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Incredible Doom

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It’s the dawn of a new age…the age of the internet. Allison is drowning under the weight of her manipulative stage magician father. When he brings home the family’s first computer, she escapes into a thrilling new world where she meets Samir, a like-minded new online friend who has just agreed to run away from home with her. After moving to a new town and leaving all of his It’s the dawn of a new age…the age of the internet. Allison is drowning under the weight of her manipulative stage magician father. When he brings home the family’s first computer, she escapes into a thrilling new world where she meets Samir, a like-minded new online friend who has just agreed to run away from home with her. After moving to a new town and leaving all of his friends behind, Richard receives a mysterious note in his locker with instructions on how to connect to “Evol BBS,” a dial-in bulletin board system, and meets a fierce punk named Tina who comes into his life and shakes his entire world view loose. Unlikely alliances, first love, and minor crime sprees abound in this teen graphic novel debut about making connections while your world is falling apart.


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It’s the dawn of a new age…the age of the internet. Allison is drowning under the weight of her manipulative stage magician father. When he brings home the family’s first computer, she escapes into a thrilling new world where she meets Samir, a like-minded new online friend who has just agreed to run away from home with her. After moving to a new town and leaving all of his It’s the dawn of a new age…the age of the internet. Allison is drowning under the weight of her manipulative stage magician father. When he brings home the family’s first computer, she escapes into a thrilling new world where she meets Samir, a like-minded new online friend who has just agreed to run away from home with her. After moving to a new town and leaving all of his friends behind, Richard receives a mysterious note in his locker with instructions on how to connect to “Evol BBS,” a dial-in bulletin board system, and meets a fierce punk named Tina who comes into his life and shakes his entire world view loose. Unlikely alliances, first love, and minor crime sprees abound in this teen graphic novel debut about making connections while your world is falling apart.

30 review for Incredible Doom

  1. 4 out of 5

    Andy

    Thank you to Harper Collins for sending me a finished copy in exchange for a promotional post. All opinions are my own. Incredible Doom takes us back to the 90s and the beginning of the internet, think dial up connections. This story focuses on 4 teenagers and the friendships/relationships they develop between them. Allison struggles at home with her abusive and controlling father. But finding a friend on the internet changes everything. When things explode, Sam and Allison run away. I really lov Thank you to Harper Collins for sending me a finished copy in exchange for a promotional post. All opinions are my own. Incredible Doom takes us back to the 90s and the beginning of the internet, think dial up connections. This story focuses on 4 teenagers and the friendships/relationships they develop between them. Allison struggles at home with her abusive and controlling father. But finding a friend on the internet changes everything. When things explode, Sam and Allison run away. I really loved seeing how the internet connected people in this, even though I do not remember BBS whatsoever. I don't think I ever connected that way. I loved the characters in this book, Tina was such a hardcore punk and easily my favorite. This ended a bit on a cliffhanger so I can't wait for the next volume. The story was jam packed with nostalgia and I really enjoyed it!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Allison

    Absolutely lovely. Story and characterization come together beautifully in this coming of age graphic novel. Multiple points of view make for a layered and engaging story, yet it is told simply and effectively. I knew and loved the characters immediately - sometimes with just a look or a gesture, I instantly recognized them from my own life, from my own school years, or related to them myself. This is a story about the power of commitment and connection, of support and belonging, achieved throug Absolutely lovely. Story and characterization come together beautifully in this coming of age graphic novel. Multiple points of view make for a layered and engaging story, yet it is told simply and effectively. I knew and loved the characters immediately - sometimes with just a look or a gesture, I instantly recognized them from my own life, from my own school years, or related to them myself. This is a story about the power of commitment and connection, of support and belonging, achieved through communication: online, in person, and through actions that demonstrate love. Many thanks to #NetGalley for providing me with an advance copy of this title.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Raychel

    Great exploration of teen life at the dawn of the internet. Bogart and Holden focus are four teens with unique experiences that will relate to a lot of different people. They have individual struggles, hopes, and fears but they all ultimately want the same thing--freedom to be themselves. I especially appreciated that this graphic novel handled emotional and physical abuse with seriousness and tact. The content was dark but all-too-familiar for too many kids in this age range. I could see this h Great exploration of teen life at the dawn of the internet. Bogart and Holden focus are four teens with unique experiences that will relate to a lot of different people. They have individual struggles, hopes, and fears but they all ultimately want the same thing--freedom to be themselves. I especially appreciated that this graphic novel handled emotional and physical abuse with seriousness and tact. The content was dark but all-too-familiar for too many kids in this age range. I could see this helping a lot of people. Great art style as well. **I received an eARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Big thanks to NetGalley and the publisher!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Julia

