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The Menopause Manifesto: Own Your Health with Facts and Feminism

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Just as she did in her groundbreaking bestseller The Vagina Bible, Dr. Jen Gunter, the internet’s most fearless advocate for women’s health, brings you empowerment through knowledge by countering stubborn myths and misunderstandings about menopause with hard facts, real science, fascinating historical perspective, and expert advice. The only thing predictable about menopaus Just as she did in her groundbreaking bestseller The Vagina Bible, Dr. Jen Gunter, the internet’s most fearless advocate for women’s health, brings you empowerment through knowledge by countering stubborn myths and misunderstandings about menopause with hard facts, real science, fascinating historical perspective, and expert advice. The only thing predictable about menopause is its unpredictability. Factor in widespread misinformation, a lack of research, and the culture of shame around women's bodies, and it's no wonder women are unsure what to expect during the menopause transition and beyond. Menopause is not a disease--it's a planned change, like puberty. And just like puberty, we should be educated on what's to come years in advance, rather than the current practice of leaving people on their own with bothersome symptoms and too much conflicting information. Knowing what is happening, why, and what to do about it is both empowering and reassuring. Frank and funny, Dr. Jen debunks misogynistic attitudes and challenges the over-mystification of menopause to reveal everything you really need to know about: - Perimenopause - Hot flashes - Sleep disruption - Sex and libido - Depression and mood changes - Skin and hair issues - Outdated therapies - Breast health - Weight and muscle mass - Health maintenance screening - And much more! Filled with practical, reassuring information, this essential guide will revolutionize how women experience menopause--including how their lives can be even better for it!


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Just as she did in her groundbreaking bestseller The Vagina Bible, Dr. Jen Gunter, the internet’s most fearless advocate for women’s health, brings you empowerment through knowledge by countering stubborn myths and misunderstandings about menopause with hard facts, real science, fascinating historical perspective, and expert advice. The only thing predictable about menopaus Just as she did in her groundbreaking bestseller The Vagina Bible, Dr. Jen Gunter, the internet’s most fearless advocate for women’s health, brings you empowerment through knowledge by countering stubborn myths and misunderstandings about menopause with hard facts, real science, fascinating historical perspective, and expert advice. The only thing predictable about menopause is its unpredictability. Factor in widespread misinformation, a lack of research, and the culture of shame around women's bodies, and it's no wonder women are unsure what to expect during the menopause transition and beyond. Menopause is not a disease--it's a planned change, like puberty. And just like puberty, we should be educated on what's to come years in advance, rather than the current practice of leaving people on their own with bothersome symptoms and too much conflicting information. Knowing what is happening, why, and what to do about it is both empowering and reassuring. Frank and funny, Dr. Jen debunks misogynistic attitudes and challenges the over-mystification of menopause to reveal everything you really need to know about: - Perimenopause - Hot flashes - Sleep disruption - Sex and libido - Depression and mood changes - Skin and hair issues - Outdated therapies - Breast health - Weight and muscle mass - Health maintenance screening - And much more! Filled with practical, reassuring information, this essential guide will revolutionize how women experience menopause--including how their lives can be even better for it!

30 review for The Menopause Manifesto: Own Your Health with Facts and Feminism

  1. 5 out of 5

    Claudia

    "When told by a patriarchal society the story of menopause is one about deserted youth, frailty, and diminished worth. The story I want you to remember is about value, agency, and voice and the knowledge to keep yourself in the best of health while demanding an equal seat at the table. That's my manifesto." Another book by Dr. Jen Gunter? Sign me in! I am a huge fan of her previous book, The Vagina Bible: The Vulva and the Vagina—Separating the Myth from the Medicine, which I think should be taugh "When told by a patriarchal society the story of menopause is one about deserted youth, frailty, and diminished worth. The story I want you to remember is about value, agency, and voice and the knowledge to keep yourself in the best of health while demanding an equal seat at the table. That's my manifesto." Another book by Dr. Jen Gunter? Sign me in! I am a huge fan of her previous book, The Vagina Bible: The Vulva and the Vagina—Separating the Myth from the Medicine, which I think should be taught in schools, so when I heard of this one, it instantly ended up on my need-to-read-asap-list. As I expected, the book is a great source of information - think of anything related to menopause and you'll find it in here. Every topic is dissected and presented under her eagle's eye, from all points of view, with pluses and minuses, and observations based on available studies. Menopause is much more than just your period stopping, and I think that's the only good thing about it, from a comfort point of view. She takes it step by step and presents all symptoms, possible treatments for its discomforts, diet, exercises, and a lot more. I was stunned to learn that many women see it as a shame and don't talk about it, or that they feel their sex life, or life, in general, is over: why?! Or maybe there is such a cultural difference between North-American culture and our East-European one? I never heard of a woman here feeling ashamed by it, nor being belittled by men for it. Anyway, for a medical book, it is a highly compelling read; I could not put it down, and that is also thanks to her writing skills. She explains everything as clear as possible; there is not a single topic to be poorly understood. I think it's a must read for every woman after 40 years old. Menopause is not something that may or may not occur to us, it is something we will have to deal with, and most of the times it comes with a lot of other health problems and discomfort, so it's better to know what to expect. Dr. Gunter, Chapeau! Again. >>> ARC received thanks to Kensington Books / Citadel via NetGalley <<<

