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New York Times bestselling author Jennifer Chiaverini returns with The Women’s March, an enthralling historical novel of the woman’s suffrage movement inspired by three courageous women who bravely risked their lives and liberty in the fight to win the vote. Twenty-five-year-old Alice Paul returns to her native New Jersey after several years on the front lines of the suffra New York Times bestselling author Jennifer Chiaverini returns with The Women’s March, an enthralling historical novel of the woman’s suffrage movement inspired by three courageous women who bravely risked their lives and liberty in the fight to win the vote. Twenty-five-year-old Alice Paul returns to her native New Jersey after several years on the front lines of the suffrage movement in Great Britain. Weakened from imprisonment and hunger strikes, she is nevertheless determined to invigorate the stagnant suffrage movement in her homeland. Nine states have already granted women voting rights, but only a constitutional amendment will secure the vote for all. To inspire support for the campaign, Alice organizes a magnificent procession down Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, DC, the day before the inauguration of President-elect Woodrow Wilson, a firm antisuffragist. Joining the march is thirty-nine-year-old New Yorker Maud Malone, librarian and advocate for women’s and workers’ rights. The daughter of Irish immigrants, Maud has acquired a reputation—and a criminal record—for interrupting politicians’ speeches with pointed questions they’d rather ignore. Civil rights activist and journalist Ida B. Wells-Barnett resolves that women of color must also be included in the march—and the proposed amendment. Born into slavery in Mississippi, Ida worries that white suffragists may exclude Black women if it serves their own interests. On March 3, 1913, the glorious march commences, but negligent police allow vast crowds of belligerent men to block the parade route—jeering, shouting threats, assaulting the marchers—endangering not only the success of the demonstration but the women’s very lives. Inspired by actual events, The Women’s March offers a fascinating account of a crucial but little-remembered moment in American history, a turning point in the struggle for women’s rights. 


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New York Times bestselling author Jennifer Chiaverini returns with The Women’s March, an enthralling historical novel of the woman’s suffrage movement inspired by three courageous women who bravely risked their lives and liberty in the fight to win the vote. Twenty-five-year-old Alice Paul returns to her native New Jersey after several years on the front lines of the suffra New York Times bestselling author Jennifer Chiaverini returns with The Women’s March, an enthralling historical novel of the woman’s suffrage movement inspired by three courageous women who bravely risked their lives and liberty in the fight to win the vote. Twenty-five-year-old Alice Paul returns to her native New Jersey after several years on the front lines of the suffrage movement in Great Britain. Weakened from imprisonment and hunger strikes, she is nevertheless determined to invigorate the stagnant suffrage movement in her homeland. Nine states have already granted women voting rights, but only a constitutional amendment will secure the vote for all. To inspire support for the campaign, Alice organizes a magnificent procession down Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, DC, the day before the inauguration of President-elect Woodrow Wilson, a firm antisuffragist. Joining the march is thirty-nine-year-old New Yorker Maud Malone, librarian and advocate for women’s and workers’ rights. The daughter of Irish immigrants, Maud has acquired a reputation—and a criminal record—for interrupting politicians’ speeches with pointed questions they’d rather ignore. Civil rights activist and journalist Ida B. Wells-Barnett resolves that women of color must also be included in the march—and the proposed amendment. Born into slavery in Mississippi, Ida worries that white suffragists may exclude Black women if it serves their own interests. On March 3, 1913, the glorious march commences, but negligent police allow vast crowds of belligerent men to block the parade route—jeering, shouting threats, assaulting the marchers—endangering not only the success of the demonstration but the women’s very lives. Inspired by actual events, The Women’s March offers a fascinating account of a crucial but little-remembered moment in American history, a turning point in the struggle for women’s rights. 

30 review for The Women's March: A Novel of the 1913 Woman Suffrage Procession

  1. 5 out of 5

    Heidi Gorecki

    I really struggled with this book. I have read Ms Chiaverini's book "Resistance Women", also a fictionalized version of real people and events, and absolutely loved it, so I was expecting much of the same with this. However, "The Women's March" was mostly a narrative of facts and events, with very small bits of dialogue scattered in, making it read more like a nonfiction history book or a biography of the 3 women featured. It didn't feel at all like a fiction book. I'm not really sure what was f I really struggled with this book. I have read Ms Chiaverini's book "Resistance Women", also a fictionalized version of real people and events, and absolutely loved it, so I was expecting much of the same with this. However, "The Women's March" was mostly a narrative of facts and events, with very small bits of dialogue scattered in, making it read more like a nonfiction history book or a biography of the 3 women featured. It didn't feel at all like a fiction book. I'm not really sure what was fictionalized but it seemed to be trying to have a foot in both worlds instead of doing either really well. Fiction is supposed to allow you to step into the characters' worlds, while being laced with emotion and dialogue, feeling what they are feeling while walking with them in their story. This, however, had very little emotion, and felt like you were outside looking in, watching events as they happened instead of being invited into them. This was almost a DNF for me, except that I know very little about women's suffrage and felt it was an important story to hear nonetheless, although I probably skimmed most of the second half just trying to get thru it. Bottom line, the content was important and good but if this was supposed to be a novel of fiction, it fell very flat for me and I was really disappointed with it. Thank you to Netgalley and William Morrow for an advanced copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Maureen Caupp

