hits counter Unsettled - Ebook PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Unsettled

Availability: Ready to download

A stirring, hopeful immigration story of Nurah and her family, who move from Karachi, Pakistan, to Peachtree City, Georgia, from Reem Faruqi, ALA Notable author of the award-winning picture book Lailah’s Lunchbox. Powerful and charming, Other Words for Home meets Front Desk in this debut middle grade novel in verse about finding your footing in a new world. From Pakistan to A stirring, hopeful immigration story of Nurah and her family, who move from Karachi, Pakistan, to Peachtree City, Georgia, from Reem Faruqi, ALA Notable author of the award-winning picture book Lailah’s Lunchbox. Powerful and charming, Other Words for Home meets Front Desk in this debut middle grade novel in verse about finding your footing in a new world. From Pakistan to Peachtree City—Nurah’s stirring story of finding your place. When Nurah’s family moves from Karachi, Pakistan, to Peachtree City, Georgia, all she really wants is to blend in, but she stands out for all the wrong reasons. Nurah’s accent, floral-print kurtas, and tea-colored skin make her feel excluded, and she’s left to eat lunch alone under the stairwell, until she meets Stahr at swimming tryouts. Stahr covers her body when in the water, just like Nurah, but for very different reasons. But in the water Nurah doesn’t want to blend in: She wants to stand out. She wants to win medals like her star athlete brother, Owais—who is going through struggles of his own in America—yet when sibling rivalry gets in the way, she makes a split-second decision of betrayal that changes their fates. As Nurah slowly begins to sprout wings in the form of strong swimming arms, she gradually gains the courage to stand up to bullies, fight for what she believes in, and find her place.


Compare

A stirring, hopeful immigration story of Nurah and her family, who move from Karachi, Pakistan, to Peachtree City, Georgia, from Reem Faruqi, ALA Notable author of the award-winning picture book Lailah’s Lunchbox. Powerful and charming, Other Words for Home meets Front Desk in this debut middle grade novel in verse about finding your footing in a new world. From Pakistan to A stirring, hopeful immigration story of Nurah and her family, who move from Karachi, Pakistan, to Peachtree City, Georgia, from Reem Faruqi, ALA Notable author of the award-winning picture book Lailah’s Lunchbox. Powerful and charming, Other Words for Home meets Front Desk in this debut middle grade novel in verse about finding your footing in a new world. From Pakistan to Peachtree City—Nurah’s stirring story of finding your place. When Nurah’s family moves from Karachi, Pakistan, to Peachtree City, Georgia, all she really wants is to blend in, but she stands out for all the wrong reasons. Nurah’s accent, floral-print kurtas, and tea-colored skin make her feel excluded, and she’s left to eat lunch alone under the stairwell, until she meets Stahr at swimming tryouts. Stahr covers her body when in the water, just like Nurah, but for very different reasons. But in the water Nurah doesn’t want to blend in: She wants to stand out. She wants to win medals like her star athlete brother, Owais—who is going through struggles of his own in America—yet when sibling rivalry gets in the way, she makes a split-second decision of betrayal that changes their fates. As Nurah slowly begins to sprout wings in the form of strong swimming arms, she gradually gains the courage to stand up to bullies, fight for what she believes in, and find her place.

30 review for Unsettled

  1. 4 out of 5

    Reading_ Tam_ Ishly

    "...but they forget that we can hear much more than they think." A book about an immigrant family from Pakistan to the US, A book in verse which is told from the perspective of Nurah, a thirteen year old girl, who's trying to find a way to fit in and spread her wings in a totally new place. A story which deals with the struggles including bullying, the pain of being separated away from home and the people we have been with all our lives, culture shock, identity, culture and gender discrimination, dome "...but they forget that we can hear much more than they think." A book about an immigrant family from Pakistan to the US, A book in verse which is told from the perspective of Nurah, a thirteen year old girl, who's trying to find a way to fit in and spread her wings in a totally new place. A story which deals with the struggles including bullying, the pain of being separated away from home and the people we have been with all our lives, culture shock, identity, culture and gender discrimination, domestic violence. Hoping to read more from the author.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Fanna

    October 24, 2020: I am a little sad to be hearing about this book right now because IT SOUNDS SO CUTE and I should've already been hyping it up!!! October 24, 2020: I am a little sad to be hearing about this book right now because IT SOUNDS SO CUTE and I should've already been hyping it up!!!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kathie

