And I'm not clear why the police detectives are carrying guns... this is supposed to be Liverpool, not New York.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Billy Jepma

    A fun read, but I think Taylor is too much of a softie for John Constantine. He writes such organic dialogue, and develops banter between character almost effortlessly, making his work so enjoyable to read. But for a character like Constantine, Taylor’s signature optimism is a bit out of place. This series certainly has the visuals a Black Label series deserve—Darick’s art brings the moodiness and gore you expect, and his layouts are fantastic. But the narrative isn’t quite as sharp as I wanted A fun read, but I think Taylor is too much of a softie for John Constantine. He writes such organic dialogue, and develops banter between character almost effortlessly, making his work so enjoyable to read. But for a character like Constantine, Taylor’s signature optimism is a bit out of place. This series certainly has the visuals a Black Label series deserve—Darick’s art brings the moodiness and gore you expect, and his layouts are fantastic. But the narrative isn’t quite as sharp as I wanted it to be, and resolves too cleanly. There’s a cool “message” behind Taylor’s story, but it’s not interrogated or explored as thoroughly as I think it needed to be. This is totally worth reading, but it isn’t the “mature” John Constantine story I was hoping for and expecting.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kristin

    I'm apparently in the minority here, but I really enjoyed this. I've loved John Constantin since his appearances in Moore's Swamp Thing run, but it's hard to find stories that aren't team books or exercises is masochism. Rise and Fall reads like a palate cleanser tale between between darker story arcs, and as that it suits me just fine. Darick Roberston's art has the same vibe as Steve Dillon's Hellblazer Run and gives me that good, good late '90s Vertigo nostalgia. I'm apparently in the minority here, but I really enjoyed this. I've loved John Constantin since his appearances in Moore's Swamp Thing run, but it's hard to find stories that aren't team books or exercises is masochism. Rise and Fall reads like a palate cleanser tale between between darker story arcs, and as that it suits me just fine. Darick Roberston's art has the same vibe as Steve Dillon's Hellblazer Run and gives me that good, good late '90s Vertigo nostalgia.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jay

    ehh, felt like Taylor was trying to force as many Constantine-isms into this, but missed on the soul (pun intended). Very surface-level stuff. Kind of like a Jurassic Park sequel - we get all the glitz, but none of the heart. If you're looking for more of the latter, go read Simon Spurrier's 12-issue run instead. ehh, felt like Taylor was trying to force as many Constantine-isms into this, but missed on the soul (pun intended). Very surface-level stuff. Kind of like a Jurassic Park sequel - we get all the glitz, but none of the heart. If you're looking for more of the latter, go read Simon Spurrier's 12-issue run instead.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Mik Cope

    Actually read this as single issues, but it seems like cheating to count each one towards my Reading Challenge! The story was okay, with some nice ideas which fit the character and some ties to John's past which, while not really canon, at least made sense in the context. The artwork wasn't brilliant, but served its purpose. Actually read this as single issues, but it seems like cheating to count each one towards my Reading Challenge! The story was okay, with some nice ideas which fit the character and some ties to John's past which, while not really canon, at least made sense in the context. The artwork wasn't brilliant, but served its purpose.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kyle Berk

    A hell of a good time. Routinely funny, and fun from start to finish. Taylor and Robertson have made a really good title here. I can’t speak to how it compares to a lot of other Hellblazer but this makes me want to read and excites me to read more John Constantine.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jason Ragle

    A solid Constantine tale by Tom Taylor with art by Darick Robertson. Not entirely my cup of tea as I like my Hellblazer stories and art a little darker and horrific. This one felt a little bright and shiny.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Rishabh

    Story- Okay, not like other Hellblazer ones Art- 3stars, I especially didnt like the character design of John Constantine by Darick Robertson Overall- Ohkay, not so good, so cant go beyond 3stars

  24. 4 out of 5

    Bryson Grenfell

    Tom Taylor continues spinning pure gold. John Constantine’s brilliant, he’s teaming up with the literal devil and I’m here for it. This was such a good time.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    That is a pitch-perfect Constantine story: nasty, mean, sexy, hilarious. Taylor nails the characters, and Robertson did some of his best work.

  26. 4 out of 5

    David Wilson

    Hands down the best thing to come out of DC's Black Label. Hands down the best thing to come out of DC's Black Label.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Dubzor

    3.5 I don't know what's with the sudden influx of comics about rich fucks getting their comeuppance, but I'm certainly not complaining. 3.5 I don't know what's with the sudden influx of comics about rich fucks getting their comeuppance, but I'm certainly not complaining.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

    The first Hellblazer story I've ever read, and it was extremely enjoyable. The first Hellblazer story I've ever read, and it was extremely enjoyable.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Deane Hariss

    Tom Taylor always knows how to entertain me. This wasn’t the best Constantine story I’ve read but it was a quick, fast paced ride that ticked most of my boxes along the way.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Scott E

    Top quality Constantine story, as good as the original run’s early years. Any story that Darick Robertson draws instantly becomes better anyway

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