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Did I Say That Out Loud?: Midlife Indignities and How to Survive Them

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Enjoy this hilarious and deeply insightful take on the indignities of middle age and how to weather them with grace—from the former editor-in-chief of Real Simple. "A pure pleasure to read." (Cathi Hanauer, author of Gone)   Do you hate the term “middle age?” So does Kristin van Ogtrop, who is still trying to come up with a less annoying way to describe those years when you Enjoy this hilarious and deeply insightful take on the indignities of middle age and how to weather them with grace—from the former editor-in-chief of Real Simple. "A pure pleasure to read." (Cathi Hanauer, author of Gone)   Do you hate the term “middle age?” So does Kristin van Ogtrop, who is still trying to come up with a less annoying way to describe those years when you find yourself both satisfied and outraged, confident and confused, full of appreciation but occasional disdain for the world around you. Like an intimate chat with your best friend, this mostly funny, sometimes sad, always affirming volume from longtime magazine journalist van Ogtrop is a celebration of that period of life when mild humiliations are significantly outweighed by a self-actualized triumph of the spirit. Finally!   Featuring stories from her own life, as well as anecdotes from her unwitting friends and family, van Ogtrop encourages you to laugh at the small irritations of midlife: neglectful children, stealth insomnia, forks that try to kill you, t.v. remotes that won’t find Netflix, abdominal muscles that can’t seem to get the job done. But also to acknowledge the things you may have lost:  innocence, unbridled optimism, smooth skin. Dear friends. Parents. It’s all here: the sublime and the ridiculous, living together in the pages of this book as they do in your heart, like a big messy family, in this no-better-term-for-it middle age.


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Enjoy this hilarious and deeply insightful take on the indignities of middle age and how to weather them with grace—from the former editor-in-chief of Real Simple. "A pure pleasure to read." (Cathi Hanauer, author of Gone)   Do you hate the term “middle age?” So does Kristin van Ogtrop, who is still trying to come up with a less annoying way to describe those years when you Enjoy this hilarious and deeply insightful take on the indignities of middle age and how to weather them with grace—from the former editor-in-chief of Real Simple. "A pure pleasure to read." (Cathi Hanauer, author of Gone)   Do you hate the term “middle age?” So does Kristin van Ogtrop, who is still trying to come up with a less annoying way to describe those years when you find yourself both satisfied and outraged, confident and confused, full of appreciation but occasional disdain for the world around you. Like an intimate chat with your best friend, this mostly funny, sometimes sad, always affirming volume from longtime magazine journalist van Ogtrop is a celebration of that period of life when mild humiliations are significantly outweighed by a self-actualized triumph of the spirit. Finally!   Featuring stories from her own life, as well as anecdotes from her unwitting friends and family, van Ogtrop encourages you to laugh at the small irritations of midlife: neglectful children, stealth insomnia, forks that try to kill you, t.v. remotes that won’t find Netflix, abdominal muscles that can’t seem to get the job done. But also to acknowledge the things you may have lost:  innocence, unbridled optimism, smooth skin. Dear friends. Parents. It’s all here: the sublime and the ridiculous, living together in the pages of this book as they do in your heart, like a big messy family, in this no-better-term-for-it middle age.

30 review for Did I Say That Out Loud?: Midlife Indignities and How to Survive Them