    Thank you Edelweiss+ and the publisher for an eARC of this book. 5 stars!!! What an absolutely beautiful story. This novel in verse comes out in May 2021, and is perfect for fans of stories like Other Words for Home by Jasmine Warga. Nurah and her family live in Pakistan, but her father finds work in the States and decides to move the family for job security and better schooling. Nurah doesn't want to leave her grandparents, friends, or the life as she knows it. Although she already speak English Thank you Edelweiss+ and the publisher for an eARC of this book. 5 stars!!! What an absolutely beautiful story. This novel in verse comes out in May 2021, and is perfect for fans of stories like Other Words for Home by Jasmine Warga. Nurah and her family live in Pakistan, but her father finds work in the States and decides to move the family for job security and better schooling. Nurah doesn't want to leave her grandparents, friends, or the life as she knows it. Although she already speak English, she feels like she stands out because of the way she dresses and the color of her skin. She joins the swim team at school, where she desperately wants to prove herself, but is always in the shadow of her athletic brother, Owais. Adjusting to life in the US is challenging for each member of her family in different ways, but like the stages of plant life referenced in the headings of the parts of the book, Nurah eventually finds a way to bloom in new soil. This is one of the most poetic and beautifully written novels in verse I've read. I wrote down so many quotes that jumped out at me with vivid language. I loved not only the nature imagery, but also the way she describes skin colors. I'm amazed at how much the author was able to communicate with such few words, and the story moves very quickly because of the format. It's inspired by many of the author's real life experiences immigrating to the US, and the feelings ring true and honest. I loved watching Nurah grow, enduring challenges and disappointments, but continuing to develop into her own unique person. Although I read the book in eARC form, the illustrations inside the book are absolutely beautiful. Soumbal Qureshi did the cover design, and I believe she was responsible for the artwork throughout the novel, which truly makes this book a work of art. I highly recommend this story, and think it would be a wonderful read aloud for middle grade classrooms.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Richie Partington

    Richie’s Picks: UNSETTLED by Reem Faruqi, HarperCollins, May 2021, 352p., ISBN: 978-0-06-304470-8 “When President Joe Biden rescinded former President Donald Trump’s ban on immigrant visas from many Muslim-majority countries on his very first day in office, those eagerly awaiting the change were elated...But Biden’s reversal of one of Trump’s signature actions hasn’t resulted in a flood of airport reunions or any quick changes...as than 40,000 application...denied due to the bans...are inc Richie’s Picks: UNSETTLED by Reem Faruqi, HarperCollins, May 2021, 352p., ISBN: 978-0-06-304470-8 “When President Joe Biden rescinded former President Donald Trump’s ban on immigrant visas from many Muslim-majority countries on his very first day in office, those eagerly awaiting the change were elated...But Biden’s reversal of one of Trump’s signature actions hasn’t resulted in a flood of airport reunions or any quick changes...as than 40,000 application...denied due to the bans...are included in what’s become a tremendous immigrant visa backlog.” -- MSNBC, 3/20/21 “Oh, imagine yourself in a building Up in flames, being told to stand still The window’s wide open, this leap is on faith You don’t know who will catch you, but maybe somebody will.” -- Sara Bareilles, “A Safe Place to Land” (2019) “Which Land Is Mine? In Peachtree City, Georgia, the trees touch the sky and the air smells different. The water tastes different too. The wind is pure and free from exhaust. Yet the sidewalks are empty. The roads have only cars. In Karachi, Pakistan, the trees are shorter like me. The air has whiffs of exhaust and mango juice is plentiful. Rickshaws sputter on the roads. A donkey here or there. Scooters everywhere. Sellers of every kind selling coconuts birds in cages balloons towels. They all gather on the road. Different melodies all at once. Even though their lives are hard, they seem free. Yet America with its pure air and people stuck inside all day is known as the land of the free. Pakistan with its free people everywhere and dirty air is known as the land of the pure.” Thirteen-year-old Nurah Haqq is a swimmer, an artist, a math aficionado, and a little sister. When Nurah’s father receives a job offer, their family of four says goodbye to the grandparents in Pakistan, and relocates to Peachtree, Georgia. In this story-in-verse of uprooting and finding one’s place in America, the author employs a gardening metaphor to organize the tale into nine parts: Uprooting, Replanting, Water, Planting Seeds, Sprouting, Rot, Budding, Wilting, and Flowering. Nurah’s observations and reactions to her early experiences in America include her making friends with the cleaning women at the hotel in which her family initially stay; bullying and worse by her peers; making friends at school; her mother’s suffering a miscarriage; revelations regarding a friend’s abusive father; the supportiveness of a nurturing art teacher; and Nurah’s struggle to excell on a swim team . Author Reem Faruqi has drawn upon her own childhood experiences and struggles as a Muslim immigrant to tell Nurah’s story. UNSETTLED, Nurah’s reaction to life in America, has a nice balance: The issues Nurah encounters are well-probed and thought-provoking,, yet the story will be readily accessible to third- and fourth-grade readers. Richie Partington, MLIS Richie's Picks http://richiespicks.pbworks.com https://www.facebook.com/richiespicks/ https://twitter.com/richiespicks [email protected]

