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From the New York Times bestselling author of Tears We Cannot Stop, a passionate call to America to finally reckon with race and start the journey to redemption. The night of May 25, 2020 changed America. George Floyd, a 43-year-old Black man, was killed during an arrest in Minneapolis when a white cop suffocated him. The video of that night’s events went viral, sparking t From the New York Times bestselling author of Tears We Cannot Stop, a passionate call to America to finally reckon with race and start the journey to redemption. The night of May 25, 2020 changed America. George Floyd, a 43-year-old Black man, was killed during an arrest in Minneapolis when a white cop suffocated him. The video of that night’s events went viral, sparking the largest protests in the nation’s history and the sort of social unrest we have not seen since the sixties. While Floyd’s death was certainly the catalyst, (heightened by the fact that it occurred during a pandemic whose victims were disproportionately of color) it was in truth the fuse that lit an ever-filling powder keg. Long Time Coming grapples with the cultural and social forces that have shaped our nation in the brutal crucible of race. In five beautifully argued chapters—each addressed to a black martyr from Breonna Taylor to Rev. Clementa Pinckney—Dyson traces the genealogy of anti-blackness from the slave ship to the street corner where Floyd lost his life—and where America gained its will to confront the ugly truth of systemic racism. Ending with a poignant plea for hope, Dyson’s exciting new book points the way to social redemption. Long Time Coming is a necessary guide to help America finally reckon with race.


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From the New York Times bestselling author of Tears We Cannot Stop, a passionate call to America to finally reckon with race and start the journey to redemption. The night of May 25, 2020 changed America. George Floyd, a 43-year-old Black man, was killed during an arrest in Minneapolis when a white cop suffocated him. The video of that night’s events went viral, sparking t From the New York Times bestselling author of Tears We Cannot Stop, a passionate call to America to finally reckon with race and start the journey to redemption. The night of May 25, 2020 changed America. George Floyd, a 43-year-old Black man, was killed during an arrest in Minneapolis when a white cop suffocated him. The video of that night’s events went viral, sparking the largest protests in the nation’s history and the sort of social unrest we have not seen since the sixties. While Floyd’s death was certainly the catalyst, (heightened by the fact that it occurred during a pandemic whose victims were disproportionately of color) it was in truth the fuse that lit an ever-filling powder keg. Long Time Coming grapples with the cultural and social forces that have shaped our nation in the brutal crucible of race. In five beautifully argued chapters—each addressed to a black martyr from Breonna Taylor to Rev. Clementa Pinckney—Dyson traces the genealogy of anti-blackness from the slave ship to the street corner where Floyd lost his life—and where America gained its will to confront the ugly truth of systemic racism. Ending with a poignant plea for hope, Dyson’s exciting new book points the way to social redemption. Long Time Coming is a necessary guide to help America finally reckon with race.

30 review for Long Time Coming: Reckoning with Race in America

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jenna

    (Memorial to Breonna Taylor, a 26 year old medical worker killed during a botched raid. Police barged into her and her boyfriend's apartment as they slept. The unarmed and recently awakened Breonna was shot six times, killing her. To date, none of the officers have been charged in Breonna's death. However, one officer was indicted for endangering her white neighbor (!). Mural painted by an unknown artist.) One day last May, I picked up the phone to call an elderly patron from our library. Because (Memorial to Breonna Taylor, a 26 year old medical worker killed during a botched raid. Police barged into her and her boyfriend's apartment as they slept. The unarmed and recently awakened Breonna was shot six times, killing her. To date, none of the officers have been charged in Breonna's death. However, one officer was indicted for endangering her white neighbor (!). Mural painted by an unknown artist.) One day last May, I picked up the phone to call an elderly patron from our library. Because she lives alone, I periodically called to check on her during the early days of the pandemic when many places, including the library, were closed. That day, almost immediately after our "How are you? Fine, and you?" she blurted, "Can you believe how that policeman killed that Black man??"  She was horrified, as was I, as were many people who saw the video of George Floyd's murder by a police officer (well, I couldn't watch it, but I read about it). "How could he do that?", Thelma (not her real name) rhetorically asked? "He told him he couldn't breathe! How could he do something like that!?".  I expressed similar sorrow and outrage, and then told her that George Floyd's murder was not an isolated incident. Hundreds of people are killed each year by those who are sworn to uphold the law and protect citizens - poor whites, Brown people, and especially Black people, most of them unarmed and posing no threat to anyone.  Thelma was appalled. She was aghast. She wanted to know when this had started and why hadn't she heard about it before now? Why did it take a bystander with a cell phone, filming the incident, for it to make it onto the news if this happens regularly? Why hadn't she known about this all along? I told her some things I've learned over the last few years about racism in America and Thelma kept asking, Why? Why are they (Black people) treated so badly?". She paused, thinking. Then she said, "I worked with a Black woman for years, one of the nicest people I've ever known. I wonder if she had people be racist to her?"  I guaranteed Thelma that her co-worker had experienced racism her entire life. Sadly, every Black and Brown person in this country (and others - racism is not isolated to the US) live under structural racism. It's not just individual people who are overtly racist, yelling out slurs or threatening their lives. Every part of America was built upon white supremacy, and white supremacy continues to hold down people of colour. And not just hold them down, but kill them, with both a figurative and a literal knee on the neck. Whether it be from inadequate and inferior health care, by angry white people who feel it's their duty to murder Blacks, by inner city poverty and violence that is a result of white supremacy, or by trigger-happy cops, trained to see Black skin as a threat, who shoot first and ask questions later, Black lives are threatened on a daily basis.  For too long, it's been easy for white America to turn a blind eye to the suffering of our fellow citizens. We benefit from the unearned privilege heaped upon us by our white skin. When we are the beneficiaries, it's easy to maintain the status quo. To not ask too many questions. To not look at what is happening to others. To pretend it isn't happening. Thankfully most people now have cell phone cameras and we have social media to share these atrocities with the world. White America can no longer say, But I didn't know! Only a fraction of the murders and other violence against Black people are recorded and shared, but it is enough that we can no longer insist these things don't happen and that we live in a post-racial America.  With the same eloquent fire with which he wrote Tears We Cannot Stop, Michael Eric Dyson delivers an impassioned plea to white America.  America has never been not-racist. It has never treated all people equally. We are long past due for a reckoning with race in America, as the subtitle of Mr. Dyson's Long Time Coming states. Each chapter is addressed to a different victim of racism, beginning with Elijah McClain, a 23 year old Black man who did things like play the violin to soothe stray cats. He was anemic and, walking home from a store one evening, waved his arms to warm himself. Someone called the cops on him for "suspicious behavior"... apparently waving your arms while Black is suspicious.  As was done to George Floyd, Elijah quickly found himself on the ground with an officer's knee on his neck. Elijah was just 5'6" tall and weighed 140 pounds. He kept crying out that he didn't have a gun, he did not pose a threat to anyone, he couldn't even kill flies. And yet police officers saw him as a threat, a threat that had to be subdued.  After the chokehold rendered him unconscious, they called paramedics who administered a lethal dose of ketamine. A sedative on an unconscious, unarmed man who had done nothing wrong.  Elijah's Blackness was a death sentence. Mr. Dyson begs us to see the humanity in these victims. He brings them to life and then walks us through their deaths. It is difficult to read at times.  As he tells their stories, he also writes about the history of race and racism in America. He begs us to put ourselves in the shoes of Black people. To both see their humanity and the injustice done to them. To open our eyes and finally start listening to the voices of people of color when they tell us why they are so afraid. When they tell us how they are oppressed. When they tell us what it's like to live under the mantle of white supremacy. What it's like to fear for your life every time you leave your home. He begs us to consider what it's like to know "that no matter how much education or money we have, how nice a car we drive, how well behaved we are, how disarming and articulate we prove ourselves to be, at any moment we might feel a baton crushing our skull, a Taser sending a jolting message to our nervous system, a bullet penetrating our flesh. All because, and for no other reason than, we are Black." Mr. Dyson also writes about topics like white comfort, the dangers of cancel culture, and why many people of color are unable to believe white people will finally do better and do the work to dismantle white supremacy. Long Time Coming is a must-read for anyone wanting to learn more about racism, its history, and its present day manifestations. It is also a must-read for those who are doing anti-racism work - It is imperative that we learn from books like these, not just to see where the system harms people of colour, but how we as individuals uphold that system. A genuine reckoning with race in America is long past due. 

