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In his brilliantly illuminating new book Sathnam Sanghera demonstrates how so much of what we consider to be modern Britain is actually rooted in our imperial past. In prose that is, at once, both clear-eyed and full of acerbic wit, Sanghera shows how our past is everywhere: from how we live to how we think, from the foundation of the NHS to the nature of our racism, from In his brilliantly illuminating new book Sathnam Sanghera demonstrates how so much of what we consider to be modern Britain is actually rooted in our imperial past. In prose that is, at once, both clear-eyed and full of acerbic wit, Sanghera shows how our past is everywhere: from how we live to how we think, from the foundation of the NHS to the nature of our racism, from our distrust of intellectuals in public life to the exceptionalism that imbued the campaign for Brexit and the government's early response to the Covid crisis. And yet empire is a subject, weirdly hidden from view. The British Empire ran for centuries and covered vast swathes of the world. It is, as Sanghera reveals, fundamental to understanding Britain. However, even among those who celebrate the empire there seems to be a desire not to look at it too closely - not to include the subject in our school history books, not to emphasize it too much in our favourite museums. At a time of great division, when we are arguing about what it means to be British, Sanghera's book urges us to address this bewildering contradiction. For, it is only by stepping back and seeing where we really come from, that we can begin to understand who we are, and what unites us.


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In his brilliantly illuminating new book Sathnam Sanghera demonstrates how so much of what we consider to be modern Britain is actually rooted in our imperial past. In prose that is, at once, both clear-eyed and full of acerbic wit, Sanghera shows how our past is everywhere: from how we live to how we think, from the foundation of the NHS to the nature of our racism, from In his brilliantly illuminating new book Sathnam Sanghera demonstrates how so much of what we consider to be modern Britain is actually rooted in our imperial past. In prose that is, at once, both clear-eyed and full of acerbic wit, Sanghera shows how our past is everywhere: from how we live to how we think, from the foundation of the NHS to the nature of our racism, from our distrust of intellectuals in public life to the exceptionalism that imbued the campaign for Brexit and the government's early response to the Covid crisis. And yet empire is a subject, weirdly hidden from view. The British Empire ran for centuries and covered vast swathes of the world. It is, as Sanghera reveals, fundamental to understanding Britain. However, even among those who celebrate the empire there seems to be a desire not to look at it too closely - not to include the subject in our school history books, not to emphasize it too much in our favourite museums. At a time of great division, when we are arguing about what it means to be British, Sanghera's book urges us to address this bewildering contradiction. For, it is only by stepping back and seeing where we really come from, that we can begin to understand who we are, and what unites us.

30 review for Empireland: How Imperialism Has Shaped Modern Britain

  1. 4 out of 5

    Andy Midwinter

    I've had this pre-ordered on Audible for weeks, and I have to say it lived up to my high expectation. Empireland is a detailed and fascinating account of the British Empire and how modern Britain is ingrained in the imperial past. A past that is more important than ever as we are now arguably more divided as a nation than ever before. This is an important read that while being a history lesson, is also accessible, and doesn’t get lost on you like some non-fiction books can. Highly recommended. I've had this pre-ordered on Audible for weeks, and I have to say it lived up to my high expectation. Empireland is a detailed and fascinating account of the British Empire and how modern Britain is ingrained in the imperial past. A past that is more important than ever as we are now arguably more divided as a nation than ever before. This is an important read that while being a history lesson, is also accessible, and doesn’t get lost on you like some non-fiction books can. Highly recommended.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Lee Harris

    9/10

  3. 5 out of 5

    Andy Horton

    A new and engaging book, by a journalist rather than historian. Sathnam Sanghera and explores how the exploitative and racist history of empire in Britain informs contemporary society, and especially how the myth or story people assume now does not reflect the reality, and how better education and understanding of the past would be a good thing. As a fellow Wulfrunian, I did smile that in his comments inn the local football stadium being named after a family which profited from slavery he still A new and engaging book, by a journalist rather than historian. Sathnam Sanghera and explores how the exploitative and racist history of empire in Britain informs contemporary society, and especially how the myth or story people assume now does not reflect the reality, and how better education and understanding of the past would be a good thing. As a fellow Wulfrunian, I did smile that in his comments inn the local football stadium being named after a family which profited from slavery he still name-checked “the mighty Wolverhampton Wanderers”. More seriously, it was interesting seeing his realisation that as a Sikh, many of his cultural assumptions had been set by the British imperial worldview. I’m many way, this was a summary of the book’s theme - the toxic legacy of the past is absorbed unnoticed in our present world view unless we explore and challenge it.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Will Bowers