  5. 5 out of 5

    Toya (the reading chemist)

    Nurah and her family lives in Pakistan while her father works in the US, but that changes when he decides it's time to relocate the family in favor of more opportunities. Nurah doesn’t want to leave the life she knows in Pakistan. Even though Nurah speaks English, she still stands out because of her accent, her skin color, and her floral-print kurtas. Nurah joins the swim team to prove herself, but she always finds herself in the shadow of her athletic brother, Owais. As Nurah settles into swimm Nurah and her family lives in Pakistan while her father works in the US, but that changes when he decides it's time to relocate the family in favor of more opportunities. Nurah doesn’t want to leave the life she knows in Pakistan. Even though Nurah speaks English, she still stands out because of her accent, her skin color, and her floral-print kurtas. Nurah joins the swim team to prove herself, but she always finds herself in the shadow of her athletic brother, Owais. As Nurah settles into swimming, she begins to embrace her differences and life inside and outside of the pool. Told in verse, this is an incredible coming of age story that sheds light on the struggles of being an immigrant in a new land and the push-pull between cultures. Faruqi does not shy away from the racism and Islamophobia that so many Muslims face. Nurah is such a fantastic character, and I loved her friendship with Stahr. I think one of the lessons that stuck with me is the importance of inviting someone to have lunch with you because that small gesture can help end loneliness and isolation for so many. Thank you to HarperKids for my review copy. This did not influence my review. All opinions are my own.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Lorie Barber

    This BRILLIANT novel-in-verse comes from Reem Faruqi, the author of Laila’s Lunchbox, one of my favorite picture books. Unsettled is Nurah’s story, told in lyrical first person, of her move from Pakistan to Peachtree City, Georgia. Nurah embarks on her own journey, from wanting to fit in to with her new surroundings to wanting to stand out - and stand up - to show her family, friends, and community who she really is. It is Nurah’s voice, her passions for art and swimming, and her empathy that ma This BRILLIANT novel-in-verse comes from Reem Faruqi, the author of Laila’s Lunchbox, one of my favorite picture books. Unsettled is Nurah’s story, told in lyrical first person, of her move from Pakistan to Peachtree City, Georgia. Nurah embarks on her own journey, from wanting to fit in to with her new surroundings to wanting to stand out - and stand up - to show her family, friends, and community who she really is. It is Nurah’s voice, her passions for art and swimming, and her empathy that make her a singular character. The pacing of the story matches her bloom, told in nine parts, each titled with a single word that gives the reader a tiny hint of what’s to come. Middle graders will be drawn to the lyrical lines (“One the rice/swallows up the water/and looks like finger holes/are poked in the rice...”) and the supporting characters, some who support Nurah, and others who are obstacles on her journey. Everyone will be drawn to a book in which they see themselves, a book in which they can learn something, and/or a story that can grow their empathy. Look out, Newbery committee!

  7. 5 out of 5

    h i n d

    I loved it ! Very wholesome, and the muslim representation was perfect "Quick wipe the counters, Quick wash the dishes, Quick vacuum the crumbs. But why? We wonder. Because we don’t want the plumber to think Muslims are dirty! Ammi’s hands pause from washing and find their way to her hips. The air puffs my hair, floats it, as I sigh. The plumber comes and goes and he does not take off his shoes, leaving red footprints of Georgia clay on the white carpet. And we are the ones worried about dirt?" If you liked it you should d I loved it ! Very wholesome, and the muslim representation was perfect "Quick wipe the counters, Quick wash the dishes, Quick vacuum the crumbs. But why? We wonder. Because we don’t want the plumber to think Muslims are dirty! Ammi’s hands pause from washing and find their way to her hips. The air puffs my hair, floats it, as I sigh. The plumber comes and goes and he does not take off his shoes, leaving red footprints of Georgia clay on the white carpet. And we are the ones worried about dirt?" If you liked it you should definitely read Other Words for Home

  8. 5 out of 5

    Tina Athaide

    This is one of those stories that sits with you long after you finish reading. Readers will be captivated by Faruqi's poetic verse and find themselves immersed in Nurah Haqq's life as she navigates life in Peachtree City Georgia. A place that is so different from Karachi, Pakistan. This story offers an authentic and real look at the challenges immigrants face, the hardships, disappointments, and joys. The verse makes this story accessible to a larger audience. Grades 4-7 This beautiful, lyrical s This is one of those stories that sits with you long after you finish reading. Readers will be captivated by Faruqi's poetic verse and find themselves immersed in Nurah Haqq's life as she navigates life in Peachtree City Georgia. A place that is so different from Karachi, Pakistan. This story offers an authentic and real look at the challenges immigrants face, the hardships, disappointments, and joys. The verse makes this story accessible to a larger audience. Grades 4-7 This beautiful, lyrical story about ones identify and belonging is perfect for fans of A Thousand Questions and Other Words For Home. Five stars for me and must have for school libraries.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Amani

