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What role does a mother play in raising thoughtful, generous children? In her literary debut, internationally award-winning writer Courtney Zoffness considers what we inherit from generations past―biologically, culturally, spiritually―and what we pass on to our children. Spilt Milk is an intimate, bracing, and beautiful exploration of vulnerability and culpability. Zoffnes What role does a mother play in raising thoughtful, generous children? In her literary debut, internationally award-winning writer Courtney Zoffness considers what we inherit from generations past―biologically, culturally, spiritually―and what we pass on to our children. Spilt Milk is an intimate, bracing, and beautiful exploration of vulnerability and culpability. Zoffness relives her childhood anxiety disorder as she witnesses it manifest in her firstborn; endures brazen sexual advances by a student in her class; grapples with the implications of her young son’s cop obsession; and challenges her Jewish faith. Where is the line between privacy and secrecy? How do the stories we tell inform who we become?


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What role does a mother play in raising thoughtful, generous children? In her literary debut, internationally award-winning writer Courtney Zoffness considers what we inherit from generations past―biologically, culturally, spiritually―and what we pass on to our children. Spilt Milk is an intimate, bracing, and beautiful exploration of vulnerability and culpability. Zoffnes What role does a mother play in raising thoughtful, generous children? In her literary debut, internationally award-winning writer Courtney Zoffness considers what we inherit from generations past―biologically, culturally, spiritually―and what we pass on to our children. Spilt Milk is an intimate, bracing, and beautiful exploration of vulnerability and culpability. Zoffness relives her childhood anxiety disorder as she witnesses it manifest in her firstborn; endures brazen sexual advances by a student in her class; grapples with the implications of her young son’s cop obsession; and challenges her Jewish faith. Where is the line between privacy and secrecy? How do the stories we tell inform who we become?

30 review for Spilt Milk: Memoirs

  1. 5 out of 5

    Elyse Walters

    Audiobook...read by the author Courtney Zoffness 4 hours and 41minutes “Split Milk”, is a literary debut memoir ... collective essays that seamlessly flow from one story to the next. From the start, I was pulled in. My emotions started spinning immediately. feelings of anger and sadness — were mixed — then..... At one point I was OUTRAGED ... if I’m being honest.... squeamishness set in. A few descriptions made me feel sick to my stomach. I literally felt on the edge of tears; and was angrily disguste Audiobook...read by the author Courtney Zoffness 4 hours and 41minutes “Split Milk”, is a literary debut memoir ... collective essays that seamlessly flow from one story to the next. From the start, I was pulled in. My emotions started spinning immediately. feelings of anger and sadness — were mixed — then..... At one point I was OUTRAGED ... if I’m being honest.... squeamishness set in. A few descriptions made me feel sick to my stomach. I literally felt on the edge of tears; and was angrily disgusted at times..... yet I couldn’t help experience the book’s poignancy. It was so gripping... almost ‘too’ real at times....raw... (and I mean ‘raw’)... It’s definitely personal & intimate...pointing fingers at truthfulness. I reflected on just how darn scary realism is. “Split Milk” is downright insanely-brilliant. This is not your average parenting book - but it’s sure valuable as one. This is not your average painful/joyful book either... but it sure is! This is not your average trip down memory lane of one’s childhood - while observing your first born daughter manifesting so many of the same things you did.... Nor... is it an average look at sexual inappropriate advances.... Nor... is “Split Milk” your average look at the Judaism, and faith in general. At times Courtney shared bizarre, funny tales about how being Jewish - not particularly religious- fits in with daily life. Jewish Mitzvah took on a whole new meaning. Nothing is ‘business as usual’. Every familiar topic covered is just a little more offbeat, just a little deeper, just a little more insightful, than most books that explore surrogacy, motherhood, parenthood, privileges, faith, organized religion, racial justice, political climate, and self awareness..... all in a 4 hour and 41 minute audiobook?/!!! “There’s a natural instinct to tell tales of one’s children. But writing about one’s own mother can be fraught. We love our mothers, and we have deep conflicts with them. We feel protective but need to assert our truth”. Courtney Zoffness relived her childhood anxiety disorder. She examined past generations (spiritually, emotionally, biologically, and culturally) — just as the blurb says..... ( with a fine observant eye). Courtney looks at what we inherit and what we pass on. ‘Split Milk’ also invites us to think about the stories we tell. Do they become the person we are? And how might we responsibility raise moral, thoughtful, well adjusted, healthy, happy children/ adults in the future. Terrific book. Gotta love our human flaws and heartbreaks - don’t we? It’s written with fierce boldness, empathy, and love. There is much to like about Courtney Zoffness... as a writer, and person. Even her name has a dazzling swaggering sound.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Teresa