    Despite the very dark subject matter and the occasionally gruesome details, Empireland faces the topic with a tremendous amount of nuance. As pointed out on many pages, discussing the British Empire critically is so often seen as unpatriotic. However the vigorous research that discusses primary and secondary sources is hard to deny. That doesn't mean many won't give it a try. The optimism displayed by Sanghera in the final chapter about broadening curricula is a tremendously uplifting and energis Despite the very dark subject matter and the occasionally gruesome details, Empireland faces the topic with a tremendous amount of nuance. As pointed out on many pages, discussing the British Empire critically is so often seen as unpatriotic. However the vigorous research that discusses primary and secondary sources is hard to deny. That doesn't mean many won't give it a try. The optimism displayed by Sanghera in the final chapter about broadening curricula is a tremendously uplifting and energising note. I personally think it's a little naïve and improvements won't come as fast as he thinks, but I am so desperately wishing that I'm proven wrong.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Arjun

    Empireland is a book that aims to understand how imperialism and empire shaped modern Britain, from the contents of our museum to the desire for politicians to describe everything as world-beating, from our multiculturalism to our education system and society's erasure of slavery, massacres, and more. It does not aim to answer every question, nor does it aim to arrive at a conclusion or balance up whether Empire was good/bad/indifferent. What it does do is tackle a broad range of topics, present Empireland is a book that aims to understand how imperialism and empire shaped modern Britain, from the contents of our museum to the desire for politicians to describe everything as world-beating, from our multiculturalism to our education system and society's erasure of slavery, massacres, and more. It does not aim to answer every question, nor does it aim to arrive at a conclusion or balance up whether Empire was good/bad/indifferent. What it does do is tackle a broad range of topics, presenting both sides of the arguments, grounded in what seems like a lot of research and reading. For anyone who isn't well-read in this subject, Empireland seems like the perfect place to start and offers many places to go from there - all it takes is a look at the extensive bibliography. What Sathnam has written is a book that everyone should read. I personally learnt more on imperialism from reading Empireland, than I did in my schooling; this is likely to be the same for the majority of Britons, who - as Sathnam points out - are more likely to have been taught about the Tudors, the Great Fire, the Plague, etc.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Viola