    An interesting and well researched look into just a small part of the fight for women's suffrage in the United States. As historical fiction there are parts of the story that were changed with artistic license, but overall it is interesting to learn more details of the 1913 suffrage procession, many of which were true. The questioning of who was responsible for failing to control the mob that attacked the procession resonates even more strongly after the events at the U.S. Capitol on January 6th An interesting and well researched look into just a small part of the fight for women's suffrage in the United States. As historical fiction there are parts of the story that were changed with artistic license, but overall it is interesting to learn more details of the 1913 suffrage procession, many of which were true. The questioning of who was responsible for failing to control the mob that attacked the procession resonates even more strongly after the events at the U.S. Capitol on January 6th 2021.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ally Geist

    My full review will be up on the Brink Literacy Project's site soon. I was excited to read this ARC because I'm all about historical fiction and social justice movements. I really enjoyed this intersectional, well-rounded depiction of all of the work that went into planning the 1913 Women's Suffrage March on Washington. I was also happy to see the portrayal of a strong Black suffragist leader and the struggles she faced in the movement – and how they were similar to and differed from women from My full review will be up on the Brink Literacy Project's site soon. I was excited to read this ARC because I'm all about historical fiction and social justice movements. I really enjoyed this intersectional, well-rounded depiction of all of the work that went into planning the 1913 Women's Suffrage March on Washington. I was also happy to see the portrayal of a strong Black suffragist leader and the struggles she faced in the movement – and how they were similar to and differed from women from other backgrounds. Clearly well researched, this novel shows the different experiences women had advocating for suffrage depending on their socioeconomic status, state, race, profession, etc. While the story did lag a bit in the middle, it quickly picked back up again. I learned a lot from this and enjoyed getting a glimpse at Alice, Maud, and Ida's lives.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Julia

    I received this book through a Goodreads Giveaway. This book focuses on a specific part of the U.S. women's suffrage movement: the march in Washington DC in 1913 and events leading up to it. Chiaverini picks three women with different rolls in the suffrage movement and different perspectives to carry the story: Maud Malone, Alice Paul and Ida B. Wells-Barnett. Maud Malone was a librarian in New York who interrupted several politicians during their speeches to ask about their views on women's suffr I received this book through a Goodreads Giveaway. This book focuses on a specific part of the U.S. women's suffrage movement: the march in Washington DC in 1913 and events leading up to it. Chiaverini picks three women with different rolls in the suffrage movement and different perspectives to carry the story: Maud Malone, Alice Paul and Ida B. Wells-Barnett. Maud Malone was a librarian in New York who interrupted several politicians during their speeches to ask about their views on women's suffrage. She also demonstrated for suffrage at the state capital in Albany. Alice Paul was a young women who joined the suffrage movement while studying in England, and became a leader of the movement in the U.S., advocating a national strategy rather than state by state. She later founded the Women's Party and was the first to advocate for the ERA. Ida B. Wells-Barnett was an African-American journalist in Chicago who wrote numerous articles condemning lynching and racism in the North as well as in the southern states. Because last year was the 100th anniversary of women's suffrage, there were several documentaries on PBS that mentioned this march. I had heard of Alice Paul and Ida B. Wells, but I didn't know anything about Maud Malone and I actually went on line to see if she was also a real person or whether Chiaverini had conflated other people to create a new character. (She was real.) I have read most of Jennifer Chiaverini's books, and have found them to be uneven. Some have been very quick reads with empathetic characters (most of the Elm Creek Quilters series). Others have dragged because the historical events that she includes have been at the expense of character development (The Union Quilters, Mrs Lincoln's Dressmaker, and The Spymistress). This one struck a good balance between the characters and the events. (The cover for this edition (ARC) is the same light blue as the others. It looks different because I took the photo on my phone and uploaded it to Goodreads.)

  5. 4 out of 5

    Joanne

    I was really hoping to like this one a bit better. It just did not sing to me. Filled with facts and heavy descriptive passages of events leading up to the National American Woman Suffrage Association's March, down Pennsylvania Avenue, the day before Woodrow Wilson's inauguration, in 1913. I was hoping for more of a character-driven story and was disappointed. Real-life women Maud Malone, Ida B. Wells-Barnett, and Alice Paul are stars of the narrative but I never felt a connection to any of them. I was really hoping to like this one a bit better. It just did not sing to me. Filled with facts and heavy descriptive passages of events leading up to the National American Woman Suffrage Association's March, down Pennsylvania Avenue, the day before Woodrow Wilson's inauguration, in 1913. I was hoping for more of a character-driven story and was disappointed. Real-life women Maud Malone, Ida B. Wells-Barnett, and Alice Paul are stars of the narrative but I never felt a connection to any of them. Just OK for me, but many others have rated it higher. I won this book in a GoodReads Giveaway-Thank you GR's and Morrow Publishing