    Set in the '90s during the early days of the internet, Incredible Doom follows the lives of four small-town teens and the unexpected (sometimes risky) ways they connect via dial-up a text-based bulletin board system, or BBS. Although there are darker moments, the accompanying code screens will be nostalgic fun or just simply insightful for many. My thanks to NetGalley for a digital ARC in exchange for feedback. Set in the '90s during the early days of the internet, Incredible Doom follows the lives of four small-town teens and the unexpected (sometimes risky) ways they connect via dial-up a text-based bulletin board system, or BBS. Although there are darker moments, the accompanying code screens will be nostalgic fun or just simply insightful for many. My thanks to NetGalley for a digital ARC in exchange for feedback.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Nathan

    I stumbled upon this comic years ago during its original run online, and was delighted to see the story continue in this collected edition. The characters are well-drawn -- both literally, in a beautiful ligne claire style reminiscent of Hergé and Scott McCloud, and in terms of how they spring to life in dialogue and action. I really like the clever, often innovative panel-to-panel storytelling -- the way computer screens become comic book panels, and moment-to-moment changes in what someone typ I stumbled upon this comic years ago during its original run online, and was delighted to see the story continue in this collected edition. The characters are well-drawn -- both literally, in a beautiful ligne claire style reminiscent of Hergé and Scott McCloud, and in terms of how they spring to life in dialogue and action. I really like the clever, often innovative panel-to-panel storytelling -- the way computer screens become comic book panels, and moment-to-moment changes in what someone types on those screens become character-defining incidents. Bogart's clever script captures that teenage sense that every interpersonal drama is huge and momentous -- yet also clearly establishes very real, compelling, even harrowing emotional stakes for its characters. It's tough to pull off the kind of balancing act this book achieves with seeming ease; at once, it's harrowing and suspenseful, warm and funny, painful and tender. Though Incredible Doom stays firmly in the realm of the realistic, I found it as riveting and entertaining as any four-color flight of fancy. Whether you were a kid in the hazy proto-Internet days this book captures so well (like I was, barely), or just want to flash back to the strange alien world where people traded music on cassette tapes and phones remained firmly attached to your wall, you won't regret reading this book.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Nancy

    This review can also be found on my blog: https://graphicnovelty2.com/2021/06/0... It’s 1994 and the internet is new. In this coming-of-age tale, four teens come together in an unlikely alliance as their home lives fall apart around them. We are introduced to Allison, whose manipulative and abusive magician father tries to control every aspect of her life. She finds refuge in the new computer he brings home and discovers an online community and really connects with a young man Samir (Sam). We also This review can also be found on my blog: https://graphicnovelty2.com/2021/06/0... It’s 1994 and the internet is new. In this coming-of-age tale, four teens come together in an unlikely alliance as their home lives fall apart around them. We are introduced to Allison, whose manipulative and abusive magician father tries to control every aspect of her life. She finds refuge in the new computer he brings home and discovers an online community and really connects with a young man Samir (Sam). We also really get to know Richard, a teen who has recently moved to a new high school, where he runs into someone he knew years ago from summer camp, who starts to bully him and creates false rumors about him to his new classmates. While being attacked in the hallway by this bully, an unlikely punk savior appears to help Richard- Tina, a tough computer expert who lives with other teens in a house in the country. Eventually, Allison escapes from her violent father and she and Sam are on the run in the middle of the night. On a parallel journey, Richard is thankful for Tina’s help, but feels confused and trapped with Tina’s housemates, recognizing they aren’t true friends like his group of friends from his old school. But circumstances and their connection online lead the two pairs to meet on the last page, opening up further adventures for this new quartet. This graphic novel effectively captures the early 1990s and reminds us of that era of technology -computer usage before the World Wide Web via dial-up with a text-based bulletin board system (BBS). It looks so very primitive now but was cutting edge for a new generation of youth who would come of age with home computers. I remember being in awe of a family that I babysat for in my neighborhood who had a computer and then a few years later in college when one of my rich sorority sisters was the first to have her own computer vs the rest of us who had to use the college’s computer lab. Now everyone seems to have their own private laptops- how far we have come in a relatively short time. The art is done in black and white with blue accents for shadows and to infer other colors. A variety of panel placements and computer screens successfully pull you into this world of technology and limitless possibilities. The art style reminded me somewhat of Scott McCloud of Understanding Comics: The Invisible Art and Daniel Clowes of Ghostworld. Clothing and hair-styles of the grunge-inspired youth, are captured well in the minimalist illustrations, with solid line art. Incredible Doom is set up to be an ongoing series, and I’m invested enough in the disenfranchised and realistic characters to look for future volumes. These tail-end Gen X teens are looking for connections, and I have enough nostalgia for that era to tune in for more.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Lorna Holland