  2. 4 out of 5

    Krista

    A manifesto is a public declaration or proclamation and we are well past due for a manifesto on menopause as 2021 is the 200th anniversary of the introduction of the word. My manifesto is for every woman to have the knowledge that I had to help them with their own menopause. I demand that the era of silence and shame about menopause yield to facts and feminism. I proclaim that we must stop viewing menopause as a disease, because that means being a woman is a disease and I reject that shoddily A manifesto is a public declaration or proclamation and we are well past due for a manifesto on menopause as 2021 is the 200th anniversary of the introduction of the word. My manifesto is for every woman to have the knowledge that I had to help them with their own menopause. I demand that the era of silence and shame about menopause yield to facts and feminism. I proclaim that we must stop viewing menopause as a disease, because that means being a woman is a disease and I reject that shoddily constructed hypothesis. I also declare that what the patriarchy thinks of menopause is irrelevant. Men do not get to define the value of women at any age. Dr Jen Gunter (OB-GYN, women’s health advocate, and internationally renowned author of The Vagina Bible) states in her introduction to The Menopause Manifesto that most women will approach menopause woefully unprepared for the changes they will encounter; societal shame dissuading women from even talking about their experiences among themselves. And as Western medicine has traditionally put most of its focus on men’s bodies and their care, women entering the menopause transition tend to not even get good information from their primary care providers: life-disrupting symptoms are dismissed as “normal” and “inevitable”; treatments offered are one size fit all; and in the US, ongoing cost and duration of medical care can be a deterrent for access. Gunter makes it very clear throughout this book that this lack of information and adequate care can be tied to the patriarchy, and she concludes the introduction with, “It shouldn’t require an act of feminism to know how your body works, but it does. And it seems there is no greater act of feminism than speaking up about a menopausal body in a patriarchal society.” The information that follows is clear and comprehensive, Gunter’s tone is generally informal and engaging, and although I picked this up on a bit of a whim, I’m very glad that I did: all information is power and I learned quite a lot. (Note: I read an ARC through NetGalley and passages quoted may not be in their final forms.) There’s a common fallacy that women were never “meant” to experience menopause. This assertion claims that menopause is an accidental state that resulted from longer life expectancies from modern sanitation and medicine, allowing women to live beyond their ovarian function. A benevolent patriarchal society allowed the failings of women — menopause — to be uncovered. The tenacity of this myth is testament to the impact of patriarchal dogma. Erasing menopausal women from history is literally reducing women to the functioning of their uterus and ovaries. When something feels off balance I replace the word “women” with “men” to see how it sounds. If it sounds reasonable I’m more likely to consider the hypothesis worthy of further evaluation, but if we would never speak about men that way, then there’s going to be a lot of side eye on my part. Has anyone ever in the history of medicine ever uttered these words? “Through good sanitation and health care, men are now living long enough to develop erectile dysfunction?” Doubtful. I knew so little about menopause that I didn’t even realise that only humans and toothed whales experience it (and for killer whales, it seems to confer some kind of an advantage: female orcas usually live to be around ninety, and males just to fifty), so that does beg the question: why menopause? Dr Gunter proposes the “grandmother hypothesis” — that human women (evolutionarily speaking) stop reproducing in order to help their daughters raise their own children, sharing their hard won knowledge and wisdom (this seems to be true for the whales, too) to the benefit of the species — and I suppose this shifting role is better than being consigned outright to the rubbish heap. Whatever the reason for the menopause transition, women’s bodies will go through a range of unpleasant experiences (from hot flashes and irregular periods to insomnia and incontinence) and Gunter stresses that a doctor should describe such experiences as “typical” instead of “normal” (where “normal” implies that these are just things women need to deal with instead of addressing). In some cases, women suffering from life-altering symptoms may be prescribed MHT (menopausal hormone replacement) and Gunter goes into interesting detail about the history of hormonal treatments — including an explanation for why it’s no longer pejoratively called “HRT” (hormone replacement treatment; nothing is being replaced because nothing is failing) — and I appreciated that she explained why the small increase of risk for breast cancer can be offset by estrogen’s role in preventing the more likely onset of cardiovascular disease or osteoporosis. I also appreciated the information she shared about so-called natural alternatives (hardly natural and never effective), the uselessness of a daily multivitamin, and the danger of pharmacist-compounded, rather than pharmaceutically manufactured, hormone creams (why do these even exist? Even the so-called libido-enhancing “scream creams” sound like snake oil.) The best way to approach menopause is to be informed so women can understand if what is happening is menopause-related; what diseases she may face due to her combination of genetics, health, and menopausal status; and what is the best way to achieve quality of life and health and how to best balance those goals against any risks. This can only happen with accurate information and without the prejudice of the patriarchy. There is a lot of good, specific information in The Menopause Manifesto, far beyond what I took away as general interest, and I can totally see how it could be a useful resource for a woman to consult before seeking medical advice. I’m glad this exists and that I read it.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Tanya

    I really enjoyed Gunter's The Vagina Bible , so I jumped at the opportunity to read this follow-up, even though I'm still a good twenty years away from having to deal with these issues. The word "menopause" first appears in an 1812 paper by French Dr. De Gardanne, but how or why it became widespread is not exactly known (and Gunter makes a great case for why it is less than ideal). Before "menopause" a variety of other terms were in use, from the good "change of life", to the not-so-great "mid I really enjoyed Gunter's The Vagina Bible , so I jumped at the opportunity to read this follow-up, even though I'm still a good twenty years away from having to deal with these issues. The word "menopause" first appears in an 1812 paper by French Dr. De Gardanne, but how or why it became widespread is not exactly known (and Gunter makes a great case for why it is less than ideal). Before "menopause" a variety of other terms were in use, from the good "change of life", to the not-so-great "middle-age decline", to the positively awful "women's inferno", "women's winter", and "death of sex". Much like her "vagenda" in The Vagina Bible, her menopause manifesto aims to dispel myths rooted in misogyny and empower women through knowledge and facts with a readable blend of expert advice, humor, personal anecdotes, and historic perspective. As expected, this proves harder in this volume: The only predictable thing about menopause is that it's unpredictable, and there is an even greater amount of taboo and misinformation circulating about this topic than any other phase of women's health, all compounded by often inconclusive scientific data due to a lack of research. With engaging, accessible writing, Gunter goes into the biology of menopause, as well as the pros and cons of available (somewhat US-centric, because of the brand names given) treatments and therapies. Some chapters were denser with information than others, but there is, again, a concise "bottom line" section at the end of each chapter, summarizing the most important take-away points. A lot of the contents were complete news to me, and I think that even just the explanations of symptoms would be reassuring to many who are going through it and feeling alone. There are practical tips and strategies for lifestyle changes that have scientifically proven, positive effects, and don't require a medical professional, such as dietary changes and physical exercise. Because of this, and the sensible way it is structured, it would be a good reference book to have on hand, and I'd recommend it to anyone who is approaching the menopausal transition, is currently going through it, or is living with someone who is, and wants to understand this change of life, and be supportive. Menopause is a planned change in a woman's life, just like puberty, not a disease, and if it was openly discussed and demystified, many women wouldn't suffer bothersome symptoms in silence, either assuming it was something they had to accept as normal, or worse, being dismissed by medical professionals for the same reason after trying to get treatment. ————— Note: I received an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review. The digital advance copy struck me less as a review copy, and more as a rough draft; it included many placeholders, typos, and other errors, as well as oddly formatted text, and the many tables and diagrams weren't displayed properly—all issues which should hopefully get resolved before the official release, so I didn't let them influence my review or rating.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Louise H - ⭐ Life in the Book Lane Reviews ⭐