    https://www.theguardian.com/books/202... Empireland by Sathnam Sanghera – review by Fara Dabhoiwal Friday 29 Jan 2021 In the endless catalogue of British imperial atrocities, the unprovoked invasion of Tibet in 1903 was a minor but fairly typical episode. Tibetans, explained the expedition’s cultural expert, were savages, “more like hideous gnomes than human beings”. Thousands of them were massacred defending their homeland, “knocked over like skittles” by the invaders’ state-of-the-art machine g https://www.theguardian.com/books/202... Empireland by Sathnam Sanghera – review by Fara Dabhoiwal Friday 29 Jan 2021 In the endless catalogue of British imperial atrocities, the unprovoked invasion of Tibet in 1903 was a minor but fairly typical episode. Tibetans, explained the expedition’s cultural expert, were savages, “more like hideous gnomes than human beings”. Thousands of them were massacred defending their homeland, “knocked over like skittles” by the invaders’ state-of-the-art machine guns. “I got so sick of the slaughter that I ceased fire,” wrote a British lieutenant, “though the General’s order was to make as big a bag as possible.” As big a bag as possible – killing inferior people was a kind of blood sport. And then the looting started. More than 400 mule-loads of precious manuscripts, jewels, religious treasures and artworks were plundered from Tibetan monasteries to enrich the British Museum and the Bodleian Library. Countless others were stolen by marauding troops. Sitting at home watching the BBC antiques show Flog It one quiet afternoon in the early 21st century, Sathnam Sanghera saw the delighted descendant of one of those soldiers make another killing – £140,000 for selling off the artefacts his grandfather had “come across” in the Himalayas. It’s a characteristically instructive vignette in Empireland, Sanghera’s impassioned and deeply personal journey through Britain’s imperial past and present. The empire, he argues, still shapes British society – its delusions of exceptionalism, its immense private and public wealth, the fabric of its cities, the dominance of the City of London, even the entitled and drunken behaviour of British expats and holidaymakersabroad. Yet the British choose not to see this: wilful amnesia about the darker sides of imperialism may be its most pernicious legacy. Among other things, it allows the British to deny their modern, multicultural identity. Moving effortlessly back and forth between history and journalism, Sanghera connects the racial violence and discrimination of his childhood in 1970s and 80s Wolverhampton with the attitudes and methods previously used to impose empire and white supremacy across the world – and still perpetuated in British fantasies of global leadership. Along the way, he tackles the racist myopia that allows present-day Britons to fantasise that “black and brown people are aliens who arrived without permission, and with no link to Britain, to abuse British hospitality”. On the contrary, imperial citizens have been enriching British life for centuries. The pioneering author and entrepreneur, Sake Dean Mahomed (1759-1851), invented the curry house. William Cuffay, the child of a freed West Indian slave and a white woman, helped lead London’s Chartist movement for greater democracy – then, after being transported, became a political organiser in Australia. Millions of others fought for Britain – in the second world war alone, 200,000 Indian soldiers were killed, wounded, or captured while serving in allied campaigns. More than 10% of the UK’s current population (including a staggering 44% of the NHS’s medical staff) is non-white. All this is because for centuries white Britons colonised nations all over the world – proclaiming their intimate, familial allegiance while invading, occupying, plundering, humiliating and killing their peoples on a massive scale – to benefit British wealth and self-esteem. We are here because you were there. Without getting bogged down in definitions, calculations or complicated comparisons, Empireland also manages to convey something of the sheer variety of imperial experiences over four centuries, and the limits of broad-brush explanations. Most of Britain’s wealth probably came from non-imperial trade. Imperial control was made possible by the collaboration of indigenous rulers and groups. Other nations have similarly problematic histories. And there’s a long history of Britons themselves criticising, not celebrating, the “full, gut-wrenching horror” of imperial violence and racism. Empireland conveys the variety of imperial experiences over four centuries – and the limits of broad-brush explanations But to make too much of such qualifications would be to miss the essential point. Both deliberately and unconsciously, the empire was “one of the biggest white supremacist enterprises in the history of humanity”, and it still corrupts British society in countless ways. Sanghera’s unflinching attempt to understand this process, and to counter the cognitive dissonance and denial of Britain’s modern imperial amnesia, makes for a moving and stimulating book that deserves to be widely read. • Empireland: How Imperialism Has Shaped Modern Britain by Satnam Sanghera is published by Viking.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ed Greening

    I was keen to hear more on the experiences of empire from an alternative perspective. I was already braced for a jarring experience from the blurb, but hoped to be mistaken, but I was not. The terms England and Britain, and English and British, are used interchangeably throughout. That the author elects to disparage the Scottish Independence movement with a throwaway remark about "nationalists" makes this all the more glaring. The style is somewhat inappropriate throughout, with details of massacr I was keen to hear more on the experiences of empire from an alternative perspective. I was already braced for a jarring experience from the blurb, but hoped to be mistaken, but I was not. The terms England and Britain, and English and British, are used interchangeably throughout. That the author elects to disparage the Scottish Independence movement with a throwaway remark about "nationalists" makes this all the more glaring. The style is somewhat inappropriate throughout, with details of massacres and atrocities interwoven with the writer's fondness for pithy and observant one liners about instagram and modern life. Perhaps though this discordance works as a metaphor for many modern feelings about the empire. This is not a work entirely without merit, with many interesting tales of real but forgotten agents acting throughout the empire. It is also eminently readable if one looks past the aforementioned lightness. I would even say I agree with many of the author's proposals that would allow for a more realistic public assessment of empire. Unfortunately I was left open jawed at the writer's tone-deaf assessment of Wales, my country, and her place in the empire. I do not dispute that Wales glosses over its imperial past, and there is a certain romance for the colonial adventure of Y Wladfa which is distasteful. However to put this assessment in a paragraph following on from criticism of the government decision to destroy documents relating to the depopulation of Diego Garcia is frankly offensive. Wales itself not only colonised but was colonised, and treated as a colonial possession - just five years before the Diego Garcia incident, Capel Celig, a rare example of a Welsh language village, was flooded to make a reservoir to serve the needs of Liverpool. The Welsh people protested, Welsh politicians voted against the proposal, yet it still went ahead. The book also ignores how the Welsh language was systematically pushed to near extinction through measures such as the Welsh Not, all while celebrating "our language" of English. Cofiwch Dryweryn.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Becki Hills