    Full review now up on the blog: https://www.thewritinggreyhound.co.uk... Incredible Doom is an immersive graphic novel focused on technology, connections, and falling in love. Technology and the internet are now so ingrained into our daily lives that it seems almost impossible to imagine a world without them. Incredible Doom, however, takes you back to the early days of the internet, when computers were confusing and nobody really knew how the internet worked. The main characters in this story are Full review now up on the blog: https://www.thewritinggreyhound.co.uk... Incredible Doom is an immersive graphic novel focused on technology, connections, and falling in love. Technology and the internet are now so ingrained into our daily lives that it seems almost impossible to imagine a world without them. Incredible Doom, however, takes you back to the early days of the internet, when computers were confusing and nobody really knew how the internet worked. The main characters in this story are all tech-savvy young people, embracing the new technology and the opportunities it brings. From making friends to answering the most difficult questions, they welcome the internet with open arms, despite the difficulties they face. It's not all about discovering new technology, though - this book deals with some pretty intense themes. From sexuality to loneliness and even abuse, this is a no-holds-barred glimpse into four young people's lives. The light and dark elements are perfectly juxtaposed for a realistic, gritty story. The design and art style are eye-catching yet simplistic. With muted colours and understated panels, the story is really brought to life, perfectly illustrating the book without detracting from the storyline. The composition is excellent; this is a really well thought out graphic novel that keeps you fully immersed throughout. Above all, though, this is a story about making connections and forging your own path. Despite some bad decisions and difficult situations, it's undeniable that the internet changes the character's lives forever. As, undoubtedly, it's changed all of our lives too.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Hudgins

    tw: domestic violence, abusive parents, arrest I really, really love this graphic novel. I read the ARC (provided via NetGalley via HarperCollins) and even this version -- with its two color illustrations -- was lovely to look at, and told a wonderful story. I appreciate the way that this comic tells the story of that period of time when the Internet was new and full of limitless potential. When one of Lisa's friends explains that her BBS board once helped him get a friend out of jail, it doesn't tw: domestic violence, abusive parents, arrest I really, really love this graphic novel. I read the ARC (provided via NetGalley via HarperCollins) and even this version -- with its two color illustrations -- was lovely to look at, and told a wonderful story. I appreciate the way that this comic tells the story of that period of time when the Internet was new and full of limitless potential. When one of Lisa's friends explains that her BBS board once helped him get a friend out of jail, it doesn't seem like an overstatement, it's the reality of the time. Everyone in Incredible Doom is at some sort of crossroads, some sort of new step where something big is about to happen to them -- whether it's finding the strength and opportunity to leave an abusive father or simply being the new kid at school. The romance in this feels real and understated, and the friendships do as well.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Wayne McCoy

    'Incredible Doom' by Matthew Bogart and Jesse Holden is a graphic novel from a particular era, and one that I miss. This story takes place in the era of the BBS or computer bulletin board. The two stories, which link, involve an a girl named Allison who is abused by her stage magician father, and a young man named Richard, who is new in town and gets invited to connect to a BBS called Evol BBS. The connection between these two and their different stories involves computers and the link that stran 'Incredible Doom' by Matthew Bogart and Jesse Holden is a graphic novel from a particular era, and one that I miss. This story takes place in the era of the BBS or computer bulletin board. The two stories, which link, involve an a girl named Allison who is abused by her stage magician father, and a young man named Richard, who is new in town and gets invited to connect to a BBS called Evol BBS. The connection between these two and their different stories involves computers and the link that strangers can make online. I loved the lonely vibe of this story. The sparse locations, the loneliness of hiding a terrible secret or being the new kid. The art reflects this quite well, and I loved all the throwback references to the BBS days of the internet. Well done! I received a review copy of this graphic novel from HarperCollins Children's Books and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for allowing me to review this graphic novel.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Alexx