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jessica | JustReadingJess

    Long Time Coming: Reckoning with Race in America by Michael Eric Dyson is an interesting and informative book about race. Long Time Coming is a fact based portrayal of race problems in the United States. Real life examples are described from recent events as well as events over the last few years. Long Time Coming started with discussing George Floyd’s death and then went on to discuss other black deaths. I’ve read multiple books about race over the last few months and I really enjoyed how Long T Long Time Coming: Reckoning with Race in America by Michael Eric Dyson is an interesting and informative book about race. Long Time Coming is a fact based portrayal of race problems in the United States. Real life examples are described from recent events as well as events over the last few years. Long Time Coming started with discussing George Floyd’s death and then went on to discuss other black deaths. I’ve read multiple books about race over the last few months and I really enjoyed how Long Time Coming discussed so many real life examples. The examples were all covered on the news, but this book discussed the main points of what happened and what the problems were. I listened to the audiobook narrated by Michael Eric Dyson and thought the narration added to the book. I really enjoy when authors narrate their own books especially nonfiction. Dyson narrating his book really shows the reader his emotion. I recommend Long Time Coming to anyone looking to learn more about the race problems in America. Thank you Libro.fm, St. Martin’s Press and Macmillan Audio for Long Time Coming. Full Review Coming Soon: https://justreadingjess.wordpress.com/

  3. 4 out of 5

    sarah

    "As George Floyd's death suggests, the knees of the nation have been on the necks of Black America for centuries." Long Time Coming offers a timely look at racism in the US, told in epistolary format with each chapter addressed to black victims and martyrs. “to be Black in America is often to feel under siege, to feel, in the marrow of our bones, genuine terror.” This book is a good opening for those looking to begin their journey of educating themselves on modern day racism. It provided clearly p "As George Floyd's death suggests, the knees of the nation have been on the necks of Black America for centuries." Long Time Coming offers a timely look at racism in the US, told in epistolary format with each chapter addressed to black victims and martyrs. “to be Black in America is often to feel under siege, to feel, in the marrow of our bones, genuine terror.” This book is a good opening for those looking to begin their journey of educating themselves on modern day racism. It provided clearly presented information in an accessible way, with many of the key base concepts of anti-racism. However, the book lacks a little depth and originality for me. For people who have already been made aware of the institutionalised and deep rooted racism in America, I feel that much of the information will be nothing new. I would have liked to dig a little deeper into some of the topics, because I know this author is definitely capable. Some of the chapters showed this potential, such as the one on cameras, which framed the issue through a different lens, and made it feel more engaging and innovative. The chapter on George Floyd was absolutely chilling, providing a more personal look at racism and changing up the format. "the camera's framing of black bodies through its lens suggested how so many black bodies were framed by whiteness in a culture that disdained the very image of blackness." I listened to the audiobook, read the by the author himself, which I think is a good way to go should you have it available to you. Michael Eric Dyson is a preacher, which comes through in the story. Therefore, hearing it audibly feels as if you are hearing speech and invigorates you with the urge to do something. However, this is also the source of one of my other complaints. It felt at times a little... preachy. It could possibly be my lack of spirituality, but I felt some sections or lines to feel as if I were in a church being preached at, which is something I just personally didn't love. "denied first their bodies, their being; then they are denied control over the social consequences of their nonbeing; finally, they are denied the very changes that only their deaths make possible." Overall, I think this book is a useful and informative look into racism in America for beginners. However, there weren't many new ideas presented, and some didn't go as much into depth as I was hoping for. It was definitely engaging and accessible, however I didn't love the preachiness of certain sections. “to be Black in America is often to feel under siege, to feel, in the marrow of our bones, genuine terror.” Thank you to Macmillan Audio and Libro.fm for this ALC Release Date: 1 December 2020

  4. 4 out of 5

    Mari

    A worthwhile entry into everyone's anti-racist reading list. There were ideas here that shouldn't be new to anyone who has been engaging with ideas of institutional racism in America, but Dyson also presents things in fresh ways. I particularly appreciated the format, letters to Elijah McLain, Breonna Taylor, Sandra Bland, Ahmaud Arbery, Hadiya Pendleton, and Clementa Pinckney, that ultimately address some aspect of racism, dating back to slavery and through Jim Crow and up to this year's Black A worthwhile entry into everyone's anti-racist reading list. There were ideas here that shouldn't be new to anyone who has been engaging with ideas of institutional racism in America, but Dyson also presents things in fresh ways. I particularly appreciated the format, letters to Elijah McLain, Breonna Taylor, Sandra Bland, Ahmaud Arbery, Hadiya Pendleton, and Clementa Pinckney, that ultimately address some aspect of racism, dating back to slavery and through Jim Crow and up to this year's Black Lives Matter protests. I appreciated seeing through lines from early slave rebellions to modern protests. I also really loved the ideas Dyson brings about the way Black progress slams against the white desire to maintain the status quo. There were a few things here that I didn't totally agree with, or that felt a little under explored. One was the chapter on cancel culture. I understand his underlying idea of how structures survive the canceling of single people, but I don't think he gets at something vital here: the use of "cancelling" as protection for members of a community. Additionally, there is a lot of hope here. While it's nice to encounter, it also feels a bit too hopeful, but that's probably particular to my own sensibilities.