  6. 4 out of 5

    Rex

    I really wanted to enjoy this book - for two main reasons. First, it's classified as historical fiction, which has become my favorite genre of late. Second, it's set in a time and focuses on events about which I know very little, but they seem important. Unfortunately it fell way short of my hopes and expectations. There's a difference between historical fiction and what I consider this book to be - historical fantasy. The author wrote about real people and real events but pretended she had the a I really wanted to enjoy this book - for two main reasons. First, it's classified as historical fiction, which has become my favorite genre of late. Second, it's set in a time and focuses on events about which I know very little, but they seem important. Unfortunately it fell way short of my hopes and expectations. There's a difference between historical fiction and what I consider this book to be - historical fantasy. The author wrote about real people and real events but pretended she had the ability to get into their heads and tell us what they were thinking and precisely what they said. She took it too far. I would have been a much better book if she had created a fictional outsider to the events and shared her thoughts and observations that way. Most of the historical fiction that has appealed so greatly to me had taken this tact. What's more, I think the author actually trivialized what the real people went through in their efforts to get women the vote in America. They tended to be very catty rather than focused on their cause and for some reason the author felt a need to go into great detail about the fashion sense of each of the main characters. I know turn-of-the century styles were cool, but did we really need to know the fabric, cut, color, hair style, hat and accessories adorned by each character before she headed to her suffrage meeting? I believe the author did a great deal of research, but I don't think she did a very good job of integrating it into the story. Much of the book reads like a history lesson. The street addresses aren't that crucial, the many, many organizations with the long names became confusing, and the peripheral characters kept coming and going to the point where I was in a hurry to finish. Oh, and all men are misogynists and evil. Speaking of the finish - I have no idea why the writer stopped where she did. There was a LOT more to the suffrage movement than just the botched parade that is the focus of this book. Maybe that was her intent, but it sells the whole movement short and what these women went though in later years is truly horrific. No mention of this until the author's notes at the end, and this is the main reason I only gave it three stars. There is a pretty good TV movie that will tell you more about these women and their trials and tribulations than this book did. I recommend you check out Iron Jawed Angels despite that absurdly bad title.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Nikki

    I received this book as a Goodreads Giveaway. The sheer amount of research that was done, and included in this book, boggles my mind. There are comments that indicate that this book is heavily loaded with data and information, rather than warmth and personality. I have to agree to a great extent. Where I think the format is justified is the brutality that was experienced in the fight for women to achieve the vote. This deserves notice and recognition. History, and the truth, shouldn't be dressed I received this book as a Goodreads Giveaway. The sheer amount of research that was done, and included in this book, boggles my mind. There are comments that indicate that this book is heavily loaded with data and information, rather than warmth and personality. I have to agree to a great extent. Where I think the format is justified is the brutality that was experienced in the fight for women to achieve the vote. This deserves notice and recognition. History, and the truth, shouldn't be dressed up for the sake of entertainment. Very well written. Having said that, don't expect the usually Jennifer Chiaverini story here.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kate Eminhizer

    The stories of the Women's Suffrage movement in the United States usually consist of focusing on the efforts of several women: Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and Lucretia Mott. While these women were certainly pivotal to the cause, their actions were not the only ones that generated awareness and change. Chiaverini has composed a remarkable book focused on the 1913 Women's Suffrage march in Washington D.C. This book has been meticulously researched and Chiaverini has very successfully The stories of the Women's Suffrage movement in the United States usually consist of focusing on the efforts of several women: Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and Lucretia Mott. While these women were certainly pivotal to the cause, their actions were not the only ones that generated awareness and change. Chiaverini has composed a remarkable book focused on the 1913 Women's Suffrage march in Washington D.C. This book has been meticulously researched and Chiaverini has very successfully taken that research and delivered it in an easy to follow format. The book introduces readers to other influential women of the suffrage movement including Alice Paul, Ida B. Wells-Barnett, and Maud Malone. It showcases how women vying for suffrage in the United States incorporated lessons learned by suffragists in other countries and chose a more docile approach. By utilizing 3 main characters with distinctly different backgrounds, Chiaverini was able to touch upon the varying views of how inclusive the fight for suffrage should be. Even with just focusing on this one major event, Chiaverini provides a comprehensive history of the suffrage movement. This is my first book by this author and it certainly won't be my last. I received an advance copy of this title via NetGalley.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Leah Unger

    Book Review…..The Women’s March by Jennifer Chiaverini Historical fiction books are a great and amazing way to learn an infinitesimal part about our country and world. The books whisk you away to a time long ago, only to draw the reader into the era and its circumstances. More often than not, they bring to mind a time when possibly our grandparents or great-grandparents have experienced the same historical event. In Jennifer Chiaverini’s book, The Women’s March, we are taken to the very capitol Book Review…..The Women’s March by Jennifer Chiaverini Historical fiction books are a great and amazing way to learn an infinitesimal part about our country and world. The books whisk you away to a time long ago, only to draw the reader into the era and its circumstances. More often than not, they bring to mind a time when possibly our grandparents or great-grandparents have experienced the same historical event. In Jennifer Chiaverini’s book, The Women’s March, we are taken to the very capitol of our nation. Women are brought together by numerous influential women to emphasize women’s suffrage and their willingness to go the distance for women’s rights and the right to vote. Can you picture it? Hundreds, if not thousands, of women from across the nation showing up on the day before president-elect Woodrow Wilson’s inauguration day. They were battered, spat upon, and told to go home. However, they were not discouraged. They wanted their message to be heard by those who would be taking office the next day only to be rejected again and again. Three women, three parts of the nation, came together for one cause, along with thousands of other women who were instrumental in giving us the privilege to vote to this day. Women’s suffrage is something we, as women, should all be interested in. Voting is a privilege and we are expected and entitled to do our due diligence. We only diminish our womanhood, if we neglect what our ancestors have paved the way for us to have a better life. Author, Jennifer Chiaverini has brought to light in her book The Women’s March what the Women Suffrage Procession of 1913 was possibly like. It is a story that keeps you turning the pages, because it “may have” been a part of your grandmother’s history of womanhood. You become intrigued and want to know more about a time when she was a young woman just starting a new family or career. It may be too late to ask our ancestors how this may have influenced her life, but we can only imagine how it may have impacted her life as a woman. The Women’s March is awe inspiring and noteworthy and I highly recommend it to anyone who enjoys historical fiction. Note: Thank you to Kaitie Leary, Marketing Coordinator, William Morrow Books, for giving me the opportunity to read the Advance Readers Copy, in exchange for an honest opinion. It was a joy and pleasure to read this book. The Women’s March is available in July 2021 and can pre-ordered from any Indie Bookstore. Shop local!!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kaye