    Okay, this was incredible (pun intended? lol)! I didn't have much expectations for this, only that I found the premise so interesting. Now I can say that I am pleasantly surprised! Incredible Doom was simple, yet so poignant. It showed the magnificence of using computers and the internet for the first time. And it also highlighted how amazing and comforting it can be, as it helps in connecting people and forging unexpected friendships. It also featured queer characters, which I didn't expect! I l Okay, this was incredible (pun intended? lol)! I didn't have much expectations for this, only that I found the premise so interesting. Now I can say that I am pleasantly surprised! Incredible Doom was simple, yet so poignant. It showed the magnificence of using computers and the internet for the first time. And it also highlighted how amazing and comforting it can be, as it helps in connecting people and forging unexpected friendships. It also featured queer characters, which I didn't expect! I loved that. My exact rating: 4.5. Anyone looking for a fast and yet moving read, this graphic novel is for you! Thank you so much to Epic Reads/Harper Alley for sending over a finished copy! This, of course, did not affect my overall opinion of the book. Full review on my blog soon! CW: child abuse, domestic abuse, bullying, violence Find me elsewhere: Instagram | Twitter | Blog

  11. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    I absolutely loved this graphic novel and I can't wait for Volume 2 to release! Let me start this by saying I absolutely have a soft spot for the 90's so this graphic novel was right in my wheelhouse. Within the graphic novel we get a look at a few teenagers who are coming of age at the start of the internet in the 90's. Allison's father is a huge asshole but she still pushes to find herself. Samir is a sweet little cinnamon roll. Richard is easily persuaded but seriously pulls on my heart strin I absolutely loved this graphic novel and I can't wait for Volume 2 to release! Let me start this by saying I absolutely have a soft spot for the 90's so this graphic novel was right in my wheelhouse. Within the graphic novel we get a look at a few teenagers who are coming of age at the start of the internet in the 90's. Allison's father is a huge asshole but she still pushes to find herself. Samir is a sweet little cinnamon roll. Richard is easily persuaded but seriously pulls on my heart strings. Tina is a badass who I think is wanting so much to feel seen and understood. I loved seeing each of these characters grow in their own way. I binged this graphic novel so fast and I see myself rereading it a few more times before we finally get the next volume which is hopefully in the next year or two. This is definitely one I would recommend to anyone who loves graphic novels, 90's nostalgia, coming of age stories and tech! I do feel it necessary to mention some content warnings: (view spoiler)[ Animal Abuse, Bullying, Emotional Abuse, Child Abuse, Drug Use, Underage Drinking (hide spoiler)]

  12. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Rae

    Finished this in a few hours - loved it. The artwork, the style, the story, amazing. I love graphic novels, but I haven’t read some for a while - and I was gifted this ARC copy from Harper Collins, so huge thanks to them! This version doesn’t have the two-colour included, but I swear it doesn’t need it, it’s so effective still in the black and white style. If you want an introduction into Graphic Novels then definitely give this one a go - very emotional storyline with themes of friendship, love, Finished this in a few hours - loved it. The artwork, the style, the story, amazing. I love graphic novels, but I haven’t read some for a while - and I was gifted this ARC copy from Harper Collins, so huge thanks to them! This version doesn’t have the two-colour included, but I swear it doesn’t need it, it’s so effective still in the black and white style. If you want an introduction into Graphic Novels then definitely give this one a go - very emotional storyline with themes of friendship, love, family, and belonging.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Brianna Noelle

    Growing up in the 90s during the boom of technology and the internet is something that shaped me as a person. This was a really great look into the lives of several teenagers when computers were first accessible to have in the home and the internet was still a baby. This handles some tough topics as well, and I'm anxious to see how the character's stories play out. Growing up in the 90s during the boom of technology and the internet is something that shaped me as a person. This was a really great look into the lives of several teenagers when computers were first accessible to have in the home and the internet was still a baby. This handles some tough topics as well, and I'm anxious to see how the character's stories play out.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jamie