    I found The Menopause Manifesto to be an informative and entertaining read. It is clear that Dr Jen Gunter feels passionately about the topic, along with the importance of the medical profession understanding how the menopause affects countless women. As a woman of a certain age myself it can be difficult to find reliable information that is useful, non judgemental and is offered by someone who clearly knows what they are talking about. Whilst the internet is a mine of useful information, it is I found The Menopause Manifesto to be an informative and entertaining read. It is clear that Dr Jen Gunter feels passionately about the topic, along with the importance of the medical profession understanding how the menopause affects countless women. As a woman of a certain age myself it can be difficult to find reliable information that is useful, non judgemental and is offered by someone who clearly knows what they are talking about. Whilst the internet is a mine of useful information, it is also a font of misinformation, old information and quackery. Medical sites, such as the NHS website in the UK, tend to be quite dry, overly factual and don't always offer more than the bland, generic advice that you will hear from most male doctors. Reading this felt like being amongst friends, ones who are willing to share the good, the bad and the ugly of menopause along with their own personal insight and advice of what they have found helpful. Every woman will experience menopause differently, yet treatment is often very generic. This book made me feel more confident in understanding what I am going through, how I can deal with it. This was all achieved with a writing style that is warm, friendly and humorous, whilst also being educational and packed full of useful information.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Emmalita

    I have been eagerly anticipating both menopause and The Menopause Manifesto: Own Your Health with Facts and Feminism for quite a while, and right now I’m disappointed in both. I know Dr. Jen Gunter knows that not every one with a uterus is a woman. I have seen her speak inclusively about trans men and nonbinary people. She also started the hashtag IfMenHadPeriods, which, well, some men do have periods. Unfortunately, The Menopause Manifesto seems to be only for women, and this undermines her sta I have been eagerly anticipating both menopause and The Menopause Manifesto: Own Your Health with Facts and Feminism for quite a while, and right now I’m disappointed in both. I know Dr. Jen Gunter knows that not every one with a uterus is a woman. I have seen her speak inclusively about trans men and nonbinary people. She also started the hashtag IfMenHadPeriods, which, well, some men do have periods. Unfortunately, The Menopause Manifesto seems to be only for women, and this undermines her stated desire to use facts and feminism to dismantle the patriarchy. In 2021, centering a book about menopause solely on women feels like a deliberate choice. I don’t know what her purpose is in ignoring trans men and nonbinary people, but the result is I cannot recommend or support this book. It particularly bothers me that in the introduction she declares the irrelevance of the patriarchy’s opinion on menopause while clinging to patriarchal definitions of gender. I am a cis woman and I have always resented people telling me who I should be because my body has female reproductive organs. It would be even more frustrating to have female reproductive organs and be defined as a woman even when you know you are not. Feminism that allows people to be defined by their bodies is going to fail in it’s goal. It’s a fact that not everyone with a uterus who will go through menopause is a woman. The feminism that insists on gender binary is not trying to dismantle the patriarchy. It’s trying to rent a room in the patriarchy while slamming the door on trans, nonbinary, and genderfluid people. It won’t work. We have over a hundred years of a feminist movement that shows dismantling the patriarchy just a little gets women nowhere. Women won’t have equality until everybody has equality. I am crying out for more conversation and science based knowledge about menopause. I would like to know what the hell is going on with my body as I transition into menopause. But, I can’t trust a woman physician who directs her information only at women any more than I can trust a man telling me about my body. I can’t trust that she’s seeing facts and not building a reality that suits her vision. I really want to like this book. I want to be able to recommend it to my friends, but I can’t. I received this as an advance reader copy from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  6. 4 out of 5

    JP

    This book is very straight forward and told in a relaxing text which put me at ease. I’ve been looking for ANYTHING that would be helpful to help me understand what was happening and how to try to manage my symptoms. The author says, this book was created so that we (as women) can better advocate for ourselves and become more educated about our medical needs and choices. I can not express enough how much, if you’re a women that you need to read this! I’ve ordered two copies myself because I’m gi This book is very straight forward and told in a relaxing text which put me at ease. I’ve been looking for ANYTHING that would be helpful to help me understand what was happening and how to try to manage my symptoms. The author says, this book was created so that we (as women) can better advocate for ourselves and become more educated about our medical needs and choices. I can not express enough how much, if you’re a women that you need to read this! I’ve ordered two copies myself because I’m giving one as a gift! This is a life changer. Ive been menopausal for three years and nothings been as helpful or as informative as this book. I also want to say that this isn’t just about menopause but a lot of other women’s issues. Dr Gunter carefully examines and explains the issue. Then she shares ALL of my available options. Hot flashes, memory, depression and osteoporosis were my favorite topics. I could go on forever so I’m just going to list some things about the book. I highly recommend this. You won’t be sorry. The book discussed symptoms such as: • Abnormal bleeding • Hot flashes • Night flashes • Sleep disturbance • Brain Fog (cognitive changes) • Joint pain Along with medical conditions such as: • Heart disease • Osteoporosis • Dementia • Alzheimer’s • Depression • Metabolic syndrome • Diabetes • UTI Thanks Citadel Press, HighBridge Audio via Netgalley. Quotes from the book: “If menopause were on Yelp it would have one star.” “Menopause is puberty in reverse.”

