hits counter Bittersweet - Ebook PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Bittersweet

Availability: Ready to download

Reflections on a reconstructed homeland and Scarborough. Bittersweet is an exciting, accomplished collection of poems evoking both a reconstructed homeland and Scarborough (Ontario). Using memory—intimate as well as collective—prompted by photographs, maps, language, and folklore, Ramoutar meditates on themes of obscured and suppressed history, time, and liminality. Her poe Reflections on a reconstructed homeland and Scarborough. Bittersweet is an exciting, accomplished collection of poems evoking both a reconstructed homeland and Scarborough (Ontario). Using memory—intimate as well as collective—prompted by photographs, maps, language, and folklore, Ramoutar meditates on themes of obscured and suppressed history, time, and liminality. Her poems journey from home to home to home, from Toronto to Guyana to South Asia; and Scarborough remains omnipresent, with a mix of identities and a strong, active, and boisterous youthful presence.


Compare

Reflections on a reconstructed homeland and Scarborough. Bittersweet is an exciting, accomplished collection of poems evoking both a reconstructed homeland and Scarborough (Ontario). Using memory—intimate as well as collective—prompted by photographs, maps, language, and folklore, Ramoutar meditates on themes of obscured and suppressed history, time, and liminality. Her poe Reflections on a reconstructed homeland and Scarborough. Bittersweet is an exciting, accomplished collection of poems evoking both a reconstructed homeland and Scarborough (Ontario). Using memory—intimate as well as collective—prompted by photographs, maps, language, and folklore, Ramoutar meditates on themes of obscured and suppressed history, time, and liminality. Her poems journey from home to home to home, from Toronto to Guyana to South Asia; and Scarborough remains omnipresent, with a mix of identities and a strong, active, and boisterous youthful presence.

41 review for Bittersweet

  1. 4 out of 5

    Maria

    Beautiful poetry!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ashwin

    Natasha Ramoutar's debut of poems, Bittersweet, takes us far and near, to Scarborough, Guyana, South Asia, and elsewhere, as we travel closer and closer to the acutely felt solitude that centres this searching, poignant collection. At the heart of this collection, perhaps, is a question that leads the final poem: How do you unravel a history of trauma, that which is woven within you? And, perhaps, at the heart of it, too, is the answer it seeks: This remembering of cultural memories through the a Natasha Ramoutar's debut of poems, Bittersweet, takes us far and near, to Scarborough, Guyana, South Asia, and elsewhere, as we travel closer and closer to the acutely felt solitude that centres this searching, poignant collection. At the heart of this collection, perhaps, is a question that leads the final poem: How do you unravel a history of trauma, that which is woven within you? And, perhaps, at the heart of it, too, is the answer it seeks: This remembering of cultural memories through the act of poetry-writing (a form of testimony, I argue) that aids in uncovering the self. Animated by this restless inner questioning, the poems meditate on the bittersweetness of the diaspora, longing for a homeland and ancestral inheritance; forces that moor the self and set it in motion, from shared memories to the forgotten lanes of history, to estranging locations and departures. Ramoutar's elegeic testimony is a voice that rises out to speak for the silenced, those exiled, removed from ancestry, from history, from self. Voices that I believe are refracted from Ramoutar's own personal life. This refraction allows for a multifaceted understanding of the poem. It is, in Ramoutar, both a narrative of removal from and return to Home, if only fleeting, if only in a dream-sleep. Strength and resilience remains the pervasive themes throughout the collection as she explores this disconnect or feeling of not belonging to a home culture. I do not have that much knowledge of poetry to furnish a comprehensive review, but I will say that Ramoutar's words are stirring and immediate, echoing days after each reading. Ultimately, the collection, Bittersweet, is highly enjoyable and satisfying. Thank you Mawenzi House Press for the advance copy, which was provided in exchange for an honest opinion.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lily Wang