    VERY reminiscent to a time and place (the early days of the internet.) It's cool as an adult to remember the promise of what could be - how different from how it is taken for granted now. I think teens would enjoy looking at it from a historical perspective - I did the best I could to pretend I didn't remember PINE email. :-) Also, I was just reading along and suddenly realized it was almost over and AHHHHHHHH! VERY reminiscent to a time and place (the early days of the internet.) It's cool as an adult to remember the promise of what could be - how different from how it is taken for granted now. I think teens would enjoy looking at it from a historical perspective - I did the best I could to pretend I didn't remember PINE email. :-) Also, I was just reading along and suddenly realized it was almost over and AHHHHHHHH!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    That was neat! Thank you NetGalley for the e-arc! The nostalgia is strong with this one! I remember when computers first started marking their appearance. Remember the dial up and if someone called it kicked you off. So you prayed your dear aunt Sally would just watch some tv and not call? Yeah...the good days. Anywho.... Allison is in a terrible relationship with her dad, Richard is the new kid, Tina is a super crazy ninja chick, and Sam Allison’s internet friend. Following these fellow computer n That was neat! Thank you NetGalley for the e-arc! The nostalgia is strong with this one! I remember when computers first started marking their appearance. Remember the dial up and if someone called it kicked you off. So you prayed your dear aunt Sally would just watch some tv and not call? Yeah...the good days. Anywho.... Allison is in a terrible relationship with her dad, Richard is the new kid, Tina is a super crazy ninja chick, and Sam Allison’s internet friend. Following these fellow computer nerds was fun and kept me on my toes.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Mandy

    2.5/5 This graphic novel is part love letter to the early Internet, part coming-of-age story for three kids who don't quite fit. The art is understated but excellent, but the story itself left me a little ... unsettled? (I wanted there to be paranormal aspects, but there were none. And the story was just getting started when the book ended.) Full review to come, but you can check out a mini-review on the Forever Young Adult Instagram. 2.5/5 This graphic novel is part love letter to the early Internet, part coming-of-age story for three kids who don't quite fit. The art is understated but excellent, but the story itself left me a little ... unsettled? (I wanted there to be paranormal aspects, but there were none. And the story was just getting started when the book ended.) Full review to come, but you can check out a mini-review on the Forever Young Adult Instagram.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jess (PassportsandPaperbacks)

    Thank you Harper360 for a physical ARC! This was such a brilliant but dark graphic novel. It touches on many subjects including friendship, familial abuse, connection and fresh starts. The art style is really great - I love how simple but expressive it is! This is one for older teens as the content includes some scenes and language that would be quite distressing. The overlying theme of the novel is hope and ends in a perfect set up for the next volume! I can’t wait to see what happens next! Cont Thank you Harper360 for a physical ARC! This was such a brilliant but dark graphic novel. It touches on many subjects including friendship, familial abuse, connection and fresh starts. The art style is really great - I love how simple but expressive it is! This is one for older teens as the content includes some scenes and language that would be quite distressing. The overlying theme of the novel is hope and ends in a perfect set up for the next volume! I can’t wait to see what happens next! Content warnings include: child abuse, physical abuse, verbal abuse, strong language, bullying, violent bullying.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Michael (Mai)

    It broke my heart. I loved it.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    It's the early 90's, which for many meant the beginning of dial-up internet. Some use it merely for information, but for others it means connections, sometimes even survival. For Allison, it's reaching out for a friend to escape the reality of her abusive father; for Samir it's similar, but for coping with his fractured family. Richard has been ostracized at school thanks to an aggressive classmate, and the mysterious Tina reaches out through her BBS system to help him find a solution. Incredibl It's the early 90's, which for many meant the beginning of dial-up internet. Some use it merely for information, but for others it means connections, sometimes even survival. For Allison, it's reaching out for a friend to escape the reality of her abusive father; for Samir it's similar, but for coping with his fractured family. Richard has been ostracized at school thanks to an aggressive classmate, and the mysterious Tina reaches out through her BBS system to help him find a solution. Incredible Doom is a whopper of a graphic novel that portrays the real and sometimes lasting relationships that people have made through their computers for the past few decades, starting at the beginning of it all. For those that are still here thanks to connections like these, these stories will resonate deeply with you.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Hayley