  7. 5 out of 5

    The CurvyJones

    I'm increasingly interested in the enigma that is the human body, specifically this point in life when things that have been working as designed (or not) for so long chug to a stop and we enter another stage in life. This book is conversational, bringing bodily functions and explanations down to a layperson's level, which I appreciated. There's a lot of history, a lot of biology, much of which, as the author stated, could be found in the vagina bible, so I felt it could be left out, but for the I'm increasingly interested in the enigma that is the human body, specifically this point in life when things that have been working as designed (or not) for so long chug to a stop and we enter another stage in life. This book is conversational, bringing bodily functions and explanations down to a layperson's level, which I appreciated. There's a lot of history, a lot of biology, much of which, as the author stated, could be found in the vagina bible, so I felt it could be left out, but for the sake of a complete guide, I understand why it was included. There was no ground breaking or lightbulb revelations- if you've searched symptoms of menopause and 'what does this mean?' you know all of this info, anyway. The benefit is having all of those internet searches in one book. This would be a great book to have in print so the reader could highlight, tab and reference, especially part 3 which can be read in full or in parts. I had a hysterectomy and kept my ovaries, so I don't have clues like menses grinding to a halt to clue me into menopause. This book is a useful guide to the process, and all involved.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Barbara (The Bibliophage)

    Originally published on my book blog, TheBibliophage.com. Dr. Jen Gunther, MD is my new chief explainer of women’s health. Her upcoming book, The Menopause Manifesto: Own Your Health with Facts and Feminism is brilliant. It’s an utterly necessary addition to every 35+ woman’s bookshelf. Run, don’t walk, to your nearest bookstore and pre-order a copy. Then, start reading on its May 25 publication date. So, what makes it so great? Simple. Gunther balances evidence-based medical advice with feminist Originally published on my book blog, TheBibliophage.com. Dr. Jen Gunther, MD is my new chief explainer of women’s health. Her upcoming book, The Menopause Manifesto: Own Your Health with Facts and Feminism is brilliant. It’s an utterly necessary addition to every 35+ woman’s bookshelf. Run, don’t walk, to your nearest bookstore and pre-order a copy. Then, start reading on its May 25 publication date. So, what makes it so great? Simple. Gunther balances evidence-based medical advice with feminist observations about menopause and women’s health. For example, she gives readers the low down the medical perspective on sexuality during the menopause transition. At the same time, she repeatedly notes the differences in how we treat the aging man’s sexuality with dignity and the aging woman’s sexuality with scorn. And frankly, it’s just plain ignored as a valid concern for women “of a certain age.” (See my recent review of Invisible Women: Data Bias in a World Designed for Men.) The topics Gunther covers are broad. She discusses whether to take lots of supplements, change your diet, and get more exercise. And details the reasons why or why not. But what sets her apart is the common-sense medical information. If you need details about how the hormonal changes around menopause work, this book is for you. Gunther also includes when they generally start and when they may start to settle down. She explains the way various medically based hormone treatments work. The terminology used over the years is confusing and Gunther defines bioidentical hormones with plenty about what aspects are just hype. Every topic women in their 40s and 50s wonder about is covered here. Gunther includes hot flashes, insomnia, skin and hair changes, breast health, weight, and so much more. My conclusions As a post-menopausal woman, I wondered if this book would provide information I didn’t know. It absolutely did! I found possible solutions to try for some typical issues. On Goodreads, a friend in her early 40s asked if it’s too early to read The Menopause Manifesto. I encouraged her to give it a try. There is a LOT of information about the whole menopause transition, starting with peri menopause. A younger woman might not need everything right now. On the other hand, a trusted resource like this would definitely help. Navigating menopause is all about feeling informed and therefore in more control. And let me say one more time, I love the feminist perspective that Gunther adds to her medical information. She minces no words in calling out the patriarchy. Sometimes she does so by explaining the truly wild historical remedies. And then reminding us that we are sadly still moving past the fallacies about menopause. Our society treats women’s aging process, including menopause as an illness. It is not. And Gunther gives women the tools to make sure their doctors’ treat them with respect and dignity. She also gives them permission to move on and find better doctors by teaching them what is hogwash and what is evidence-based medicine. If you need a solid reference book to support your menopausal transition and healthy aging process, I recommend The Menopause Manifesto. Pair with Darcey Steinke’s terrific memoir, Flash Count Diary: Menopause and the Vindication of Natural Life. Acknowledgements Many thanks to NetGalley, Kensington Books / Citadel, and the author for a digital advanced reader’s copy in exchange for this honest review.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sally Kilpatrick