  1. 4 out of 5

    Diane S ☔

    My reactions to this book are mixed. I picked it up wanting some humor and there are some stories that I did find humorous. Others I felt she tried too hard, or I just wasn't interested. Surprisingly, while I wanted humor the stories I liked the most, where I felt she was writing from real emotion, weren't humorous. Rebel Love, on the loss of a pet, was bittersweet, honest and insightful. I fell in love with Rebel, the unruly let with a big heart. Her thoughts on her mother, her parents aging, we My reactions to this book are mixed. I picked it up wanting some humor and there are some stories that I did find humorous. Others I felt she tried too hard, or I just wasn't interested. Surprisingly, while I wanted humor the stories I liked the most, where I felt she was writing from real emotion, weren't humorous. Rebel Love, on the loss of a pet, was bittersweet, honest and insightful. I fell in love with Rebel, the unruly let with a big heart. Her thoughts on her mother, her parents aging, were great. I could definitely relate. Her letter to her son on his graduation, also funny, sad. Enjoyed her lists, things that irritated her, found have been my list, with a few substitutions. Probably could be the list of many. There are other lists to which I could relate. Definitely worth reading but as I said my view was mixed but that's not to say you would feel the same. ARC from Edelweiss.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    Giveaway win! 3.5 Stars! I know a lot of people need to feel connected to or relate to the people they read about. I'm not one of those people. I love reading about people who I share absolutely nothing in common with. Kristin van Ogtrop fits the bill. Kristin van Ogtrop is a rich, middle aged white woman who lives in New York City. I can't relate to anything in her life but I was still entertained. I'm not yet middle aged but its gets unsettling closer everyday and from talking to my middle aged Giveaway win! 3.5 Stars! I know a lot of people need to feel connected to or relate to the people they read about. I'm not one of those people. I love reading about people who I share absolutely nothing in common with. Kristin van Ogtrop fits the bill. Kristin van Ogtrop is a rich, middle aged white woman who lives in New York City. I can't relate to anything in her life but I was still entertained. I'm not yet middle aged but its gets unsettling closer everyday and from talking to my middle aged sister it's not a whole lot of fun. In fact I enter to win this book just so I could give this book to her. After reading it though I dont think she'll like it. I loved Ogtrop's sense of humor and her out of touch stories of working at Vogue and Real Simple magazine(btw who has heard of Real Simple magazine????) but my sister will definitely hate it. Kristin van Ogtrop is super neurotic and it was at times quite a lot to handle. My sister would lose her mind and I still really want to see her read it just for my own entertainment( I'm a terrible little sister). Kristin spends the majority of this book talking about how she doesn't care about dumb things now that she's middle aged...and then she goes on to talk about how much she cares about dumb things like Snapchat and BAPE. Despite working for Vogue for years she is confused by fashions "kids today" wear. I found this hilarious but a lot of people(my sister included) will find this annoying and out of touch. Overall this book isnt for everyone but if you're at the library and you want a quick entertaining read then pick this book up!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Monnie

    Reading a book on how to deal with the indignities of middle age for me is sort of akin to locking the barn door after the horse is out (I just celebrated, or more accurately, bemoaned, my 80th birthday). But curiosity got the better of me: Were my experiences similar to the author's? If not, how (and maybe why) were they different? Besides that, the book description included the word "hilarious." Far be it from me to pass up a chance to laugh - even if it's at myself. And chuckle I did - sometim Reading a book on how to deal with the indignities of middle age for me is sort of akin to locking the barn door after the horse is out (I just celebrated, or more accurately, bemoaned, my 80th birthday). But curiosity got the better of me: Were my experiences similar to the author's? If not, how (and maybe why) were they different? Besides that, the book description included the word "hilarious." Far be it from me to pass up a chance to laugh - even if it's at myself. And chuckle I did - sometimes out loud - and not infrequently (nor insignificantly) I was reminded of one of my all-time favorite writers, the late, great Erma Bombeck (a longtime syndicated newspaper columnist and best-selling book author who wrote very funny things about suburban home life). And for sure, I could identify with much of the author's experiences and insights; one that stood out in particular is being a very competent person - especially at work - but clueless about operating a TV remote. I've been saying for a couple of years now that should anything happen to my husband of nearly 60 years, I'd need help with just two things: How to work at least one of our five TV remotes and how to pump my own gas. Still other points - like the dubious ability to break a toenail at the drop of a hat - are intimately familiar as well. For me, though, it's the whole toe - which comes as a result of refusing to wear shoes indoors (or outdoors, every time I can get away with it). Not a year goes by that something - like an errant bedpost - jumps out to nail one of my toes. My favorite section, though, came at the end in the form of cautionary lists. Most are spot-on and yes, I've been there. Still, I couldn't resist adding a couple of personal notes that come from living a good 30 years longer than the author, to-wit: Things that are annoying but unavoidable: Needing reading glasses to make dinner. Yep - or if, like me, you've worn glasses for many years, you'll suddenly need bifocals. And then, somewhere between age 50 and 70, you'll develop cataracts that render all types of lenses ineffective. On the plus side, cataract surgery can for many people, including me, mean you won't need glasses at all. How long that lasts, of course, remains to be seen: Stay tuned. Things that aren't worth it: Trying to open clamshell packaging without using scissors. I second that (with painful cuts to prove it) and add that I've lost count of the number of fingernails I've broken a fingernail trying to open any cardboard packaging before I see the spot designated "Open Here." So keep the scissors handy as well as your glasses (unless you've had cataract surgery). Things that will always be confusing: How sometimes leaves on a plant turn yellow because you're underwatering and other times because you're overwatering. By the time you're my age, you stop caring. I just water mine every six months whether they need it or not; yellow leaves simply mean they better match my kitchen walls. Brown is quite another matter and kind of fun; I get to toss the whole plant and start again. Things you learn along the way: Eventually you will have too many scented candles. Also knick knacks, frayed dish towels long since relegated to cleaning rag status, sheets that don't fit any bed in the house, plastic shopping bags stuffed with dozens of other plastic shopping bags and, with a tip of the hat to the COVID-19 pandemic, toilet paper. Don't believe me? Just ask our daughter, who grows more concerned every week about how she'll get rid of all that stuff when I'm gone. All told, this is a delightful and entertaining book that I don't hesitate to recommend to all ages. Mid-lifers can commiserate (boy, how you'll commiserate), while spring chickens can learn what to expect and seniors like me can have the satisfaction that comes from saying honey, you ain't seen nuthin' yet. Thanks to the publisher, via NetGalley, for providing me with a pre-release copy to read and review. Well done!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Karen Dukess