    3.5 I received this book as the May read for The Nervous Breakdown Book Club. It’s subtitled “memoirs,” but I think it’s more a collection of personal essays than it is memoir(s), not that there’s anything wrong with that. The most effective of the pieces for me was the chapter titled “Trespass” (called “Spilt Milk” in an earlier version published in the Paris Review Daily). Its story brings together the occupation the writer has at the time, her job of taking care of her infant son’s needs, and 3.5 I received this book as the May read for The Nervous Breakdown Book Club. It’s subtitled “memoirs,” but I think it’s more a collection of personal essays than it is memoir(s), not that there’s anything wrong with that. The most effective of the pieces for me was the chapter titled “Trespass” (called “Spilt Milk” in an earlier version published in the Paris Review Daily). Its story brings together the occupation the writer has at the time, her job of taking care of her infant son’s needs, and issues involving her own anxious mother. The latter were brought up in an earlier essay with the idea that she not only has some of the same anxiety issues as her parents, but her fear that she has passed them on to her oldest son, despite her best efforts. Zoffness’s mother seems like a fascinating person and I’d love to know more about her, but her identity, even though she’s described as a former singer in a folk-rock band in the sixties who hung out with Jimi Hendrix, is protected. Other essays concern the author, as a ghostwriter, interviewing a man who’s originally from Aleppo, and her younger son’s role-playing as a police officer. The topics are of this time and, especially as regards to parenting, universal.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Zibby Owens

    Spilt Milk is really a bunch of memoirs instead of just one, which is innovative because of how the book was divided into sections. This book is about what we inherit from past generations and what we pass on to our children—not just biologically but also culturally, historically, and spiritually. The author shows that understanding of passing things on from a few different angles. There is a section called "Hot for Teacher" about a student who expresses his desire to have his way with the author Spilt Milk is really a bunch of memoirs instead of just one, which is innovative because of how the book was divided into sections. This book is about what we inherit from past generations and what we pass on to our children—not just biologically but also culturally, historically, and spiritually. The author shows that understanding of passing things on from a few different angles. There is a section called "Hot for Teacher" about a student who expresses his desire to have his way with the author and how she handled that situation in relation to the inappropriate sexualization of women. Another interesting part of the book was thinking about how your older son had more anxiety about your younger son about going to school. One of the questions she pokes at in this book is how much influence parents have on their children. To listen to my interview with the author, go to my podcast at: https://zibbyowens.com/transcript/cou...

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sara Batkie

    To be honest, motherhood is not a topic I naturally gravitate to. My knee-jerk contrarian view throughout my twenties was that it was one of the least interesting things a woman could do with her life. That's softened considerably since my sister and friends have started having children. But trust me when I say that Courtney Zoffness's generous and vulnerable book of essays was a bit of a revelation. Beautifully written, funny, and surprising, it feels like having a conversation with your most w To be honest, motherhood is not a topic I naturally gravitate to. My knee-jerk contrarian view throughout my twenties was that it was one of the least interesting things a woman could do with her life. That's softened considerably since my sister and friends have started having children. But trust me when I say that Courtney Zoffness's generous and vulnerable book of essays was a bit of a revelation. Beautifully written, funny, and surprising, it feels like having a conversation with your most warm and honest friend. I can't wait for readers to discover this when it publishes in March.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Courtney Maum