    Lots of great information here. I would say too much information, but I'm not sure I believe in such a thing. That said, those who are suffering and looking for specific solutions might be frustrated with discussions of history. I, on the other hand, found the book to be empowering through knowing the history of how menopause has been perceived and treated. Gunter is mad, and I don't blame her. Throughout the book she calls out both society and the medical profession for how they've treated--or n Lots of great information here. I would say too much information, but I'm not sure I believe in such a thing. That said, those who are suffering and looking for specific solutions might be frustrated with discussions of history. I, on the other hand, found the book to be empowering through knowing the history of how menopause has been perceived and treated. Gunter is mad, and I don't blame her. Throughout the book she calls out both society and the medical profession for how they've treated--or not treated, in some cases--the very natural menopause transition. At the end of the book she talks about her rage and says "The source of my rage was this reproductive reckoning. The realization that menopause was just one more way that the burden of perpetuating the species is unequally borne by women and one more way that our biology is weaponized against us. It is the ultimate gaslighting because it's this biology--from puberty to grave--that literally birthed humanity as we know it." Honestly, I'm pretty salty, too. The fact that medical research is so damned skewed toward men means that Gunter only has so many suggestions to give because she wants to give good information with scientific backing. Again and again, she points to "cures" for menopause that haven't been properly studied. Again and again, she declares that women deserve better. Come for the history of menopause and for what facts she can give us on how to ease symptoms and generally make our way through a fraught reverse puberty that not a one of us asked for. Stay for her reminder that menopause has actually contributed to the longevity of the species, most specifically through how grandmothers have helped mothers keep the family hearty and hale. As she further says in the conclusion, "Many women have been conditioned to fear menopause as an expiration date for relevance and as a sign of weakness only because that is what men thought. In fact, we have this amazing data that tells us that menopause is the opposite--a time when historically women contributed great things to society because of their knowledge and their age....When told by a patriarchal society the story of menopause is one about deserted youth, frail, and diminished worth. The story I want you to remember is about value, agency, and voice and knowledge to keep yourself in the best of health while demanding an equal seat at the table." Side note: Before reading, I heard complaints that this book did not address the trans community. Early on in the book, Gunter noted that all of the studies she could find to cite involved women who have or had ovaries. She also noted that "More research is desperately needed." She does give what information she can in that early chapter.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Trisha

    Is it ever wrong to find out more about female health? No, I don't think it is! I'm in! Is it ever wrong to find out more about female health? No, I don't think it is! I'm in!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Chantal Côté

    3.5 stars Thank you to Netgalley and the publisher for providing me with a complimentary e-arc in exchange for my honest review.. First of all, I am going through menopause and felt I wasn’t sufficiently informed. First part of the book about the history of menopause and then the medical part were difficult to read. I admit to skipping some of it.I liked the fact that the author shared where research are nowadays and rejects most .of them. My preferred part was on nutrition and supplements. I was i 3.5 stars Thank you to Netgalley and the publisher for providing me with a complimentary e-arc in exchange for my honest review.. First of all, I am going through menopause and felt I wasn’t sufficiently informed. First part of the book about the history of menopause and then the medical part were difficult to read. I admit to skipping some of it.I liked the fact that the author shared where research are nowadays and rejects most .of them. My preferred part was on nutrition and supplements. I was interested in finding out how hair and skin can be impacted by menopause but it was not covered in this book. I would recommend this book only if you are considering hormone therapy. The book convinced me you can’t rely on anything but your doctor’s advice!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Dawn

    I received an ARC of this title from NetGalley. I found Gunter's The Vagina Bible: The Vulva and the Vagina—Separating the Myth from the Medicine extremely helpful even at my relatively advanced age. Needless to say, I was thrilled to find this latest title all about one of my favorite topics, menopause. (Yes, I lead a fairly sad life.). Gunter presents the information in a way that feels like one your best girlfriends is talking with you and sharing super valuable tips. Add this to her experien I received an ARC of this title from NetGalley. I found Gunter's The Vagina Bible: The Vulva and the Vagina—Separating the Myth from the Medicine extremely helpful even at my relatively advanced age. Needless to say, I was thrilled to find this latest title all about one of my favorite topics, menopause. (Yes, I lead a fairly sad life.). Gunter presents the information in a way that feels like one your best girlfriends is talking with you and sharing super valuable tips. Add this to her experience as an OB/GYN and you have a great combo. If a book on menopause can be "fun" to read, then this is that book. My only slight criticism is that at times the author takes the feminist slant a bit far in her rebuke of the "patriarchy". I would take that aspect of the book with a grain of salt and just focus on the information she is sharing. As a woman who is deep in menopause (sorry, TMI), I learned a lot about my body and found the book to be reassuring as well as informative about other strategies I might explore with diet, MHT, etc. I think this book would be helpful for women approaching perimenopause, those like myself who are in the thick of it, and even for their partners/loved ones to better understand what the woman-of-a-certain age in their life is going through.

  13. 4 out of 5

    ✿✿✿May

    I thought I could relate to it....and some information was good. A lot of the scientific stuff was a bit overwhelming. And 13+ hours of audiobook about menopause can suck the life out of anybody.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Isil Arican