    Disclaimer: I got this ARC on @NetGalley. This is a book I wish I had when I was younger and I think it's perfect for fans of Once Upon an Eid! It touches on what it's like to be the new kid and to be a Muslim kid which isn't something I've seen a lot of so I absolutely love that about Unsettled. If you've got a kid in MS or you enjoy reading Middle-Grade books then I highly recommend adding this one to your shelves! Disclaimer: I got this ARC on @NetGalley. This is a book I wish I had when I was younger and I think it's perfect for fans of Once Upon an Eid! It touches on what it's like to be the new kid and to be a Muslim kid which isn't something I've seen a lot of so I absolutely love that about Unsettled. If you've got a kid in MS or you enjoy reading Middle-Grade books then I highly recommend adding this one to your shelves!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Katie Reilley

    Absolutely stunning middle grade novel in verse! With the hope of new opportunity, Nurah’s father makes the decision to move her family from Karachi, Pakistan to Peachtree City, Georgia. Nurah is torn between wanting to blend in with her new surroundings at school and in her community and wanting to stand out as a member of the swim team and stand up to those who bully. The story is told in nine sections with themes tied to gardening (Uprooting, Replanting, Water, Planting Seeds, Sprouting, Rot, Absolutely stunning middle grade novel in verse! With the hope of new opportunity, Nurah’s father makes the decision to move her family from Karachi, Pakistan to Peachtree City, Georgia. Nurah is torn between wanting to blend in with her new surroundings at school and in her community and wanting to stand out as a member of the swim team and stand up to those who bully. The story is told in nine sections with themes tied to gardening (Uprooting, Replanting, Water, Planting Seeds, Sprouting, Rot, Budding, Wilting, Flowering). Nurah voice is one of passion and strength, and readers will love watching Nurah gain courage, fight for what she believes in, and ultimately find her place. Although the novel is fictional, the author drew on her own life experiences in writing Nurah’s story. Don’t miss the author’s note, glossary, and recipe at the end. Out now - highly recommend!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Fizah(Books tales by me)

    It is a wholesome and heartwarming tale of Nurah whose family immigrated to the USA from Pakistan. I loved the way author covered her whole story and change in life in form of poetry. I totally loved the book and the way every emotion was caught is just AWESOME.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Louise Gooding

    I’ll be honest, when I first downloaded this eARC to review I was suprised to see how poetic it was. I mean I know it was poetic but for some reason I wasn’t expecting this style. Although it threw me a little at the beginning, it took no time at all to get lost in this book and the way the words flow, a river of words dancing over the pages. Gah it’s beautiful. Such a wonderful book you’ve created here Reem! I think the choice in style is really clever, i think it pulls you in, in a way that a I’ll be honest, when I first downloaded this eARC to review I was suprised to see how poetic it was. I mean I know it was poetic but for some reason I wasn’t expecting this style. Although it threw me a little at the beginning, it took no time at all to get lost in this book and the way the words flow, a river of words dancing over the pages. Gah it’s beautiful. Such a wonderful book you’ve created here Reem! I think the choice in style is really clever, i think it pulls you in, in a way that a regular fiction couldnt. We don’t have any books in our bookshelf or kindles written in this way so it was a very pleasant change! The story follows a young girls move, with her family, from Pakistan to America. From learning about the move, to discovering herself in a new place, settling in, making new friends and relationships around her. It also touches on Nurrah’s challenges with racism and islamophobia.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Harrison

    Moving to a new neighborhood is hard, but moving halfway around the world can be overwhelming. At first, everything in Georgia seems different. Nurah is different. The one place where Nurah and Owais feel comfortable is the pool. Dipping into the blue, they can almost feel at peace. Written in verse, Unsettled is a fast moving, compelling read. Some chapters are a few pages, others a few sentences. Author Reem Faruqi takes advantage of the sparse language, allowing the spaces and silences to say Moving to a new neighborhood is hard, but moving halfway around the world can be overwhelming. At first, everything in Georgia seems different. Nurah is different. The one place where Nurah and Owais feel comfortable is the pool. Dipping into the blue, they can almost feel at peace. Written in verse, Unsettled is a fast moving, compelling read. Some chapters are a few pages, others a few sentences. Author Reem Faruqi takes advantage of the sparse language, allowing the spaces and silences to say as much as the words. The simplicity is eloquent and moving. Nurah is a lovely character. Throughout the book, she learns her own heart, her own hopes, her own talents. Nurah finds her voice, and begins to discover who she wants to become. Unsettled is a warm read that offers themes of empowerment, belonging and self-discovery.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ris Sasaki

    2.5 ⭐ This was one of those cases that it's not as if the story, characters and message that it's trying to portrait is badly developed or something like that. This is one of those cases that I couldn't get used to the writing style and the way that the author projected her verses to structure her poems. Overall, it was an enjoyable and fast read. 2.5 ⭐ This was one of those cases that it's not as if the story, characters and message that it's trying to portrait is badly developed or something like that. This is one of those cases that I couldn't get used to the writing style and the way that the author projected her verses to structure her poems. Overall, it was an enjoyable and fast read.

