hits counter Curb - Ebook PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Curb

Availability: Ready to download

Curb maps our post-9/11 political landscape by locating the wounds of domestic terrorism at unacknowledged sites of racial and religious conflict across cities and suburbs of the United States. Divya Victor documents how immigrants and Americans navigate the liminal sites of everyday living: lawns, curbs, and sidewalks undergirded by violence but also constantly repaved wit Curb maps our post-9/11 political landscape by locating the wounds of domestic terrorism at unacknowledged sites of racial and religious conflict across cities and suburbs of the United States. Divya Victor documents how immigrants and Americans navigate the liminal sites of everyday living: lawns, curbs, and sidewalks undergirded by violence but also constantly repaved with new possibilities of belonging. Curb witnesses immigrant survival, familial bonds, and interracial parenting in the context of nationalist and white-supremacist violence against South Asians. The book refutes the binary of the model minority and the monstrous, dark “other” by reclaiming the throbbing, many-tongued, vermillion heart of kith.


Compare

Curb maps our post-9/11 political landscape by locating the wounds of domestic terrorism at unacknowledged sites of racial and religious conflict across cities and suburbs of the United States. Divya Victor documents how immigrants and Americans navigate the liminal sites of everyday living: lawns, curbs, and sidewalks undergirded by violence but also constantly repaved wit Curb maps our post-9/11 political landscape by locating the wounds of domestic terrorism at unacknowledged sites of racial and religious conflict across cities and suburbs of the United States. Divya Victor documents how immigrants and Americans navigate the liminal sites of everyday living: lawns, curbs, and sidewalks undergirded by violence but also constantly repaved with new possibilities of belonging. Curb witnesses immigrant survival, familial bonds, and interracial parenting in the context of nationalist and white-supremacist violence against South Asians. The book refutes the binary of the model minority and the monstrous, dark “other” by reclaiming the throbbing, many-tongued, vermillion heart of kith.

33 review for Curb

  1. 5 out of 5

    James

    "the percussive hinder, the fescues of coriander, thunder haitch, haitch, haitch turns the lathe with each exhale" —Locution / Location "the percussive hinder, the fescues of coriander, thunder haitch, haitch, haitch turns the lathe with each exhale" —Locution / Location

  2. 4 out of 5

    October Hill Magazine

    Review by Julianna Björkstén, Assistant Poetry Editor and Book Reviewer October Hill Magazine Divya Victor’s latest collection, Curb, documents the day-to-day trauma—the consequence of colonialism, systemic racism, and hate crimes—experienced by South Asian immigrants and Americans with crackling, poetic precision. In its transcription of both commonplace microaggressions and domestic joys, Victor’s collection illuminates the lived realities of belonging and unbelonging as an immigrant in America Review by Julianna Björkstén, Assistant Poetry Editor and Book Reviewer October Hill Magazine Divya Victor’s latest collection, Curb, documents the day-to-day trauma—the consequence of colonialism, systemic racism, and hate crimes—experienced by South Asian immigrants and Americans with crackling, poetic precision. In its transcription of both commonplace microaggressions and domestic joys, Victor’s collection illuminates the lived realities of belonging and unbelonging as an immigrant in America. Curb bears witness to the unacknowledged, invisible, and ever-present racism in urban and suburban America and commemorates South Asians killed by white supremacist violence, often, as the title suggests, on their own doorsteps. A celebrated and masterful poet, Victor flexes her aesthetic range throughout the collection. Made up of 14 sections (including the “Notes & Objects Cited” at the back), each section boasts its own unique logic; voice, form, and tone cannot be pinned down. Curb exhibits a kind of intertextual documentary poetics, quoting court testimonies, referencing historical documents, and providing blocky journalistic descriptions of hate crimes. Some poems, particularly in the “More Curbs” section, seem to stutter on the page; the repetition of their broken, isolated words constitute disjointed flashes of violence—decipherable only due to the explanatory paragraphs that follow. Many of the poems, particularly the ones told in first person, detail the linguistic lineage of displacement and the omnipresent lexicon of prejudice in the lives of South Asian migrants. This language appears in the collection through the distant, numb jargon of government forms—visas, FAFSAs, petitions, passport photos, birth/death certificates—which are always in the margins of immigrant life. Victor interweaves this harsh, impersonal jargon with the intimate, evocative language of the family and the domestic, thereby demonstrating the gross disconnect between lived diasporic experience and the way South Asian bodies are handled by imperialist institutions. In her poems, Victor counters the patronizing voice of empire and institution (“ma’am can you name two national holidays?”) with the devoted language of family and belonging (“...ma was a bowl made for two, brimming / beyond any border”)...[read the rest of the review in October Hill Magazine's Spring 2021 Issue]

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jenny Bhatt

    Review up at NPR: https://www.npr.org/2021/04/25/985926... Review up at NPR: https://www.npr.org/2021/04/25/985926...

  4. 4 out of 5

    Gary

  5. 4 out of 5

    Nikita Malhotra

  6. 5 out of 5

    jennet wheatstonelllsl

  7. 4 out of 5

    Greg Bem

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sanchari Sur

  9. 5 out of 5

    Emily DeMaderios

  10. 5 out of 5

    Hm0ng

  11. 4 out of 5

    Joe

  12. 5 out of 5

    Alycia Calvert

  13. 5 out of 5

    Emme

  14. 4 out of 5

    Nicola

  15. 4 out of 5

    Emily

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jen Deepa

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sylvia

  18. 5 out of 5

    Melon109

  19. 4 out of 5

    Caroline

  20. 5 out of 5

    Zoë Fay-Stindt

  21. 4 out of 5

    Morgan Beck

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jeffrey Shen

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

  24. 4 out of 5

    lacy

  25. 4 out of 5

    Breadfly

  26. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jaeha

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sydney

  29. 4 out of 5

    Shwetha

  30. 5 out of 5

    Palak

  31. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca H.

  32. 5 out of 5

    Randa Fayez

  33. 5 out of 5

    Hibah Kamal-Grayson

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.