    Smart, funny, and unfailingly honest, Kristin van Ogtrop is the ideal companion for traversing the bumpy roads of midlife. Whether chronicling the rollercoaster of insomnia, the challenge of parenting people who inexplicably consider themselves adults, the experience of walking away from a career no longer worth salvaging, or the disappearance of a beloved dog, Kristin van Ogtrop finds meaning in the mayhem. Did I Say That Out Loud? is not only beautifully written, but is grounded in gratitude, Smart, funny, and unfailingly honest, Kristin van Ogtrop is the ideal companion for traversing the bumpy roads of midlife. Whether chronicling the rollercoaster of insomnia, the challenge of parenting people who inexplicably consider themselves adults, the experience of walking away from a career no longer worth salvaging, or the disappearance of a beloved dog, Kristin van Ogtrop finds meaning in the mayhem. Did I Say That Out Loud? is not only beautifully written, but is grounded in gratitude, which makes this collection both a comfort and a delight. I loved reading it and will probably re-read it!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Karen R

    I enjoyed this candid insightful book. Kristin’s humorous anecdotes and from-the-heart thoughts on family and how the passage of time has changed her made me reflective and nostalgic at times as I identify with similar situations. I enjoyed the flow of Kristin’s words and writing style.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mary Novaria

    I’m Saying it Out Loud: I Love This Book My friend Judy and I ordered this book immediately after The Strand bookstore introduced us to Kristin van Ogtrop during a virtual book event in April. (Author Susan Orlean interviewed her, and that was indeed a treat!) After devouring Did I Say That Out Loud?, Judy and I both agreed we’d like to take Kristin out for a glass of wine. We want more of the stories, insights, and wit she shares – qualities that, these days, are much needed and all too rare. T I’m Saying it Out Loud: I Love This Book My friend Judy and I ordered this book immediately after The Strand bookstore introduced us to Kristin van Ogtrop during a virtual book event in April. (Author Susan Orlean interviewed her, and that was indeed a treat!) After devouring Did I Say That Out Loud?, Judy and I both agreed we’d like to take Kristin out for a glass of wine. We want more of the stories, insights, and wit she shares – qualities that, these days, are much needed and all too rare. Thanks to quarantine, racial injustice, and other factors I won’t bore you with, I confess I’ve found myself reading lately, especially non-fiction, with a somewhat hypercritical filter: “Well, there’s some privilege for you!” Or “How can this person be so tone deaf?” And, as I mentioned in another recent review, how annoyed I am by the self-congratulatory monologue that screams, "I've got it all figured out! I am enlightened! I am woke!" Kristin van Ogtrop rises above all that to share that, like most of us, she doesn’t have it all figured out. Her honesty, humor, and self-deprecation made this book so relatable for me, another white, middle-aged, wife, mother, and writer. Like many of us, she had to come to terms with the rapidly changing publishing industry, leaving a much-loved editorial position. She admits to leaving in tears on her last day, which I appreciate because that would be me. (Screw the powers that be who encourage women to pretend we are stoic, automatons.) The essays in this book drew me into van Ogtrop’s daily life so thoroughly that I felt like I could see into her home, hear her conversations and laughter, and feel her happiness, grief, and mother/daughter guilt. Her journey has been mine in many ways: Worry about children? Check. Turn house upside down for missing shin guard: Check. Concern for aging parents and their memory lapses? Check. Saying goodbye to a much-beloved pet? Check. Having a dear friend die far to young? Check. Van Ogtrop’s stories, most of them not Covid-related (thankfully), reminded me what it’s like to have dinner parties and sip wine with girlfriends in person and not on Zoom; and that if our careers feel stalled out, it’s not the end, there’s something else out there, another fulfilling chapter. There are so many relevant-to-me statements in this book, and you’ll likely find more than a few yourself. The author quotes Nora Ephron: “I don’t think any day is worth living without thinking about what you’re going to eat next at all times.” And, in the context of remembering where we’ve come from: “This was, of course, before I gained the self-awareness to realize that I am not an intellectual, just a smartish person who likes to read.” Most importantly, as pertains to motherhood, a statement from a letter van Ogtrop wrote to her son on the occasion of his college graduation. This is something I have lived and come to terms with, but it bears repeating and remembering, for me at least: “…one of my greatest mistakes as a mother was to conflate your success with mine.” The icing on the cake is van Ogtrop’s occasional cultural references to things I love, like the TV shows Schitt’s Creek and the “six-hour, Pride and Prejudice starring Colin Firth, and the film It’s a Wonderful Life, an annual, Christmas Eve tradition in our home. Kristin, you and your book showed up at just the right time. Thank you. Clearly, we have much in common. So, about that glass of wine…