  15. 4 out of 5

    JoyAnn

    People certainly do contain multitudes, and Nurah experiences and faces a multitude of emotions and experiences in this book. This book in verse portrays these emotions succinctly yet deeply and delicately portrays immigration, Alzheimer’s, sibling jealousy, violence, miscarriage, and racism while following Nurah’s journey. Such a powerful read.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    Thank you to NetGalley and HarperCollins for an early e-ARC of this book. Nurah, a young Pakistani girl, and her family move from Karachi to Peachtree City, Georgia, hoping for better opportunities as her father says. But Nurah misses her home where she fits in and feels like she belongs. In Georgia, Nurah stands out in the way she dresses, speaks, and the color of her skin. She is lonely and alone until she meets a friend, Stahr, at swimming tryouts and starts to find a reason to want to stand ou Thank you to NetGalley and HarperCollins for an early e-ARC of this book. Nurah, a young Pakistani girl, and her family move from Karachi to Peachtree City, Georgia, hoping for better opportunities as her father says. But Nurah misses her home where she fits in and feels like she belongs. In Georgia, Nurah stands out in the way she dresses, speaks, and the color of her skin. She is lonely and alone until she meets a friend, Stahr, at swimming tryouts and starts to find a reason to want to stand out. She wants to get attention for swimming like her older brother Owais. Her confidence wavers as Owais seems to overshadow her in the pool, but as her swimming success increases, so does her belief in herself both in and out of the pool. A great middle grade novel in verse debut that spotlights the highs and lows of the immigrant experience, and discovering your place after leaving the only home you’ve ever known.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Galiah Morgenstern

    Unsettled blew me away! I LOVED the lyrical novel in verse. Nurah tells all the pieces of the story with such vivid authenticity. Comes together to paint a vibrant scene of a new immigrant’s struggles and triumphs, and finding her voice.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Nina

    The hype is real! The writing , the story , and the characters. All 5 stars !

  19. 4 out of 5

    Aiman

    This is a fast read due to the verse style (so really, you have no reason to not read it!) starring the unapologetically Pakistani-American Muslim I've been waiting for. I was taken aback by the beautiful, seamless inclusion of Nurah's faith (from 5 daily prayers to wearing a full-covered swimsuit to so much more), but really the center of this book is Nurah, her friends, her swimming aspirations, and her life in general - all the aspects that make her her, a person with multiple identities but This is a fast read due to the verse style (so really, you have no reason to not read it!) starring the unapologetically Pakistani-American Muslim I've been waiting for. I was taken aback by the beautiful, seamless inclusion of Nurah's faith (from 5 daily prayers to wearing a full-covered swimsuit to so much more), but really the center of this book is Nurah, her friends, her swimming aspirations, and her life in general - all the aspects that make her her, a person with multiple identities but who is not solely her identities. I am so excited and impressed this quality work has been added to the existing stock of literature and will be picking up anything Reem Faruqi writes in the future - she is clearly a gifted writer.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    I read Reem Faruqi's UNSETTLED in a single sitting, unwilling to take myself out of this gorgeous story and its stunning poetry. Nurah's story manages to be both heartbreaking and inspiring. Young readers will absolutely love her. They will hurt for her as she navigates a new and sometimes painful world with grace, bravery, and wisdom. I wish I could quote from an ARC, because there are so many beautiful passages just waiting to be dog-eared. Highly recommend. Many thanks to the author and Harpe I read Reem Faruqi's UNSETTLED in a single sitting, unwilling to take myself out of this gorgeous story and its stunning poetry. Nurah's story manages to be both heartbreaking and inspiring. Young readers will absolutely love her. They will hurt for her as she navigates a new and sometimes painful world with grace, bravery, and wisdom. I wish I could quote from an ARC, because there are so many beautiful passages just waiting to be dog-eared. Highly recommend. Many thanks to the author and Harper Collins Children's for the advanced copy.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Miles