  5. 5 out of 5

    David Wineberg

    There are only so many ways to slice and dice racism. There is the pathetic legal trail, the shameful political trail, tragic straight history, personal memoirs and the legacy of civil rights efforts, to name the top few. Michael Eric Dyson has taken pages from each of them and sewn them into “letters” to Blacks who have been murdered, mostly by whites, in Long Time Coming. Each chapter is addressed to a different victim: Elijah McLain, Breonna Taylor, Sandra Bland, Ahmaud Arbery, Hadiya Pendleto There are only so many ways to slice and dice racism. There is the pathetic legal trail, the shameful political trail, tragic straight history, personal memoirs and the legacy of civil rights efforts, to name the top few. Michael Eric Dyson has taken pages from each of them and sewn them into “letters” to Blacks who have been murdered, mostly by whites, in Long Time Coming. Each chapter is addressed to a different victim: Elijah McLain, Breonna Taylor, Sandra Bland, Ahmaud Arbery, Hadiya Pendleton, and Clementa Pinckney. In the letter (Dear Elijah, etc.), Dyson recaps the way they died to them, and launches into a discourse on some aspect of racism from slavery and Jim Crow lynchings to Black Lives Matter. It’s a different approach, but the content is largely the same. There is no new ground broken here, but the usual sick feeling over 400 years of abuse, physical, mental and sexual, is ever-present. Early on, in what might be the only really memorable development, Dyson explains the “law of white racist physics”: “A Black body and a white body cannot exist in the same space and same time without white permission.” “Black bodies that violate the rules of play automatically revert back to the conventions of slavery and the protocol of the plantation.” I had not seen that anywhere before. The hero of the story, if it can be called that, is the cell phone. Dyson does not examine it very closely, but the cellphone has produced real time, definitive, unimpeachable, blow by blow documentation of the murders of ordinary Blacks, out in public. The videos show what are more like executions than arrests. They prove conclusively what Blacks have complained about since Reconstruction: police brutality on top of racial discrimination. Cell phone videos have mobilized whites as nothing ever has before. They have certainly provided much of the story Dyson presents in his book. I found three complaints buried in the letters. Dyson bemoans the fact that Blacks are not a unified group. They have the same range of opinions and attitudes as anyone else, and do not speak with one voice. It is, of course, unreasonable to think it would ever be otherwise. He also confronts the pickiness whereby whites’ awakening to the continuing discrimination of Blacks might have the effect of reducing the work to cure it, as in the attitude of once it’s out in the open, it is therefore being dealt with. It is not, any more than #metoo has stopped sexual assaults or Congressional hearings have made Facebook a safe place, or listing Trump’s lies has stopped them. Lastly, he does not approve of cancel culture, whereby social media simply avoids mention if not denying the existence of those who offend. What with all the various opinions and attitudes, Dyson most reasonably calls for dealing with structural issues instead of canceling. The final chapter/letter is addressed to the Reverend Clementa Pinckney, who was gunned down in his church by Dylan Roof, who hoped to somehow start a race war by doing so. In it, Dyson tells of his own preaching and love of God. He can’t understand how white churches condone all the hate of other races and cultures. But he is full of hope. He sees the possibility of civility and equality, and he clings to it enthusiastically. It is a relief after a litany of crimes against humanity. David Wineberg

  6. 5 out of 5

    Andy

    Thank you to Libro.FM for an ALC in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own. Definitely will be rereading this in the future. What a way to start off my 2021 reading. This book is painful and challenging in the best way possible. Long Time Coming gives you the bare minimum in the details of the history of police brutality in the USA, but the details we do get, damn. Hearing the details of Floyd's murder was heartbreaking. I want this to never happen again in this country. I think Thank you to Libro.FM for an ALC in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own. Definitely will be rereading this in the future. What a way to start off my 2021 reading. This book is painful and challenging in the best way possible. Long Time Coming gives you the bare minimum in the details of the history of police brutality in the USA, but the details we do get, damn. Hearing the details of Floyd's murder was heartbreaking. I want this to never happen again in this country. I think this should be required reading in schools and especially for white people. There is no hiding from how corrupt the police force is when seeing the gruesome murders committed. Each chapter is addressed to a Black person who was killed by the police. Dyson takes us from the beginning of enslavement to modern day 2020. The mix of historical lessons and modern day examples is striking. The way we see how our history has led us to present day is needed and terrifying. The USA is the way it is now because it was built this way, acknowledging this is the only way to move forward and begin to dismantle the systems that are in place. Extra star for Dyson's phenomenal narrating. Highly recommend the audiobook!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Caleb

    The Not F-ing Around Coalition is the best part of this book. My heart was heavy after rehashing unarmed African-American murder victims. My gripe about this book is a lack of action plan for shifting power (e.g. bank black/financial empowerment or local policy reviews).

  8. 4 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    Dyson addresses Black martyrs Elijah McClain, Emmett Till, Eric Garner, Breonna Taylor, Hadiya Pendleton, Sandra Bland, and Rev. Clementa Pinckney in what is basically a series of essays about white supremacy, police brutality, and the Black Lives Matter movement. Among other things, he also touches on the backlash against the Hamilton musical and the 1619 project, the Gayle King interview that brought up sexual assaults after Kobe Bryant's death, cancel culture, and white comfort. As with his Te Dyson addresses Black martyrs Elijah McClain, Emmett Till, Eric Garner, Breonna Taylor, Hadiya Pendleton, Sandra Bland, and Rev. Clementa Pinckney in what is basically a series of essays about white supremacy, police brutality, and the Black Lives Matter movement. Among other things, he also touches on the backlash against the Hamilton musical and the 1619 project, the Gayle King interview that brought up sexual assaults after Kobe Bryant's death, cancel culture, and white comfort. As with his Tears We Cannot Stop: A Sermon to White America, the writing style feels odd at times on the page, as if intended for oral presentation, as if this were more a transcription of a speech or sermon. The audiobook version may be a better presentation of the material, and I'll probably try his next book in that format. Still, even on paper, Dyson's voice is compelling. I don't always agree with everything he says this time around -- such as a rationalization for looting during protests -- but I find his arguments powerful and persuasive, and I know I will dwell on them and use them to question my own positions and belief. And if I find myself in the wrong, I take comfort from his emphasis on fallibility, forgiveness and redemption.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sahitya