    I chose to read this book during the historical week when a woman of color was sworn in as the first female Vice President of the United States. It made me wonder what the three main characters of "The Women's March" would have thought of the historical event and the political and racial tensions preceding it. Jennifer Chiaverini weaves the stories of three separate suffragettes who are fighting for the right to vote for women. Alice Paul returns home from England where she has worked with milita I chose to read this book during the historical week when a woman of color was sworn in as the first female Vice President of the United States. It made me wonder what the three main characters of "The Women's March" would have thought of the historical event and the political and racial tensions preceding it. Jennifer Chiaverini weaves the stories of three separate suffragettes who are fighting for the right to vote for women. Alice Paul returns home from England where she has worked with militant suffragettes. There she experiences serving time in prison, hunger strikes and being force fed. She decides to stage the largest gathering of suffragettes in a parade in Washington DC on the day before the inauguration of Woodrow Wilson. Maude Malone is a NYC librarian (yay!). She is famous for asking (heckling) politicians their stance on Women and the right to vote. She is dragged away and tried for speaking up during a rally for Wilson as he campaigns. Ida B. Wells is a black journalist. She writes about lynchings in the south and sets up organizations to help the colored in Chicago. This isn't the easiest book to read. There are a lot of names and some of the descriptions aren't pleasant. But it is an important book. I was surprised at how ignorant I was of these women and the contributions they made to the women's movement. My 20-something daughter took and TA'd women's study classes in college and knew far more than me about the time period and events. The story covers 1910 until March 3, 1913 when the March of Women was held. I learned there were groups with different ideas on how to get women's rights. Some wanted to focus state by state. Others wanted a national amendment. And Ida wanted minorities and especially blacks to not be forgotten. Sadly I realized as I finished reading that the goals of these women are still trying to be achieved. Be sure and read the ending notes from the author. I was happy to learn that Ida B. Wells earned a posthumous Pulitzer Prize only last year in 2020 for investigative jounalism. This book would be great for book clubs and those interest in women's rights. Thank you to NetGalley and William Morrow and Custom House for an ARC ebook in exchange for an honest review.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Judith

    Historical fiction is my favorite genre, so I was delighted to be provided an opportunity to review an ARC copy of “The Women’s March: A Novel of the 1913 Woman Suffrage Procession,” by Jennifer Chiaverini, which centers on the historic march on Washington the day before Woodrow Wilson’s first inauguration in March 1913. This book focuses on the work of three main characters: Alice Paul, a middle class university educated Quaker, who gained experience working for the suffragette movement in Engl Historical fiction is my favorite genre, so I was delighted to be provided an opportunity to review an ARC copy of “The Women’s March: A Novel of the 1913 Woman Suffrage Procession,” by Jennifer Chiaverini, which centers on the historic march on Washington the day before Woodrow Wilson’s first inauguration in March 1913. This book focuses on the work of three main characters: Alice Paul, a middle class university educated Quaker, who gained experience working for the suffragette movement in England; Ida Bell Wells-Barnett, an African-American originally from Mississippi, residing in Chicago at the time of the march, where she was a leader of the suffragette movement; and Maud Malone, a working-class librarian who gained notoriety by being arrested for challenging candidates at political rallies to declare whether or not they were for or against “woman suffrage.” Unfortunately, my enthusiasm quickly waned as I slogged through long narratives detailing the family histories of each of the three main characters, along with descriptions of a dizzying array of supporting characters and innumerable suffrage organizations both local and national. When the book finally began to feel like a novel instead of a history tome, the tedium didn’t lift. Instead, the few character interactions took the form of countless meetings, speeches, and rallies. As a result, none of the characters ever really came to life. Although I did learn a lot about the suffrage movement and the individuals who played a part in it, for the reasons set forth above, I can’t say that I enjoyed the book. However, the author should be commended for her well-researched examination of the “woman suffrage” movement. If the reader approaches the book as a history lesson as opposed to an entertaining novel, then perhaps the reader won’t be as disappointed as I was.