    Ah! Such a smart book about the giant smallness that is a working mother's life. The intimate micro-moments and the biggest questions, all taking place in the same day part. I especially liked that these essays deal with both political and spiritual/religious questions which many essay collections didn't get into. The essays that delved into Zoffness' relationship with her opaque and challenging mother were especially moving. Can't wait to read more from this writer! Ah! Such a smart book about the giant smallness that is a working mother's life. The intimate micro-moments and the biggest questions, all taking place in the same day part. I especially liked that these essays deal with both political and spiritual/religious questions which many essay collections didn't get into. The essays that delved into Zoffness' relationship with her opaque and challenging mother were especially moving. Can't wait to read more from this writer!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Lisamarie

    Such an insightful and thought-provoking collection of essays dealing with the complexities of raising children, self-perception and self-doubt both as a child and as an adult, and the effects of ones own upbringing. Courtney Zoffness writes with honesty and seriousness and just enough of a rhythm to keep the memoirs swiftly moving. I'm looking forward to an upcoming book discussion with the author! Such an insightful and thought-provoking collection of essays dealing with the complexities of raising children, self-perception and self-doubt both as a child and as an adult, and the effects of ones own upbringing. Courtney Zoffness writes with honesty and seriousness and just enough of a rhythm to keep the memoirs swiftly moving. I'm looking forward to an upcoming book discussion with the author!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Chloe Weiss

    Zoffness is a lyrical genius who writes magical, musical prose. The ending of each essay will give you chills. The cadence of the language will mesmerize you. The sensory, cinematic descriptions will stay with you for days. You will audibly laugh at Zoffness’ masterful moments of wit on one page, then on the next page feel your throat sting with sadness. A must-read collection that helps us breathe through today’s terrifying times.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Grace

    I am by no means a quick reader, but I devoured this collection. Each essay has such a distinct voice, setting, and set of sensory images; I was transported. There are so many beautiful turns in here as well, and the endings were hard to get out of my mind. Special shoutout to "Holy Body" and "Trespass" in particular; those two are really sticking with me, and I imagine they will be for a while. I am by no means a quick reader, but I devoured this collection. Each essay has such a distinct voice, setting, and set of sensory images; I was transported. There are so many beautiful turns in here as well, and the endings were hard to get out of my mind. Special shoutout to "Holy Body" and "Trespass" in particular; those two are really sticking with me, and I imagine they will be for a while.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Bethany Johnson

    I adore books by/about anxiety-ridden mothers of small children. These women are my people. I've said it before, and I'll say it again. I feel seen. Zoffness writes so eloquently, but in a way that's accessible to even the most harried of mothers. Her stories offer some sense of reassurance that in the midst of our lonely, isolating struggles to do right by our children, we are not alone. She reminds us that at some point, we can finally reclaim our bodies as our own and that the transition will I adore books by/about anxiety-ridden mothers of small children. These women are my people. I've said it before, and I'll say it again. I feel seen. Zoffness writes so eloquently, but in a way that's accessible to even the most harried of mothers. Her stories offer some sense of reassurance that in the midst of our lonely, isolating struggles to do right by our children, we are not alone. She reminds us that at some point, we can finally reclaim our bodies as our own and that the transition will give us a sense of relief, but also a sense of nostalgic mourning.  Zoffness explores the roots of her anxiety, touching on the notion that traumatic incidents should, in theory, be all-consuming. And yet, looking back, they are a mere blip on the radar, often because we are steeped in self doubt and there's no time to grieve for our past selves. Zoffness describes her own traumatic incidents with an intentional casualness, often describing them in one short paragraph. It serves to emphasize the fact that women are subjected to countless offenses, and expected to pull it together and stay composed. Memories of my own past flooded forth - incidents that could have (and perhaps should have) derailed me. But as a woman, I'm expected to relegate them to a few short sentences in my metaphorical autobiography, despite how much they actually affected me. And then there's the creeping self-doubt, a result of other people diminishing what feels, to me, like trauma.  Zoffness writes, "Neither of my parents remembers me being so anxious. My memories surprise them. Confuse them. 'Are you sure?' they say." I felt that. Minimization by the people in my life makes me question the seriousness of incidents in my past that, objectively and rationally, I know were traumatic. Zoffness describes this thought process perfectly. "Maybe I was overreacting. Maybe I'd misremembered - dismissive tendencies that, I see now, encourage rapacious behavior."     One essay stood out to me for different reasons. She writes about how her son went through a phase of idolizing law enforcement - dressing like them, engaging in dramatic play, and even touring a precinct. She struggles with his naivete, knowing he is still just a child.  She describes the way she explained her own criminal past to her son in such a simple, straightforward way. And yet, there is profundity in the simplicity. She was caught shoplifting $196 worth of clothes. Since the officer assumed she was from a "good family" he recommended her for a first time offender program, for which she paid $100 cost of prosecution - because she could afford it. She donated $196 of clothes to children in foster care - because she could afford it. She had her record expunged - because she could afford it. And she listed the community service hours she completed as a term of her diversion program on her Ivy League college application, right after checking the box that she had never been convicted of a crime. I just...wow. Like I said - stunning in its simplicity.  Sigh. Just read it.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    Both intermarried, but only one’s spouse converted. Both struggled with the religious aspects of Judaism, yet one felt strong enough about Zionism to make aliyah. Each became a writer, although their paths to being published greatly differed. Courtney Zoffness, who has won awards for her fiction and nonfiction, uses the essay format to explore her life in “Spilt Milk” (McSweeney’s), while Aaron Leibel, who won two Rockower Awards for Excellence (2018 and 2019) from the American Jewish Press Asso Both intermarried, but only one’s spouse converted. Both struggled with the religious aspects of Judaism, yet one felt strong enough about Zionism to make aliyah. Each became a writer, although their paths to being published greatly differed. Courtney Zoffness, who has won awards for her fiction and nonfiction, uses the essay format to explore her life in “Spilt Milk” (McSweeney’s), while Aaron Leibel, who won two Rockower Awards for Excellence (2018 and 2019) from the American Jewish Press Association, offers a more traditional memoir format in “Figs and Alligators: An American Immigrant’s Life in Israel in the 1970s and 1980s” (Chickadee Prince Books). See the rest of my review at https://www.thereportergroup.org/past...