  7. 5 out of 5

    Zibby Owens

    This book was perfect because the essays were bite-size and so funny—relatable tales of work, family, love, and comic mishaps along the way. It talked about some of the indignities of middle age and how to get through mid-life. The original essays featured stories from the author's own life and anecdotes from her friends and family. I loved the humor and how all the essays tied up at the end. I especially loved how her dad handled it when the author swallowed the fork; he said, "Could I just lea This book was perfect because the essays were bite-size and so funny—relatable tales of work, family, love, and comic mishaps along the way. It talked about some of the indignities of middle age and how to get through mid-life. The original essays featured stories from the author's own life and anecdotes from her friends and family. I loved the humor and how all the essays tied up at the end. I especially loved how her dad handled it when the author swallowed the fork; he said, "Could I just leave a fork on your pillow?" Then at the parking garage, he says, "Yep, this is my daughter. She swallowed a fork." I also loved the paragraph about aging and life because it sums up a lot in the book. The author said, "Yeats knew that things fall apart and the center cannot hold. My center cannot hold either, which is why I've got back fat and a muffin top above the waistband of my pants." To listen to my interview with the author, go to my podcast at: https://zibbyowens.com/transcript/kri...

  8. 4 out of 5

    Robin Shilling

    Laughed out loud a few times, but mostly I couldn't relate as a large part of the book is about her being a mother. I don't, and won't, have kids so it doesn't apply to me. I can see how others might like it more though! Laughed out loud a few times, but mostly I couldn't relate as a large part of the book is about her being a mother. I don't, and won't, have kids so it doesn't apply to me. I can see how others might like it more though!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Ada-Marie

    Enjoyable. Relatable. Poignant. I love KVO and miss her at the helm of Real Simple. Thank you to Kristin VanOgtrop, Little, Brown and Company, and Net Galley for the ARC! #didisaythatoutloud #netgalley

  10. 5 out of 5

    Amy Lawson

    Howled with laughter. Exactly what I needed. Please read this book if you are middle age ish with young adult ish kids 😎

  11. 4 out of 5

    Nancy Gilreath

    You are not alone! That’s what I took away from this book about the indignities of being a middle aged woman, or, to be more specific, an upper middle class privileged woman in her 50s negotiating changing circumstances. I could have written this book - just change a few names and places. I think most of my friends also could have written this. Kristin van Ogtrop takes on our bodies, our adult children, our parents, waning careers, book club, and evolving friendships with gentle humor and only s You are not alone! That’s what I took away from this book about the indignities of being a middle aged woman, or, to be more specific, an upper middle class privileged woman in her 50s negotiating changing circumstances. I could have written this book - just change a few names and places. I think most of my friends also could have written this. Kristin van Ogtrop takes on our bodies, our adult children, our parents, waning careers, book club, and evolving friendships with gentle humor and only some sadness. Written during the pandemic, and read by me during the same, her words hit home even closer than they might in a few years. Van Ogtrop left me laughing, nostalgic but somehow energized and hopeful for the next chapter. A very fun read that book clubs like mine would enjoy for a change of pace.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Andrienne