    If we’ve been following the news for a few years and know a bit of American history with regards to white supremacy and racism, this book might not offer anything new but sometimes, we do need a reminder. The sheer repetition that I felt while listening to the audiobook is proof of how much racism permeates the so-called law and order/justice system in this country. I couldn’t bookmark a lot of the hard hitting lines because I didn’t have an ebook with me, but there were many moments where the a If we’ve been following the news for a few years and know a bit of American history with regards to white supremacy and racism, this book might not offer anything new but sometimes, we do need a reminder. The sheer repetition that I felt while listening to the audiobook is proof of how much racism permeates the so-called law and order/justice system in this country. I couldn’t bookmark a lot of the hard hitting lines because I didn’t have an ebook with me, but there were many moments where the author’s words made me emotional. Definitely worth a listen.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Andre

    Michael Eric Dyson is one of our most prolific scholars presently. So it may stand to reason with dozens of published works and hundreds of articles, that it may take some measure of creativity to keep tackling these issues of race in America. Dyson is at his inventive best here when he writes each chapter in a form of a letter to some fallen martyrs. In each he writes of sorrow and failure and updates the fallen as to the current atmosphere and if anything has changed. In the prelude he writes Michael Eric Dyson is one of our most prolific scholars presently. So it may stand to reason with dozens of published works and hundreds of articles, that it may take some measure of creativity to keep tackling these issues of race in America. Dyson is at his inventive best here when he writes each chapter in a form of a letter to some fallen martyrs. In each he writes of sorrow and failure and updates the fallen as to the current atmosphere and if anything has changed. In the prelude he writes to Elijah McClain, the young man killed in Colorado, despite pleading with the Cops he was not who they saw in their imagination but a tender hearted introverted young man who avoided any kind of conflict. Dyson pens, “The history of race would yet again be condensed into an interaction between a young Black anybody from Black anywhere doing Black anything on any given Black night.” It is that kind of encapsulating prose that keeps this book moving at a quick clip and doing so in a way that few others can approximate. He addresses Emmett Till in chapter one and laments, “I wish I could say that your death changed things forever, But here we are, my brave young soldier of light, caught in the madness of hare once again. Long before your death, and so many times since then, we have pledged to reckon with the racial catastrophe at the heart of our democracy. And too many times we have reneged on that promise and failed to embrace our best racial future.” It is that failure, which brings a note of sadness to these pages, but we must grapple with the reality, because what is the alternative? As he writes these letters, he takes the liberty to expound and explore ancillary issues, such as “cancel culture” and calls out its deleterious effects. He takes on police brutality or the “Blue Plague” in his letter to Eric Garner and reminds him that some few years later; Floyd would die similarly while mouthing the same words, “I can’t breathe.” And Dyson chillingly recounts George Floyd’s last minutes on Earth. There is a letter to Hadiya Pendleton whose death “didn’t come at the hands of a cop or vigilante.” A necessary inclusion, if only to thwart the criticism that we don’t care when Black people kill each other. Utter nonsense! In the letter to Sandra Bland, he takes a minute to rif on the Black next and the White again that continues to plague us. He includes a quick dissection of the word rage with that Dyson brilliance and ingeniousness. What Dyson is conveying to would-be-allies, “to be Black in America is often to feel under siege, to feel, in the marrow of our bones, genuine terror.” If one can truly grasp that, then maybe a true reckoning with race can take place in America. This is another excellent work by Michael Eric Dyson, and one should take the time to read this book. A big thanks to St. Martin’s press for gifting me an ARC.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Shannaka

    If there is any time to read this book, IT IS NOW! This novel by Michael Eric Dyson provides a roadmap from racial reckoning to reconciliation. In letters written to 5 black martyrs, Dyson, a distinguished scholar of race and religion, brings to light black inequity, the struggle between the competing approaches of the "black next" versus the "white again", the expectation of reinforcing white comfort (both as a noun and a verb) and ending w/a plea for social justice & hope for the nation. Thank If there is any time to read this book, IT IS NOW! This novel by Michael Eric Dyson provides a roadmap from racial reckoning to reconciliation. In letters written to 5 black martyrs, Dyson, a distinguished scholar of race and religion, brings to light black inequity, the struggle between the competing approaches of the "black next" versus the "white again", the expectation of reinforcing white comfort (both as a noun and a verb) and ending w/a plea for social justice & hope for the nation. Thank you to Libro.fm for providing me with a copy of the audiobook! If you all didn't know, Libro.fm is the first audiobook company to directly support local bookstores. They make it possible for customers to buy audiobooks directly through our independent bookstore, giving us the power to keep money within our local economy, create local jobs, and make a difference in our community.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Pam

    Michael Eric Dyson has written seven “letters” to African Americans—all but one who were killed by white people and addresses the systemic racism, hatred, ignorance, entitlement and violence that caused these horrific murders. Dyson is passionate and eloquent as he describes the circumstances of each person’s death and connects these terrible acts with the sickness in American culture that is revealed in the newly energized, but not new white supremacy movement, by the twisted and perverse conne Michael Eric Dyson has written seven “letters” to African Americans—all but one who were killed by white people and addresses the systemic racism, hatred, ignorance, entitlement and violence that caused these horrific murders. Dyson is passionate and eloquent as he describes the circumstances of each person’s death and connects these terrible acts with the sickness in American culture that is revealed in the newly energized, but not new white supremacy movement, by the twisted and perverse connections between today’s police force and slave catchers, and by the tiresome and frustrating experience of “each gesture of Black advance being dogged by retaliation. Each Black “next” is opposed by a white “again.” I was a bit frustrated with this book. I didn’t always understand the connection between the person to whom Dyson was writing his letter and the racist indignities and brutality that Dyson chose to connect with that person’s life and death. For instance, a big part of the letter to Hadiya Pendleton centered on Dyson’s criticism of cancel culture.