    Vagina Bible was one of the best books I read, so I was looking forward to publication of The Menopause Manifesto by Dr. Jen Gunter again and it did not disappoint! Not to mention how timely it was for me to read it as a woman who started her ups & downs journey into the realm of peri-menopause. I love Jen Gunter's style: She is factual, informative, fun and can explain complex medical concepts with a plain language and able to fill the gaps between clinical data & social implications, so we can Vagina Bible was one of the best books I read, so I was looking forward to publication of The Menopause Manifesto by Dr. Jen Gunter again and it did not disappoint! Not to mention how timely it was for me to read it as a woman who started her ups & downs journey into the realm of peri-menopause. I love Jen Gunter's style: She is factual, informative, fun and can explain complex medical concepts with a plain language and able to fill the gaps between clinical data & social implications, so we can question not only the biological/physiological facts but also the preconceived ideas the society imposes on us regarding women's health. Menopause Manifesto should be a handbook for every women going through a major stage in their lives (and their partners). It explains the changes in the body, the reasons behind it as well as how to approach various solutions & treatments available. While doing so, it provides science based explanations along with lots of food for thought on how menopausal women are treated in our patriarchal cultures. She provides comparative examples to show the absurdity of some claims & suggestions. For example many women will develop fibroids by the time they reach to menopausal age, and in some cases they are suggested to get a hysterectomy (removal of uterus)- which is fine and potentially a good approach for some. However they are also mostly advised to get oophorectomy along, for the sake of 'preventing future ovarian cancers'. She points out the absurdity of this, by comparing a similar situation in men. No men has been ever offered to get their testicles removed while -say during inguinal hernia operation as a preventative measure for testicular cancer. She gives a great tip related to this biased approach in society: If you are in doubt replace women w/ men in these advices and see how that sounds. If it sounds ridiculous, re-evaluate the advice given to women. Most likely the advice is due to the fact women are seen as 'incubators' in a patriarchal society and the advice revolves around their usefulness. Dr. Gunter explains the changes happening in the body through menopause journey, goes into the details of preventative strategies for muscle loss, bone loss or other symptoms, details potential interventions from surgical options to hormonal ones with their pros and cons, and explains how 'one size does not fit all' because it is such a personal decision for each woman. She also dissects some claimed 'remedies' that are not supported by science and data in detail, and cautions the reader against them. As a person who is trained to be a medical doctor, many of the physiological/clinical aspects of this book was known to me to an extent. But I still learned so many new things and found this book extremely useful and fun to read. It even helped me to answer some questions I had on my own health and well being, the questions I was unable to find a solid answers from other resources, including my own doctor. As a result, I am much more informed and feel empowered to make certain decision on how to approach some health issues I am having, or what kinds of support I would need as I step deeper into the realm of menopause. Vagina Bible was a major gift list item for many of my female friends, and now Menopause Manifesto is also added to the list of amazing gifts I will consider giving to my close age friends. The last paragraph tells it all: "When told by a patriarchal society the story of menopause is one about deserted youth, frailty, and diminished worth. The story I want you to remember is about value, agency, and voice and the knowledge to keep yourself in the best of health while demanding an equal seat at the table. That’s my manifesto." A solid five star book.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Shelleyrae at Book'd Out

    “I demand that the era of silence and shame about menopause yield to facts and feminism. I proclaim that we must stop viewing menopause as a disease, because that means being a woman is a disease and I reject that shoddily constructed hypothesis. I also declare that what the patriarchy thinks of menopause is irrelevant. Men do not get to define the value of women at any age.” After 38 years of regular but long, heavy and painful periods (minus 4 successful pregnancies and three miscarriages), I’v “I demand that the era of silence and shame about menopause yield to facts and feminism. I proclaim that we must stop viewing menopause as a disease, because that means being a woman is a disease and I reject that shoddily constructed hypothesis. I also declare that what the patriarchy thinks of menopause is irrelevant. Men do not get to define the value of women at any age.” After 38 years of regular but long, heavy and painful periods (minus 4 successful pregnancies and three miscarriages), I’ve actually been looking forward to menopause in some ways. At 48, I have now been experiencing the symptoms of peri menopause for about 18 months, and while I expected some of the more well known effects such as hot flushes, insomnia and irregular bleeding, I now realise, thanks to Jen Gunter and The Menopause Manifesto, that the inexplicable joint pain I have been suffering may also be related. For the uninformed, menopause occurs when there are no more follicles in the ovaries capable of ovulating, meaning there are no more eggs, and menstruation ceases. The average age when this happens is 50-52 years. However the transition to menopause (often referred to as peri menopause) can start several years earlier, and the length, and the severity of symptoms, may vary significantly from woman to woman. There are dozens of common symptoms and conditions associated with menopause from an increased risk of heart disease to a decrease in libido, but they don’t just occur in a vacuum - they may be influenced by general health, age and lifestyle factors. Gunter provides detailed but mostly accessible medical facts about the biological process of menopause, its medical ramifications, and a comprehensive guide to treatment options. Useful chapter summaries in point form are provided if you are inclined to skim the denser scientific material. Personal anecdotes and blunt observations from the author ensures the material is rarely dry. The Menopause Manifesto not only delivers the science but also explores how menopause is perceived (primarily in America and similar cultures). Gunter includes discussion about patriarchal medicine’s tendency to dismiss or minimise the experience of menopause, the culture of shame attached to the transition, and the lack of education surrounding the process. The feminist slant of the book is unapologetic as Gunter encourages women to empower themselves with knowledge so as to better advocate for their own health. The Menopause Manifesto is a comprehensive, practical resource for all in possession of female reproductive organs. I wish I had read something like this five years ago and strongly recommend that women aged from in their early forties consider educating themselves about menopause well in advance.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Alicia

    Honestly - must read for anyone who is likely to experience menopause, and probably for all those who are out the other side. So much I didn't know, so many things I thought I knew from news reports but never saw the updates or corrections showing them not to be true. All presented in a pretty approachable way. Honestly - must read for anyone who is likely to experience menopause, and probably for all those who are out the other side. So much I didn't know, so many things I thought I knew from news reports but never saw the updates or corrections showing them not to be true. All presented in a pretty approachable way.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Tammy Bellflower

    I recommend this read for all the ladies.

  18. 4 out of 5

    KrisAnne

    Absolutely essential reading for anyone who is going to experience menopause. I find it pretty essential to be getting my information from someone who accounts for patriarchy, systemic racism, social determinants of health, and other factors when discussing how people experience menopause. If you didn't know, Dr Jen spends a lot of time debunking bullshit medical claims on the internet, so you should already be following her. Highly recommended. Absolutely essential reading for anyone who is going to experience menopause. I find it pretty essential to be getting my information from someone who accounts for patriarchy, systemic racism, social determinants of health, and other factors when discussing how people experience menopause. If you didn't know, Dr Jen spends a lot of time debunking bullshit medical claims on the internet, so you should already be following her. Highly recommended.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Alana Ronningen

    Interesting history and summary of how menopause affects the body, how long things typically last and how patriarchy has made it more difficult to get answers and help. This doctor prefers HRT to herbs and supplements though and that's where I generally disagree with her. Interesting history and summary of how menopause affects the body, how long things typically last and how patriarchy has made it more difficult to get answers and help. This doctor prefers HRT to herbs and supplements though and that's where I generally disagree with her.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Meghan Doidge