  12. 4 out of 5

    joyce w. laudon

    I must confess that I did not know nearly as much as I thought I did about the movement that led to the (eventual) right for women to vote in the United States. I was aware of those who started the movement both the U.S. and England but I was familiar with only one of the three women featured in this novel. The three are Alice Paul, Ida Wells and Maud Malone. Each has her life story told against the vivid backdrop of the politics of the day and their individual histories. Alice Paul was raised as I must confess that I did not know nearly as much as I thought I did about the movement that led to the (eventual) right for women to vote in the United States. I was aware of those who started the movement both the U.S. and England but I was familiar with only one of the three women featured in this novel. The three are Alice Paul, Ida Wells and Maud Malone. Each has her life story told against the vivid backdrop of the politics of the day and their individual histories. Alice Paul was raised as a Quaker; Ida Wells knew much about slavery, and Maud Malone was an Irish American librarian. What led each of these women to fight so hard for something that many now take for granted? Jennifer Chiaverini helps readers to understand why they worked persistently for what they believed in. These three are not the only ones who appear in the book. To name just two others, there are Jane Addams and Ava Vanderbilt. The history that Alice, Ida and Maud lived through comes to life in this novel. I was especially struck by all that Ida Wells endured including the impact of yellow fever on her life, the lynchings of people that she knew and much more. Around these women are the men, many of whom wanted to thwart votes for women. They included President Wilson. Will the women succeed in organizing a massive march for the day before his inaugural? Read this one to find out. I found The Women’s March to be among my very favorite books by this author. I learned a lot but did not feel that I was being lectured to. This historical fiction should be on reading lists for high school students and up. It would make a superb book club selection. Many thanks to NetGalley and the publisher. All opinions are my own.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Perrianne

    The year is 1913, the era of women's suffrage was beginning to blossom in a huge way and the Woman Suffrage Procession that year was a turning point. This novel is based on the facts that the author researched as well as interesting information on the life and times. Although the history of the era is very interesting, there were a lot of characters to keep track of. I found it surprising that most of the female suffragettes were actually affluent white women. I also found it puzzling that the wo The year is 1913, the era of women's suffrage was beginning to blossom in a huge way and the Woman Suffrage Procession that year was a turning point. This novel is based on the facts that the author researched as well as interesting information on the life and times. Although the history of the era is very interesting, there were a lot of characters to keep track of. I found it surprising that most of the female suffragettes were actually affluent white women. I also found it puzzling that the women's movement wasn't across all races. However, Jim Crow laws were still being upheld and equality was still a very distant dream. The women were divided over whether they should seek suffrage state by state or push through to a national amendment to get the vote for all women. It is interesting to note that black men did have their vote by this point in history. I admit to knowing little about the history of women's suffrage, but this book was chock full of historical details. It read more like a history textbook than a fictional retelling of the history of the women's movement. I found myself getting bogged down with so many characters and women's organizational names that I felt daunted. She has a very extensive backlist and I have read and enjoyed a few of her other novels, but this one simply lost momentum for me. I received a copy of this book from a Goodreads giveaway and I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 255, Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Margie Bunting

    If you are a history buff with a particular interest in women’s rights, you may find this book fascinating. It’s more of a narrative about the struggle for women’s suffrage in early 20th century United States than a plotted story. The author focuses on three real-life women who advocated for women’s right to vote. Although she was from a Quaker family, Alice Paul had joined the Pankhursts’ military suffragists in England and been treated brutally in prison for her efforts. Returning to the US, s If you are a history buff with a particular interest in women’s rights, you may find this book fascinating. It’s more of a narrative about the struggle for women’s suffrage in early 20th century United States than a plotted story. The author focuses on three real-life women who advocated for women’s right to vote. Although she was from a Quaker family, Alice Paul had joined the Pankhursts’ military suffragists in England and been treated brutally in prison for her efforts. Returning to the US, she became highly educated and ultimately caught the eye of national organizers. Ida Bell Wells-Barnett and her husband came from slavery backgrounds. She co-founded the Negro Fellowship League and found herself advocating for both women’s rights and racial equality. Maud Malone was a librarian who fearlessly challenged politicians to state publicly where they stood on women’s suffrage. I found the last section of the book the most interesting. A women’s suffrage parade was planned for the day before Woodrow Wilson’s inauguration, and the Illinois delegation decided to walk to Washington, DC from New York City (250 miles) to participate. The author’s highly detailed account of the women’s travels and travails, the challenge to whether Ida—the sole member of color in the delegation—would be allowed to march with them, and their goal of delivering a letter in person to the President-Elect brought the struggle to life. And Jennifer Chiaverini’s research seems impeccable. My thanks to NetGalley and William Morrow for the opportunity to read this book.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Abigail Myers

    ***Goodreads giveaway ARC winner, thank you!*** The 1913 Women's March is an event that I must have heard of in passing once or twice, but I was largely unfamiliar with it, and so I was glad to read Jennifer Chiaverini's engaging and meticulously researched novel about it. I appreciated the level of detail that was obviously drawn from letters, journals, and contemporary accounts, and the sharp characterization of the three suffragists (Ida B. Wells Barnett, Alice Paul, and Maud Malone) whose sto ***Goodreads giveaway ARC winner, thank you!*** The 1913 Women's March is an event that I must have heard of in passing once or twice, but I was largely unfamiliar with it, and so I was glad to read Jennifer Chiaverini's engaging and meticulously researched novel about it. I appreciated the level of detail that was obviously drawn from letters, journals, and contemporary accounts, and the sharp characterization of the three suffragists (Ida B. Wells Barnett, Alice Paul, and Maud Malone) whose stories form the core of the book. ***very minor spoilers ahead...as a novel based on historical facts, not sure how "spoiler" they are, but there you have it*** I found the book's treatment of the racism within the suffrage movement to be uneven, however, which left me wanting a bit more. When Chiaverini discussed Susan B. Anthony's relationship with Ida B. Wells Barnett, it illuminated Anthony's complicated legacy on race and helped me understand how Wells Barnett could maintain her respect for Anthony. But the book seemed to let Alice Paul and the national leadership of the suffrage movement off the hook for tolerating segregation at the march. While it gave me new admiration for Ida B. Wells Barnett and her forceful, dignified response to being excluded from her predominantly-white state delegation's section during the march, I didn't get a clear sense of how Paul or the movement reckoned, or failed to reckon, with that moment.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Nancy L