    Thank you to Harper360 for sending me an ARC of Incredible Doom from Matthew Bogart and Jesse Holden. Usually in my reviews I use quotes from the book, but I can't really do that in this case with it being a graphic novel. Overall, it was easy to read, and didn't take me long to read through Volume 1. Although this is classed as YA, it did feel as though it could easily be aimed at younger readers too, perhaps a middle grade audience. I thought some of the tribulations that the main characters are f Thank you to Harper360 for sending me an ARC of Incredible Doom from Matthew Bogart and Jesse Holden. Usually in my reviews I use quotes from the book, but I can't really do that in this case with it being a graphic novel. Overall, it was easy to read, and didn't take me long to read through Volume 1. Although this is classed as YA, it did feel as though it could easily be aimed at younger readers too, perhaps a middle grade audience. I thought some of the tribulations that the main characters are facing in the story - particularly Richard struggling to fit in, Sam's 'broken family', and Allison being subject to her abusive father - highlight the value of the internet in allowing a way to escape and connect with people you might not otherwise connect with. Some of these difficult circumstances will no doubt reflect the situations of some younger readers, and so they may feel more of a bond with the characters. However, I did feel that the characters themselves were a little two-dimensional. It is tricky creating depth of character in a graphic novel, because you can only ever relay speech, and the characters' environments through images, but the character voices did feel quite similar even though they spanned gender and age. I do think this will likely be an interesting series for younger readers, especially those who are interested in technology and the evolution of the internet - something that I didn't have as a child, but that everyone takes for granted nowadays. I don't think I would read more personally, but do think Volume 1 ended at a point that would keep younger readers engaged for Volume 2.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Michael Lee

    This was not what expected when I read the title of this book, Incredible Doom. I thought this was going to be a far different book than what I read. I wished the author had chosen a different title for this book. A title that would have reflected the good story about friendship, growing up, internet message boards, and acceptance this fun book shows us. That being said, I really enjoyed reading the story. There was so much I could relate to. I think any adult who went through the awkward years o This was not what expected when I read the title of this book, Incredible Doom. I thought this was going to be a far different book than what I read. I wished the author had chosen a different title for this book. A title that would have reflected the good story about friendship, growing up, internet message boards, and acceptance this fun book shows us. That being said, I really enjoyed reading the story. There was so much I could relate to. I think any adult who went through the awkward years of being a teenager can relate and laugh reading this story. Kids and teens who read this book can learn a bit about the beginning of message boards on the Internet and also learn about what life was like in the 1990s. When my kids get older, I might tell them to read this book to find out what the Internet was like when I was kid in the 90s. I liked the interwoven stories of the four kids in the book. I liked how each of the main characters grows and changes for the better by the end of the book. I also enjoyed seeing the kids find friendship, love, and acceptance. It was really beautiful when Richard and Tina made up at the end of their last chapter. When Richard and Tina accept each other and start to understand each other was very well done. This book has some harsh language in it. So I do think you need to be older or a teen who is ok with vulgarity in a book to really enjoy the story. If you grew up in the 90s and remember old AOL message boards then I think you’ll enjoy this book. Stay awesome!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sabrina

    The book follows different teens going through a range of life's issues, but they are all linked by the new computers they have at home and how they find a way to connect with strangers through a text messaging system called BBS - Bulletin Board System. I really felt for all of the characters and what they were going through, bullying at school, manipulative parents, facing discrimination. But there was also a lot of support and connections and even some funny bits. Despite everything, Allison ha The book follows different teens going through a range of life's issues, but they are all linked by the new computers they have at home and how they find a way to connect with strangers through a text messaging system called BBS - Bulletin Board System. I really felt for all of the characters and what they were going through, bullying at school, manipulative parents, facing discrimination. But there was also a lot of support and connections and even some funny bits. Despite everything, Allison has a lot of humour. It's a very quick read but with a roller coaster of emotions. Sympathy for the characters, rage against the ones hurting them, frustration, laughter, and the ending even made me tear up a little. I got a bit confused between the characters but I think I just need to pay a bit more attention when reading graphic novels. The temptation is just to whizz through the book but it's worth slowing down to take it all in properly. The emails were a bit hard to read, especially on the black pages. The finished copy will have much higher quality pages but I actually kind of loved that the proof felt like it was printed on paper from those old computers (yes, I really am old enough to have used one and probably still have some of the printouts! 😱 ) I also loved the nostalgia of the huge computers, cassette players and old style telephones. The story is not really finished by the end of the book, but it still has a very satisfying ending. I really enjoyed reading this and now I need to know when I can get hold of Vol 2!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Robin Pelletier