  13. 4 out of 5

    David Dunlap

    A short, powerful book. The author assigns each chapter the name of a black person killed (mostly) by police and then addresses a letter to that person, writing about the implications of his/her death within the larger context of systemic racism in contemporary America. He also assigns each of the chapters a color: gold (prelude), black, blue, white, red, and green (postlude). The book is both engaging and thought provoking, as well as deeply moving in places. The chapters on the police (blue) , A short, powerful book. The author assigns each chapter the name of a black person killed (mostly) by police and then addresses a letter to that person, writing about the implications of his/her death within the larger context of systemic racism in contemporary America. He also assigns each of the chapters a color: gold (prelude), black, blue, white, red, and green (postlude). The book is both engaging and thought provoking, as well as deeply moving in places. The chapters on the police (blue) , with its detailed description of George Floyd's death (this passage moved me to tears), on white appropriation of black people (white), with its interesting juxtaposition of the words 'next' and 'again', and on white comfort (also white), with its helpful metaphor of racism as a tree, were especially meaningful to me. I also appreciate the author's ability with words. Highly recommended!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Shalea

    "Long Time Coming: Reckoning with Race in America" was heartbreaking, infuriating and an insightful reminder. Heartbreaking and infuriating because in 2020 Blacks are STILL dealing with our skin color being seen as a weapon and/or a threat. Black parents are tasked with teaching our young sons and daughters that we are still viewed as unequal in the eyes of society. Young White boys and girls are treated better. You DO NOT have the same rights and privileges as your white friends (it may seem li "Long Time Coming: Reckoning with Race in America" was heartbreaking, infuriating and an insightful reminder. Heartbreaking and infuriating because in 2020 Blacks are STILL dealing with our skin color being seen as a weapon and/or a threat. Black parents are tasked with teaching our young sons and daughters that we are still viewed as unequal in the eyes of society. Young White boys and girls are treated better. You DO NOT have the same rights and privileges as your white friends (it may seem like you do, don't make that mistake). Black parents are tasked with teaching our children that you must always be on alert for the dangers your skin color "delivers". You will be jailed or killed in the blink of an eye. For all of the above, this is infuriating. Why are we as Blacks expected to forgive and forget the ill/deadly treatment we receive at the hands of Whites? The history of Blacks in this country is not supposed to be discussed, let's sweep it under the rug because it is too uncomfortable to discuss.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Larry

    The five chapters are written as letters to black victims of violence: "Black Death" (Emmett Till); "Blue Plague" (George Floyd); "White Theft" (Eric Garner); "Seeing Red" (Hadiya Pendleton); and "White Comfort" (Sandra Bland). Except for "Seeing Red," the letters are searing indictments of white supremacy, privilege, and state-sanctioned violence. "Seeing Red" is mostly about "cancel culture" and I thought it did not fit with the rest of book or the tragic fate of Hadiya Pendleton. The other ch The five chapters are written as letters to black victims of violence: "Black Death" (Emmett Till); "Blue Plague" (George Floyd); "White Theft" (Eric Garner); "Seeing Red" (Hadiya Pendleton); and "White Comfort" (Sandra Bland). Except for "Seeing Red," the letters are searing indictments of white supremacy, privilege, and state-sanctioned violence. "Seeing Red" is mostly about "cancel culture" and I thought it did not fit with the rest of book or the tragic fate of Hadiya Pendleton. The other chapters are often emotionally wrenching. Although I am frequently disgusted and appalled by Trump's behavior, I think Dyson's book is weakened when he repeatedly denounces Trump as a "neo-fascist."

  16. 5 out of 5

    Allison Berkowitz

    There were glimmers of the book that beautifully do what the author said the whole book was about: racial reckoning and urging people, especially white people, to look inward and act. But much more than that there was a plethora of describing black deaths in depth. I think it’s important for all people to know this pain but so many of us have drowned in it this year.... personally I don’t feel any better off or more helpful or enlightened after reading about those deaths again. I did think it wa There were glimmers of the book that beautifully do what the author said the whole book was about: racial reckoning and urging people, especially white people, to look inward and act. But much more than that there was a plethora of describing black deaths in depth. I think it’s important for all people to know this pain but so many of us have drowned in it this year.... personally I don’t feel any better off or more helpful or enlightened after reading about those deaths again. I did think it was an interesting presentation to share the information in the form of writing to black people whose lives were taken without cause.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    This book is filled with over generalizations and hypocrisy that may sound morally “good” but certainly disregard fact. The tragic events mentioned in this book are inarguably horrible and inhumane. But it does not mean that they can be generalized to points that this author makes. Individual incidents cannot be simplified to national issues when it statistically does not make sense. Nor does it mean that the author can assume the thoughts of others wanting these things to happen. Additionally, This book is filled with over generalizations and hypocrisy that may sound morally “good” but certainly disregard fact. The tragic events mentioned in this book are inarguably horrible and inhumane. But it does not mean that they can be generalized to points that this author makes. Individual incidents cannot be simplified to national issues when it statistically does not make sense. Nor does it mean that the author can assume the thoughts of others wanting these things to happen. Additionally, the author calls out examples of people preaching about racism but then profiting off of book deals. Seems like Michael Eric Dyson could take a look in the mirror to see what he himself is doing. I challenge people to follow this book with Candace Owen’s “Blackout” and notice how they address very similar issues but how Owen’s are so clearly based in fact and reason.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Bob

    Another excellent, challenging sermon by Dyson on America today: the ongoing systemic crises of racism (and sexism, genderism, classism . . .), the failure of the country (and particularly white people) to confront these isms head-on, and his own sorrow and anger and hopefulness at where we have been and where we are. Addressing each chapter to a murdered Black man or woman, Dyson pulls no punches in calling out and naming the conscious and sub-conscious barriers and opponents to evolving equali Another excellent, challenging sermon by Dyson on America today: the ongoing systemic crises of racism (and sexism, genderism, classism . . .), the failure of the country (and particularly white people) to confront these isms head-on, and his own sorrow and anger and hopefulness at where we have been and where we are. Addressing each chapter to a murdered Black man or woman, Dyson pulls no punches in calling out and naming the conscious and sub-conscious barriers and opponents to evolving equality. Much to reflect upon, much work to be done.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Mary Sisney