    Unsettled is a beautifully written story of a young girl longing to "fit in" in a new country while missing her friends and family far away. The main character, Nurah is easy to relate to on so many levels. Many of us have experienced feeling different--for our size, hair color, skin color, religious beliefs or a myriad of other reasons. Nurah has to deal with many of these at once, all while learning to navigate a strange new culture. Ms. Faruqi's language is lovely and lyrical, and I found mys Unsettled is a beautifully written story of a young girl longing to "fit in" in a new country while missing her friends and family far away. The main character, Nurah is easy to relate to on so many levels. Many of us have experienced feeling different--for our size, hair color, skin color, religious beliefs or a myriad of other reasons. Nurah has to deal with many of these at once, all while learning to navigate a strange new culture. Ms. Faruqi's language is lovely and lyrical, and I found myself rooting for Nurah--desperately wanting her to find her voice. The novel, which is told in verse, touches on all the hallmark issues of middle school in a way that perfectly resonated with me. All of the emotions Nurah experiences, I can still remember experiencing myself. Some experiences are universal. I highly recommend this book for any middle school library or classroom. The note to readers in the beginning lets us know that the author based the story on her own experiences as a child. I was immediately drawn into the journey the character was going to take me on during the story. And I wasn't disappointed! There's a glossary of terms and even a recipe in the back matter. Excellent book!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Lisa McDonald

    Thanks to NetGalley and HarperCollins for the chance to read and review this eARC. Unsettled by Reem Faruqi is a thought-provoking book exploring the topics of immigration, fitting in, siblings, friendship, and family relationships. Despite Nurah's resistance, Nurah's family moves from Pakistan to Georgia, USA when she is about 13 or 14. A time when all you want to do is be like everyone else. But when you are the only brown skinned person in the room, it is inherently difficult. It becomes even Thanks to NetGalley and HarperCollins for the chance to read and review this eARC. Unsettled by Reem Faruqi is a thought-provoking book exploring the topics of immigration, fitting in, siblings, friendship, and family relationships. Despite Nurah's resistance, Nurah's family moves from Pakistan to Georgia, USA when she is about 13 or 14. A time when all you want to do is be like everyone else. But when you are the only brown skinned person in the room, it is inherently difficult. It becomes even MORE difficult if you add in being Muslim, thus occasionally wearing a hijab, and covering up when you swim,. As she navigates these new waters, she makes some missteps along the way leading to learning who she is and what she is willing to stand up for.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jill

    I love novels in verse and this book was no exception. It always amazes me that an author can give so much depth to the story and the characters using so many fewer words. I loved hearing Nurah's experiences moving from her beloved Grandparents and country of Pakistan. Reading the author's note at the end showed how much of the story was based on Reem Faruqi's own experiences and I feel those kinds of stories are so important for all readers. Reading her first hand accounts of how her Muslim fam I love novels in verse and this book was no exception. It always amazes me that an author can give so much depth to the story and the characters using so many fewer words. I loved hearing Nurah's experiences moving from her beloved Grandparents and country of Pakistan. Reading the author's note at the end showed how much of the story was based on Reem Faruqi's own experiences and I feel those kinds of stories are so important for all readers. Reading her first hand accounts of how her Muslim family was treated after 9/11 was eye opening to me. This is an important book for middle grade readers to have access to. Nurah and her family are relatable, loving, and loyal. I highly recommend this story full of adversity, friendship, and family.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kasey Short

    I really enjoyed this book! It is written in beautiful verse. Each poem seems to stand alone but also be connected to create a engaging an powerful story. I think middle grades students would be engaged and relate to this story of being a new kid, feeling different among ones peers and sibling rivalry. The book follows a young girl who moves from Pakistan to Georgia and has to acclimate to an entirely new culture, experience racism and Islamophobia and her mothers miscarriage.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Mia

    I absolutely loved this book! This story is presented in such a beautiful way. Short poetic glimpses, each telling us about Nurah. Incredibly gorgeous writing leads us through the feelings and experiences of a young girl immigrating from Pakistan to the United States. Just a beyond lovely reading experience. This is one I will preorder for myself. Wonderful! Absolutely wonderful! Thank you NetGalley for allowing me to read this book in exchange for my honest opinion.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jas Asbill

    A Gorgeous, melodic, entrancing, heartbreaking, victorious read. She painted the characters emotions beautifully. I could read it again and again. I applaud this book for so many things, but I think what I love the most is the honest telling of the stages of life threaded throughout. The lost hope of a child and how that affects all of them, the importance of friendship, the need to be the voice of accountability, and it just keeps going. CAWPILE Rating: 10/10

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Halbur

    This 📖 left me speechless. It’s so good, I just don’t know what to say. The beautiful words inside match the beauty of the cover. I hope it builds compassion and understanding in those that read! Thanks for sharing an ARC with #bookposse This book is amazing! @ReemFaruqi @HarperCollins

