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Bindi

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WINNER Daisy Utemorrah Award 2019 Meet 11-year-old Bindi. She’s not really into maths but LOVES art class and playing hockey. Her absolute FAVOURITE thing is adventuring outside with friends or her horse, Nell. A new year starts like normal—school, family, hockey, dancing. But this year hasn’t gone to plan! There’s a big art assignment, a drought, a broken wrist AND the bigg WINNER Daisy Utemorrah Award 2019 Meet 11-year-old Bindi. She’s not really into maths but LOVES art class and playing hockey. Her absolute FAVOURITE thing is adventuring outside with friends or her horse, Nell. A new year starts like normal—school, family, hockey, dancing. But this year hasn’t gone to plan! There’s a big art assignment, a drought, a broken wrist AND the biggest bushfires her town has ever seen! Bindi is a verse novel for mid-upper primary students. Written ‘for those who plant trees’, Bindi explores climate, bushfires, and healing. Written from the point of view of 11-year-old, Bindi and her friends on Gundungurra Country.


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WINNER Daisy Utemorrah Award 2019 Meet 11-year-old Bindi. She’s not really into maths but LOVES art class and playing hockey. Her absolute FAVOURITE thing is adventuring outside with friends or her horse, Nell. A new year starts like normal—school, family, hockey, dancing. But this year hasn’t gone to plan! There’s a big art assignment, a drought, a broken wrist AND the bigg WINNER Daisy Utemorrah Award 2019 Meet 11-year-old Bindi. She’s not really into maths but LOVES art class and playing hockey. Her absolute FAVOURITE thing is adventuring outside with friends or her horse, Nell. A new year starts like normal—school, family, hockey, dancing. But this year hasn’t gone to plan! There’s a big art assignment, a drought, a broken wrist AND the biggest bushfires her town has ever seen! Bindi is a verse novel for mid-upper primary students. Written ‘for those who plant trees’, Bindi explores climate, bushfires, and healing. Written from the point of view of 11-year-old, Bindi and her friends on Gundungurra Country.

52 review for Bindi

  1. 4 out of 5

    Nadia King

    I have to admit to not being a big fan of verse novels, but Bindi by Indigenous woman, Kirli Saunders is most definitely an exception. Written from the perspective of eleven-year-old Bindi in Gundungurra Country, it gives readers a slice of Bindi’s everyday including her love of hockey; art; her horse, Nell; bawa (the bush); and garrall (black cockatoo). When fire threatens Bindi’s home, their town and the land, the community comes together as one. What I really loved about this book was the simp I have to admit to not being a big fan of verse novels, but Bindi by Indigenous woman, Kirli Saunders is most definitely an exception. Written from the perspective of eleven-year-old Bindi in Gundungurra Country, it gives readers a slice of Bindi’s everyday including her love of hockey; art; her horse, Nell; bawa (the bush); and garrall (black cockatoo). When fire threatens Bindi’s home, their town and the land, the community comes together as one. What I really loved about this book was the simplicity of language; the way the words spoke to the reader: "And for a moment, I forget that Mum was taken." Written so simply and so beautifully, the words in this story speak of more than just themselves. Beautifully illustrated by Dub Leffler, one of Australia’s most sought after Indigenous illustrators of children’s literature, Bindi is a book you will treasure. A glossary at the back of the book was a big plus for me. Highly recommended reading.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Anna Davidson

    A simply stunning verse novel about caring for Country, family, friendship and community resilience after fire. Physically, this is a beautiful book - hardcover, appealing layout and beautiful illustrations.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Gill

    A beautiful book. Full review here. A beautiful book. Full review here.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    Kirli writes so beautifully about the earth and landscape. She has such spiritual connection to the garrall.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Underground Writers