    Absolutely essential ready for EVERYONE. Sathnam Sanghera is incredible. Having only really started learning about the true impact of empire during the BLM protests last summer, it wasn’t until reading this book that I realised how little I really knew. Not only was it unbelievably eye-opening but it was also so engagingly written that it didn’t feel intimidating, like so many historical books. Cannot recommend it highly enough.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Tutankhamun18

    //4.5// This book is great. It feels like the author is a friend who is widely read on the subject of colonialism and empire and is now recounting his findings. I apprechiated how well referenced the conversational tone ones and have added many more books to my tbr. His bibliography provides a great reading list and this wonderful book guides the reader through the material. He touches on how present day Britain has been impacted by its empire in positive (nhs, multiculturalism ect. )and negative //4.5// This book is great. It feels like the author is a friend who is widely read on the subject of colonialism and empire and is now recounting his findings. I apprechiated how well referenced the conversational tone ones and have added many more books to my tbr. His bibliography provides a great reading list and this wonderful book guides the reader through the material. He touches on how present day Britain has been impacted by its empire in positive (nhs, multiculturalism ect. )and negative ways (beliefs about superiority, lack of repriations ect) and revisits narratives we have been told about the empire. I thought the beginning was a little weak and had I been in charge of the editing of this book, I would have put the first chapter at the end; after he has exposed all the parts of history that he does. Gives more ammunition to the ideas put forward to Achebe and in the Interest - that the past always contained ant racists or decent humans who were against many ateocities. He touches on dismantling statues, the british museum, the drain of wealth from the (east asian)colonies resulting in them now being developing countries, how improvements in literacy where made in the colonies but also how there was a greater rise in inequality. He raises interesting points that I had not considered before such as the colonial undertones of the Brexit debate, how Germany has faced its past containing Nazis built memorials, paid repriations and teaches it in school- while Britain barely makes multiculturalism part of the national curriculum - let alone colonialism, Asian entrepreneurship is celebrated but often comes about because of the racism of the job market. “Britain, is surely to acknowledge that brown people are here because Britain, at best, had close relationships with its colonies for centuries, which included millions of the colonized putting their lives on the line for Britain during two world wars, or because Britain, at worst, violently repressed and exploited its colomies for centuries.” “Of course we like to remember the abolition of the slave trade and the defeat of the Nazis, and sonetimes even the success of muliculturalism and our history of anti-racism and the social justice campaigns it inspired, but we also dominated the spave trade for a significant period, ran one of the biggest white supremacist enterprises in the history of humanity and dabbled in genocide, and the stains of it has seeped into many aspexts of our contemporary culture, from the jobs market to the sinister reemergence of violent white supremacy.”