    the Women's March by Jennifer Chiaverini is centered around three woman and the lead up to the Women's March in Washington D.C. in March, 1913. The beginning of the book gives the reader some background on the real-life women; Ida B. Wells, Alice Paul, and Maud Malone. They are three amazing women and their stories are well told. Chiaverini puts a lot of work into her research of historical events and this is certainly true of The Women's March. I found the beginning with their individual storie the Women's March by Jennifer Chiaverini is centered around three woman and the lead up to the Women's March in Washington D.C. in March, 1913. The beginning of the book gives the reader some background on the real-life women; Ida B. Wells, Alice Paul, and Maud Malone. They are three amazing women and their stories are well told. Chiaverini puts a lot of work into her research of historical events and this is certainly true of The Women's March. I found the beginning with their individual stories captivating and the end with the march itself very satisfying. Unfortunately, I thought there were parts in the middle that read like a text book instead of a novel. When Chiaverini put us in the head of Ida Wells, a Black woman, and what is was like to sit on a train not knowing if someone would come and kick her to the back, it was powerful, much more so than when she lectured about race relations in early 20th century. I think it is very important to understand what women went through over a hundred years ago to get women the right to vote. It is a great subject and overall a good book I just would have liked to be in their heads more. Thanks to NetGalley for the advance copy for this review.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Bonnie Staughton

    I won this book in the Goodreads giveaways. I went with some friends of mine, and my husband, to a museum in Virginia which used to be a prison. In a couple rooms, there was an exhibit on the suffragists and how they were treated. It horrified me and sparked my interest in knowing more. This book follows 3 women, one Black, who participated in the suffragist movement activities. A lot of the book is concerned with the Woman Suffrage Procession of 1913 which was to be in Washington, DC the day bef I won this book in the Goodreads giveaways. I went with some friends of mine, and my husband, to a museum in Virginia which used to be a prison. In a couple rooms, there was an exhibit on the suffragists and how they were treated. It horrified me and sparked my interest in knowing more. This book follows 3 women, one Black, who participated in the suffragist movement activities. A lot of the book is concerned with the Woman Suffrage Procession of 1913 which was to be in Washington, DC the day before President Woodrow Wilson's inauguration. President Wilson was anti-suffrage, though he would never come out and admit it. I was very interested in finding out that the suffragists came through Beltsville, MD (where I grew up) and College Park, MD (closeby) where they were warned of the men students at the Maryland Agricultural College (now the University of MD where my husband graduated). If the bad weather during their walk wasn't enough, the behavior of the anti-suffragists was very scary for the women. I learned so much that I never knew about the suffragists through this book and I hope to continue reading and learning about the brave women who were "on a mission" to get the women's right to vote.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Meredith Snepp

    This title was given to me as a digital copy from NetGalley in exchange for my honest review. This was my first Chiaverini novel, which is surprising. She writes quite prolifically, mostly about topics and people I enjoy reading about. I will have to say, this was much less dialogue and much more narrative than I was anticipating. This felt almost like a history book (like, the kind you would get in college) versus a pleasure read. It is quite evident Chiaverini dedicated a lot of time researchi This title was given to me as a digital copy from NetGalley in exchange for my honest review. This was my first Chiaverini novel, which is surprising. She writes quite prolifically, mostly about topics and people I enjoy reading about. I will have to say, this was much less dialogue and much more narrative than I was anticipating. This felt almost like a history book (like, the kind you would get in college) versus a pleasure read. It is quite evident Chiaverini dedicated a lot of time researching and preparing for this book. I felt like I had to finish this book because of the topic-I am ashamed to say I know less about women's suffrage than I should, and I was hoping this book would paint a vivid and engaging portrait to learn from. It felt...clinical? Sterile? I didn't feel like I connected to any of the characters, and I felt like I was hearing about their experiences almost second or third hand instead of being able to experience it alongside them. I'm not sure if this is how all of her works are written, or if this was an exception. It's an important topic and moment in history, but it was almost too much information to be considered "historical fiction".

  19. 4 out of 5

    LeeAnn

    I love historical fiction - especially when an author brings to light a time in History that isn't already overloaded (I'm looking at you, WWII). This novel is a well-crafted story narrated by 3 very different women who are taking part, ultimately, in the Women's March of 1913. There is a lot of build up to the actual March, which is actually a satisfying zenith of the book. My favorite character is Maud. Perhaps because she is a librarian, ("Everyone in New York eventually came to the library.") I love historical fiction - especially when an author brings to light a time in History that isn't already overloaded (I'm looking at you, WWII). This novel is a well-crafted story narrated by 3 very different women who are taking part, ultimately, in the Women's March of 1913. There is a lot of build up to the actual March, which is actually a satisfying zenith of the book. My favorite character is Maud. Perhaps because she is a librarian, ("Everyone in New York eventually came to the library.") but also because of all 3 main characters, she is the best drawn. I love her sense of humor and serious side, culminating in a... well, not exactly victory. But a satisfying ending nonetheless. ("'Victory?' Maud wondered, exchanging a bewildered glance with Phoebe.") Please read the author's notes at the end. There's always more to the story! Thanks to the author and publisher for this ARC. 🤓

