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Decorum #6

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There are many assassins in the known universe, this is the story of the most well-mannered one. “Good manners will open doors that the best assassin cannot.”


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There are many assassins in the known universe, this is the story of the most well-mannered one. “Good manners will open doors that the best assassin cannot.”

28 review for Decorum #6

  1. 4 out of 5

    James

    So the part with the weird alien folk that were dealing with the egg or whatever has finally tied into the other part of the story with Neha learning to be an assassin. This story is heating up as we approach the final two issues.

  2. 5 out of 5

    RG

    At times its way too trippy and others its just pure genius but I'm still enjoying it At times its way too trippy and others its just pure genius but I'm still enjoying it

  3. 4 out of 5

    Reuben

    Everything starts to come together. The apocalyptic robot cult asks the assassin’s group to help them get the egg, and promises them money in return. Neha takes the offer, because she wants the money to save her family. We also get some more insight on the dreams of Master Morley, which I thought they had dropped after issue 2. Basically, he sees a vision of some sort of apocalypse, presumably caused by the robots. And at the very end, we Luca coming after Neha for revenge.

  4. 4 out of 5

    PvOberstein

    Decorum continues to be, panel-for-panel, quite literally the most gorgeous comic I have ever read. There’s like a half-dozen different art styles and they are All. So. Beautiful. So what happened in this excellent issue of this under-loved series? The “Big Picture” plot, with all the fate-of-the-universe/cosmic war overtones, finally intersects with the story of courier-turned-assassin Neha Nori Sood. Chi Ro Chi Ro Chi - the… entity… executing the search for The Egg - hires the entirety of the Si Decorum continues to be, panel-for-panel, quite literally the most gorgeous comic I have ever read. There’s like a half-dozen different art styles and they are All. So. Beautiful. So what happened in this excellent issue of this under-loved series? The “Big Picture” plot, with all the fate-of-the-universe/cosmic war overtones, finally intersects with the story of courier-turned-assassin Neha Nori Sood. Chi Ro Chi Ro Chi - the… entity… executing the search for The Egg - hires the entirety of the Sisterhood of Man, offering them a solid-diamond planetoid in exchange for their services. The populace of the school is unleashed, dispersing assassins across the Milky Way. Critically, Neha and her teacher, Imogen Smith-Morley, part ways after at least three years of tutelage (no matter how low Neha is willing to go in splitting her share of the bounty). Imogen gets the best character development this issue, even if her motivations remain opaque. She is, if anything, borderline undiplomatic with the clients, seeming to find the whole affair distasteful. Later on, Neha finds Imogen packing a small armory’s worth of weaponry, remarking that “you seem like you’re taking this one personally”. We know from past issues that Imogen seems unusually sensitive to issues of orphans and children (plausibly being one herself), which may connect with Chi Ro Chi Ro Chi’s orders to kill whatever comes out of The Egg if it should hatch. Or, perhaps, she just does not want Neha to see whatever it is she’s about to do. While the two seem relatively close (Neha puking on Imogen’s shoes apparently becoming an inside joke), Imogen notes that in the three years they’ve worked together, Neha has seen her work exactly once. I forget if this was clarified earlier, but it’s confirmed that Chi Ro Chi Ro Chi is a robot (or at least, is recognized as something synthetic). Diamonds continue to have significant currency, which does a good job of bounding where we are on the nanotechnology development scale. There’s another extremely difficult to interpret scene at The House Morley. The scene comes immediately after Neha visits her family to keep up the payments on their stasis pods; the narrative flow suggests the events are happening near-simultaneously, though this does not strictly have to be the case, particularly in light of the black-and-white shading hinting that this is “the past” (in addition to other events suggesting these take place in Imogen’s past, see this post). Mr. Morley (again referring to Imogen not as “Smith-Morley” but simply “Morley”) relates another vision in which he saw Imogen hanging above an abyss, incapable of struggle, the chasms of the wall “a nightmare of human suffering and infernal machinery”. As Imogen puts it: “Well, that sounds ominous”.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Pop Bop

    Witty and Smart This is a gorgeous series. It's loaded with dry, flinty wit, and features deep and engaging characters. Often books like this - that look so good and have an edgy out-there vibe - are hard to follow and seem almost intentionally dense or opaque. This series, though, despite its otherworldly art, has a crisp, clear, and accessible narrative line that keeps the reader grounded and invested. One of my favorites, and this volume advances the story briskly and cleanly. (Please note that Witty and Smart This is a gorgeous series. It's loaded with dry, flinty wit, and features deep and engaging characters. Often books like this - that look so good and have an edgy out-there vibe - are hard to follow and seem almost intentionally dense or opaque. This series, though, despite its otherworldly art, has a crisp, clear, and accessible narrative line that keeps the reader grounded and invested. One of my favorites, and this volume advances the story briskly and cleanly. (Please note that I had a chance to read a free advance ecopy of this book without a review requirement, or any influence regarding review content should I choose to post a review. Apart from that I have no connection at all to either the author or the publisher of this book.)

  6. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    2.5

  7. 4 out of 5

    David Pain

    Very good. After a very scrappy start this is now an enjoyable read. I previously said the art was was too random and jarring but, fuck, I take that back. It really is astoundingly beautiful.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jordyn

  9. 5 out of 5

    Chris Bromley

  10. 5 out of 5

    sQVe

  11. 4 out of 5

    Tom

  12. 4 out of 5

    Allan

  13. 5 out of 5

    Tom

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Love

  15. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

  16. 4 out of 5

    Rob S.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Yael

  18. 4 out of 5

    Anny Barros

  19. 4 out of 5

    Lee J. Keller

  20. 5 out of 5

    StaySkeptic

  21. 5 out of 5

    Khabeer Rashad

  22. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Emmanuel

  23. 4 out of 5

    Amy Epperhart

  24. 4 out of 5

    Laestilografica

  25. 4 out of 5

    Crud Mucosa

  26. 4 out of 5

    Micah

  27. 5 out of 5

    Pär Thorstensson

  28. 5 out of 5

    Salviannie Mable

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