  11. 4 out of 5

    Taylor Owens

    The best book I've read this year! Short and relatable stories about topics ranging from anxiety to unwanted sexual advances to the Trump presidency to the murder of George Floyd. It was so so good. So relevant, and I feel like I'm finally able to read about the past few years now that there is a light at the end of the tunnel. Everyone should read this! The best book I've read this year! Short and relatable stories about topics ranging from anxiety to unwanted sexual advances to the Trump presidency to the murder of George Floyd. It was so so good. So relevant, and I feel like I'm finally able to read about the past few years now that there is a light at the end of the tunnel. Everyone should read this!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kristina Setka

    This book is really beautiful, polished writing with a nurturing tone. Motherhood, Judaism, coming of age, police brutality, and other themes & stories.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Weiss

    A beautiful, honest portrayal of motherhood.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Carrie Bornstein

    I couldn’t put this book down. So beautifully and expressively written, with each separate essay perfectly layering over the one before it. The only downside about Spilt Milk was that eventually it had to end. Highly, highly recommended.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Weinstein

    This book is so beautiful. I especially appreciated the little moments described here and the way the author linked them to bigger topics. She's clearly someone who is curious about herself and those closest to her but also about far ranging topics that seem to fall into her life from all directions. It is a quick, captivating read with lingering language and imagery. I loved it! This book is so beautiful. I especially appreciated the little moments described here and the way the author linked them to bigger topics. She's clearly someone who is curious about herself and those closest to her but also about far ranging topics that seem to fall into her life from all directions. It is a quick, captivating read with lingering language and imagery. I loved it!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kate-Lynn Brown

    A gorgeous collection of essays that should be in everyone's TBR pile. Zoffness explores motherhood, religion, adolescence, mental illness, and more in this vulnerable collection. While there are threads woven between the essays, each is its own distinct snapshot. Zoffness is a master of narrative nonfiction, proven in this lovely collection. A gorgeous collection of essays that should be in everyone's TBR pile. Zoffness explores motherhood, religion, adolescence, mental illness, and more in this vulnerable collection. While there are threads woven between the essays, each is its own distinct snapshot. Zoffness is a master of narrative nonfiction, proven in this lovely collection.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kats