    I'm going to need to read this at least twice more, it’s packed with info! And you all need to read this early! Don't wait until you are in the deep and (possibly) overwhelmed. I'm going to need to read this at least twice more, it’s packed with info! And you all need to read this early! Don't wait until you are in the deep and (possibly) overwhelmed.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sophie

    An excellent reference guide for women over 40. Well explained and easy to read. I’ll definitely buy the paper copy once published. Thank you for this ARC.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    "I demand that the era of silence and shame about menopause yield to facts and feminism. I proclaim that we must stop viewing menopause as a disease, because that means being a woman is a disease and I reject that shoddily constructed hypothesis. I also declare that what the patriarchy thinks of menopause is irrelevant. Men do not get to define the value of women at any age." Ok, I just turned 40 in February and these titles totally call to me as I know I may have some years yet but as it says I "I demand that the era of silence and shame about menopause yield to facts and feminism. I proclaim that we must stop viewing menopause as a disease, because that means being a woman is a disease and I reject that shoddily constructed hypothesis. I also declare that what the patriarchy thinks of menopause is irrelevant. Men do not get to define the value of women at any age." Ok, I just turned 40 in February and these titles totally call to me as I know I may have some years yet but as it says I want to be prepared and I am all about preventative care. Btw got a mammogram last Saturday and no cancer detected! Yay first 40 yo adult level attained without harm!   This book goes into amazing detail depending on experiences and symptoms to look out for and here's a few items that jumped out to me: ⏺There is so much shame in menopause isn't there!? Such a patriarchal idea, that women are worth nothing now that they can no longer have babies. I want a menopause party! I want to start a trend! Let's all have fun and say we survived our years of horrible periods! ⏺This author mentioned that "Hunger is an emotion" I can totally see that. ⏺Cardiovascular symptoms may be what are usual for men but those aren't what women feel. So women are dying from heart attacks by misogyny. ⏺Oooo I totally agree with the "ad feminem" attack on women when they are on their period, during and after pregnancy, on menopause that they can't think or function properly. Ugh ⏺I got to the desire section! Thank goodness that coconut oil is ok to use lol. ⏺ Odor - STFU I have never bought into the douche game. It's def a guy thing ugh patriarchy is in everything. Where is the testical freshening aisle? Totally recommend this book for those going through menopause and as a proactive manual to help get past all the BS and how to advocate for your body when it starts changing. Thank you ne tgalley and kensingtonbooks for the e-ARC for my honest and voluntary review.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Christy Maguire

    Hard pass on this book for its limited scope. If you want a doctor during this transition who is supportive and openminded Dr. Gunter is not for you. Too many reasons to detail why I did not like this book. I recommend "The Wisdom of Menopause" by Dr. Northrup instead, which says a lot of the same things, but in a much more nurturing way. A primary difference is that Gunter says women too often blame our symptoms on menopause (or fluctuating hormones) because we are conditioned to do exactly wha Hard pass on this book for its limited scope. If you want a doctor during this transition who is supportive and openminded Dr. Gunter is not for you. Too many reasons to detail why I did not like this book. I recommend "The Wisdom of Menopause" by Dr. Northrup instead, which says a lot of the same things, but in a much more nurturing way. A primary difference is that Gunter says women too often blame our symptoms on menopause (or fluctuating hormones) because we are conditioned to do exactly what the patriarchy wants us to do. Northrup agrees that we need to debunk the myth of raging hormones, but she accounts for symptoms as a wider problem of women in distress and her brain chemistry. TWoM is much more comprehensive in scope. Of course, Dr. Gunter would pooh-pooh this recommendation because Dr. Northrup endorses alternative healing. Gunter makes sweeping generalizations about women who are interested in supplements, saying they do not support vaccines, or rigorous testing. Worse, she fails to address the very reason that women flock to alternative and complementary medicine >> because the medical establishment continually lets them down. Perimenopause is not an acute condition, which is where Western medicine excels. It was not the book for me, and I wouldn't recommend it.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Angelina

    Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for this eARC in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own. Menopause Manifesto is a book that should be in every woman's bookshelf. Dr. Gunter presents the information in a way that feels like one your best girlfriends is talking with you and sharing super valuable tips; her experience as an OB/GYN only adds to the book. As a woman who is peri-menopausal, I learned a lot about my body and found the book to be reassuring as well as informativ Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for this eARC in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own. Menopause Manifesto is a book that should be in every woman's bookshelf. Dr. Gunter presents the information in a way that feels like one your best girlfriends is talking with you and sharing super valuable tips; her experience as an OB/GYN only adds to the book. As a woman who is peri-menopausal, I learned a lot about my body and found the book to be reassuring as well as informative about other strategies I might explore with diet, MHT, etc. I think this book would be helpful for women approaching perimenopause, those in menopause, and even for their partners/loved ones to better understand what the woman-of-a-certain age in their life is going through. Highly recommend!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Meigan

    OB/GYN extraordinaire Dr. Jen Gunter takes what we already know (and didn’t know) about menopause and expands on it, separating facts from fiction, and breaks it down into a way that’s both easy to consume and fun for readers to digest. Dr. Jen also cuts through the deep misogyny surrounding menopause and specifically addresses challenges that peri- and post-menopausal women will face, making it super easy for women to take the information presented and use it to empower themselves. Ask question OB/GYN extraordinaire Dr. Jen Gunter takes what we already know (and didn’t know) about menopause and expands on it, separating facts from fiction, and breaks it down into a way that’s both easy to consume and fun for readers to digest. Dr. Jen also cuts through the deep misogyny surrounding menopause and specifically addresses challenges that peri- and post-menopausal women will face, making it super easy for women to take the information presented and use it to empower themselves. Ask questions. Don’t be afraid to talk to your doctor. Your symptoms are real and aren’t a mere affliction of the female brain. This book is humorous, it’s interesting and informative, and certainly worth a read for anyone curious about reproductive health what to expect with menopause. *Many thanks to She Speaks, Kensington Books, and Dr. Jen Gunter for the gifted book!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Grace