  20. 4 out of 5

    Laura Hill

    Thanks to NetGalley and William Morrow for an advance copy of this book which will be published on July 27, 2021 A well-researched, fictionalized history of Women's suffrage through three key players: Alice Paul, Ida B Wells-Barnett, and Maud Malone. Ranging from the hunger strikes, imprisonment, and mistreatment in England through the Women's March of 1913 which is credited with a huge role in getting women's suffrage passed in the U.S., this book includes all of the frustrating and detailed ste Thanks to NetGalley and William Morrow for an advance copy of this book which will be published on July 27, 2021 A well-researched, fictionalized history of Women's suffrage through three key players: Alice Paul, Ida B Wells-Barnett, and Maud Malone. Ranging from the hunger strikes, imprisonment, and mistreatment in England through the Women's March of 1913 which is credited with a huge role in getting women's suffrage passed in the U.S., this book includes all of the frustrating and detailed steps that it took to get there. I admire Chiaverini's focus on facts rather than drama -- if I have any complaint it is that this almost makes the book a little too dry with the recitation of meetings and organizations. On the other hand, it's a realistic portrayal of how big change is actually made (kind of the sausage factories).

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kim McGee

    Another shining example of the heroism and determination of women in the fight for equality. Alice Paul, Maude Malone and Ida B. Wells came from different backgrounds and parts of the country but they came together to risk everything to campaign for women's rights. Each gained attention for the Suffrage Movement by putting themselves at the front of every protest, political campaign stop and rally until Woodrow Wilson and others could not ignore their strength or numbers. A fascinating look at h Another shining example of the heroism and determination of women in the fight for equality. Alice Paul, Maude Malone and Ida B. Wells came from different backgrounds and parts of the country but they came together to risk everything to campaign for women's rights. Each gained attention for the Suffrage Movement by putting themselves at the front of every protest, political campaign stop and rally until Woodrow Wilson and others could not ignore their strength or numbers. A fascinating look at history but with a more personal look at these courageous women. It was amazing to see how many times they were thrown in prison, manhandled and the target of verbal abuse just to gain one baby step for women for each giant leap of the men in charge. My thanks to the publisher for the advance copy.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    Oh how I wanted to love thee. I decided to give this historical fiction book a try because well, how could I not like a book about the women that toiled to earn my right to vote? Well, it happened. I was never a big fan of history class and this book felt like never ending history class homework. I felt like there wasn’t much of a fictional story and it read like a textbook full of organizational names and leaders. There seemed to be no fictional story at all. It tells the story of three differe Oh how I wanted to love thee. I decided to give this historical fiction book a try because well, how could I not like a book about the women that toiled to earn my right to vote? Well, it happened. I was never a big fan of history class and this book felt like never ending history class homework. I felt like there wasn’t much of a fictional story and it read like a textbook full of organizational names and leaders. There seemed to be no fictional story at all. It tells the story of three different women working towards achieving the right for women to vote in America. I appreciate the history and the women that participated in the suffrage movement, but this just didn’t work for me at all. Thank you to Harper Collins, William Morrow, NetGalley, and Book Club Girls for this advanced copy in exchange for an honest review.

  23. 4 out of 5

    CARRIE

    I was so excited to a get an advanced reader copy of this book! An interesting historical topic, an author I've never read but have heard such great things about, and my favorite genre of book sounds like the perfect summer reading! I did learn a lot the suffrage movement in the early 1900's, and about some of the women who were involved that I hadn't heard of before. But ... I really struggled to finish, and ended up skimming through most of it. I love historical fiction, but prefer books that do I was so excited to a get an advanced reader copy of this book! An interesting historical topic, an author I've never read but have heard such great things about, and my favorite genre of book sounds like the perfect summer reading! I did learn a lot the suffrage movement in the early 1900's, and about some of the women who were involved that I hadn't heard of before. But ... I really struggled to finish, and ended up skimming through most of it. I love historical fiction, but prefer books that do more telling of a story than sharing so many people, places and events that they begin to feel more like a history textbook than fictional novel. "5" for the well researched history lesson, but a "2" for reading enjoyment and making me care about the characters. Thank you to Harper Collins, NetGalley, and Book Club Girls for this advanced copy in exchange for an honest review.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Lin Jacobsen

    I have been a reader ofJennifer Chiaverini since the Elm Creek Quilt series, and looked forward to reading The Women’s March. I was disappointed in this book, as it didn’t seem to draw me in, until the final third of the book. I tried to care about the three main characters, particularly since they were women at the forefront of the Women’s Suffrage Movement. The book seemed to be somewhere between historic documentation, and a fictional/based on fact book. I seldom take more than a few days to I have been a reader ofJennifer Chiaverini since the Elm Creek Quilt series, and looked forward to reading The Women’s March. I was disappointed in this book, as it didn’t seem to draw me in, until the final third of the book. I tried to care about the three main characters, particularly since they were women at the forefront of the Women’s Suffrage Movement. The book seemed to be somewhere between historic documentation, and a fictional/based on fact book. I seldom take more than a few days to read a book, but this book seemed to go on forever. I received this book courtesy of William Morrow/Harper Collins Publishers, which I appreciated. I know that I will continue to be Jennifer Chiaverini reader.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Emma V