  10. 4 out of 5

    Rohan Fernando

    As a Sri Lankan immigrant to the UK, I read this book with great interest. As a Times reader I usually enjoy Mr Sanghera's column in the paper. The book is well-written and gives valuable insights into how Britain has been shaped by the empire. As an immigrant, Mr Sanghera is able to observe certain characteristics of the British which they might not realise for themselves. However, there are serious problems with how he assesses the way the Empire affected the colonies. Mr Sanghera contends tha As a Sri Lankan immigrant to the UK, I read this book with great interest. As a Times reader I usually enjoy Mr Sanghera's column in the paper. The book is well-written and gives valuable insights into how Britain has been shaped by the empire. As an immigrant, Mr Sanghera is able to observe certain characteristics of the British which they might not realise for themselves. However, there are serious problems with how he assesses the way the Empire affected the colonies. Mr Sanghera contends that since the British did some reprehensible acts, the good must be ignored. This is illogical. He gives detailed accounts of the massacres, famines and racism but does not mention Britain's role in improving governance, public services and infrastructure. In Sri Lanka, all our schools, hospitals law courts and parliament are based on the British model. There is also a problem with his references. There are an enormous number of them, over 600 but they are almost all by the Western, liberal, elites who are invariably antagonistic towards the Empire and vilify it at every opportunity. There seems to be only one by an Indian who lived during the colonial era. This is astonishing given the large number of books written by Indians during the British period or in the decades immediately thereafter. These are people who experienced the Empire at first hand. The only Asians he quotes our ones born long after independence. Why have the voices of the Indians who in the best position to judge the Empire been put on mute? I also wonder how much Mr Sanghera knows about life in India. He admits that his family spoke little about their lives in India, except his grandfather who respected the British. It is regrettable that Mr Sanghera did not explore why he held these views. When he went back to India he wasn't able to fully communicate with his family as he does not speak the language. Has Mr Sanghera ever visited an Indian school, hospital, law court, museum or parliament? These are the true legacies of the British Empire. Mr Sanghera spent some time in India researching the Amritsar massacre and it seems that he looks on the Empire through the prism of this event. The book is worth reading but there are shortcomings. A critique of it based on references by Indians who lived during the Empire in given in: http://www.forgotten-raj.org/doc/Empi...

  11. 5 out of 5

    Michael Cook

    A missed opportunity I really wanted to enjoy this as it's in my epistemological purview and theres a real insightful book in here. I dont think this book would change the minds of any entrenched imperialists who yearn for days of empire but its probably important that a non-white British voice reflects on those days. When it's good, it is excellent. I feel like I learnt loads (as somebody who learnt nothing about our empire during my education)...but it cant make its mind up whether it's an analy A missed opportunity I really wanted to enjoy this as it's in my epistemological purview and theres a real insightful book in here. I dont think this book would change the minds of any entrenched imperialists who yearn for days of empire but its probably important that a non-white British voice reflects on those days. When it's good, it is excellent. I feel like I learnt loads (as somebody who learnt nothing about our empire during my education)...but it cant make its mind up whether it's an analysis of the untold story of the empire or the authors journey discovering these. It suffers from this and starts to drag in places with certain points laboured and others were sprinted passed. Chapter 11 part way through seemingly either tries to settle scores with, or score points with the no marks (on both sides) who live their lives on Twitter- which will no doubt date the book and felt trivial and off putting compared to the abuses and genocide discussed pages earlier.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Eugene Gallagher

    Described correctly in the review below, Sathnam Sanghera questions both his own ignorance of Britain’s imperial history, as well as why Britain has such trouble looking his own history in the eye. It is quite up-to-date : even the risible Laurence Fox manages to get a mention. There is an element of a clipping job about it, but Sanghera has no pretensions to be an historian himself, pointing you to more substantial figures as he goes. Nonetheless he is good on , for example, the strange mix of Described correctly in the review below, Sathnam Sanghera questions both his own ignorance of Britain’s imperial history, as well as why Britain has such trouble looking his own history in the eye. It is quite up-to-date : even the risible Laurence Fox manages to get a mention. There is an element of a clipping job about it, but Sanghera has no pretensions to be an historian himself, pointing you to more substantial figures as he goes. Nonetheless he is good on , for example, the strange mix of nostalgia and amnesia in depictions of India on TV, the slight of hand that goes on in how Britain’s domination of international slavery is discussed and how anyone putting a spotlight to the darker side of Empire will invite denunciations of being”woke or “anti-British”, despite there having being critics of imperialism even at the time. It is never less than readable.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Simon Linacre

    I started this book at the end, looking at the dozens of pages of notes and hundreds of references that formed the basis of this remarkable book. But on top of the huge amount of research, Sathnam Sanghera obviously put a huge amount of himself into this book, laying his soul bare and open to the distressingly predictable racist pile-on he has had to endure since publication. I hope he thinks it was worth it, as I do, as the book not only explodes myths of empire, but engages the reader on a ver I started this book at the end, looking at the dozens of pages of notes and hundreds of references that formed the basis of this remarkable book. But on top of the huge amount of research, Sathnam Sanghera obviously put a huge amount of himself into this book, laying his soul bare and open to the distressingly predictable racist pile-on he has had to endure since publication. I hope he thinks it was worth it, as I do, as the book not only explodes myths of empire, but engages the reader on a very human level which helps bring the history that do often played out thousands of miles away into our everyday lives. It’s superb.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Gurpreet Kaur