    3.5 rounded down I loved The Vagina Bible: The Vulva and the Vagina—Separating the Myth from the Medicinea and was really excited to dig into Gunter's next book, but I have to say I fund this one somewhat less compelling. Part of that could entirely be on me and the fact that I'm still a good 15-20 years away from any of this being truly relevant, though I knew that going in and thought/still think it's good to have an idea of things to come! But this seemed a bit more ~academic~ than her last bo 3.5 rounded down I loved The Vagina Bible: The Vulva and the Vagina—Separating the Myth from the Medicinea and was really excited to dig into Gunter's next book, but I have to say I fund this one somewhat less compelling. Part of that could entirely be on me and the fact that I'm still a good 15-20 years away from any of this being truly relevant, though I knew that going in and thought/still think it's good to have an idea of things to come! But this seemed a bit more ~academic~ than her last book and not quite as easy to consume/digest. The chapters seemed longer, and overall it just didn't feel quite as engaging. Lot of great information to be sure, but I do think if you're not withing a couple of years of menopause, you might not get a ton out of this one.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Dana Goldstein

    Advance reader copy supplied by NetGalley in exchange for review. The Menopause Manifesto is a comprehensive look at the stage of life every woman goes through. The book has enormous value for someone who has not yet gone through menopause or is in the early stages peri-menopause and trying to sort out what is happening. If you have read Dr. Gunter's The Vagina Bible, then you are already familiar with the author's feminist point of view. While I commend Dr. Gunter for being a voice and advocate f Advance reader copy supplied by NetGalley in exchange for review. The Menopause Manifesto is a comprehensive look at the stage of life every woman goes through. The book has enormous value for someone who has not yet gone through menopause or is in the early stages peri-menopause and trying to sort out what is happening. If you have read Dr. Gunter's The Vagina Bible, then you are already familiar with the author's feminist point of view. While I commend Dr. Gunter for being a voice and advocate for women, her constant repetition of the influence of patriarchy and the role of misogyny- not only in medicine, but in society as well - was distracting. I agree that medicine has not been kind and considerate to women and there are still gaping holes in the research and treatment of women's health, and it's important that Dr. Gunter point this out. Perhaps just a little bit less frequently. The book is well-divided, making it easy to keep this on the shelf as a reference book. Part one discusses the history and physiology of menopause and gives readers a deep look into the reproductive system. Part two digs into the symptoms, what to expect and treatment options. It is in Part two that Dr. Gunter assures women that what you are experiencing is common, but not normal (that's the kind of feminism I can get behind). She encourages women to seek answers, even if that means finding a new provider. Part three takes on therapy, hormones, diets and supplements. It's a balanced and in=depth look at treatment options with a great deal of medical terminology and a breakdown of the side effects from medications. Part four focusses on encouraging women to take charge of their own well-being and not silently suffer because we have heard the message that it's just menopause and we should accept it. Overall, the book is highly technical and medical and I drifted off from time to time, completely lost and overwhelmed with the jargon. I would have liked to read more anecdotes about Dr. Gunter's own experience or from some of the women she has treated.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Shawna

    This manifesto is a must-read for all women. Dr. Gunter's straightforward and warm appeal makes you feel like you are sitting with a girlfriend drinking wine and discussing the big M. I don't know why more women don't talk about these changes. It is normal and it is going to happen whether we all like it or not. We might as well become educated when it comes to our bodies. This book is filled to the brim with information. I plan to buy a copy for myself to use as a reference guide. Thank you to This manifesto is a must-read for all women. Dr. Gunter's straightforward and warm appeal makes you feel like you are sitting with a girlfriend drinking wine and discussing the big M. I don't know why more women don't talk about these changes. It is normal and it is going to happen whether we all like it or not. We might as well become educated when it comes to our bodies. This book is filled to the brim with information. I plan to buy a copy for myself to use as a reference guide. Thank you to NetGalley and Citadel Press for an advance copy in exchange for an honest review.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Stefanie Lubkowski

    This is exactly the kind of book I wish I had for all my women's health concerns: straight-forward, filled with explanations of physiology and research results, honest risk-assessments, and de-bunking of pseudo science and medicine, plus refutation of patriarchal narratives about women's aging. I went from feeling a lot of trepidation about the start of my menopause transition and sad feelings about it ultimately being a time of diminishment in my physical capacities and social relevance, to ach This is exactly the kind of book I wish I had for all my women's health concerns: straight-forward, filled with explanations of physiology and research results, honest risk-assessments, and de-bunking of pseudo science and medicine, plus refutation of patriarchal narratives about women's aging. I went from feeling a lot of trepidation about the start of my menopause transition and sad feelings about it ultimately being a time of diminishment in my physical capacities and social relevance, to achieving a positive perspective of menopause as a valuable shift in my body's priorities that will allow me to age better.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    Just EXACTLY what I needed. An empowering, clear, science-based, easy-to-read-and-understand, honest set of FACTS and options to get me started, things to consider, and my list for my next doctor appointment is all set! I love how empowering it is to have a clear set of reasons-for and reasons-against something like MHT that I can discuss with my doctor and feel like I am making an intelligent and informed decision. Gunter also has a delightful snarky sense of humor that I also loved, just to to Just EXACTLY what I needed. An empowering, clear, science-based, easy-to-read-and-understand, honest set of FACTS and options to get me started, things to consider, and my list for my next doctor appointment is all set! I love how empowering it is to have a clear set of reasons-for and reasons-against something like MHT that I can discuss with my doctor and feel like I am making an intelligent and informed decision. Gunter also has a delightful snarky sense of humor that I also loved, just to top it all off. All of this was good, but the chapters on supplements and "natural" hormone products was extra helpful as I had had some pressure about them in the past. It's nice to know the facts. Hallelujah!

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