    Candid and heartfelt. My favorite story was about the gastrointestinal emergency and he one about Rebel. Thanks to the publisher for the advance copy access.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Donna Boyd

    Thank you to #NetGalley, the author, and the publisher for providing me with a digital copy of this book prior to publication. Did I Say That Out Loud: Midlife Indignities and How to Survive Them by Kristin von Ogtrop is a gem of a book. It is like talking to your sister or your best friend about the ups and downs of parenthood, growing older, and just life in general. I especially liked the chapter where she and her sister decided to buy a lake house together and, to make things even more inter Thank you to #NetGalley, the author, and the publisher for providing me with a digital copy of this book prior to publication. Did I Say That Out Loud: Midlife Indignities and How to Survive Them by Kristin von Ogtrop is a gem of a book. It is like talking to your sister or your best friend about the ups and downs of parenthood, growing older, and just life in general. I especially liked the chapter where she and her sister decided to buy a lake house together and, to make things even more interesting, not to have any schedule about which family stays there when. At one point there were eleven people (including 5 children, all boys) and four dogs staying in the small house. Included throughout the book are some really great lists like the words you never want to hear your doctor say, or the reasons you can't sleep or my personal favorite, the marriage compatibility test. Another good chapter was "Don't Make Me Rate You" where von Ogtrop talked about how everything we do has to be documented on social media from deciding to do whatever it is we want to do, then actually doing it, taking a photo of it and posting the photo on social media and then checking again and again to see if anyone liked the post. It is an honest commentary on life in the world of social media. The book has its serious side too, von Ogtrop has surgery, she loses her job, a friend dies, she gives us a formula to calculate how many more times we will see our parents before they die. All in all von Ogtrop makes us realize that we have a lot to be thankful for.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Christine

    I thought I was going to really like this as I think I am the target audience and this belief was reinforced when the first part talked about how prevalent mindfulness has become but not all that funny or interesting. Her swallowing a plastic fork tine, survey reviews, college kids jobs at Vogue, Premiere, Glamour and Time Inc and death of magazines, toenail, she shed - even those insights I liked (the ones with kids) were not original. Surprised she uses mankind instead of humanity Best essays I thought I was going to really like this as I think I am the target audience and this belief was reinforced when the first part talked about how prevalent mindfulness has become but not all that funny or interesting. Her swallowing a plastic fork tine, survey reviews, college kids jobs at Vogue, Premiere, Glamour and Time Inc and death of magazines, toenail, she shed - even those insights I liked (the ones with kids) were not original. Surprised she uses mankind instead of humanity Best essays we’re the ones about the kids: worrying about them even if you have no idea what they do at college, fact that they can use 3D printer but can’t mail a letter, turning on the TV with all the remotes and comfort with tech and how they keep you so busy and yet you miss them when they’re gone. -I’ll be nicer if you’ll be smarter. -her parents subtext: You are amazing. You can handle that. You’ll figure it out. You will succeed.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Sherri Puzey

    35 // “So let’s just feel happy to be here. To cry sometimes, when the occasion calls for it, but to laugh as often as we can—that is enough.” DID I SAY THAT OUT LOUD? is a collection of essays by @kvanogtrop , former editor-in-chief of Real Simple magazine. I sat down with this book over the weekend and finished it in just a couple of sittings because it was so relatable, heartfelt, and laugh-out-loud funny. my absolute favorite essays were the ones on friendship, marriage, and aging parents, bu 35 // “So let’s just feel happy to be here. To cry sometimes, when the occasion calls for it, but to laugh as often as we can—that is enough.” DID I SAY THAT OUT LOUD? is a collection of essays by @kvanogtrop , former editor-in-chief of Real Simple magazine. I sat down with this book over the weekend and finished it in just a couple of sittings because it was so relatable, heartfelt, and laugh-out-loud funny. my absolute favorite essays were the ones on friendship, marriage, and aging parents, but the entire book felt like a couple of hours with a friend in delightful conversation. and isn’t that what we all really need right about now? 4/5⭐️—I liked it! Out April 13. thank you to @littlebrownspark and @netgalley for the early copy of this book! #DidISayThatOutLoud