    This was the perfect book to listen on while on a mother's day hike with my family (we get on best when we ignore each other, so everyone listens to their own thing..... books, music, podcasts..... and then we talk to each other on the breaks), as it's an incredibly astute portrayal of motherhood, family dynamics, inherited traits and anxieties, faith, a fraught relationship with one's mother and much more. It's almost a collection of essays, all of them memoirs, that give you an insight into th This was the perfect book to listen on while on a mother's day hike with my family (we get on best when we ignore each other, so everyone listens to their own thing..... books, music, podcasts..... and then we talk to each other on the breaks), as it's an incredibly astute portrayal of motherhood, family dynamics, inherited traits and anxieties, faith, a fraught relationship with one's mother and much more. It's almost a collection of essays, all of them memoirs, that give you an insight into the heart and soul of this incredibly gifted writer, and many times I was nodding in agreement or feeling upset on the author's behalf. Incidentally, this is the first book I have read that mentions Covid and George Floyd/BLM, where it doesn't rub me the wrong way, probably because it's just mentioned and not laboured in any way. Courtney Zoffness writes beautifully - I listened to the audio book (narration is done by the author herself), but I may buy the hard copy to reread and underline some of her observations. Hard to believe this is her literary debut, it is so polished. Highly recommend it.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Marisa

    I listened to this one narrated by the author and she is just an exceptional writer. These essays are memoirs of her life but the way they are written or the way she narrated them felt so personal and like fictional stories or fables. Although she is sharing personal parts of her life, I was left wanting more. More about her mother and her time singing with famous people like Jimi Hendrix. I can't properly express myself or how great this book was. Basically she used up all the good words and I a I listened to this one narrated by the author and she is just an exceptional writer. These essays are memoirs of her life but the way they are written or the way she narrated them felt so personal and like fictional stories or fables. Although she is sharing personal parts of her life, I was left wanting more. More about her mother and her time singing with famous people like Jimi Hendrix. I can't properly express myself or how great this book was. Basically she used up all the good words and I am depleted to continue with language.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jeffrey Anthony

    The stories in this memoir really resonated with me and I feel fortunate to have had this book sent to me through the McSweeney's book club program. As a Gen X'er I could relate to almost every story on some level and the Jimi Hendrix story is absolutely incredible. I look forward to reading more books by Courtney Zoffness in the future. The stories in this memoir really resonated with me and I feel fortunate to have had this book sent to me through the McSweeney's book club program. As a Gen X'er I could relate to almost every story on some level and the Jimi Hendrix story is absolutely incredible. I look forward to reading more books by Courtney Zoffness in the future.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Shawn Ly’s Book Notes & Quotes

    I listened to the audiobook version of this, read by the author. Of course we get the full impact of the book...the full effect of the author’s personality through her voice. But throughout the book I thought that her voice never goes past a set range of notes/inflections, which can make it seem monotonous. I think that it would have been better with a voice over narrator.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Yarub Khayat

    صدر هذا الكتاب في شهر مارس عام 2021 متناولا ذكريات المؤلفة عن طفولتها ونشأتها في بيئة يهودية وتأثير كل ذلك عليها، ودور والدتها، وكل الأمهات في تنشئة ذرية قادرة على التفكير والتصرف بنبل وشهامة. يتضمن الفيديو المرفق لقاء مع المؤلفة، ومع محررة الكتاب، واقترح تجاوز النصف الساعة الأولى منه حيث أن بها قراءة لبعض محتويات الكتاب، ولكن بأسلوب ممل، ويتحول اللقاء ليصبح ممتعا ومفيدا للتعريف بالكتاب بعد تلك الدقائق التي اقترحت تجاوزها. https://youtu.be/wjTuJFp2D3I صدر هذا الكتاب في شهر مارس عام 2021 متناولا ذكريات المؤلفة عن طفولتها ونشأتها في بيئة يهودية وتأثير كل ذلك عليها، ودور والدتها، وكل الأمهات في تنشئة ذرية قادرة على التفكير والتصرف بنبل وشهامة. يتضمن الفيديو المرفق لقاء مع المؤلفة، ومع محررة الكتاب، واقترح تجاوز النصف الساعة الأولى منه حيث أن بها قراءة لبعض محتويات الكتاب، ولكن بأسلوب ممل، ويتحول اللقاء ليصبح ممتعا ومفيدا للتعريف بالكتاب بعد تلك الدقائق التي اقترحت تجاوزها. https://youtu.be/wjTuJFp2D3I