    This review was first published on the Underground Writers website, where you can also read an interview with the author and the illustrator: http://underground-writers.org/review... To read and consume the verse novel Bindi is a gift—especially for children who will get the opportunity to share and learn from its contents. Kirli Saunders has created a book that is accessible to older children, delightful to read, and powerful in its capacity to encapsulate the reality of bushfire damage on Austr This review was first published on the Underground Writers website, where you can also read an interview with the author and the illustrator: http://underground-writers.org/review... To read and consume the verse novel Bindi is a gift—especially for children who will get the opportunity to share and learn from its contents. Kirli Saunders has created a book that is accessible to older children, delightful to read, and powerful in its capacity to encapsulate the reality of bushfire damage on Australian communities within a children’s verse novel. Bindi follows the life of an eleven-year-old girl, Bindi, who lives on Gundungurra Country and witnesses the power and devastation that bushfires cause all while playing hockey and having fun with her friends and family. While Bindi tackles such a real and prominent topic for many Australians it is not an arduous text, but rather an opportunity to understand and learn from life-changing events. What Bindi ensures is that after there is fire, there is hope for the future. I particularly enjoyed reading about the shared belonging that arises in a community in times of crisis. I believe that Saunders’ touches home for many readers in the creation of Bindi. The fires are a reminder of a reality that Australia witnessed not even twelve months ago. A reality that reappears each summer across the country. we wait like the houses that many of us may not return to But the verse novel isn’t doom-and-gloom—it is a possibility for change in our age of climate crisis. The three subtitles are: Seedlings, Cinders, and Sprouts—a clear and beautiful homage to the cycle of life, death, and rebirth that uncovers through bushfire damage. Along with the subtitles which emphasise the imagery of firecomes the beautiful charcoal drawings of Dub Leffler. The poetic language of Saunders coupled with Leffler’s illustrations makes for a visually stunning book. Three of the most significant drawings match with the subtitles to create a simplistic yet effective image of the same plant through the cycle of bushfire damage and rebirth. The devastation brought on by fire that children read in ‘Cinders’ flows naturally into ‘Sprouts’, which is where Saunders instills courage and agency into the children who read Bindi. Saunders herself hopes that the text will help children to “understand their responsibility in caring for Country and feeling equipped or more aware on how to do that.” The children who read this book are our country’s future leaders, and what a remarkable way to encourage a dialogue for children to learn about land, preservation, and the environment. Another marker of the brilliance of Bindi is that it is written in both Gundungurra Language and English. This inclusion of both languages is fluid due to neither language being bracketed or footnoted. This is a deliberate choice by Saunders who is interested in “decolonising the publishing framework and understanding the right way to publish language.” The glossary at the back of the book is a learning tool for children to understand what each Gundungurra word means and how to properly pronounce it. Bindi is a safe and educational text which encourages learning of Language and caring for the environment for both First Nations children and non-First Nations children. I hope that all schools will include Bindi in their curriculum as it is a beautiful way to start a dialogue with children about caring for Australia during our climate change crisis and looking forward into the future for ways to prevent fires.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sam Schroder

    So many coincidences led me to the moment where I got to sit on my bed and read this beautiful verse novel. Bindi is 11 and her story explores the ordinary moments of a girl - her school days, her family, her history - and the very real and relatable experience of Australia in a dry and dangerous summer. A class set of this book will be joining my ever growing and always improving book room collection first thing back at school in 2021. It is that good. As Saunders is a Bowral alumni, it will be m So many coincidences led me to the moment where I got to sit on my bed and read this beautiful verse novel. Bindi is 11 and her story explores the ordinary moments of a girl - her school days, her family, her history - and the very real and relatable experience of Australia in a dry and dangerous summer. A class set of this book will be joining my ever growing and always improving book room collection first thing back at school in 2021. It is that good. As Saunders is a Bowral alumni, it will be my honour and privilege to introduce our students to her work through this beautiful volume. Very highly recommended for lovers of poetry, bird lovers, lovers of the Australian landscape and readers of all ages. A joy to read.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jane Hansen

    Easy to read prose that flows so easily. An enlightening story told from a young perspective. As the story unfolds the imagery is vivid and littered with little surprises along the way. The use of Gundungurra words is beautiful and adds another layer to the poetry.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Michael Earp

    A fantastic middle grade verse novel about surviving bush fires and returning to the traditional care for country of the First Nations peoples.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

  10. 5 out of 5

    Danielle

  11. 5 out of 5

    Megan Hemmings

  12. 5 out of 5

    Adam Farley

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sheryl Cootes

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kimberley

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kristy (sometimes_i_read_books)

  16. 5 out of 5

    Holly

  17. 5 out of 5

    Liz Derouet

  18. 4 out of 5

    Catherine

  19. 4 out of 5

    Harriet Lobegeiger

  20. 5 out of 5

    Xenica Ayling

  21. 4 out of 5

    Megan Warren

  22. 5 out of 5

    Vic Byrne

  23. 5 out of 5

    Tamara

  24. 5 out of 5

    Christine

  25. 4 out of 5

    Tanya

  26. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Azzopardi

  27. 4 out of 5

    Elyse Lucas

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Beder

  29. 4 out of 5

    Marianne

  30. 5 out of 5

    Tamara

  31. 4 out of 5

    Claire

  32. 4 out of 5

    Louisa Robertson

  33. 5 out of 5

    Donna

  34. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

  35. 4 out of 5

    Sabine

  36. 4 out of 5

    Phuong

  37. 5 out of 5

    Lily

  38. 4 out of 5

    Pip

  39. 5 out of 5

    Cassandra Taylor

  40. 5 out of 5

    Emily

  41. 5 out of 5

    Jacqui

  42. 5 out of 5

    . Rikie

  43. 5 out of 5

    Kiara Hall-Grande

  44. 5 out of 5

    Alison Evans

  45. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

  46. 5 out of 5

    Book Mitch

  47. 5 out of 5

    Paul

  48. 5 out of 5

    Hayley Spark

  49. 4 out of 5

    Penelope Oliver-Sharp

  50. 5 out of 5

    Amy

  51. 5 out of 5

    Kyra

  52. 5 out of 5

    Rhiannon

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