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kirin

    This book is a great OWN voice, middle grade coming of age book that rings with truth and hope in its poetic lines that sweep you up and keep you cheering.  Over 352 pages the author's semi-autobiographic story of coming to Peachtree City, Georgia from Karachi, Pakistan beautifully unfolds.  I absolutely loved this book and the way it is told, in verse.  The details, often small, ring with such sincerity that even those that have never moved to a new country, or been to a new school will feel fo This book is a great OWN voice, middle grade coming of age book that rings with truth and hope in its poetic lines that sweep you up and keep you cheering.  Over 352 pages the author's semi-autobiographic story of coming to Peachtree City, Georgia from Karachi, Pakistan beautifully unfolds.  I absolutely loved this book and the way it is told, in verse.  The details, often small, ring with such sincerity that even those that have never moved to a new country, or been to a new school will feel for young Nurah Haqq and be inspired by her success, touched by her hardships, and disappointed in her mistakes. SYNOPSIS: Nurah's best day is spent on the beach with her best friend Asna, playing in the warm waves and riding camels.  However it ends up also being her worst day, when she returns home to her father's news that they are moving to America.  Strong, confident Nurah who spends time with her grandparents, swimming with her older brother Owais, and excelling at math in school is reluctantly leaving it all behind to start anew. When they arrive in Georgia the family of four settles in a hotel until they find a house.  Everything is different and new, and the transition with no friends and family difficult for the entire family.  The way words are pronounced, the way the air feels and the birds chirp all make Nurah long for home.  When they find a swimming pool at the rec center, things start to slowly change.  Owais was a medal winner in Karachi, and will be one here too, people start admiring him, and Nurah tries to bask in his light. School starts and math is a relief, but people are white, so white, and a boy reaches out to shake her hand.  She feels betrayed that she has been told the schools in America are better, and lunchtime, with no one to sit by is a huge stress.  She questions her clothing, her appearance, and the weather. Her and Owais try out for the swim team and make it, and Nurah makes her first friend, Stahr. Stahr lives a few houses down from their new house and when Nurah's mom has a miscarriage, it is Stahr's mom who comes to show support and give comfort.  The support is reciprocated when Stahr and her mom need help escaping from her abusive father. As Nurah works to win swimming races and be more like her brother, she works to find her voice and use it to defend others and herself.  A terrorist attack committed by someone claiming to be Muslim sets the family up to be targets.  In a moment of jealousy, Nurah doesn't intervene to help her brother and the consequences are huge. WHY I LIKE IT: I love the details and how they are articulated.  I related to so much of Nurah's feeling and impressions, that I reached out to the author and found her to be just as endearing as her character.  The feeling of being different when swimming because of your decision to be modest, the role of food to comfort you and make you feel at home, the older brother that you so desperately want to resemble and be like: All of it hit close to home for me.  I love how religion and culture are so much a part of the story and about the character's identity, not to be made preachy, just to understand her and her experiences.  She goes to the masjid, she prays, she starts to wear hijab. I love how she finds her voice and defends those that can't, but that her path is not easy.  She makes mistakes and she has to challenge herself to do what is right.  The backdrop is always trying to "settle" in a new place, but the story has it's own plot points that are interesting and simply made more impactful by Nurah's unique perspective. There are lots of little climaxes and victories for Nurah that show her to be well-rounded and relatable.  You cheer for her early on and enjoy the journey.  The only slight hiccup I felt was the name confusion of her Nana and Nani (Nana), it is explained, but it was a little rocky for me, it might be based on a real thing in her family, but once that is resolved, the book flows beautifully and smoothly. FLAGS: Nothing a 3rd/4th grader would find alarming, but none-the-less: Crushes: Nurah has a crush on a boy at school when he shakes her hand and picks her for a lab partner, but she moves on from him while still maintaining a crush on her brother's friend Junaid.  Nothing happens, she just thinks they are cute. Miscarriage: Her mother has a miscarriage and it details a blighted ovum and the mental strain on the mom and family in the aftermath. Abuse: Stahr's father is abusive Hate: There are bullies, discrimination, physical violence. TOOLS FOR LEADING THE DISCUSSION: The book is a little below level for my middle school book club, but I think it it was on a bookshelf and a middle schooler picked it up, they wouldn't set it down until they were done reading it.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Panda Incognito