  22. 5 out of 5

    Polina Lerman

    Organised in a very unique way with topics ranging from motherhood to religion and Trump’s presidency

  23. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    Read by author, a flow of stories about her life Enjoyed

  24. 5 out of 5

    Steve Lively

    This debut is a strong and revealing series of essays. Zoffness is GenX writer whose sharp humor and relatable bitterness merge exceptionally well in each of the ten selections.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    Love her writing

  26. 5 out of 5

    Mary Yram

    The stories that can make you feel that much in a few pages are too good. If you have some great stories like this one, you can publish it on NovelStar.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Dugan

    A perfect feat of vulnerability, introspection, precision, and cadence. For the lover of deeply personal and captivating essays, SPILT MILK delivers on every page. MARVELOUS!!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jen (bookscoffeedogs)

    Quick but fascinating read. Her writing style is fantastic and felt like how may brain works, a little bit of this thought over here to this next thought over there. For me, she nails sort of this constant dichotomy that we all find ourselves in life, in writing style and the topics she covers here. Push, pull, what to do, what not to do, why people do, the struggles of us all to right ships in our lives, have compassion, move through difficulties, stay open and still confused. Yeah. Writing thi Quick but fascinating read. Her writing style is fantastic and felt like how may brain works, a little bit of this thought over here to this next thought over there. For me, she nails sort of this constant dichotomy that we all find ourselves in life, in writing style and the topics she covers here. Push, pull, what to do, what not to do, why people do, the struggles of us all to right ships in our lives, have compassion, move through difficulties, stay open and still confused. Yeah. Writing this review I’m reminded of the large amount of topics here from varying times in her life. I’m a fan.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Emily Grace

    Sometimes a book comes along at just the right time in your life. 𝘚𝘱𝘪𝘭𝘵 𝘔𝘪𝘭𝘬 was one such serendipitous read for me. ⁣ ⁣ Sitting on my couch for over a year, my thoughts feel like an anxious jumble. A rampant illness, police brutality and sexist violence mixed with photos of what seems like countless smiling babies from friends and influencers projected from my phone screen in equal measure. These things seem distinct and disconnected, but to me they were not. All of this happening while I stayed Sometimes a book comes along at just the right time in your life. 𝘚𝘱𝘪𝘭𝘵 𝘔𝘪𝘭𝘬 was one such serendipitous read for me. ⁣ ⁣ Sitting on my couch for over a year, my thoughts feel like an anxious jumble. A rampant illness, police brutality and sexist violence mixed with photos of what seems like countless smiling babies from friends and influencers projected from my phone screen in equal measure. These things seem distinct and disconnected, but to me they were not. All of this happening while I stayed in my house hiding from the illness outside and dealing with the one inside my own body. All during a time when I felt helpless to do anything about the world and in the wake of a diagnosis that meant carrying a child myself would be high risk. To be honest, I never wanted children, but it's a whole other thing to be told that by someone else. My brain felt like a hamster wheel and 𝘚𝘱𝘪𝘭𝘵 𝘔𝘪𝘭𝘬 was a salve—not for providing a cure for my fears and worries but for sharing them with me.⁣ ⁣ It was almost uncanny how this collection seemed to touch on so much of what I was thinking about; anxiety, motherhood, police violence, bodies, sexism, loving and leaving New York. Zoffness approached all these topics with openness, insight and originality, qualities that would make this a worthy read for anyone even if you don't see yourself in all the subjects like I did.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

    A beautiful collection of essays--or memoirs--about being a daughter, a mother, and an artist. I love how the author explores what we inherit and what we pass down to our children. Her connection to her Jewish upbringing and her discomfort with practicing Judaism are particularly moving. I especially love the essays "Black Forest" and "Chaos Theory". A beautiful collection of essays--or memoirs--about being a daughter, a mother, and an artist. I love how the author explores what we inherit and what we pass down to our children. Her connection to her Jewish upbringing and her discomfort with practicing Judaism are particularly moving. I especially love the essays "Black Forest" and "Chaos Theory".

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