    Where do I start with this book, I have never dog eared so many pages with the intention to make notes (something I try to avoid but this book earned it, trust me). First of all, the History graduate in me really appreciated the extensive variety of sources used throughout the book, making this an incredibly informed read. There were many sections in the book that made me physically cringe and gasp but Chapter 9 The Origins of our Racism' made me feel a rage like no other. It's not the most plea Where do I start with this book, I have never dog eared so many pages with the intention to make notes (something I try to avoid but this book earned it, trust me). First of all, the History graduate in me really appreciated the extensive variety of sources used throughout the book, making this an incredibly informed read. There were many sections in the book that made me physically cringe and gasp but Chapter 9 The Origins of our Racism' made me feel a rage like no other. It's not the most pleasant of reads but that is what makes it so brilliant and refreshing in the sea of selective amnesia that the majority of Britain displays. This is essential reading for someone looking to enlighten themselves on a subject that is completely missed by the national curriculum. It discusses at length the lasting impact that Empire has had on Britain, including sentiments lowards BAME.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Paul Hughes

    Loved this. Sanghera draws ob his own experience as a British Sikh to come to grips with the Empire. Less personal memoir than Natives, it clearly threads together a whole host of well researched, revealing and sometimes shocking facts about Imperialism. The links to 21st century identity are interesting and sometimes tenious. The problem with a lot of books about the Empire is the same reason that Sanghera believes it is rarely taught. It is just too big to comphrend.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ruth Lemon

    This was an excellent and concise overview of how the Empire can still be seen/felt in British society today. It points to key historical events (and ideas) and shows how modern Britain has been influenced, particularly looking towards the Empire’s presence in India. Despite the subject matter in places, the book is an enjoyable read. Very well written and excellently researched. I’ve ordered several books from the bibliography!

  17. 4 out of 5

    MR David J Millett

    Out of the fog of Empire An important topic. Statham Sanghera writes as someone who has been on a personal journey to make sense of Empire and its legacy. It is an opportunity for us to make a similar journey and emerge from the fog created by the collective amnesia and false narratives that surround this topic.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Danny Johnson

    "... when the British empire was at its territorial peak in the early 1920s, it covered 13.71 million square miles, which represents 24 per cent of the earth's land area or equivalent to 94 per cent of the moon's surface area or almost exactly twice as large as the surface area of Pluto" "... when the British empire was at its territorial peak in the early 1920s, it covered 13.71 million square miles, which represents 24 per cent of the earth's land area or equivalent to 94 per cent of the moon's surface area or almost exactly twice as large as the surface area of Pluto"

  19. 5 out of 5

    Nisha Patel

    A really interesting and thought provoking book about the British Empire. Not just about the cruelty, which we don't ever hear about but also how it is taught in schools (or not) and governs the way we think. A really interesting and thought provoking book about the British Empire. Not just about the cruelty, which we don't ever hear about but also how it is taught in schools (or not) and governs the way we think.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jas

    Fantastic read - the history book I wish I had at school instead of the skewed version we were taught about Britain's imperial past. Sathnam writes in a balanced and fair manner, without watering down the facts. Fantastic read - the history book I wish I had at school instead of the skewed version we were taught about Britain's imperial past. Sathnam writes in a balanced and fair manner, without watering down the facts.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Stefka Dragoeva

    Somber account of British colonial past, which still shapes and will carry on shaping life in Britain..

  22. 4 out of 5

    Aubrey Tait

    Shocked at how little I knew about the British Empire, this should be on every schools curriculum.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Simon Freeman

    Factualy interesting but a tedious read

  24. 4 out of 5

    Tom Richards

    Nuanced, considered, brilliantly researched. Sanghera’s ‘Empireland’ is a fascinating look at how the echoes of Empire have influenced modern Britain. Worth a read for anyone looking to learn more about the legacies of Empire - the good, the bad and the ugly.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Craig Matthews

  26. 4 out of 5

    Patrick Craston

  27. 5 out of 5

    Emma Cronin

  28. 4 out of 5

    Fatima

  29. 5 out of 5

    Helena

  30. 4 out of 5

    avoidworldlyaffairs

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