    I had declared a six-month moratorium on reading anti-racism books since I read so many in 2020 (and quite a few in 2019), but I usually enjoy the eloquent, profound (except when he’s discussing Jay-Z and Beyoncé) writing of the man I call the 21st Century James Baldwin, so I decided to buy and read this brief book before tackling the much longer Obama memoir. While I enjoyed sections of the book, the rhetorical device of addressing black victims of white violence didn’t work, especially when Dy I had declared a six-month moratorium on reading anti-racism books since I read so many in 2020 (and quite a few in 2019), but I usually enjoy the eloquent, profound (except when he’s discussing Jay-Z and Beyoncé) writing of the man I call the 21st Century James Baldwin, so I decided to buy and read this brief book before tackling the much longer Obama memoir. While I enjoyed sections of the book, the rhetorical device of addressing black victims of white violence didn’t work, especially when Dyson decided to include a victim of black violence. For the device to work, he would need to change his style and content as he addressed very different people. Emmett Till was a fourteen-year-old boy killed in the fifties while Reverend Clemente Pinckney was a 41-year-old preacher/politician killed in 2015. Oddly, Reverend Dyson’s letter to Pinckney is the briefest. The whole book should have been addressed to him since there was no need for an eloquent, intelligent, mature preacher to change his style when addressing another man with the same qualities. My favorite sections of the book were the ones addressed to Emmett Till and Eric Garner, not only because I learned more about their cases (I didn’t know that Till stuttered and learned many new details about the Floyd murder) but also because I could understand why Dyson discussed Michael Brown with Till and George Floyd with Garner. Both Brown and Till were teenagers, and both had been accused of misbehaving in a store before they were murdered. Both Garner and Floyd were large men apprehended for misdemeanor crimes and killed by police officers who literally took their breath away on the street/sidewalk of a large city as they were seen and heard on cellphone video saying that they couldn’t breathe. My least favorite letter was the one to fifteen-year-old Hadiya Pendleton, who was killed by a black gang member after she attended Obama’s 2013 inauguration. Not only did she not fit the pattern of being killed by whites, but it’s not clear why Dyson would discuss cancel culture, METOO, and rape culture with a fifteen-year-old girl. The content of that section also bothered me because I’ve been writing on the topic since at least 2016. I understand that Dyson can’t say what I can say because he’s a man. In fact, he worries about being accused of “toxic masculinity” in his letter to Sandra Bland. I also know that he had some issues with Bill Cosby (as did I; I was on Dyson’s side when he was defending black folks against Bill’s “pull up your pants” rants), but anyone who can’t say that the fact that Doctor William Cosby, who donated millions of dollars to colleges, promoted education in both of his eighties shows, and was known as America’s Dad, is in jail while Donald Trump, who had a fraudulent university and was known for being a con artist, is in the White House, put there in 2016 by white women who voted for a confessed sexual assaulter instead of a sane white woman, shows that America is still a white supremacist country shouldn’t discuss race and sex. Before we saw the difference in the way white supremacist terrorists were treated and the way peaceful BlackLivesMatter protesters were treated, I was contrasting the treatment of METOO activists and BLM activists. The cancel culture discussion is also surprisingly incoherent. There’s a difference between many powerful white men like Charlie Rose, Matt Lauer, and Chris Matthews losing their jobs while black and Jewish men went to jail and black public intellectuals criticizing each other’s work. The R Kelly versus Bill Cosby situation is also very different. Dr. Cosby was convicted because his so-called victims (the giant white alien whose case was new enough to prosecute voluntarily took three pills from a man who was never a real doctor) were overwhelmingly white. Kelly’s victims were young black girls. The Reverend Doctor Dyson should have left the cancel culture/METOO/race/sex discussion to old black women like me. I battled Rose McGowan and her army and won (they started blocking me on Twitter). If a METOO white woman calls me a toxic racist, I’ll call her a spiteful, whiny white supremacist.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Trevor Seigler

    In May of last year, George Floyd was murdered by the Minneapolis Police Department in broad daylight, his lynching captured on camera for all the world to see. In the midst of a global pandemic and a racist Trump administration's unwillingness to address racial injustice, the world erupted in protests and anger. Making sense of the tumult has taken up a large part of our national conversation, and Michael Eric Dyson does his best to address these topics in his new book. "Long Time Coming," taki In May of last year, George Floyd was murdered by the Minneapolis Police Department in broad daylight, his lynching captured on camera for all the world to see. In the midst of a global pandemic and a racist Trump administration's unwillingness to address racial injustice, the world erupted in protests and anger. Making sense of the tumult has taken up a large part of our national conversation, and Michael Eric Dyson does his best to address these topics in his new book. "Long Time Coming," taking its name from a line in Sam Cooke's classic song "A Change Is Gonna Come," is written in the style of letters that Dyson addresses to martyrs of the movement from the past (Emmett Till) to the present (Floyd, Clementa Pinckney, Sandra Bland, etc.). In each chapter, Dyson breaks down the reasons for Black grief, white comfort, police brutality, and cancel culture. Not every argument he puts forth holds weight, but a lot of it goes a long way towards making sense of the madness that pervades our nation in the form of racism. Dyson, a learned critic of the American system, highlights the ways in which comfort for white folks is often at the expense of Black people (the Black "future" mangled by the white "again"), and how even well-meaning gestures (like cancel culture) might not be as forward-thinking as they seem. It's a fast-moving, well-written dissection of our most grievous wound, our most untreated malady, and our most brutal sin. And it doesn't offer any easy answers for us as readers, apart from hope that things can change. Not through just prayer or meditation, but through action. The murder of George Floyd caught America off guard, and facilitated important discussions that continue into this year about how we have treated Black and brown minorities in this country, and what we can do to change that treatment for the betterment of all. I hope those discussions aren't drowned out by the clutching-at-straws of a soon-to-be ex-president who got his favorite toy and platform taken away from him, but I don't know how much my fellow white people will put up with before they push back and argue that "things aren't that bad anymore." But with truth-tellers like Michael Eric Dyson manning the intellectual barricades, the truth has a way of marching on.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Donna Hines

    Triumphant! Profoundly Moving! Angelic! This book moved me to tears in a beautiful eye-opening way that I can't ever recall happening in any other work such as this creation by Michael Eric Dyson. The way this was worded as a tribute, a revolution, a call to action in standing united as one, is exactly what this nation needs. We cannot allow ignorance, racial profiling, racism, and white supremacists ruin this country. While many will look to the past to diagnosis the current state-you don't have to Triumphant! Profoundly Moving! Angelic! This book moved me to tears in a beautiful eye-opening way that I can't ever recall happening in any other work such as this creation by Michael Eric Dyson. The way this was worded as a tribute, a revolution, a call to action in standing united as one, is exactly what this nation needs. We cannot allow ignorance, racial profiling, racism, and white supremacists ruin this country. While many will look to the past to diagnosis the current state-you don't have to look far to recall slavery by white men and you need not wonder why so many social injustices continue with the current individual in office. This is literally a 'Long Time Coming' and I wonder how many more times we will use hashtags, we will paint street blocks, we will march, yet we will continue in agony, pain, and despair over these innocent individuals who are being profiled simply for the way they look -be killed! When is enough -ENOUGH?! I come from a family that is mixed. My two brothers both married beautiful women outside our race. I've welcomed my sister in laws with open arms. We are but one race and that's the human race! We bleed the same color! The way in which this was written in terms of speaking personally to each victim of abuse brought me to my knees! It should move all of you to stand up and speak out! We cannot continue down this dark, dreary, disturbing, deadly road! This is inhumane and CRIMINAL! Those who violate the law should be punished yet because they work in law enforcement their allowed no knock warrants, their allowed to kill for the sake of a $20 counterfeit bill or a pack of cigarettes? This nation has become more of a third world country and it's so sick! This is not my current president and I pray the next opportunity we have to vote them all out -we do! I'm a democrat for a reason. I don't want handouts but a hand up. I'm tired of seeing my brother and sister murdered in plain view and they receive nothing more than thoughts and prayers. Keep the prayers! Protect and serve! Not just serve! This is the best book of the year! Please take all the time you need and get yourself a copy as soon as able. You won't regret you did!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Laura Hoffman Brauman