    This graphic novel's style was a little dark for my taste: dark in it's art style and images. The palette is very dark and ominous. Given the subject matter within - it matches the narrative. However, it was really dark. I liked the alternating character viewpoints/storylines and how they tied together in the end. Allison is using the internet to escape reality and a VERY abusive magician of a father. That's his profession: magician, but he's not a magical person. He's rather evil. The internet This graphic novel's style was a little dark for my taste: dark in it's art style and images. The palette is very dark and ominous. Given the subject matter within - it matches the narrative. However, it was really dark. I liked the alternating character viewpoints/storylines and how they tied together in the end. Allison is using the internet to escape reality and a VERY abusive magician of a father. That's his profession: magician, but he's not a magical person. He's rather evil. The internet bring her Sam and freedom. Sam has to be my favorite - he literally runs out in nothing but his underwear to help Allison when she was most in need and does everything possible to hep he to get somewhere safe. He's a real gem of a guy and I respect and appreciate that. Richard is a social outcast in his new town. He finds help to escape his bullies online and with a new friend: Tina. TIna has some issues of her own, but she spreads her message of reform and uses the internet to help others. When TIna finds herself in trouble, Richard steps up for a new friend to help her out. In the end, the characters are brought together by the invention of the computer and the internet. Even though a computer and the web is a novelty - this showcases how it was used for good. Trigger warning: parent abuse

  24. 5 out of 5

    Bobby

    How shocked and suprised was I when this ARC showed up at my door after thinking I didn't have a chance in hell of getting actual ARC's from a publishing house! Definitely a pinch me moment for me as a book blogger! I don't read a ton of graphic novels so my opinions perhaps do reflect that though. Incredible Doom is a YA graphic novel and the first volume in a series that explores first love and friendship as well as a few darker themes during the 90's and the early years of the internet. The 9 How shocked and suprised was I when this ARC showed up at my door after thinking I didn't have a chance in hell of getting actual ARC's from a publishing house! Definitely a pinch me moment for me as a book blogger! I don't read a ton of graphic novels so my opinions perhaps do reflect that though. Incredible Doom is a YA graphic novel and the first volume in a series that explores first love and friendship as well as a few darker themes during the 90's and the early years of the internet. The 90's era and the introduction of computers is really what drew me to requesting this book in the first place as it's not a topic I've read about before and especially not in graphic novel form. Originally I thought this was going to be sci-fi but it's resolutely in the historical genre with solid contemporary themes. The art style in here really fits the content and the era it's set in. It's quite video game-esque with a really classic style of drawing and it definitely gives me those 90's comic strip vibes. It's consistent all the way through and is detailed without each frame being too crowded. My copy was in black and white but I understand that the finished edition will be in full colour, the first few pages wer printed in blue, black and white tones which I really loved so I hope that's what the final copy looks like as well. We follow a handful of characters mainly Allison and Richard. Allison is trying to get away from her abusive father and strikes up an internet relationship with Samir and together they form an escape plan. Richard has just moved to a new town and is struggling to fit in when he attracts the attention of a group of bullies but finds solace in an internet forum where he meets someone unexpected. The two storylines are seperate but are both fairly compelling to follow and the relationships formed throughout the book are really sweet and excepting. I think the dialogue had a few weak points, it sometimes felt a little unrealistic but not so much that it was a massive problem or anything, I just found myself cringeing sometimes. Like I said, I'm pretty new to graphic novels as a format so that may be why I wasn't blow away by it but it still had a lot of strong qualities that impressed me. The way abuse and bullying is examined is done very well, it's fairly dark but felt true to life. It's without a doubt a strong opening volume that concluded in a really clever way and I would definitely pick up the next volume as well. * I received a physical copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Any quotes included in this review are subject to change. Massive thank you to Harper Collins for sending me an ARC copy.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sophie Snow