    The Women’s March tells the story of Ida B. Wells, Alice Paul, and Mad Malone in the time leading up to the 1913 March on Washington. While this book bills itself as a novel , it reads like a nonfiction book with a handful of lines of imagined dialogue. Clearly Ms. Chiaberini has done her research about intriguing historical events and people; however, she struggles to craft a cohesive, compelling narrative incorporating these events and characters. In lieu of plot, the novel is predominantly sp The Women’s March tells the story of Ida B. Wells, Alice Paul, and Mad Malone in the time leading up to the 1913 March on Washington. While this book bills itself as a novel , it reads like a nonfiction book with a handful of lines of imagined dialogue. Clearly Ms. Chiaberini has done her research about intriguing historical events and people; however, she struggles to craft a cohesive, compelling narrative incorporating these events and characters. In lieu of plot, the novel is predominantly spent painstakingly explaining each character’s history. One thing I did appreciate was the frank depiction of racism in many aspects of the suffrage movement. Thank you William Morrow for the ARC giveaway.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Debra

    Thank you Harper Publisher for the advanced copy. I have become an avid historical fiction person, however I am more interested in the Civil War or WWII era. Although I enjoyed this book, I did not love it like I did Resistance Women. The cause of Alice, Maude, and Ava are shared because they all want something for women. Alice comes back from Great Britain weakened from hunger strikes and jail time. Maude is tired of other women trying to stop the march. "...privileged women who haughtily insis Thank you Harper Publisher for the advanced copy. I have become an avid historical fiction person, however I am more interested in the Civil War or WWII era. Although I enjoyed this book, I did not love it like I did Resistance Women. The cause of Alice, Maude, and Ava are shared because they all want something for women. Alice comes back from Great Britain weakened from hunger strikes and jail time. Maude is tired of other women trying to stop the march. "...privileged women who haughtily insisted that they did not need to vote and didn't want any other woman to have it either." I wish this read more like a novel and less like nonfiction. However, if you want a well researched book about the resistance march be sure to pick up this book. Great read for the time period.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Theresa

    Read dates are wrong… didn’t want book counted in my 2021 list. Just not feeling this … the first 50 pages were an absolute chore. I didn’t hate it but I really disliked it. Wanted to throat punch the characters and I’d only read the tip of the iceberg of their story. Might comeback? Not an impossible thought, but not likely. In compliance with FTC guidelines------I received this book free from a Goodreads Giveaway in exchange for an honest review. The content of this review is not influenced by Read dates are wrong… didn’t want book counted in my 2021 list. Just not feeling this … the first 50 pages were an absolute chore. I didn’t hate it but I really disliked it. Wanted to throat punch the characters and I’d only read the tip of the iceberg of their story. Might comeback? Not an impossible thought, but not likely. In compliance with FTC guidelines------I received this book free from a Goodreads Giveaway in exchange for an honest review. The content of this review is not influenced by that fact. The feelings expressed are solely mine. I sincerely appreciate the chance to read and review this book.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    A must read! Such a wise choice to focus mostly on The Women’s March with important investigations into the point of view of Black Women, Western Women Voters, Southern Women, and a look at events in England. A watershed time in US History and the focus on the events leading up to and after The Women’s March kept the focus tight. The research is excellent. The intro lays the ground work and moves at a slower pace. You will finish the book with a great appreciation for the historical achievements A must read! Such a wise choice to focus mostly on The Women’s March with important investigations into the point of view of Black Women, Western Women Voters, Southern Women, and a look at events in England. A watershed time in US History and the focus on the events leading up to and after The Women’s March kept the focus tight. The research is excellent. The intro lays the ground work and moves at a slower pace. You will finish the book with a great appreciation for the historical achievements of these pioneering women. Excellent! I read an advance readers’ copy from NetGalley.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Janet Arden

    Jennifer Chiaverini packs her novel, The Women's March, with interesting facts. For instance, I confess I did not really know the difference between suffragist and suffragette until now. I enjoyed learning more about Maud Malone, Ida B. Wells-Barnett, and Alice Paul. I found myself wanting to change history, and wanted things like a happy meeting between Ida and Alice. I found the pacing of the book uneven at times, but (as a librarian) I will still recommend it to many of my patrons who I belie Jennifer Chiaverini packs her novel, The Women's March, with interesting facts. For instance, I confess I did not really know the difference between suffragist and suffragette until now. I enjoyed learning more about Maud Malone, Ida B. Wells-Barnett, and Alice Paul. I found myself wanting to change history, and wanted things like a happy meeting between Ida and Alice. I found the pacing of the book uneven at times, but (as a librarian) I will still recommend it to many of my patrons who I believe will enjoy it.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Schultz

    Read if you: Want a strong and eye-opening historical novel about the suffragist movement. This is one of Chiaverini's best in several years. I appreciated how she presented the shameful racist (and to a lesser extent, classist) attitudes of the movement; Ida B. Wells is a central figure in this story. Librarians/booksellers: Your historical fiction fans will flip! Many are likely already fans of Jennifer Chiaverini. Many thanks to William Morrow/Custom House and NetGalley for a digital review c Read if you: Want a strong and eye-opening historical novel about the suffragist movement. This is one of Chiaverini's best in several years. I appreciated how she presented the shameful racist (and to a lesser extent, classist) attitudes of the movement; Ida B. Wells is a central figure in this story. Librarians/booksellers: Your historical fiction fans will flip! Many are likely already fans of Jennifer Chiaverini. Many thanks to William Morrow/Custom House and NetGalley for a digital review copy in exchange for an honest review.

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