    I was introduced to Dyson's work with Tears We Cannot Stop - one of the most powerful reads I picked up the year it came out. The structure of it - set up like a sermon - was incredibly effective for getting me to stop, reflect, and learn. In Long Time Coming, Dyson also uses structure to drive home the impact of his writing. The book is set up as 5 essays, constructed as letters, one each to Emmett Till, Eric Garner, Breonna Taylor, Hadiya Pendleton, and Sandra Bland. Exploring concepts of whit I was introduced to Dyson's work with Tears We Cannot Stop - one of the most powerful reads I picked up the year it came out. The structure of it - set up like a sermon - was incredibly effective for getting me to stop, reflect, and learn. In Long Time Coming, Dyson also uses structure to drive home the impact of his writing. The book is set up as 5 essays, constructed as letters, one each to Emmett Till, Eric Garner, Breonna Taylor, Hadiya Pendleton, and Sandra Bland. Exploring concepts of white supremacy and racism under the structure of a letter to lives that were tragically lost worked both from the perspective of exploring the topic as well as evoking emotion and connection. In the section where he talks about cancel culture, he was definitely pushing me to think outside of my comfort zone and I will need more time to reflect (and definitely reread) on this section. I can appreciate the importance of listening to voices, allowing for change, seeking to understand different perspectives - these are all things I value. At the same time, I also feel like you don't owe anyone space in your head or your time and attention if the views they espouse are harmful or derogatory. The final letter to Sandra Bland dealt substantially with the idea of white comfort and the need to be uncomfortable for change to happen. I flagged a lot of passages in this section, a great deal of it resonated for me. "Dear Sandra, if white folk are serious about the siege of ignorance coming to an end, the sort of ignorance that helped to end our life, then they've got to put themselves into uncomfortable circumstances; they must reject the comfort of ignoring the raw Black truth that Black folk must live with. Such learning doesn't happen overnight; it can't be done in a CliffsNotes version of Black identity. White brothers and sisters must deliberately expose themselves to experiences that force them to grow. They've got to swim in the pools of our thoughts and expressions, our resistance and rebellion, our tragedies and traumas, our arguments and disagreements, our joys and affections, our love and happiness"

  23. 4 out of 5

    Booksandcoffeepleasemx

    Thank you LibroFm, MacMillan Audio and Michael Eric Dyson for giving me this ALC in exchange for an honest review. The night of May 25, 2020 changed America. George Floyd, a 46-year-old Black man, was killed during an arrest in Minneapolis when a white cop suffocated him. The video of that night’s events went viral, sparking the largest protests in the nation’s history and the sort of social unrest we have not seen since the sixties. While Floyd’s death was certainly the catalyst, (heightened by Thank you LibroFm, MacMillan Audio and Michael Eric Dyson for giving me this ALC in exchange for an honest review. The night of May 25, 2020 changed America. George Floyd, a 46-year-old Black man, was killed during an arrest in Minneapolis when a white cop suffocated him. The video of that night’s events went viral, sparking the largest protests in the nation’s history and the sort of social unrest we have not seen since the sixties. While Floyd’s death was certainly the catalyst, (heightened by the fact that it occurred during a pandemic whose victims were disproportionately of color) it was in truth the fuse that lit an ever-filling powder keg. Long Time Coming grapples with the cultural and social forces that have shaped our nation in the brutal crucible of race. In five beautifully argued chapters―each addressed to a black martyr from Breonna Taylor to Rev. Clementa Pinckney―Dyson traces the genealogy of anti-blackness from the slave ship to the street corner where Floyd lost his life―and where America gained its will to confront the ugly truth of systemic racism. Ending with a poignant plea for hope, Dyson’s exciting new book points the way to social redemption. Long Time Coming is a necessary guide to help America finally reckon with race. This book was heart-wrenching, powerful, brutal, honest, powerful and moving. There are not enough words, we need to keep learning and listening, this a must read. http://www.instagram.com/booksandcoff...

  24. 5 out of 5

    C

    Well written in the form of letters to black people who were murdered recently followed by an explanation of the black history and injustices. It's very thought provoking. On the other hand, it seems to point a finger at white people who don't understand the black experience. He doesn't understand the white experience it seems. We did not choose to be born of white parents in a white neighborhood. All white people do not share the same degree of *white privilege*. There are those of us who are aw Well written in the form of letters to black people who were murdered recently followed by an explanation of the black history and injustices. It's very thought provoking. On the other hand, it seems to point a finger at white people who don't understand the black experience. He doesn't understand the white experience it seems. We did not choose to be born of white parents in a white neighborhood. All white people do not share the same degree of *white privilege*. There are those of us who are aware of the suffering endured by people of color and have tried to understand and tried to make a difference. This book left me feeling that *we whites* had done nothing. I and a friend read countless books on racism, trying to understand the whole picture. We volunteered at a prison for a combined total of over 30 years, not to tell the men what to do but to listen, really hear the stories and facilitate their own solutions to their own challenges. I personally was chaplain to HIV/AIDS patients, mostly of color, in a county hospital walking with them not preaching at them. It would be good if he did at least acknowledge that some *whites* do care deeply and are angry with each unjust killing of a black person. We are frustrated as well that our voices are not heard when we deeply support equity, justice, and changes to this extremely unfair system in this country.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jimalion Itsabookishworld_