    It's not often I come away from a book and have to put my hands up and say, "I don't get it." But that's where we're at with this one. It just wasn't for me, and I can't even think how I would rate it. It was very character-driven with not much plot, and I found it all a bit all over the place in terms of the story and characters jumping around. It was a little hard to keep track of everything. It all felt very unrealistic, too, which I think was a missed opportunity in looking at the realistic l It's not often I come away from a book and have to put my hands up and say, "I don't get it." But that's where we're at with this one. It just wasn't for me, and I can't even think how I would rate it. It was very character-driven with not much plot, and I found it all a bit all over the place in terms of the story and characters jumping around. It was a little hard to keep track of everything. It all felt very unrealistic, too, which I think was a missed opportunity in looking at the realistic lives of characters in these kinds of situations. Although I didn't really gel with the art style, I loved the black pages a lot. Thank you to Harper 360 for the ARC. All reviews are 100% honest.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Desiree

    I was very excited to begin this graphic novel and it did not disappoint, though it wasn't anything like I expected. For whatever reason, I wasn't counting on this to be as dark as it was, but it wasn't without reason, as far as character background and story development goes. This wasn't sad, or dark, or edgy for shock value- it was to tell the story and make it better. These characters are instantly believable and it makes readers invested. This book isn't what I expected, but it is phenomenal I was very excited to begin this graphic novel and it did not disappoint, though it wasn't anything like I expected. For whatever reason, I wasn't counting on this to be as dark as it was, but it wasn't without reason, as far as character background and story development goes. This wasn't sad, or dark, or edgy for shock value- it was to tell the story and make it better. These characters are instantly believable and it makes readers invested. This book isn't what I expected, but it is phenomenal.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Elise

    This follows a short period of life for 3 teenagers who all seem very lonely and are trying to navigate their space in the world. Alison who is suffering at the hand of her abusive and controlling father. Richard who has just moved to a new town and is having to adapt to a new school, while all his friends are far away. Samir who is great with computers and becomes a supportive, online friend. Lovely depiction of teen life, while also covering off some tough topics. Thank you to Harper360YA for my This follows a short period of life for 3 teenagers who all seem very lonely and are trying to navigate their space in the world. Alison who is suffering at the hand of her abusive and controlling father. Richard who has just moved to a new town and is having to adapt to a new school, while all his friends are far away. Samir who is great with computers and becomes a supportive, online friend. Lovely depiction of teen life, while also covering off some tough topics. Thank you to Harper360YA for my proof copy!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Elia

    This is a good start to what I hope is at least a two-parter, because of the cliffhanger ending. Also, it should probably come with a bit of a CW due to the depictions of child abuse happening here. It's set in 1991, which will mean that some of the teens this is geared towards will have absolutely NO idea what is happening with the technology this showcases without some outside research, but for those who know a bit about the early days of computers, it's a fun throwback. This is a good start to what I hope is at least a two-parter, because of the cliffhanger ending. Also, it should probably come with a bit of a CW due to the depictions of child abuse happening here. It's set in 1991, which will mean that some of the teens this is geared towards will have absolutely NO idea what is happening with the technology this showcases without some outside research, but for those who know a bit about the early days of computers, it's a fun throwback.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Tianna

    My first graphic novel I’ve read in a really long time! It was kind of all over the place and hard to follow at first but it got better towards the end of the novel. It was an ok plot line, but rather unrealistic? Not my favourite book ever, but not the worst. I loved the character development, but the plot was just not it. I don’t even know if I understood the whole story or just got the gist of it.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Shepard (Between-the-Shelves)

    3.5/5 stars I really enjoyed the art in this, and it's nods to the beginning stages of the internet. The art really fits the overall tone of the story, with its sort of dark undertone. There were times that I wanted a bit more character development, but this is a first volume, so maybe we'll get it with time. I'm not sure about its overall appeal to teens, but the cover might make them pick it up! 3.5/5 stars I really enjoyed the art in this, and it's nods to the beginning stages of the internet. The art really fits the overall tone of the story, with its sort of dark undertone. There were times that I wanted a bit more character development, but this is a first volume, so maybe we'll get it with time. I'm not sure about its overall appeal to teens, but the cover might make them pick it up!

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