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sandra

    This book is both incredibly funny and accurate. Life as an aging (though not yet aged) woman is an interesting journey. The author is older than I am, and is a mother, but despite these differences, I related to many things throughout, and was able to find humor and sympathy even in those I did not. There were a few chapters and parts that didn’t engaged me as much, and I perhaps felt a little less spoken to as it went on, but I would say it’s a 3.5 star rating - it starts out a 4, with some 5 This book is both incredibly funny and accurate. Life as an aging (though not yet aged) woman is an interesting journey. The author is older than I am, and is a mother, but despite these differences, I related to many things throughout, and was able to find humor and sympathy even in those I did not. There were a few chapters and parts that didn’t engaged me as much, and I perhaps felt a little less spoken to as it went on, but I would say it’s a 3.5 star rating - it starts out a 4, with some 5 moments, but ends up more a 3 overall in the end.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Erin Blakeley

    'Did I Say That Out Loud' perfectly captures the humor, poignancy, and absurdity of family life, when you're past having little kids but not quite done having your adult children peel off their socks and leave them strewn all over your house. (Fraterfamilies everywhere, you are not alone!) It is a thoughtful meditation about kids and friends and dogs and husbands, and about continuing to discover your purpose after your dream job has come to a close--delivered in a voice that is at once chatty, w 'Did I Say That Out Loud' perfectly captures the humor, poignancy, and absurdity of family life, when you're past having little kids but not quite done having your adult children peel off their socks and leave them strewn all over your house. (Fraterfamilies everywhere, you are not alone!) It is a thoughtful meditation about kids and friends and dogs and husbands, and about continuing to discover your purpose after your dream job has come to a close--delivered in a voice that is at once chatty, wise and laugh-out-loud funny. Bravo!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Valerie Milledge

    I was skeptical whether Kristin van Ogtrop’s follow-up to her first book “Just Let Me Lie Down” would bring me to the same state of side-splitting laughter. She did not disappoint! From the more light-hearted recounts of cutting the apron strings to the heart-tugging topics of aging parents, losing loved ones and reckoning with our own “maturation”, I found Kristin’s essays both comforting and, at times, hilarious. Thank goodness there are female authors who have the courage to advertise that we I was skeptical whether Kristin van Ogtrop’s follow-up to her first book “Just Let Me Lie Down” would bring me to the same state of side-splitting laughter. She did not disappoint! From the more light-hearted recounts of cutting the apron strings to the heart-tugging topics of aging parents, losing loved ones and reckoning with our own “maturation”, I found Kristin’s essays both comforting and, at times, hilarious. Thank goodness there are female authors who have the courage to advertise that we are not at all perfect and in our imperfection can be found all the best stuff!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Konet

    This was more enjoyable and humorous than I thought it was going to be. I am very glad this was not a preachy self help book but a collection of true stories and hilarious, witty, brutally honest insights. This gave me a much needed laugh. A little long but it did not bother me because it reads fast. Highly recommended for anyone who needs a laugh during the coronavirus pandemic. Thanks to Netgalley, Kristin von Ogtrop and Little Brown & Company for an ARC in exchange for an honest review. Availabl This was more enjoyable and humorous than I thought it was going to be. I am very glad this was not a preachy self help book but a collection of true stories and hilarious, witty, brutally honest insights. This gave me a much needed laugh. A little long but it did not bother me because it reads fast. Highly recommended for anyone who needs a laugh during the coronavirus pandemic. Thanks to Netgalley, Kristin von Ogtrop and Little Brown & Company for an ARC in exchange for an honest review. Available: 4/13/21

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jan Banning

    I found this book a bit sad. I was looking for something a little more humorous. Having suffered the loss of both parents and a long term marriage this really was not a good fit. The story about Rebel just about tore my heart out.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl Lock

    So funny. So real. So sad at times.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

    Fun quick read with essays on mid-life and the challenges.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mary Crotty

    Laugh out loud FUNNY - touching and hilarious all in one

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kathy

    Entertaining read with plenty of laughs and a fair bit of contemplation.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Shawna

    Funny, honest, relatable and accurate book. I found myself chuckling a lot and shaking my head yes as I read because some of it was just that spot on in life as of now.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Amelia Wall Warner

    Hilarious and insightful- I feel like Kristin understands the inside voice in my head!!!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Tracy

  28. 5 out of 5

    Gregory G.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

  30. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Mackedon

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