    Thank you @librofm and @Stmartinpress for a gifted copy of this book. “The fatalities that result from them both are often unified by a single cry: I can’t breathe — whether from lungs turned to sponge because of the disease’s virulent spread, or Black bodies being suffocated in the merciless embrace of conscienceless cops." 2020 will forever be the year that will exist in the nightmares of millions of people. Whether it be the global pandemic or the brutal truth of systemic racism finally making Thank you @librofm and @Stmartinpress for a gifted copy of this book. “The fatalities that result from them both are often unified by a single cry: I can’t breathe — whether from lungs turned to sponge because of the disease’s virulent spread, or Black bodies being suffocated in the merciless embrace of conscienceless cops." 2020 will forever be the year that will exist in the nightmares of millions of people. Whether it be the global pandemic or the brutal truth of systemic racism finally making its way to the eyes of people who have turned their heads for far too long. We have lived in a world where the power so to speak has been believed to belong in the hands of Whites, that there is some type of superiority in skin that holds no pigmentation. We have lived in a world where those same people have given themselves the right to decide who is worthy of living and who is not. There has been the blood of Black and Brown men and women poured in the streets of the Land of The Free. Lives taken with no justice received. So many Black and Brown women, men and children afraid to step outside of their homes that have proven now to be unsafe for fear that they’re lives will be taken for just being who they are. In A Long Time Coming Dyson addresses how racism has shaped the way our society and culture exist. In each chapter Dyson address victims of racism and police brutality, and what brings this book to life is Dyson’s own voice. He is not only providing us his research, he is speaking with frustration, pain, and hope. A hope that I think we all can understand and even all want. While the subject matter alone is a tough to read because we are currently living in a time where history is repeating itself, but to listen to Dyson read off the names of lives taken, now that is a completely different type of pill to swallow. This book is necessary, and I will highly suggest it to anyone. I will leave you with this line that has stuck with me since finishing the book: "denied first their bodies, their being; then they are denied control over the social consequences of their nonbeing; finally, they are denied the very changes that only their deaths make possible."

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    An incredibly powerful book on the race and the pandemic and the race pandemic. MED expertly puts together letters to those lives lost to police brutality and racism all because white America continues to allow it. Along with history, current events, what has been done in the past to move forward, how/why it was stopped this is a plea to how we can and must continue to push forward even when it’s uncomfortable to get to the equality that is historically and currently not attainable for everyone An incredibly powerful book on the race and the pandemic and the race pandemic. MED expertly puts together letters to those lives lost to police brutality and racism all because white America continues to allow it. Along with history, current events, what has been done in the past to move forward, how/why it was stopped this is a plea to how we can and must continue to push forward even when it’s uncomfortable to get to the equality that is historically and currently not attainable for everyone in America. This was a heartbreaking listen speaking out to those lost to great violence. It’s an absolutely necessary read (I recommend audio) for everyone. Thank you to MED for writing this even when it’s exhausting to keep explaining and urging people to act now to save Black lives. Thank you to Libro.fm for my ALC to listen and share.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Brandon Woodard

    What can I say?? Dr. Dyson absolutely knocked its out of the park with this work. The usuals of the color in the chapter heading, to the letters to those slain by police, to addressing things in society like our president, cancel culture, white comforter, neighbor on neighbor carnage and so much more this book is an absolute must read. If you are new to the works of Dr. Dyson give this one a read. The ability of Dr Dyson to weave the sacred black preaching rhetoric with dense philosophical thoug What can I say?? Dr. Dyson absolutely knocked its out of the park with this work. The usuals of the color in the chapter heading, to the letters to those slain by police, to addressing things in society like our president, cancel culture, white comforter, neighbor on neighbor carnage and so much more this book is an absolute must read. If you are new to the works of Dr. Dyson give this one a read. The ability of Dr Dyson to weave the sacred black preaching rhetoric with dense philosophical thought, while weaving in the story of the black communities’ unmet reality of the American dream is breathtaking. The topics discussed and history shared is much needed. To my white brothers and sisters YOU NEED TO READ THIS BOOK. I would dare say this might be one of the best books I’ve read in a few years. I highly recommend it.

  28. 4 out of 5

    smalltownbookmom

    Powerfully moving. In some ways an adult version of Dear Martin. He starts off each of his chapters/sections addressing a Black person who died as a result of violence (ie George Floyd, Breonna Tayler, Sandra Bland, Hadiya Pendleton, etc) and expressing his sorrow for their tragic deaths. The book covers a lot of the major points about systemic racism in America today while also being hopeful and urging white people not to ignore their privilege or turn a blind eye to the experiences of BIPOC. I Powerfully moving. In some ways an adult version of Dear Martin. He starts off each of his chapters/sections addressing a Black person who died as a result of violence (ie George Floyd, Breonna Tayler, Sandra Bland, Hadiya Pendleton, etc) and expressing his sorrow for their tragic deaths. The book covers a lot of the major points about systemic racism in America today while also being hopeful and urging white people not to ignore their privilege or turn a blind eye to the experiences of BIPOC. It's a very accessible book, that fans of Uncomfortable conversations with a Black man will enjoy. I hope more people start to listen to books like these and don't sit idly by thinking it doesn't matter.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Graham

    content warning for anti-Black violence. LONG TIME COMING reminds readers to maintain persistent opposition to the police violence & societal structures that murdered Breonna Taylor, George Floyd, & countless other African Americans. written entirely in the year 2020, LONG TIME COMIMG recounts the deaths of Emmett Till, Ahmaud Arbery, George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, & more, adding historical analysis of policing Black bodies, sociopolitical commentary on American culture & society, & overall a cry content warning for anti-Black violence. LONG TIME COMING reminds readers to maintain persistent opposition to the police violence & societal structures that murdered Breonna Taylor, George Floyd, & countless other African Americans. written entirely in the year 2020, LONG TIME COMIMG recounts the deaths of Emmett Till, Ahmaud Arbery, George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, & more, adding historical analysis of policing Black bodies, sociopolitical commentary on American culture & society, & overall a cry for change. LONG TIME COMING doesn’t necessarily add any new details or insights, but the book beseeches readers to remember what we’ve learned abt racism + to maintain the antiracist momentum of early summer 2020.

  30. 4 out of 5

    AOz

    There is nothing brand new or groundbreaking in this book that we already don't know, or just don't want to discuss. However, Dyson stiches all the issues into one compelling need for racial reckoning. In five excellent chapters, each one is addressed to a black martyr from Breonna Taylor to Rev. Clementa Pinckney. I found this book to be very enlightening. Long Time Coming is a necessary guide to help America finally reckon with race issues and behavior. The author uses our history to show how There is nothing brand new or groundbreaking in this book that we already don't know, or just don't want to discuss. However, Dyson stiches all the issues into one compelling need for racial reckoning. In five excellent chapters, each one is addressed to a black martyr from Breonna Taylor to Rev. Clementa Pinckney. I found this book to be very enlightening. Long Time Coming is a necessary guide to help America finally reckon with race issues and behavior. The author uses our history to show how racism is a sickness that needs to be dealt with and understood. Its a hard book to read, because of the hard truths it deals with.

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