    I feel like I should give this book three stars for its coverage of important issues, but I want to rate this the same way that I would rate any other poorly constructed free verse novel, without giving it extra credit just because it is based on the author's experience as a Muslim immigrant. I respect her desire to share parts of her story with the world, but I am rating this book as a literary experience and a middle grade read, not based on my appreciation for the topic. I found this book frus I feel like I should give this book three stars for its coverage of important issues, but I want to rate this the same way that I would rate any other poorly constructed free verse novel, without giving it extra credit just because it is based on the author's experience as a Muslim immigrant. I respect her desire to share parts of her story with the world, but I am rating this book as a literary experience and a middle grade read, not based on my appreciation for the topic. I found this book frustrating as a literary experience because even though the minimalism of free verse sometimes suited a challenging topic within the text, the writing often lacked rhythm and just seemed like simple sentences broken up with lots of white space. I typically don't care for free verse, but done well, like in Full Cicada Moon or Red, White, and Whole, it can be part of the story and an integral aspect of the whole experience. Here, the style choices rarely seemed artful, and typically just read as choppy, broken-up text. It was a fast read, but I would much rather have invested more time in something that felt more complete and better written. Secondly, I have reservations about this book as a middle grade novel. The author attempts to address a dizzying array of different issues, such immigration, anti-Muslim prejudice, a grandmother with Alzheimer's, casual racism, school friendships and early interest in boys, family dynamics and sibling rivalry, a violent assault, miscarriage and subsequent pregnancy, and off-page domestic violence in a friend's home. These are all important issues, but a single book can't adequately address all of them, especially when it's in a free verse format. This made the coverage seem very shallow, and I think this could be overwhelming for a sensitive reader. When I was in the target audience, I had a hard time with books that threw a lot of different tragic or traumatic things at the reader all at once, without taking the time to fully explore them or give the reader a chance to process them before something else happens. For me as an adult, this book just seemed shallow, surface-level, and like a juggler tossing way too many spinning plates into the air, but it could be emotionally overwhelming for a sensitive kid who isn't very aware of these issues and is struggling to deal with the concepts, or who would find them personally triggering. The biggest offender here is the violent assault. It happens to the girl's brother abruptly and under strange circumstances, and it's never fully explained to the reader exactly what happened. I believe this is because the girl's family tried to shelter her from the specific details, but the reader has no chance for processing or catharsis, because it's pretty much swept under the rug, and all of the attempts to show the brother's silence around the house or trauma experiences don't really work, because you don't know exactly what happened, what took place in the aftermath, or what he is thinking and feeling. It's one of way too many subplots that the author has spinning, and often gets pushed aside for more chipper, choppy free verse about school. Since this incredibly serious, traumatic incident doesn't get the attention it is due, I think the author should have left it out of the novel entirely. Overall, I found this book frustrating and disappointing, and even though other people have enjoyed it and will enjoy it, it is not something that I will personally recommend or promote, and I especially would not recommend it to a highly sensitive or younger elementary reader who would not be prepared to process the inadequately addressed traumatic events that take place in this story.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ms. Yingling

    E ARC provided by Edelweiss Plus In this novel in verse, Nurah's father has gotten a job in the US, and moves the family to Georgia for better opportunities in education and employment than they have in Pakistan. They leave behind a grandmother who is suffering from dementia, friends, and a home that they love. The US is different, and starting in an extended stay hotel while they look for a house is not ideal. Nurah's brother, Owais, joins the local swim team with her, but isn't his usual self. E ARC provided by Edelweiss Plus In this novel in verse, Nurah's father has gotten a job in the US, and moves the family to Georgia for better opportunities in education and employment than they have in Pakistan. They leave behind a grandmother who is suffering from dementia, friends, and a home that they love. The US is different, and starting in an extended stay hotel while they look for a house is not ideal. Nurah's brother, Owais, joins the local swim team with her, but isn't his usual self. Another girl at the pool, Stahr (who lived very near Nurah's new house), also wears long sleeves when she swims, but it's because her father is abusive. Nurah's mother has a miscarriage and is very depressed about it, and Stahr's mother visits. This connection helps both of them, and Stahr is a good friend to Nurah, who struggles with some other students who make mean comments and are generally unwelcome. Nurah doesn't feel as confident speaking up in the US as she did back in Pakistan, but when she sees repeated injustices, she starts to rebuild her confidence and starts to speak up for herself and others. Strengths: There have been a lot of books lately about immigrants who have little choice but to leave their home countries because of war or other reasons, so it is interesting to see Nurah's perspective when her parents want to come to the US but she would rather stay. It was great that she was involved in the swim team. The reaction of the other students is unfortunate, but hopefull books such as this one can help young readers understand what it is like to move to a completely new environment. The page decorations are attractive, and comparisons to both Other Words for Home and Front Desk are apt. Teachers who like a lot of lyrical descriptions and figurative, poetic language will love this one. Weaknesses: It would have been nice to see more of Nurah's life in Pakistan, so the contrast to life in the US was more vivid. There's a lot going on, with the grandmother, the mother's miscarriage, and Stahr's bad family situation. Since the book is fairly short, it would have been nice to see more of Nurah and her family's adjustment to school, foods, her home, and friendships. What I really think: While I would like to see stories about immigrant children that don't have so many sad things happening, that is often the reality. Most of my students with roots in other countries came to the US when they were very, very young, so don't have an experience like Nurah's. It's important to have lots of different stories, and I hope in time we get more like Khan's Zayd Saleem or Pancholy's The Best at It that have stories centered around middle grade activities with students with a variety of cultural background. (I'd love to see more children from Somali, Ghana, Nepal, Iran or Eritrea, because that's the background many of my students have.)

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...