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A Whore Just Like The Rest: The Music Writings Of Richard Meltzer

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He is one of the inventors of rock criticism. His first book, The Aesthetics of Rock (acclaimed by Greil Marcus as "a disemboweling of rock's soft white underbelly"), became an instant cult classic when published in 1970. And for the next thirty years he fearlessly expanded the boundaries of music writing. Now he has collected the best of his prodigious output into a gonzo He is one of the inventors of rock criticism. His first book, The Aesthetics of Rock (acclaimed by Greil Marcus as "a disemboweling of rock's soft white underbelly"), became an instant cult classic when published in 1970. And for the next thirty years he fearlessly expanded the boundaries of music writing. Now he has collected the best of his prodigious output into a gonzo sampler of the reviews, profiles, interviews, and essays that form the heart of his rockwriter legacy. Traveling from psychedelia to the "dinosaur-rot early '70s" to the redeeming majesty of punk and the constant solace of jazz, this will stand as a remarkable document of an era by a singular voice in music writing.


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He is one of the inventors of rock criticism. His first book, The Aesthetics of Rock (acclaimed by Greil Marcus as "a disemboweling of rock's soft white underbelly"), became an instant cult classic when published in 1970. And for the next thirty years he fearlessly expanded the boundaries of music writing. Now he has collected the best of his prodigious output into a gonzo He is one of the inventors of rock criticism. His first book, The Aesthetics of Rock (acclaimed by Greil Marcus as "a disemboweling of rock's soft white underbelly"), became an instant cult classic when published in 1970. And for the next thirty years he fearlessly expanded the boundaries of music writing. Now he has collected the best of his prodigious output into a gonzo sampler of the reviews, profiles, interviews, and essays that form the heart of his rockwriter legacy. Traveling from psychedelia to the "dinosaur-rot early '70s" to the redeeming majesty of punk and the constant solace of jazz, this will stand as a remarkable document of an era by a singular voice in music writing.

30 review for A Whore Just Like The Rest: The Music Writings Of Richard Meltzer

  1. 4 out of 5

    Vaughan

    When you're done with Carducci, read this, from the guy who invented rock criticism way back in the 60s (man!) I re-read the piece "Vinyl Reckoning" about every 6 months, and while I don't agree with everything in this collection, I wouldn't part with it. Amazing stuff, but like Carducci, not for the faint of heart--Meltzer's style is convoluted to say the least. Oh what the hell--buy it now..... When you're done with Carducci, read this, from the guy who invented rock criticism way back in the 60s (man!) I re-read the piece "Vinyl Reckoning" about every 6 months, and while I don't agree with everything in this collection, I wouldn't part with it. Amazing stuff, but like Carducci, not for the faint of heart--Meltzer's style is convoluted to say the least. Oh what the hell--buy it now.....

  2. 5 out of 5

    Adam

    I’ve got some problems with Meltzer, and they’re not his obtuse pseudo intellectual bullshit—I like that part about him. No, what I don’t like about Meltzer is (1) Fundamentally, I’m not convinced he is fucking mad about music, the way my friends and I are and (2) he ruins a bunch of pieces with stupid and creepy things to say about women. First, about not bleeding for music: who does this guy listen to in order to access the sublime, to transcend, to rise above? I read all 608 pages of this boo I’ve got some problems with Meltzer, and they’re not his obtuse pseudo intellectual bullshit—I like that part about him. No, what I don’t like about Meltzer is (1) Fundamentally, I’m not convinced he is fucking mad about music, the way my friends and I are and (2) he ruins a bunch of pieces with stupid and creepy things to say about women. First, about not bleeding for music: who does this guy listen to in order to access the sublime, to transcend, to rise above? I read all 608 pages of this book and I can’t tell you. The only inkling we get is from a couple of his early pieces in which he poetically waxes on some 60s rocknroll, like the Stones and the Kinks. In fact, I got really excited when I first started the book, about how I might connect with this guy about early rock n roll. Anticipating his later chapters, I was excited about what light he would shed on classic 70s LA punk. But he never took me there—he just sort of belched and burped for the next 500-something pages. Second, about his misognynism. Introducing women by mentioning whether or not they responded to his come-ons? Leering at girls? This guy is gross. Undoubtedly, he explains this as part of his “bad boy of rock criticism” title, but there’s nothing “bad boy” about it—it’s banal. Tired, worn-out, old-fashioned, same-as-always, pure sexist banality. As for the the pseudo-intellectual bullshit that other dear Goodreaders complain about? That’s the real-stuff. That’s the potential of Meltzer, which he foolishly squanders. Maybe his other work stays course with uniting the ordinary and the transcendent, the delinquent and the abstract, the high with the low. As our man Bangs says; rock n roll poetry. And what about Bangs? Why is Meltzer so strangely condescending and jerky about Bangs? Maybe it’s because he knows Bangs really does bleed love for music and the sublime?

  3. 5 out of 5

    Mark Desrosiers

    I'm not sure what to make of his ears (he's a huge Doors fan, for example), but he's a hilarious writer 80% of the time. Still, in this collection he uses his gonzo talents to squeeze out sour grapes a bit too often. I'm not sure what to make of his ears (he's a huge Doors fan, for example), but he's a hilarious writer 80% of the time. Still, in this collection he uses his gonzo talents to squeeze out sour grapes a bit too often.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Derek

    Tremendous overview of Meltzer's career as a "rock critic." Extremely funny pretty much all the way thru. Tremendous overview of Meltzer's career as a "rock critic." Extremely funny pretty much all the way thru.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Rob

    One of the only music writers I genuinely like. He hates most music. Good for him.

  6. 4 out of 5

    John Dziennik

    If you like the title, read the book. More of a culture critic than a music critic, he's the guy you thought you got stuck sitting next to who turned out to be an erudite weirdo. If you like the title, read the book. More of a culture critic than a music critic, he's the guy you thought you got stuck sitting next to who turned out to be an erudite weirdo.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Justin Holt

    Unreadable at times. Meandering and downright boring at others. Meltzer's writing on L.A. Punk are almost redeeming, but sheesh, this one felt like a chore. Unreadable at times. Meandering and downright boring at others. Meltzer's writing on L.A. Punk are almost redeeming, but sheesh, this one felt like a chore.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Yushriel Sembiring

  9. 4 out of 5

    Cene Ketcham

  10. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Calaman

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

  12. 5 out of 5

    A. Bickham

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jay Macke

  14. 4 out of 5

    Joel Craig

  15. 4 out of 5

    Eric

  16. 5 out of 5

    Darren

  17. 5 out of 5

    Karen

  18. 5 out of 5

    Still

  19. 4 out of 5

    Brian

  20. 5 out of 5

    Dan Celebrity

  21. 5 out of 5

    James Mitchell

  22. 4 out of 5

    Justin

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mike

  24. 5 out of 5

    Patrick Brown

  25. 5 out of 5

    Scott Fendley

  26. 4 out of 5

    Tiffany Hill

  27. 5 out of 5

    Phillip Harris

  28. 5 out of 5

    Karen Eliot

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ben

  30. 5 out of 5

    Chris Eckert

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