    My first five star review on this website that is not for my own book

  4. 4 out of 5

    Liana

    4/5 stars Thank you to Mawenzi House for providing me with a digital review copy! Bittersweet is a newly released poetry collection by Natasha Ramoutar, an Indo-Guyanese writer from Scarborough, Ontario, Canada. Her poetry weaves through her various homes from Guyana to Scarborough, detailing the complexities that can arise when thinking about the concept of home. What I enjoyed the most about Ramoutar’s poetry was the way she was able to evoke a sense of belonging and not belonging. How do you h 4/5 stars Thank you to Mawenzi House for providing me with a digital review copy! Bittersweet is a newly released poetry collection by Natasha Ramoutar, an Indo-Guyanese writer from Scarborough, Ontario, Canada. Her poetry weaves through her various homes from Guyana to Scarborough, detailing the complexities that can arise when thinking about the concept of home. What I enjoyed the most about Ramoutar’s poetry was the way she was able to evoke a sense of belonging and not belonging. How do you honour your culture and identity once you step into your homeland for the first time? How do you unravel a history of trauma that surrounds not only those who came before you, but yourself as well? Does where you live bear the same weight in your identity as your home as much as other homelands? These questions and more came to mind as I read these incredibly thought provoking poems. Ramoutar has a gift for vivid imagery — I felt transported to exact snippets and moments in time. My favourite poem from this collection was “Ink” because I liked the juxtaposition between what one says and what one actually means. Bittersweet is a stunningly beautiful (both in and out, I mean, look at that gorgeous cover) testament to homes — wherever that may be and whatever that may mean to you.

  5. 4 out of 5

    2TReads

    These poems resonated with me on a personal level as they explored self, home, homeland, knowing, belonging, and remembering. Us Diaspora Babies, We Do Not Sleep: spoke on our history that we were forever removed from, and even though we know of and retain aspects of that history in the way we speak, dance, cook, tell stories, there will always be that yearning to truly know the land from which our ancestors were stolen, tricked into leaving. It was especially poignant when one line from certain These poems resonated with me on a personal level as they explored self, home, homeland, knowing, belonging, and remembering. Us Diaspora Babies, We Do Not Sleep: spoke on our history that we were forever removed from, and even though we know of and retain aspects of that history in the way we speak, dance, cook, tell stories, there will always be that yearning to truly know the land from which our ancestors were stolen, tricked into leaving. It was especially poignant when one line from certain poems held such a depth of meaning and the reader could just run over that line again and again, ruminating on the memories and realities that are contained within. Truly a collection of poems that traces history, family, and heritage for us and those who came before.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Catherine Hernandez

    Bittersweet is a collection of poems by fellow Scarborough writer, Natasha Ramoutar. The title perfectly captures the experience of reading her words. Each poem simultaneously lulls you into the comforts of home, the love of family while ruining you with stories of diasporic disconnection and lost language.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Erica

    I really enjoyed this collection from a local to me (Ontario) author. I was able to connect with many of the poems and will be keeping this close at hand to read and again. Can't wait to see more from this author! I really enjoyed this collection from a local to me (Ontario) author. I was able to connect with many of the poems and will be keeping this close at hand to read and again. Can't wait to see more from this author!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kristen

    Beautiful diasporic poetry from a talented new voice.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Mabel

  10. 4 out of 5

    Todd Tyrtle

  11. 4 out of 5

    Justine Abigail

  12. 4 out of 5

    Shetu

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sanchari Sur

  14. 5 out of 5

    Natalie Lim

  15. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Anderson

  16. 5 out of 5

    Cassie

  17. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany

  18. 5 out of 5

    Emily Riddle

  19. 5 out of 5

    Khashayar Mohammadi

  20. 5 out of 5

    Mawenzi House

  21. 4 out of 5

    The Latest Book

  22. 4 out of 5

    Katarina Pranjic

  23. 5 out of 5

    Halley Nisleit

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sadia Qureshi

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ɛɾιɳ

  26. 4 out of 5

    Char

  27. 5 out of 5

    j

  28. 5 out of 5

    Alexis

  29. 4 out of 5

    Leo

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jamal Baksh

  31. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Bradley

  32. 5 out of 5

    Tolu

  33. 5 out of 5

    Lindy

  34. 5 out of 5

    Femi

  35. 4 out of 5

    Veronique Armstrong

  36. 5 out of 5

    Faye

  37. 4 out of 5

    whatishannahreading

  38. 5 out of 5

    Katie Lawson

  39. 5 out of 5

    Leonicka

  40. 4 out of 5

    Trish Salah

  41. 5 out of 5

    Jsak

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.